JUSTICE AND PEACE STUDIES (JPST)

College of Arts and Sciences, Interdisciplinary Program
O'Shaughnessy Education Center (OEC) 470, (651) 962-5420
Finnegan (JPST) (Chair), Klein (JPST), Nelson-Pallmeyer (JPST)

Department Web Site: http://www.stthomas.edu/justpeace/

Justice and peace studies is an interdisciplinary department designed to prepare students to be responsible critics of contemporary societies and effective agents for positive social transformation. The program offers a general major or minor, along with three optional tracks for major concentrations:

  • The Conflict Transformation concentration prepares students to analyze the dynamics and identify transformative opportunities in conflicts at multiple levels, from interpersonal to international, while developing practical skills in mediation and conflict resolution through partnerships with local practitioners and organizations that exemplify best practices in the field.
  • The Public Policy Analysis and Advocacy concentration develops social analysis skills for public policy formation, evidence-based research and argumentation, as well as communication and networking skills for effective advocacy around issues such as environmental sustainability and climate change, foreign policy and peacebuilding, and economic justice and social welfare.
  • The Leadership for Social Justice concentration helps students anticipate and begin preparing for the full arc of a career in which successful community organizing requires them to institutionalize the changes they seek, through social entrepreneurship and nonprofit management.

Core courses for the major and minor, and the pattern of the program in general, make use of the four stages of the Circle of Praxis:

  1. Experience (actual and vicarious) of poverty, injustice, social conflict, or marginalization.
  2. Descriptive analysis: Empirical study of the economic, political, social, and cultural realities of society, and the historical events that produce them.
  3. Normative analysis: Moral judgment on existing societies; study of alternative possibilities; and analysis of the moral values at stake.
  4. Action possibilities: Strategies and skills for transforming society from its present condition to a better condition.

The justice and peace studies program is strongly interdisciplinary and interfaith. It promotes understanding and appreciation of widely diverse ideologies, cultures, and world views. Special attention is given to the rich tradition of Roman Catholic social thought in the context of pluralistic world societies.

Students graduating with a major in justice and peace studies will understand how the circle of praxis works, as well as the role of each of its components. They will also know how to use skills associated with each component. They will know the principles of active nonviolence, how it operates to promote social change, and historical examples of its use. Students will also learn the techniques and appropriate uses of other methods of social change, with special focus on community organizing, social entrepreneurship, nonprofit management and public policy advocacy. They will be able to engage in respectful dialogue with people whose values and positions differ widely from their own. They will understand and be able to use conflict resolution skills in personal life and small groups, and they will understand how these techniques are used in inter-group and international conflicts. They will have developed the personal skills and confidence to work effectively in organizations committed to justice and peace.

While all core courses utilize all four steps of the Circle of Praxis, JPST 250 concentrates on experience and descriptive analysis, and THEO 421 concentrates on normative analysis. Others core courses focus on action possibilities. All students who major in justice and peace studies take each of the signature courses from the three concentration areas: JPST 375 Conflict Analysis and Transformation, JPST 355 Public Policy Analysis and Advocacy, and JPST 365 Leadership for Social Justice. 

Major in Justice and Peace Studies: Concentration in Leadership for Social Justice

Justice and Peace Studies-Leadership in Social Justice - Major Field Guide

  • JPST 250 Introduction to Justice and Peace Studies (4 credits)
  • JPST 280 Active Nonviolence (4 credits)
  • JPST 355 Public Policy (4 credits)
  • JPST 365 Leadership for Social Justice (4 credits)
  • JPST 375 Conflict Analysis and Transformation (4 credits)
  • JPST 473 Vocational Internship Seminar (0 credits, in conjunction with internship)
  • THEO 421 Theologies of Justice and Peace (4 credits) — Based on student career interests, other THEO 400 classes may substitute for this course, with permission of the program director.
  • Significant experience engaging student directly with situation of poverty, injustice, social conflict, or marginalization (0 credits — see section below for more information)
  • Internship during junior or senior year (0-4 credits — see section below for more information) 

Plus:

  • SOCI 110 Social Problems
  • ENTR 200 Foundations of Entrepreneurship
  • ENTR 490 Social Entrepreneurship
  • SOCI 365 Social Psychology
  • COJO 111 Communication & Citizenship

One additional cultural awareness course from the following list:

  • COJO 326 Modern American Rhetoric
  • COJO 328 Communication of Race, Class, and Gender
  • COJO 370 Intercultural Communication
  • COJO 430 Society, Culture and the Media
  • COJO 432 Media Structure and Power
  • PSYC 151 Cross-Cultural Psychology
  • SOCI 251 Race and Ethnicity
  • SOCI 301 General Anthropology
  • SOCI 350 Social Inequality: Privilege & Power

Two applied communication courses from the following list:

  • COJO 220 Interpersonal Communication
  • COJO 274 Small Group Communication
  • COJO 276 Argumentation & Advocacy
  • COJO 320 Organizational Communication
  • COJO 338 Political Communication
  • COJO 366 Persuasion
  • JPST 370 Conflict Mediation
  • JPST 478 Experiential Learning [internship taken for credit]

 

Major in Justice and Peace Studies: Concentration in Conflict Transformation

Justice and Peace Studies-Conflict Transformation - Major Field Guide

  • JPST 250 Introduction to Justice and Peace Studies (4 credits)
  • JPST 280 Active Nonviolence (4 credits)
  • JPST 355 Public Policy (4 credits)
  • JPST 365 Leadership for Social Justice (4 credits)
  • JPST 375 Conflict Analysis and Transformation (4 credits)
  • JPST 473 Vocational Internship Seminar (0 credits, in conjunction with internship)
  • THEO 421 Theologies of Justice and Peace (4 credits) — Based on student career interests, other THEO 400 classes may substitute for this course, with permission of the program director.
  • Significant experience engaging student directly with situation of poverty, injustice, social conflict, or marginalization (0 credits — see section below for more information) 
  • SOCI 110 Social Problems
  • COJO 111 Communication and Citizenship
  • SOCI 365 Social Psychology
  • COJO 276 Argumentation and Advocacy
  • JPST 370 Conflict Mediation
  • JPST 478 Experiential Learning [internship taken for 4 credit hours] 

Plus one of the following:

  • IDSC 291 The Anatomy of Violence
  • SOCI 350 Social Inequality: Privilege & Power 

Plus one of the following:

  • COJO 328 Communication of Race, Class, and Gender
  • COJO 370 Intercultural Communication
  • PSYC 151 Cross-Cultural Psychology
  • SOCI 251 Race and Ethnicity
  • SOCI 301 General Anthropology

 

Major in Justice and Peace Studies: Concentration in Public Policy Analysis and Advocacy

Justice and Peace Studies-Public Policy Analysis and Advocacy - Major Field Guide

  • JPST 250 Introduction to Justice and Peace Studies (4 credits)
  • JPST 280 Active Nonviolence (4 credits)
  • JPST 355 Public Policy (4 credits)
  • JPST 365 Leadership for Social Justice (4 credits)
  • JPST 375 Conflict Analysis and Transformation (4 credits)
  • JPST 473 Vocational Internship Seminar (0 credits, in conjunction with internship)
  • THEO 421 Theologies of Justice and Peace (4 credits) — Based on student career interests, other THEO 400 classes may substitute for this course, with permission of the program director. 
  • Significant experience engaging student directly with situation of poverty, injustice, violence, and/or marginalization (0 credits — see section below for more information) 
  • Internship during junior or senior year (0-4 credits — see section below for more information)

Recommendations:

  • As students fulfill their social analysis requirement in the core curriculum, they should anticipate which of the disciplines below they will focus upon, in order to meet prerequisites for classes in this concentration.
  • As students fulfill their lab science requirements in the core curriculum, they are encouraged to take one of the following courses:
    • BIOL 102 Conservation Biology
    • CHEM 101 Environmental Chemistry
    • GEOL 113 Earth’s Record
  • As students fulfill their third math and science requirement in the core curriculum, they are encouraged to take the following course:
    • STAT 220—Statistics 1

Plus at least 3 courses in one discipline from the following clusters, plus 1 course each in 2 other disciplines (5 total): 

Economics:

  • ECON 211 Current Economic Issues (4 credits)
  • ECON 252 Principles of Microeconomics (4 credits)
  • ECON 326 Industry Studies (4 credits)
  • ECON 333 Regional and Urban Economics (4 credits)
  • ECON 370 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (4 credits)

Environmental studies:

  • ENVR 151 Humans and the Environment (4 credits)
  • ENVR 212 Social Dynamics and the Environment (4 credits)
  • ENVR 301 Environmental Ethics (4 credits)
  • ENVR 351 Environmental Policy Formation (4 credits) 

Geography:

  • GEOG 298 Geography for Social Analysis (4 credits)
  • GEOG 321 Geographic Information Systems (4 credits)
  • And one of the following:
    • GEOG 322 Geographical Analysis (4 credits)
    • GEOG 331 Conservation Geography (4 credits)
    • GEOG 421 Applied GIS (4 credits)

Public policy in the U.S.:

  • POLI 104 American Government in Comparative Perspective (4 credits)
  • POLI 205 Introduction to the American Public Policy Process (4 credits)
  • POLI 303 Urban and Metro Politics (4 credits)

Foreign policy and international relations:

  • POLI 225 Introduction to World Politics (4 credits)
  • POLI 320 American Foreign Policy (4 credits)
  • POLI 321 Comparative Foreign Policy (4 credits)

Sociology and Social Work:

  • SOCI 110 Social Problems (4 credits)
  • SOCI 251 Race and Ethnicity (4 credits)
  • SOCI 350 Social Inequality: Privilege and Power (4 credits)
  • SOWK 281 Introduction to Social Work (4 credits)
  • SOWK 391 Social Policy for Social Change (4 credits)

Two applied communication courses:

  • COJO 111 Communication & Citizenship (4 credits)
  • COJO 276 Argumentation & Advocacy (4 credits)
  • COJO 320 Organizational Communication (4 credits)
  • COJO 338 Political Communication (4 credits)
  • COJO 366 Persuasion (4 credits)
  • COJO 372 Environmental Communication (4 credits)
  • JPST 370 Conflict Mediation (4 credits)
  • JPST 478 Experiential Learning [internship taken for 4 hours credit] 

 

Major in Justice and Peace Studies (generalist track)

Justice and Peace Studies (generalist track) - Major Field Guide

  • JPST 250 Introduction to Justice and Peace Studies (4 credits)
  • JPST 280 Active Nonviolence (4 credits)
  • JPST 355 Public Policy(4 credits)
  • JPST 365 Leadership for Social Justice (4 credits)
  • JPST 375 Conflict Analysis and Transformation (4 credits)
  • JPST 473 Vocational Internship Seminar (0 credits, in conjunction with internship)
  • THEO 421 Theologies of Justice and Peace (4 credits) — Based on student career interests, other THEO 400 classes may substitute for this course, with permission of the program director.
  • Significant experience engaging student directly with situation of poverty, injustice, social conflict, or marginalization (0 credits — see section below for more information)
  • Internship during junior or senior year (0-4 credits — see section below for more information)

Plus four additional credits in descriptive analysis
Appropriate courses include:

  • ACST 200 Introduction to American Culture and Difference (4 credits)
  • BIOL 102 Conservation Biology (4 credits)
  • COJO 326 Modern American Rhetoric (4 credits)
  • COJO 328 Communication of Race, Class, and Gender (4 credits)
  • COJO 370 Intercultural Communication (4 credits)
  • COJO 430 Society, Culture and the Media (4 credits)
  • COJO 432 Media Structure and Power (4 credits)
  • ECON 211 Current Economic Issues (4 credits)
  • ECON 337 Economics of the Public Sector (4 credits)
  • ECON 339 Labor Economics (4 credits)
  • ECON 345 Economics of Development and Growth (4 credits)
  • ENVR 151 Humans and the Environment (4 credits)
  • ENVR 212 Social Dynamics and the Environment (4 credits)
  • GEOG 111 Human Geography (4 credits)
  • GEOG 113 World Geography (4 credits)
  • GEOL 113 The Earth’s Record of Climate (4 credits)
  • GEOL 115 Environmental Geology (4 credits)
  • HIST 116 African American History in Global Perspective (4 credits)
  • HIST 210 Modern Latin America, 1800 to the Present (4 credits)
  • HIST 371 History of U.S. Foreign Policy (4 credits)
  • HIST 372 Vietnam and the United States (4 credits)
  • IDSC 467 City Arts: Field Seminar (HECUA) (4 credits)
  • IDSC 472 MUST Seminar: Field Studies in the Twin Cities (HECUA) (4 credits)
  • POLS 225 Introduction to World Politics (4 credits)
  • POLS 301 American Political Behavior (4 credits)
  • POLS 302 Women and Politics (4 credits)
  • POLS 314 Constitutional Rights and Liberties (4 credits)
  • POLS 326 International Law and Organizations (4 credits)
  • POLS 350 Comparative Politics of the New Europe (4 credits)
  • POLS 352 Third World Politics and Government (4 credits)
  • PSYC 121 Social Psychology (4 credits)
  • PSYC 151 Cross-Cultural Psychology (4 credits)
  • SOCI 110 Social Problems (4 credits)
  • SOCI 200 Introduction to Criminal and Juvenile Justice (4 credits)
  • SOCI 251 Race and Ethnicity (4 credits)
  • SOCI 301 General Anthropology (4 credits)
  • SOCI 350 Social Inequality: Privilege & Power (4 credits)
  • SOCI 353 Global Perspectives on Gender (4 credits)
  • SOCI 365 Social Psychology (4 credits)
  • SOWK 340 Human Behavior and the Social Environment (4 credits)

Plus four additional credits in normative analysis
Appropriate courses include:

  • BETH 301 Business Ethics (4 credits)
  • BLAW 303 International Business Law (4 credits)
  • BLAW 351 Environmental Law (4 credits)
  • BLAW 352 Gender Issues and the Law (4 credits)
  • CATH 401 Church and Culture: Social Dimensions of Catholicism (4 credits)
  • COJO 276 Argumentation and Advocacy (4 credits)
  • COJO 366 Persuasion (4 credits)
  • ENGL 217 Multicultural Literature (4 credits)
  • ENGL 218 Literature by Women: Critical History (4 credits)
  • ENGL 337 The Literature of Human Diversity (4 credits)
  • ENGL 341 Literature by Women: Critical Questions (4 credits)
  • ENVR 301 Environmental Ethics (4 credits)
  • IDSC 291 The Anatomy of Violence (4 credits)
  • IDSC 466 City Arts: Reading Seminar (HECUA) (4 credits)
  • IDSC 471 MUST Seminar: Research on Urban Issues (HECUA) (4 credits)
  • PHIL 350 Advanced Ethical Theory (4 credits)
  • PHIL 353 Machiavelli, Hobbes, and Nietzsche (4 credits)
  • PHIL 357 Political Philosophy (4 credits)
  • POLS 275 Introduction to Political Thought (4 credits)
  • POLS 375 American Political Thought (4 credits)
  • THEO 325 The Catholic Social Traditions (4 credits)
  • THEO 365 Prophetic Literature of the Old Testament (4 credits)
  • THEO 422 Christian Faith and the Management Professions (4 credits)
  • THEO 432 Black Religious Experience (4 credits)
  • THEO 447 Faith, Social Transformation and Social Work
  • THEO 449 Christian Faith and the Engineering Profession
  • THEO 454 The Morality of War
  • THEO 455 The Church in Latin America
  • THEO 456 Christianity and Consumer Culture
  • THEO 457 Theology and Public Discourse
  • THEO 458 The Bible from a Multicultural Perspective
  • THEO 459 Theology and the Environment
  • THEO 460 Christian Ethics and U.S. Immigration
  • THEO 465 The Bible and Justice

Note: Additional 300- and 400-level Theology courses may also qualify, with approval of the JPST director.

  • WMST 205 Foundations in Women’s Studies (4 credits)

Plus:

Additional courses to be selected with the approval of the program director, to bring the total number of credits to 44 (40 for a double major). These courses may deal with any part of the Circle of Praxis. Students seeking further opportunities to learn the theories behind, or honing of, skills for action might consider:

  • ENTR 360 Creativity and Change (4 credits)
  • ENVR 351 Environmental Policy Formation (4 credits)
  • JPST 385 Globalization and Social Movements (4 credits)
  • SOWK 391 Social Policy for Social Change (4 credits) 

Students majoring only in Justice and Peace Studies are strongly encouraged to take a “methods” course from a department that uses approaches relevant to the way they are choosing to complete the JPST major. The purpose of this recommendation is to strengthen abilities in data interpretation, manipulation and generation.

Possibilities include:

  • GEOG 221 Computer Skills in Geography (4 credits)
  • POLS 205 Introduction to the American Public Policy Process (4 credits)
  • SOCI 210 Research Methods in Sociology (4 credits)
  • SOCI 220 Sociological Analysis (4 credits) 

Minor in Justice and Peace Studies

  • JPST 250 Introduction to Justice and Peace Studies (4 credits)
  • JPST 280 Active Nonviolence (4 credits)
  • THEO 421 Theologies of Justice and Peace (4 credits) 

Plus one of the following:

  • JPST 355 Public Policy (4 credits)
  • JPST 365 Leadership for Social Justice (4 credits)
  • JPST 375 Conflict Analysis and Transformation (4 credits)

Plus:

  • Eight additional credits to be selected with the approval of the program director. At least four of these credits must be outside the student’s major department. Any of the courses listed for the major may be applied to the minor. 

Note: A focused version of the JPST minor is available to Engineering students. See the sub-section on “Peace Engineering” in the Engineering (ENGR) section of the catalog. 

 

Significant experience:

Appropriate experience of poverty, injustice, social conflict, or marginalization. May be done for credit through 475-478 Experiential Learning.

It may also be done on a non-credit basis (e.g., in the context of another course or through volunteer activities). Possibilities include a trip taken as part of JPST 385, Campus Ministry programs, and off-campus study through programs that expose students to poverty and oppression.

Examples of appropriate off-campus study programs include those run by: HECUA (e.g., conflict resolution in Northern Ireland, poverty in the Twin Cities; development in Ecuador; environment in Guatemala; immigration in Norway); Augsburg’s Center for Global Education (e.g., in Cuernevaca Mexico); American University’s Washington Semester (e.g., on homelessness); and UMAIE. Campus Ministry programs include VISION trips during January term, spring break or summer sessions (to Guatemala, Appalachia, the border of Mexico, a Native American reservation, etc.), and VIA programs located in the Twin Cities (e.g., working at a shelter, tutoring immigrant students, etc.).

Internship and seminar in the area of justice and peace studies. The internship may, but need not, carry credit:

JPST 473 Vocational Internship Seminar (0 credit)

Students are required to take this seminar during the semester they are doing an internship. At the core of this mini course is a reflective process designed to lead students to: a deeper understanding of the practical means of working for social change; an evaluation of their internship experience (both in terms of gaining a deeper understanding of their own vocation and a better understanding of the type of institutions they are working with); and applying these insights to future course work and career planning. Five 2-hour seminars through the course of the semester provide opportunities for those engaged in individual placements to get peer support for their discernment process.

The internships themselves involve at least 7-10 hours a week of justice and peace work. Students doing internships for credit by enrolling for JPST 475-478 Experiential Learning are usually required to do a total of 100 hours of work for 2 credit hours, or 200 hours of work for 4 credit hours.

Students doing a concentration in Conflict Transformation, Public Policy Analysis and Advocacy, or Leadership for Social Justice must choose an internship that allows them to develop skills in their area. In general, acceptable placements include work with a nonprofit or governmental group doing direct service; education for peace and justice; political action for peace and justice; and leadership positions in UST’s Students for Justice and Peace (SJP). There is no objection to using an appropriate internship from another major (such as social work) to fulfill this requirement as long as the student is enrolled in JPST 473 during the semester of the internship.

Alternatively, the internship and seminar requirement may sometimes be fulfilled by participating in appropriate off-campus academic programs which have reflective internship components, such as the programs of HECUA and Augsburg’s Center for Global Education. Students may also get credit for doing further research on, and analysis of, their internship experience by enrolling in JPST 475-478 Experiential Learning.

Course Number Title Credits
JPST  243 Individual Study 2 OR 4
JPST  250 Intro to Justice & Peace 4
JPST  269 Research 2 OR 4
JPST  280 Active Nonviolence 4
JPST  297 Topics 4
JPST  355 Public Policy 4
JPST  365 Leadership for Social Justice 4
JPST  370 Conflict Mediation 4
JPST  375 Conflict Analysis & Transform 4
JPST  385 Globalization & Social Mvmts 4
JPST  389 Researach 2 OR 4
JPST  393 Individual Study 2 OR 4
JPST  473 Vocational Internship Seminar 0
JPST  476 Experiential Learning 2
JPST  478 Experiential Learning 4
JPST  489 Topics 4