Home
A student hops on his bike outside the entrance to Koch Commons October 11, 2016.

FAFSA and MN Dream Act

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is the gateway to need-based aid for most students. Completing it will open up new college funding opportunities.

  • Who Should Submit the FAFSA?
  • Submission Basics
  • Common FAFSA Errors
  • FAFSA Verification
  • Special Circumstances
  • The FAFSA is your way of indicating that you’re interested in receiving assistance paying for college. It’s the only way you can become eligible for grants, work-study and federal student loans.

    If you’re interested in those things, we’d highly encourage you to submit the FAFSA.

    How do I submit it?

    Go to fafsa.gov and follow the instructions. You’ll need the previous year’s tax information and our school code (002345). It should take 30 to 60 minutes to complete.

    When should I submit it?

    The FAFSA opens on Oct. 1 and we recommend you try to do submit it shortly after that. That will ensure that you get your financial aid award as early as possible and that you’ll have plenty of time to thoroughly compare all the schools you’re considering before making a decision.

    You DO NOT have to be admitted to St. Thomas before you complete the FAFSA. You can do it before you even apply.

    When will I hear back about my aid?

    We start sending notification of award (NOA) letters on January 15 to students who have submitted their FAFSAs and have been admitted as a part of our Early Action timeline.

    Completing the FAFSA can be a little complicated, so here are a few things to watch out for.

    After filing the FAFSA, a student’s FAFSA may be selected for verification, a process they’ll need to complete before they can receive financial aid.

    Things happen. We get that. That’s why we have a process for students to appeal their aid award to account for special financial circumstances.

    These can include:

    • Death or disability of a parent or spouse since filing the FAFSA
    • Divorce or separation of parent or student since filing the FAFSA
    • Medical, dental, or dependent care expenses not reimbursed by insurance or by an employer's pre-tax cafeteria plan
    • Unemployment
    • Loss child support and/or taxable Social Security benefits
    • Business or farm closed due to bankruptcy, foreclosure, or natural disaster
    • Private high school, junior high, or elementary tuition expenses for other family members
    • Parents' or spouse's personal college loan payments
    • Parent(s) enrolled in college in 2018 or 2019 and paying out-of-pocket college tuition

    Special circumstances applications, if accepted, may result in an increase in need-based loans, student employment, or additional grant assistance. It will typically take 2-4 weeks to process your application after all required documentation has been received.

    Who Should Submit the FAFSA?

    The FAFSA is your way of indicating that you’re interested in receiving assistance paying for college. It’s the only way you can become eligible for grants, work-study and federal student loans.

    If you’re interested in those things, we’d highly encourage you to submit the FAFSA.

    Submission Basics

    How do I submit it?

    Go to fafsa.gov and follow the instructions. You’ll need the previous year’s tax information and our school code (002345). It should take 30 to 60 minutes to complete.

    When should I submit it?

    The FAFSA opens on Oct. 1 and we recommend you try to do submit it shortly after that. That will ensure that you get your financial aid award as early as possible and that you’ll have plenty of time to thoroughly compare all the schools you’re considering before making a decision.

    You DO NOT have to be admitted to St. Thomas before you complete the FAFSA. You can do it before you even apply.

    When will I hear back about my aid?

    We start sending notification of award (NOA) letters on January 15 to students who have submitted their FAFSAs and have been admitted as a part of our Early Action timeline.

    Common FAFSA Errors

    Completing the FAFSA can be a little complicated, so here are a few things to watch out for.

    FAFSA Verification

    After filing the FAFSA, a student’s FAFSA may be selected for verification, a process they’ll need to complete before they can receive financial aid.

    Special Circumstances

    Things happen. We get that. That’s why we have a process for students to appeal their aid award to account for special financial circumstances.

    These can include:

    • Death or disability of a parent or spouse since filing the FAFSA
    • Divorce or separation of parent or student since filing the FAFSA
    • Medical, dental, or dependent care expenses not reimbursed by insurance or by an employer's pre-tax cafeteria plan
    • Unemployment
    • Loss child support and/or taxable Social Security benefits
    • Business or farm closed due to bankruptcy, foreclosure, or natural disaster
    • Private high school, junior high, or elementary tuition expenses for other family members
    • Parents' or spouse's personal college loan payments
    • Parent(s) enrolled in college in 2018 or 2019 and paying out-of-pocket college tuition

    Special circumstances applications, if accepted, may result in an increase in need-based loans, student employment, or additional grant assistance. It will typically take 2-4 weeks to process your application after all required documentation has been received.

    Notification of Award Guide

    Still confused? We created a guide that walks you through the details of the financial aid process.