ENGINEERING (ENGR) - SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

School of Engineering
O’Shaughnessy Science Hall (OSS) 100, (651) 962-5750
www.stthomas.edu/engineering

Faculty:

Weinkauf (dean), Abraham, Acton, Bennett, Ellingson, George, Greene, Hennessey, Jalkio, Mowry, Nelson-Cheeseman, Nepal, Rajagopalan, Shepard, Thomas, Wentz.

Faculty from other departments and adjunct faculty from industry teach specialized courses.

Engineering Degrees and Tracks offered:

The School of Engineering at the University of St. Thomas offers a range of tracks in engineering: 

  • B.S. in Electrical Engineering (BSEE)
  • B.S. in Mechanical Engineering (BSME)
  • Dual BS/BA degree programs with Business, Physics, and Computer & Information Sciences
  • Fifth Year Masters of Science (MS) in Mechanical and Electrical Engineering
  • Pre-engineering and 3-2 program
  • Minors in engineering
  • Peace Engineering Option

What is Engineering?:

The value of an engineering education is a lifetime of opportunity. Engineering is the bridge between the ever expanding technological frontier and today’s societal needs. Engineers use design, science, mathematics, creativity and business analysis to create solutions to improve almost every facet of human life. The production of food, energy, clean water, medicine, cars, transportation systems, building materials, robotic machines, computers, communications equipment, electronic devices, paper, plastics, and even clothing fibers is all driven by engineers. Engineering is central to the creation of new technologies such as medical devices, renewable energy, efficient engines, advanced materials, micro-machines, biotechnology, and nanotechnology. Engineers are also leaders in broader fields such as business, medicine, patent law and government.

About Engineering at the University of St. Thomas:

Our mission is to provide an applied, values-based learning experience that produces well rounded, innovative engineers and technology leaders who have the technical skills, passion and courage to make a difference. Our mechanical and electrical engineering programs are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc.

Program outcomes and objectives are designed to provide the graduate with a rigorous engineering experience balanced with the perspective of a liberal arts foundation. The educational objectives of each engineering program describes what we expect our graduates to accomplish in their work after graduation, as follows: 

  1. Create with Engineering Skills: Use engineering skills and principles to create systems, products, and services that meet articulated and unarticulated needs of people and improve the quality of their lives in a sustainable way.
  2. Grow in a Learning Profession: Increase personal knowledge and skill through graduate or professional study, appropriate certifications, and work assignments.
  3. Contribute through Citizenship: Contribute time, knowledge, and skills to the profession,community, and the world.
  4. Lead through one’s Work: Serve as a team member or team leader, demonstrating ethical behavior, social sensitivity, and professional responsibility. 

All said, the students stand at the center of our work. Our faculty are dedicated teachers and practitioners and work to foster a vibrant educational environment. We strongly believe that an Engineering education is about rolling up your sleeves, getting your hands dirty on projects, and wrapping your mind around ideas which have the potential to change our world. Graduates will demonstrate competence in a variety of skills that enhance their ability to solve problems in diverse ways to meet the needs of the global community. Graduates will also develop teamwork and effective communication skills while gaining a comprehensive understanding of the design process and engineering systems.

The School of Engineering curricula and programs are designed to foster an engaging engineering experience for our students. The year-long Senior Design Clinic pairs teams of students with members of industry in creating a prototype solution to a real technical problem in the field. Our industry partners in the Twin Cities area sponsor numerous co-op and summer internships for our students. Beyond the theory developed in the lectures, both the Electrical and Mechanical Engineering curricula are designed to continually develop the hands-on skills of our students. From the freshman to senior level laboratories, students continue to gain a working knowledge of the modern engineering tools necessary to solve advanced technical problems.

Degree in Electrical Engineering (BSEE)

The bachelor of science in electrical engineering (BSEE) curriculum includes courses in circuits and electronics, signal processing and control system design, digital electronics and microprocessors, and electromagnetic fields and waves with a focus on embedded system design. The electrical engineering program is academically rigorous, complemented with a full liberal arts experience of the University of St. Thomas Core Curriculum.

The Electrical Engineering program outcomes and objectives as well as sample degree plans may be found at: www.stthomas.edu/engineering/electrical. In addition to satisfying the University of St. Thomas Core Curriculum requirements (see page 22 ), students earning a BSEE degree must also meet the Electrical Engineering Major requirements and the Electrical Engineering allied requirements listed below. A four year degree plan for the BSEE is available in the School of Engineering main office or from any Engineering faculty advisor.

Electrical Engineering (B.S.E.E.) - Major Field Guide

Electrical Engineering Major Requirements

  • ENGR 150 Introduction to Engineering (1 credit)
  • ENGR 230 Digital Design (4 credits)
  • ENGR 240 Circuit Analysis (4 credits)
  • ENGR 330 Design with Microprocessors I (4 credits)
  • ENGR 331 Design with Microprocessors II (4 credits)
  • ENGR 340 Signals and Systems (4 credits)
  • ENGR 342 Electromagnetic Fields and Waves (4 credits)
  • ENGR 345 Electronics I (4 credits)
  • ENGR 346 Electronics II (4 credits)
  • ENGR 410 Control Systems and Automation (4 credits)
  • ENGR 431 Design of Embedded Systems (4 credits)
  • ENGR 480 Engineering Design Clinic I (4 credits)
  • ENGR 481 Engineering Design Clinic II (4 credits)

Plus

  • eight credits of engineering electives as approved by the Program 

Electrical Engineering Allied Requirements

  • CISC 130 Introduction to Programming and Problem Solving in the Sciences (4 credits)

or

  • CISC 131 Introduction to Programming and Problem Solving (4 credits)

Note: CISC 130 is recommended for this major

  • MATH 113 Calculus I (4 credits)
  • MATH 114 Calculus II (4 credits)
  • MATH 200 Multi-Variable Calculus (4 credits)
  • MATH 210 Introduction to Differential Equations and Systems (4 credits)
  • PHYS 111 Introduction to Classical Physics I (4 credits)
  • PHYS 112 Introduction to Classical Physics II (4 credits)
  • PHYS 225 Applications of Modern Physics (4 credits)
  • PHYS 341 Electricity and Magnetism (4 credits)

Degree in Mechanical Engineering (BSME)

The bachelor of science in mechanical engineering (BSME) is an applied-engineering program, blending theory and research with practical engineering fundamentals. The program is academically rigorous, complemented with a full Liberal Arts experience of the University of St. Thomas Core Curriculum. The mechanical engineering curriculum provides a foundation in theoretical and applied mechanics, materials, electrical-electronic fundamentals, computer aided design, automation systems, thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid flow, manufacturing processes and practical design. The B.S.M.E. program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of ABET. Program outcomes and objectives may be found at: www.stthomas.edu/engineering/mechanical/.

In addition to satisfying the University of St. Thomas Core Curriculum requirements (see page 22), students earning a BSME degree must also meet the Mechanical Engineering Major requirements and the Mechanical Engineering allied requirements listed below. A four year degree plan for the BSME is available in the School of Engineering main office or from any Engineering faculty advisor.

Engineering, Mechanical (B.S.M.E.) - Major Field Guide

Mechanical Engineering Major Requirements

  • ENGR 150 Introduction to Engineering (1 credit)
  • ENGR 171 Engineering Graphics and Design (4 credits)
  • ENGR 220 Statics (4 credits)
  • ENGR 221 Mechanics of Materials (4 credits)
  • ENGR 320 Machine Design and Synthesis (4 credits)
  • ENGR 322 Dynamics (4 credits)
  • ENGR 350 Introduction to Electronics (4 credits)
  • ENGR 361 Engineering Materials (4 credits)
  • ENGR 371 Manufacturing Processes (4 credits)
  • ENGR 381 Thermodynamics (4 credits)
  • ENGR 382 Heat Transfer (4 credits)
  • ENGR 383 Fluid Mechanics (4 credits)
  • ENGR 410 Control Systems and Automation (4 credits)
  • ENGR 480 Engineering Design Clinic I (4 credits)
  • ENGR 481 Engineering Design Clinic II (4 credits)

Plus

  • four credits of engineering electives

Mechanical Engineering Allied Requirements

  • CHEM 109 General Chemistry for Engineers (4 credits) (or CHEM 111 however, CHEM 109 is preferred for this major)
  • CISC 130 Introduction to Programming and Problem Solving in the Sciences (4 credits)

or

  • CISC 131 Introduction to Programming and Problem Solving (4 credits)

Note: CISC 130 is preferred for this major

  • MATH 113 Calculus I (4 credits)
  • MATH 114 Calculus II (4 credits)
  • MATH 200 Multi-Variable Calculus (4 credits)
  • MATH 210 Introduction to Differential Equations and Systems (4 credits)
  • PHYS 111 Introduction to Classical Physics I (4 credits)
  • PHYS 112 Introduction to Classical Physics II (4 credits) 

Dual Degree in Electrical or Mechanical Engineering (BSEE or BSME) and General Business Management (B.A.)

The dual degree program in electrical or mechanical engineering and general business management is designed for students with an interest in both engineering and business. The program combines the applied engineering concepts of electrical or mechanical engineering with knowledge of the financial, marketing and management disciplines of the business program. Students in this dual program will have skills to prepare them for a wide variety of opportunities in industry or advanced graduate education. The dual degree program requires approximately five years to complete. Upon completion, students receive a B.A. degree in business administration and a B.S. in either electrical or mechanical engineering.

  • Students must complete the appropriate Engineering Major Requirements and the respective Engineering allied requirements for the B.S. in Mechanical Engineering or Electrical Engineering listed above.

Plus:

  • ACCT 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting (4 credits)
  • ACCT 215 Managerial Accounting (4 credits)
  • BETH 301 Business Ethics (4 credits)
  • BUSN 200 Business Learning Through Service (0 credit)
  • OPMT 310 Operations Management (4 credits)
  • FINC 321 Financial Management (4 credits)
  • MGMT 305 Management and Organizational Behavior (4 credits)
  • MGMT 480 Strategic Management (4 credits)
  • MKTG 300 Principles of Marketing (4 credits)

Plus four credits from the following:

  • BLAW 301 Legal Environment of Business (4 credits)
  • BLAW 302 Business Law for Accounting (4 credits)
  • BLAW 303 International Business Law (4 credits)

Plus additional allied Requirements:

  • ECON 251 Principles of Macroeconomics (4 credits)
  • ECON 252 Principles of Microeconomics (4 credits)
  • STAT 220 Statistics (4 credits)
  • COJO 105 Communications in the Workplace (4 credits)

Dual Degree in Electrical Engineering (BSEE) and Physics (B.A.)

The dual degree program in electrical engineering and physics is designed for students interested in combining lab skills and theory with engineering principles and practice. Students in this dual program will have skills to prepare them for a wide variety of opportunities in industry or advanced graduate education. The dual degree program may require an additional semester to complete. Upon completion, students receive a B.A. degree in physics and a B.S.E.E. degree accredited by EAC of ABET.

  • Students must complete the Electrical Engineering major requirements (see above), the allied requirements for a B.S. in Electrical Engineering plus four credits of engineering electives.

Plus:

  • PHYS 215 Foundations in Modern Physics (4 credits)
  • And four credits of physics electives 

Dual Degree in Electrical Engineering (BSEE) and Computer Science (B.A.)

The dual degree program in electrical engineering and computer & information science is designed for students interested in both hardware and software aspects of computing. Students in this dual program will have skills to prepare them for a wide variety of opportunities in industry or advanced graduate education. The dual degree program requires approximately five years to complete. Upon completion, students receive a B.A. degree in Computer Science and a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering.

  • Students must complete the Electrical Engineering major requirements (see above) and the allied requirements for a B.S. in Electrical Engineering.

Plus:

  • CISC 210 Security (4 credits)
  • CISC 230 Object-Oriented Design and Programming (4 credits)
  • CISC 231 Data Structures Using Object-Oriented Design (4 credits)
  • CISC 310 Operating Systems (4 credits)
  • CISC 370 Networking (4 credits)
  • CISC 450 Database Design I (4 credits)

Plus eight credits from the following:

  • CISC 320 Systems Analysis and Design (4 credits)
  • CISC 342 Computer Applications in Experimental Science (4 credits)
  • CISC 440 Artificial Intelligence and Robotics (4 credits)
  • CISC 451 Database Design II (4 credits)

PRE-ENGINEERING AND 3-2 PROGRAMS

See Pre-Professional Programs 

Peace Engineering

Designed for engineering students interested in becoming responsible critics of contemporary societies and effective agents for positive social transformations. Students should expect this program to take one additional semester. The study option leads to B.S. degrees in either Electrical or Mechanical Engineering and a minor in Justice and Peace Studies.

  • Students must complete the major requirements and the allied requirements for a B.S. in either Electrical Engineering or Mechanical Engineering (see above).

Plus:

  • JPST 250 Introduction to Justice and Peace Studies (4 credits)
  • JPST 280 Active Nonviolence (4 credits)
  • THEO 421 Theologies of Justice and Peace (4 credits)

Plus:

Eight additional credits to be selected with the approval of the JPST program director. Some of these courses may have additional prerequisites; students will either need to meet those prerequisites or negotiate in order to be admitted into the courses.

Appropriate courses include:

  • BLAW 351 Environmental Law (4 credits)
  • ECON 345 Economics of Development and Growth (4 credits)
  • ENVR 151 Humans and the Environment (4 credits)
  • ENVR 212 Social Dynamics and the Environment (4 credits)
  • ENVR 301 Environment Ethics (4 credits)
  • GEOG 111 Human Geography (4 credits)
  • GEOG 113 World Geography (4 credits)
  • POLS 326 International Law and Organizations (4 credits)
  • POLS 352 Third World Politics and Government (4 credits)
  • SOCI 301 Cultural Anthropology (4 credits)

A significant experience is strongly recommended:

Appropriate experience of poverty and/or issues of societal sustainability. May be done for credit through JPST 475-478 experiential learning and used towards the eight additional credits mentioned previously.

Minor in General Engineering

The general engineering minor provides a broad overview of topics in both electrical and mechanical engineering. It offers the opportunity to explore the field of engineering and provides an understanding of the technology of products and processes. It also strengthens pre-med and pre-law candidates who intend to pursue specialized areas such as biomechanics or patent law. This minor is not available for students majoring in electrical or mechanical engineering.

Students must complete courses from the following list:

  • ENGR 150 Introduction to Engineering I (1 credit)
  • ENGR 171 Engineering Graphics and Design (4 credits)
  • ENGR 230 Digital Design (4 credits)

Plus one of the following courses:

  • ENGR 220 Statics(4 credits)
  • ENGR 240 Circuit Analysis (4 credits)
  • ENGR 330 Microprocessors (4 credits)
  • ENGR 381 Thermodynamics (4 credits)

Plus

  • four additional credits of engineering (ENGR) classes

Minor in Electrical Engineering

The electrical engineering minor is designed for students with majors in the sciences, mathematics, mechanical engineering, quantitative methods, and business. This minor serves both those who plan to go on to graduate school in engineering and those entering business and industry. The engineering minor offers the opportunity to explore the field of engineering and provides an understanding of the technology of products and processes. It also strengthens pre-med and pre-law candidates who intend to pursue specialized areas such as biomechanics or patent law.

Students must complete sixteen credits from the following:

  • ENGR 230 Digital Design (4 credits)
  • ENGR 240 Circuit Analysis (4 credits)
  • ENGR 330 Design with Microprocessors I (4 credits)
  • ENGR 331 Design with Microprocessors II (4 credits)
  • ENGR 340 Signals and Systems (4 credits)
  • ENGR 342 Electromagnetic Fields and Waves (4 credits)
  • ENGR 345 Electronics I (4 credits)
  • ENGR 346 Electronics II ( 4 credits)
  • ENGR 350 Introduction to Electronics (4 credits)
  • ENGR 410 Control Systems and Automation (4 credits)
  • ENGR 431 Design of Embedded Systems (4 credits)
  • ENGR 460 Engineering Economics and Project Management (4 credits)
  • ENGR 470 Fundamentals of Mechatronic Engineering I (4 credits)

Minor in Mechanical Engineering

The mechanical engineering minor is designed for students with majors in the sciences, mathematics, electrical engineering, quantitative methods, and business. This minor serves those who plan to go on to graduate school in engineering and those entering business and industry. The engineering minor offers the opportunity to explore the field of engineering and provides an understanding of the technology of products and processes. It also strengthens pre-med and pre-law candidates who intend to pursue specialized areas such as biomechanics or patent law.

Students must complete Sixteen credits from the following:

  • ENGR 171 Engineering Graphics and Design(4 credits)
  • ENGR 220 Statics (4 credits)
  • ENGR 221 Mechanics of Materials (4 credits)
  • ENGR 320 Machine Design and Synthesis (4 credits)
  • ENGR 322 Dynamics (4 credits)
  • ENGR 328 Fuel Cell Engineering (4 credits)
  • ENGR 361 Engineering Materials (4 credits)
  • ENGR 371 Manufacturing Processes (4 credits)
  • ENGR 381 Thermodynamics (4 credits)
  • ENGR 382 Heat Transfer (4 credits)
  • ENGR 383 Fluid Mechanics (4 credits)
  • ENGR 410 Control Systems and Automation (4 credits)
  • ENGR 420 Computer Aided Manufacturing (4 credits)
  • ENGR 430 Applications of Thermodynamics (4 credits)
  • ENGR 460 Engineering Economics and Project Management (4 credits)
  • ENGR 470 Fundamentals of Mechatronic Engineering I (4 credits)

Minor in Engineering Education

The Engineering Education minor is designed for students who are majoring in Education. The minor is intended to give pre-service teachers a solid background in basic engineering concepts that can be applied to a P-12 classroom. Special effort is made throughout the program to tie engineering concepts to the Minnesota academic standards in science.

Students must complete the following courses:

  • ENGR 130 Fundamentals of Engineering for Educators I (4 credit)
  • ENGR 171 Engineering Graphics and Design (4 credits)
  • EDUC 327 Engineering in the P-12 Classroom (4 credits)

Plus eight elective credits from the following list:

  • ENGR 123 Energy and the Environment (4 credits)
  • ENGR 220 Statics (4 credits)
  • ENGR 230 Digital Design (4 credits)
  • ENGR 350 Introduction to Electronics (4 credits)
  • ENGR 361 Engineering Materials (4 credits)
  • ENGR 371 Manufacturing Processes (4 credits)
  • ENGR 381 Thermodynamics (4 credits)

*Any other ENGR course may be substituted for elective credit with the permission of the minor advisor.

Plus four credits from the following list may be used towards the eight elective credits:

  • PHYS 104 Astronomy (4 credits)
  • PHYS 105 Musical Acoustics (4 credits)
  • PHYS 109 General Physics I (4 credits)
  • PHYS 110 General Physics II (4 credits)
  • PHYS 111 Classical Physics I (4 credits)
  • PHYS 112 Classical Physics II (4 credits)
Course Number Title Credits
ENGR  123 Energy and the Environment 4
ENGR  130 Fundamentals of ENGR for EDUC 4
ENGR  150 Introduction to Engineering 1
ENGR  171 Engineering Graphics & Design 4
ENGR  175 Intro to Electrical Eng. 2
ENGR  220 Statics 4
ENGR  221 Mechanics of Materials 4
ENGR  230 Digital Design 4
ENGR  240 Circuit Analysis 4
ENGR  243 Individual Study 2 OR 4
ENGR  269 Research 2 OR 4
ENGR  296 Topics 2
ENGR  297 Topics 2 OR 4
ENGR  298 Topics 4
ENGR  320 Machine Design & Synthesis 4
ENGR  322 Dynamics 4
ENGR  330 Design with Microprocess I 0 TO 4
ENGR  331 Design with Microprocess II 4
ENGR  340 Signals and Systems 4
ENGR  342 Electromagnetic Fields/Wave 4
ENGR  345 Electronics I 4
ENGR  346 Electronics II 4
ENGR  350 Introduction to Electronics 4
ENGR  361 Engineering Materials 4
ENGR  371 Manufacturing Prcs & Stat Cont 4
ENGR  381 Thermodynamics 4
ENGR  382 Heat Transfer 4
ENGR  383 Fluid Mechanics 4
ENGR  389 Research 2 OR 4
ENGR  393 Individual Study 2 OR 4
ENGR  410 Control Systs & Automation 4
ENGR  420 Advanced Computer Aided Mfg 4
ENGR  431 Design of Embedded Systems 4
ENGR  460 Engineering Econ & Managem 4
ENGR  476 Experiential Learning 2
ENGR  478 Experiential Learning 3 OR 4
ENGR  480 Engineer Design Clinic I 4
ENGR  481 Engineer Design Clinic II 4
ENGR  488 Topics 2
ENGR  489 Topics 4
ENGR  490 Topics 4
ENGR  491 Research 2 OR 4
ENGR  495 Individual Study 2 OR 4
ENGR  497 Individual Study 4