Writing Across the Curriculum

The mission of the Writing Across the Curriculum program is to create a culture of writing at the University of St. Thomas, enabling students to think critically, to engage deeply in their learning, and to write with confidence, precision, and grace.

Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) classes fall into three categories:

  • Writing Intensive (WI)

Students learn to practice writing as a process:  generating and developing ideas, offering helpful feedback to others, using feedback from instructors and peers to revise drafts, and editing near-final drafts. This writing process is used to promote critical thinking as well  as to produce quality academic writing. WI classes are typically offered in the core curriculum.

  • Writing to Learn (WTL)

Students complete a series of informal, low-stakes writing assignments that promote critical thinking and facilitate learning course content. WTL classes are offered throughout the curriculum.

  • Writing in the Disciplines (WID)

Students learn the genres and conventions of writing in their major fields of study and the rationales behind them. The writing process is supported at critical stages of development and includes instructor feedback on drafts. WID classes are offered in the major.

 

Students must complete a minimum of two (2) Writing Intensive classes*, one (1) Writing to Learn class, and one (1) Writing in the Disciplines class to fulfill the Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.
*At least one Writing Intensive course must be outside of the department of English.

WAC class offerings vary by term and are identifiable by the section number:

  • Writing Intensive sections will begin with a 'W'
  • Writing to Learn sections will begin with an 'L'
  • Writing in the Disciplines sections will begin with a 'D'

 

For more information you may also refer to the Writing Across the Curriculum website:  http://www.stthomas.edu/wac/

 

Fall 2022 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
AMCD 200 - L01 American Culture:Power/Identit - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 126

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 126

Course Registration Number:

40299 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kanishka Chowdhury

AMCD 200, American Culture:Power/Identity: (This course was originally titled ACST 200: Introduction to American Culture and Difference; the name change has been submitted as an information item to the UCC). In AMCD 200, students learn about the historical and theoretical foundations of Cultural Studies as an academic discipline and use cultural theory to analyze a variety of cultural products and representations. In this course, students look specifically at dominant and subversive constructions of gender, race, ethnicity, national and sexual identities, and how these constructions are deployed through cultural practices and productions such as sports, film and television, folklore and popular culture, youth subcultures, music, and so on. For example, the course may contain units on "nation" and the creation of American mythologies; the process of hero-making in American history; stereotypes and the representation of race and ethnicity in television and film; representations of gender and sexuality in advertising; as well as a section on American music from jazz, blues, folk and roots music, to rock and roll, punk, and hip-hop.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ARTH 202 - L01 History of Street Art See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

43087 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Heather M. Shirey

Street art—including graffiti, murals, and other installations in public space—provides expressive avenues for marginalized voices, shapes urban space, and promotes competing visions of community development. In contrast to art that is created for museums or the commercial art market, street art is uniquely positioned to engage with social issues from a critical perspective. This class will involve an analysis of street art projects from the United States, situated in comparison with projects from around the world. Topics to explored include the history of street art over time (from its origins in graffiti to contemporary mural festivals); the impetus for street art in communities in the USA and globally; models for creating, preserving, and presenting street art; the institutionalization of street art; street art as it relates to diversity and inclusion; and, ultimately, the potential for street art to play a role in social change.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 4141330-1510- T - - - - -
VSP 1-- - - R - - -
ARTH 206 - L01 Cultural History Photography See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

43046 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Heather M. Shirey

The invention of photography and its dissemination throughout the world coincided with an explosive time in the development of American culture and identity. Probing the medium of photography as it relates to structures of power, constructs of race, and issues of social justice, this course surveys the cultural history of photography with a special emphasis on photography in the United States. This course does not have any prerequisites and it provides an overview of the development of photographic techniques and applications from the origins of photography in the 1830s to the present as well as a critical focus on photography and issues of diversity, inclusion and social justice from an art historical perspective.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 2030955-1135- T - - - - -
VSP -- - - R - - -
COMM 326 - W01 Communication in Pop Culture - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 210

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

41836 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Bernard J. Armada

This course focuses on the creation and use of rhetoric in public persuasion settings, including social movements and political campaigns. The diversity of rhetorical acts examined may include campaign ads, speeches, films, advertisements, music, memorials, architecture and other nonverbal strategies. Topics of study may include: The rhetoric of domination and resistance, national identity formation, and the rhetoric of public memory.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COMM 328 - D01 Comm of Race, Class & Gender M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 311

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 311

Course Registration Number:

41833 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Debra L. Petersen

This course focuses on theories and research of the historical and contemporary correlation between gender, race, class, and communicative practices, including rhetorical practice and mass communication content. It includes the influence of gender and racial stereotypes on public speech and debate, political campaigns and communication, organizational leadership, news coverage and advertising. Topics include: gendered perceptions of credibility; who is allowed to communicate and who is silenced due to class and racial privilege; and the impact of gender, race and class stereotypes about human nature, expertise, and abilities on individuals and groups that want to participate in public culture and communication. Students analyze and evaluate their own communicative styles in light of course readings and activities.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COMM 340 - W01 Television Criticism - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42986 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Pamela H. Nettleton

This course will provide students with the opportunity to understand television as a text situation in a cultural context. It will examine television from a critical perspective, review a wide variety of program genres and incorporate several theoretical orientations to the qualitative analysis of TV. Students, along with reading about and discussion of critical perspectives, watch programs such as comedies, dramas, news, advertisements, miniseries, etc., and write several critical analyses of the programs.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ECON 331 - 01 Economic Inequality M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 207

Course Registration Number:

43790 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Tyler C. Schipper

Economic Inequality focuses on two types of inequality often studied by economists: income and wealth inequality. The course will illustrate how inequality in the U.S. has evolved over time, and how it compares to other countries. It puts particular emphasis on using data and modeling to explain the origins of inequality and explore the impacts of policies aimed to address it. The course highlights how inequality relates to demographics such as race, gender, and education. Finally, it explores hard questions about whether inequality is unavoidable, whether it matters, and what can be done about it. Prerequisites: ECON 251 and ECON 252

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
EDUC 329 - 01 Diverse Learners & Families See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

43098 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Chelda Smith Kondo

This course is designed to equip prospective teachers with the knowledge, instructional practices, and dispositions to successfully manage diverse classrooms, using their understanding of multiple learning modalities and all types of diversity to promote all students' personal and academic achievement. The course engages candidates with issues such as race, class, gender, exceptionality, oppression, and discrimination while examining the crucial role of educators in influencing positive, systematic change for social justice.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MOH 3181400-1540M - W - - - -
VMP 11400-1540M - W - - - -
ENGL 202 - W04 Behind Bars: Prison Literature - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 202

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MHC 202

Course Registration Number:

43131 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucy A. Saliger

The difficult contradictions in our criminal legal system – which purportedly aims to reduce violence, addictions, and crime, to keep us safe, and promote justice – hide in plain sight. Thus we simultaneously recognize and do not recognize these contradictory realities: the violence and injustices that often occur in our jails and prisons, profound disparities in legal representation and sentencing bound up with race, class, and nationality, and a host of tangled methods and aims often in conflict with one another. While "crime" news reports, movies, and series keep certain stories ever present in our societal imagination, they tend to obscure deeper stories. In this class, we'll attempt to enter into and understand those deeper stories using both media and texts; writers may include Michelle Alexander, Jimmy Santiago Baca, Brittany Barnett, Johann Hari, Martin Luther King, and Bryan Stevenson. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies both a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 214 - L01 American Authors I See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

42915 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Andrew J. Scheiber

Where does the popular perception of America as the “New World” come from? How could slavery flourish in a land idealizing freedom? Why were immigrants so feared and reviled? Why did expansionism push out some and make millionaires of others? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings from the beginnings of the American literary tradition to the turn of the twentieth century. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as religious identity, political reform, race, slavery, war, gender, and industrialization. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 121 or 190. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SCB 1401055-1200M - - - - - -
VSP 11055-1200- - W - F - -
ENGL 218 - L01 Lit by Women:Critical Hist See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

42920 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

From Sappho to Austen to Woolf to Morrison – women have been rendering the world into exquisite words for centuries. But how has the writing of women served as a critique of patriarchy? What impact has women’s writing had on important cultural and political movements such as abolition, suffrage, and environmentalism? In what ways has the writing of women been more radical than polite, more aggressive than demure, more confrontational than deferential? How have women consistently defied the limiting expectations of them through the creation of some of the most experimental, risky, and defiant works of literature in existence? These questions and more will be explored in this course, which focuses on the history of literature by women. While it will concentrate mainly on British and American women writers, the course will also address the work of non-western writers. Ultimately, this course will examine gender and its role in both the composition and reading of literary texts. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 121 or 190. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 2090935-1040M - - - F - -
VSP 1-- - - - - - -
JPST 275 - W01 Qualitative Methods M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 308

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 308

Course Registration Number:

40332 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael C. Klein

This course introduces students to qualitative research theories, methods, and techniques focused on representing voices of women, people of color, people in poverty and others that are marginalized or excluded from dominant culture. Specifically, students will gain familiarity with the qualitative social science methods of interviews, ethnography, documentary research, and focus groups. Throughout the course, students will be guided through the process of designing and conducting their own unique research projects meanwhile learning from ongoing research with their instructors and partner organizations. In addition to training in data collection techniques, analysis, and varied epistemologies, the course thoroughly explores the ethics of research with marginalized communities and the ways in which research can and does relate to social change. Together, participants in this course will co-create a teaching/learning community wherein we all critically analyze and respectfully value each person’s individual and particular contributions as well as our diverse understandings of social reality and how we position ourselves in the multiple worlds in which we live and work.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JPST 280 - W01 Active Nonviolence - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 305

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 305

Course Registration Number:

41054 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy C. Finnegan

Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MGMT 384 - L01 Project Management - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 MCH 115

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

MCH 115

Course Registration Number:

43403 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ernest L. Owens

This course presents the concepts, techniques, and behavioral skills needed for managing projects effectively. The course introduces students to a project's life cycle (from project definition and goals to completion of the project) and the behavioral dynamics that need to be managed to achieve success. Project leaders need to fulfill multiple roles on a project including managing the timeline, meeting project specifications, resource budgeting and creating a sustainable project culture. Prerequisites: MGMT 200 or MGMT 305; and OPMT 300 or OPMT 310; and Junior standing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MGMT 385 - 01 Inclusive Leadership - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MCH 236

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MCH 236

Course Registration Number:

43404 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Rama K. Hart

Leaders, both with and without formal management titles, need to appreciate the diverse people internal and external to their organizations and society at large. It is critical that leaders step up to design and deliver effective programs of inclusion in their organizations. Culturally competent leaders think critically about these programs and practice inclusion at individual, interpersonal, team, organization, and community levels. This requires foundational knowledge, skills, and attitudes applied in diverse domestic and global contexts. This course introduces a range of perspectives to explore topics including, but not limited to, human diversity; inclusive cultures; social identity and perception; power and privilege; and models and paradigms for interpersonal and organizational inclusion. Prerequisites: MGMT 200 or MGMT 305 and Junior standing. Note: Students who receive credit for MGMT 385 may not receive credit for MGMT 388

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MGMT 385 - 02 Inclusive Leadership - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MCH 236

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MCH 236

Course Registration Number:

43405 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Rama K. Hart

Leaders, both with and without formal management titles, need to appreciate the diverse people internal and external to their organizations and society at large. It is critical that leaders step up to design and deliver effective programs of inclusion in their organizations. Culturally competent leaders think critically about these programs and practice inclusion at individual, interpersonal, team, organization, and community levels. This requires foundational knowledge, skills, and attitudes applied in diverse domestic and global contexts. This course introduces a range of perspectives to explore topics including, but not limited to, human diversity; inclusive cultures; social identity and perception; power and privilege; and models and paradigms for interpersonal and organizational inclusion. Prerequisites: MGMT 200 or MGMT 305 and Junior standing. Note: Students who receive credit for MGMT 385 may not receive credit for MGMT 388

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MKTG 488 - 01 Multicultural & Inclusive Mktg M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 MCH 238

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MCH 238

Course Registration Number:

43466 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Michael C. Porter, Minerva J. Purvis

The purpose of this course will be to help you appreciate the presence and understand the nuisances and similarities of various subcultures within the United States. From targeting and segmenting customers to developing partnerships, we will discuss how these may impact American marketing practices and trends. Realizing that a subculture is any group that shares a set of attitudes, values and goals, this course will consider not only ethnic subcultures but religious, sexual orientation & gender identity, ability, and generational subcultures. You will be exposed to concepts such as cultural capital, intercultural penetration, intersectionality, historical context and other concepts of culture and identity as you learn how you and organizations can effectively and responsibly engage with multiple diverse stakeholders. Prerequisite: MKTG 200 Course fulfills DISJ Flag

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 230 - 01 Disability and Human Dignity See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

42963 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gloria R. Frost

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability. Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability. This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course. Some of the central questions examined in the course include: What is disability? Is disability merely a medical condition? In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources? Does disability itself make a person worse off, or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse? How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US? What is the basis for human dignity? What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities? Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisites: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
VSP -M - W - - - -
JRC 2460935-1040- - - - F - -
PHIL 230 - 02 Disability and Human Dignity See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

42964 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gloria R. Frost

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability. Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability. This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course. Some of the central questions examined in the course include: What is disability? Is disability merely a medical condition? In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources? Does disability itself make a person worse off, or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse? How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US? What is the basis for human dignity? What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities? Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisites: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
VSP -M - W - - - -
JRC 2461215-1320- - - - F - -
PHIL 230 - 03 Disability and Human Dignity See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

42965 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gloria R. Frost

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability. Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability. This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course. Some of the central questions examined in the course include: What is disability? Is disability merely a medical condition? In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources? Does disability itself make a person worse off, or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse? How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US? What is the basis for human dignity? What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities? Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisites: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
VSP -M - W - - - -
JRC 2461335-1440- - - - F - -
PSYC 205 - L01 Psychology of Women M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 JRC LL62

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

JRC LL62

Course Registration Number:

41675 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Britain A. Scott

An examination of physiological, experiential, and social factors affecting the psychological development of women and their status as adults. Addresses diversity among women and how factors such as class and race intersect with historical and contemporary gender inequalities in women's lives. Topics include: biological and social influences on the development of gender, research on sex-related differences in psychological traits and cognitive abilities, media image and stereotypes of women, close relationships and sexuality, mothering, employment, aging, violence against women, and psychological health. Prerequisite: PSYC 111

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 207 - 01 Drugs and Behavior - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC LL62

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC LL62

Course Registration Number:

40373 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mari S. Gades

The course surveys some basic facts and principles of administration, absorption, transport, action, deactivation and elimination of drugs. Various classes of drugs; their effects on mood, behavior, and consciousness; their use and misuse; and phenomena of chemical dependency and its treatment modalities are discussed. Lectures, readings, films, tapes and invited speakers are employed. Prerequisite: PSYC 111

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOCI 251 - W01 Race and Ethnicity M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MHC 308

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MHC 308

Course Registration Number:

40950 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Patricia L. Maddox

Race and ethnicity as significant components of U.S. social structure; the cognitive and normative aspects of culture which maintain and effect varying manifestations of social distance, tension, prejudice and discrimination between majority and minorities at both micro and macro levels, nationally and internationally. This course meets a requirement in American Cultural Studies and Justice and Peace Studies. Prerequisite: sophomore standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOCI 354 - 01 Sex in Society M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 MHC 203

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

MHC 203

Course Registration Number:

41830 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Patricia L. Maddox

Sexuality as a social construction is explored with a specific focus on cultural and institutional influences including the family, economy, religion, government, and the media. Current research findings are discussed within the context of historical change in American sexual behavior, attitudes and research methodologies. This course meets a requirement in Family Studies. Prerequisite: SOCI 100 or 110

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOWK 391 - 01 Social Policy for Change - T - R - - - 1335 - 1510 SCB 120

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

SCB 120

Course Registration Number:

41092 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Andrea A. Nesmith

This course equips students to understand and critically analyze current and past social policies. Policy alternatives are explored with a focus on the values and attitudes as well as the societal, economic and political dynamics from which they originate. Roles and responsibilities of citizens and professionals in formulating and implementing policies responsive to actual social needs are addressed. Prerequisite: SOWK 181 (or 281 under the old course number) or consent of the Program Director.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 226 - L03 Spirituality: Christ Marriage M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 201

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

JRC 201

Course Registration Number:

42043 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Marguerite L. Spencer

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This section is designed to acquaint students with the theology of Christian marriage, understood as covenant relationship and as sacrament, that is, an effective sign of God's love in our world. Primary though not exclusive emphasis will be on the Roman Catholic tradition. Students will also examine contemporary cultural attitudes toward sexuality, marriage, and the family in the light of Christian theology.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 228 - L06 Comparative: Interrel Encountr - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

41982 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Hans S. Gustafson

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. In the last half century religious diversity in the West has rapidly increased, bringing people from different religious traditions into daily contact. This has resulted in new conflicts, sometimes in violence, but also in new collaborations and friendships. Drawing on several approaches to interreligious conflict and relations, this course will examine the dynamic encounters that take place between and among people of different religious identities and ask students to reflect on their own role in religiously complex situations. Students will consider this interreligious reality and their role in it against the backdrop of their own individual relationship to spirituality, faith, and theology. To foster interreligious understanding beyond the classroom, students in this course will spend significant time outside the classroom directly engaging religious diversity. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)