Writing Across the Curriculum

The mission of the Writing Across the Curriculum program is to create a culture of writing at the University of St. Thomas, enabling students to think critically, to engage deeply in their learning, and to write with confidence, precision, and grace.

Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) classes fall into three categories:

  • Writing Intensive (WI)

Students learn to practice writing as a process:  generating and developing ideas, offering helpful feedback to others, using feedback from instructors and peers to revise drafts, and editing near-final drafts. This writing process is used to promote critical thinking as well  as to produce quality academic writing. WI classes are typically offered in the core curriculum.

  • Writing to Learn (WTL)

Students complete a series of informal, low-stakes writing assignments that promote critical thinking and facilitate learning course content. WTL classes are offered throughout the curriculum.

  • Writing in the Disciplines (WID)

Students learn the genres and conventions of writing in their major fields of study and the rationales behind them. The writing process is supported at critical stages of development and includes instructor feedback on drafts. WID classes are offered in the major.

 

Students must complete a minimum of two (2) Writing Intensive classes*, one (1) Writing to Learn class, and one (1) Writing in the Disciplines class to fulfill the Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.
*At least one Writing Intensive course must be outside of the department of English.

WAC class offerings vary by term and are identifiable by the section number:

  • Writing Intensive sections will begin with a 'W'
  • Writing to Learn sections will begin with an 'L'
  • Writing in the Disciplines sections will begin with a 'D'

 

For more information you may also refer to the Writing Across the Curriculum website:  http://www.stthomas.edu/wac/

 

J-Term 2021 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 217 - L01 Multicultural Literature See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

10669 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

What does it mean to be labeled an African American dramatist? A Latino/a poet? A transgender novelist? An Asian American essayist? A Native American environmental writer? How do the varied experiences and backgrounds of authors writing from diverse subject positions inform, mark, and/or transform their writing? How do the works of these writers fit into, conflict with, actively resist, or even redefine the American Literary canon as it has been traditionally understood? These questions and more will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive reading of literature from: a) American communities of color; b) postcolonial peoples; c) immigrant and/or diasporic peoples; or d) LGBTQ communities. This course will focus on the literary and cultural texts of one or more of these groups with an emphasis on the cultural, political, and historical contexts that surround them. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major, the Human Diversity requirement in the old core curriculum, and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice flag in the new core curriculum. It also completes the core Literature and Writing requirement for those who started with an ENGL 201-204 class in the old core curriculum, satisfies the allied COJO/ENGL requirement for select business students, and fulfills the WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisites: ENGL 121, 190, 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0900-1200- T W R F - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 217 - L02 Multicultural Literature See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

10793 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Melissa J. Hendrickx

What happens when race and sexuality collide? This fully online course will emphasize intersectionality through literature from writers of color who are also members of the LGBTQ+ community. We will discuss the impact of having multiple minority statuses as well as historic (dis)connections between racial and LGBTQ+ social justice movements. Through poetry, novels, and essays, we will examine how LGBTQ+ writers of color redefine our understanding of identity, language, and relationships, while simultaneously expanding the American Literary canon. For students under the old core program, this course satisfies the core Literature and Writing requirement for those who started with an ENGL 201-204 class, satisfies the core Human Diversity requirement, the Diversity requirement for English majors. For those under the new core program, this course satisfies a Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. This course also satisfies a WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 121, 190, 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0900-1100- - W - - - -
-- - - - - - -
THEO 227 - L01 Contexts:Justice & Peace - T W R F - - 0900 - 1200

Days of Week:

- T W R F - -

Time of Day:

0900 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10731 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Frederick W. Nairn

In this course, students will explore approaches to theology that emerge out of diverse cultural contexts. Sections may focus on biblical interpretation, dynamics of church life, mission work, or transnational solidarity through the eyes of the marginalized, or they may focus on efforts to articulate and bear witness to the gospel amid new cultures and historical challenges, according to the instructor’s discretion. Sections may focus on experiences of marginalization and oppression as a source for theological reflection for women (giving rise to feminist/womanist/mujerista theologies, for example), or for people of color or indigenous peoples (giving rise to Latin American, African-American, Minjung, and South African liberation theologies, for example), or for economically exploited classes (also giving rise to liberation theologies). This course will thus provide an opportunity to learn how the global Christian community is gaining fresh insights into the gospel that were missed when the dominant perspective on theology reflected primarily the experience of European men, or to learn how claims by Christians have at various times served both to challenge and to reinforce systems of power and privilege. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)