Writing Across the Curriculum

The mission of the Writing Across the Curriculum program is to create a culture of writing at the University of St. Thomas, enabling students to think critically, to engage deeply in their learning, and to write with confidence, precision, and grace.

Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) classes fall into three categories:

  • Writing Intensive (WI)

Students learn to practice writing as a process:  generating and developing ideas, offering helpful feedback to others, using feedback from instructors and peers to revise drafts, and editing near-final drafts. This writing process is used to promote critical thinking as well  as to produce quality academic writing. WI classes are typically offered in the core curriculum.

  • Writing to Learn (WTL)

Students complete a series of informal, low-stakes writing assignments that promote critical thinking and facilitate learning course content. WTL classes are offered throughout the curriculum.

  • Writing in the Disciplines (WID)

Students learn the genres and conventions of writing in their major fields of study and the rationales behind them. The writing process is supported at critical stages of development and includes instructor feedback on drafts. WID classes are offered in the major.

 

Students must complete a minimum of two (2) Writing Intensive classes*, one (1) Writing to Learn class, and one (1) Writing in the Disciplines class to fulfill the Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.
*At least one Writing Intensive course must be outside of the department of English.

WAC class offerings vary by term and are identifiable by the section number:

  • Writing Intensive sections will begin with a 'W'
  • Writing to Learn sections will begin with an 'L'
  • Writing in the Disciplines sections will begin with a 'D'

 

For more information you may also refer to the Writing Across the Curriculum website:  http://www.stthomas.edu/wac/

 

Fall 2021 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
AMCD 200 - L01 American Culture:Power/Identit M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 JRC 222

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

40445 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David T. Lawrence

AMCD 200, American Culture:Power/Identity: (This course was originally titled ACST 200: Introduction to American Culture and Difference; the name change has been submitted as an information item to the UCC). In AMCD 200, students learn about the historical and theoretical foundations of Cultural Studies as an academic discipline and use cultural theory to analyze a variety of cultural products and representations. In this course, students look specifically at dominant and subversive constructions of gender, race, ethnicity, national and sexual identities, and how these constructions are deployed through cultural practices and productions such as sports, film and television, folklore and popular culture, youth subcultures, music, and so on. For example, the course may contain units on "nation" and the creation of American mythologies; the process of hero-making in American history; stereotypes and the representation of race and ethnicity in television and film; representations of gender and sexuality in advertising; as well as a section on American music from jazz, blues, folk and roots music, to rock and roll, punk, and hip-hop.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COMM 326 - W01 Communication in Pop Culture - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 246

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

44028 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Bernard J. Armada

This course focuses on the creation and use of rhetoric in public persuasion settings, including social movements and political campaigns. The diversity of rhetorical acts examined may include campaign ads, speeches, films, advertisements, music, memorials, architecture and other nonverbal strategies. Topics of study may include: The rhetoric of domination and resistance, national identity formation, and the rhetoric of public memory.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
EDUC 329 - 01 Diverse Learners & Families See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44509 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Eleni Roulis

This course is designed to equip prospective teachers with the knowledge, instructional practices, and dispositions to successfully manage diverse classrooms, using their understanding of multiple learning modalities and all types of diversity to promote all students' personal and academic achievement. The course engages candidates with issues such as race, class, gender, exceptionality, oppression, and discrimination while examining the crucial role of educators in influencing positive, systematic change for social justice.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MOH 3181400-1540M - W - - - -
VMP 11400-1540M - W - - - -
VMP -- - - - - - -
ENGL 202 - W05 Business & American Identity See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44123 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

This course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 2091215-1320M - - - - - -
VSP 11215-1320- - W - - - -
VSP 1-- - - - - - -
ENGL 202 - W06 Business & American Identity See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44124 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

This course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 2111335-1440M - - - - - -
VSP 11335-1440- - W - - - -
VSP 1-- - - - - - -
ENGL 202 - W5A Business & American Identity See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44186 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

This course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
VSP 11215-1320M - - - - - -
MHC 2091215-1320- - W - - - -
VSP 1-- - - - - - -
ENGL 202 - W6A Business & American Identity See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44187 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

This course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
VSP 11335-1440M - - - - - -
MHC 2111335-1440- - W - - - -
VSP 1-- - - - - - -
ENGL 341 - L01 African American Women's Lit See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

41383 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

At the start of her novel MAMA DAY, Gloria Naylor writes, "someone who didn't know how to ask wouldn't know how to listen." Audre Lorde, in "The Master's Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master's House," questions, "What does it mean when the tools of a racist patriarchy are used to examine the fruits of that same patriarchy? It means that only the most narrow perimeters of change are possible and allowable." Both writers call on their readers to approach African-American women's texts with humility, openness, and curiosity. They call upon readers to find new tools to dismantle racism, sexism, homophobia, and all the intersecting forms of racism that blight our lives. In this course, we will be "integrating" across communities and across time as we explore women's lived experience of the American racial and gender divide. We will be moving chronologically from the poetry of Gwendolyn Brooks during the Civil Rights era to the prose and poetry of Audre Lorde, where racial and second-wave feminist concerns intersect. We will study issues of black and mixed-race identity, questions of body image, and the painful realities of colorism in Toni Morrison's THE BLUEST EYE (1970), Gloria Naylor's MAMA DAY (1988), and Natasha Trethewey's MONUMENT (2018). The course will end with contemporary treatments of the economics, politics, and sociology of race intersecting with gender in Dominique Morisseau's THE DETROIT PROJECT and PIPELINE, Claudia Rankine's CITIZEN and THE WHITE CARD. This course satisfies the Diversity Literature requirement for English majors and English with a Professional Writing Emphasis students; a literature requirement for English with a Creative Writing students; the Human Diversity core requirement (old core); the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice core requirement (new core); and Integrations in the Humanities (new core). It also satisfies a major and minor requirement for the Women, Gender, & Sexuality Studies program. Prerequisite: ENGL 121, 190, or ENGL 201-204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 4540935-1040M - - - F - -
VSP 1-- - - - - - -
HIST 292 - 01 Topics:Native American History - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 302

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 302

Course Registration Number:

41394 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephen R. Hausmann

This course provides an overview of Indigenous history in North America from the long era before European contact to the present day. Content will include the stories of well-known individuals and topics such as Sitting Bull and the Battle at the Little Bighorn, as well as lesser-known figures and events such as Susan La Flesche Picotte and the Alcatraz Occupation. We will also examine events central to American national history from the perspective of “facing East from Indian Country” to learn how Native people across North America played crucial roles in, and were affected by, historical trends and events. These include the age of empires and revolutions in the 18th century, American expansion and conquest in the nineteenth century, and globalization and the Cold War in the twentieth century. Finally, the course ends with a discussion of the recent Indigenous past during the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, including the highly publicized #NODAPL protests on the Standing Rock Reservation in 2016 and 2017 and the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on reservation communities.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 292 - 01A Topics:Native American History - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 302

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 302

Course Registration Number:

44709 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephen R. Hausmann

This course provides an overview of Indigenous history in North America from the long era before European contact to the present day. Content will include the stories of well-known individuals and topics such as Sitting Bull and the Battle at the Little Bighorn, as well as lesser-known figures and events such as Susan La Flesche Picotte and the Alcatraz Occupation. We will also examine events central to American national history from the perspective of “facing East from Indian Country” to learn how Native people across North America played crucial roles in, and were affected by, historical trends and events. These include the age of empires and revolutions in the 18th century, American expansion and conquest in the nineteenth century, and globalization and the Cold War in the twentieth century. Finally, the course ends with a discussion of the recent Indigenous past during the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, including the highly publicized #NODAPL protests on the Standing Rock Reservation in 2016 and 2017 and the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on reservation communities.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JPST 275 - W01 Qualitative Methods M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 208

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 208

Course Registration Number:

40519 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael C. Klein

This course introduces students to qualitative research theories, methods, and techniques focused on representing voices of women, people of color, people in poverty and others that are marginalized or excluded from dominant culture. Specifically, students will gain familiarity with the qualitative social science methods of interviews, ethnography, documentary research, and focus groups. Throughout the course, students will be guided through the process of designing and conducting their own unique research projects meanwhile learning from ongoing research with their instructors and partner organizations. In addition to training in data collection techniques, analysis, and varied epistemologies, the course thoroughly explores the ethics of research with marginalized communities and the ways in which research can and does relate to social change. Together, participants in this course will co-create a teaching/learning community wherein we all critically analyze and respectfully value each person’s individual and particular contributions as well as our diverse understandings of social reality and how we position ourselves in the multiple worlds in which we live and work.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MGMT 385 - 01 Inclusive Leadership - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 MCH 111

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

MCH 111

Course Registration Number:

45087 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Kris Donnelly

Leaders, both with and without formal management titles, need to appreciate the diverse people internal and external to their organizations and society at large. It is critical that leaders step up to design and deliver effective programs of inclusion in their organizations. Culturally competent leaders think critically about these programs and practice inclusion at individual, interpersonal, team, organization, and community levels. This requires foundational knowledge, skills, and attitudes applied in diverse domestic and global contexts. This course introduces a range of perspectives to explore topics including, but not limited to, human diversity; inclusive cultures; social identity and perception; power and privilege; and models and paradigms for interpersonal and organizational inclusion. Prerequisites: MGMT 200 or MGMT 305 and Junior standing. Note: Students who receive credit for MGMT 385 may not receive credit for MGMT 388

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MGMT 385 - 01A Inclusive Leadership - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 MCH 111

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

MCH 111

Course Registration Number:

45088 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Kris Donnelly

Leaders, both with and without formal management titles, need to appreciate the diverse people internal and external to their organizations and society at large. It is critical that leaders step up to design and deliver effective programs of inclusion in their organizations. Culturally competent leaders think critically about these programs and practice inclusion at individual, interpersonal, team, organization, and community levels. This requires foundational knowledge, skills, and attitudes applied in diverse domestic and global contexts. This course introduces a range of perspectives to explore topics including, but not limited to, human diversity; inclusive cultures; social identity and perception; power and privilege; and models and paradigms for interpersonal and organizational inclusion. Prerequisites: MGMT 200 or MGMT 305 and Junior standing. Note: Students who receive credit for MGMT 385 may not receive credit for MGMT 388

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 205 - L01 Psychology of Women See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

43777 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Britain A. Scott

An examination of physiological, experiential, and social factors affecting the psychological development of women and their status as adults. Addresses diversity among women and how factors such as class and race intersect with historical and contemporary gender inequalities in women's lives. Topics include: biological and social influences on the development of gender, research on sex-related differences in psychological traits and cognitive abilities, media image and stereotypes of women, close relationships and sexuality, mothering, employment, aging, violence against women, and psychological health. Prerequisite: PSYC 111

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SCB 1121335-1415M - W - - - -
VSP 1-- - - - - - -
PSYC 205 - L1A Psychology of Women See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

45285 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Britain A. Scott

An examination of physiological, experiential, and social factors affecting the psychological development of women and their status as adults. Addresses diversity among women and how factors such as class and race intersect with historical and contemporary gender inequalities in women's lives. Topics include: biological and social influences on the development of gender, research on sex-related differences in psychological traits and cognitive abilities, media image and stereotypes of women, close relationships and sexuality, mothering, employment, aging, violence against women, and psychological health. Prerequisite: PSYC 111

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SCB 1121425-1510M - W - - - -
VSP 1-- - - - - - -
SOCI 251 - W01 Race and Ethnicity See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

42893 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Patricia L. Maddox

Race and ethnicity as significant components of U.S. social structure; the cognitive and normative aspects of culture which maintain and effect varying manifestations of social distance, tension, prejudice and discrimination between majority and minorities at both micro and macro levels, nationally and internationally. This course meets a requirement in American Cultural Studies and Justice and Peace Studies. Prerequisite: sophomore standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 2061055-1200M - W - - - -
VSP 1-- - - - - - -
SOCI 354 - 01 Sex in Society M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

OEC 414

Course Registration Number:

44019 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Patricia L. Maddox

Sexuality as a social construction is explored with a specific focus on cultural and institutional influences including the family, economy, religion, government, and the media. Current research findings are discussed within the context of historical change in American sexual behavior, attitudes and research methodologies. This course meets a requirement in Family Studies. Prerequisite: SOCI 100 or 110

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOWK 391 - 01 Social Policy for Change - T - R - - - 1335 - 1510 SCB 112

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

SCB 112

Course Registration Number:

43060 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Renee A. Hepperlen

This course equips students to understand and critically analyze current and past social policies. Policy alternatives are explored with a focus on the values and attitudes as well as the societal, economic and political dynamics from which they originate. Roles and responsibilities of citizens and professionals in formulating and implementing policies responsive to actual social needs are addressed. Prerequisite: SOWK 181 (or 281 under the old course number) or consent of the Program Director.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 226 - L03 Spirituality: Christ Marriage M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 247

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

JRC 247

Course Registration Number:

44278 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Marguerite L. Spencer

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section is designed to acquaint students with the theology of Christian marriage, understood as covenant relationship and as sacrament, that is, an effective sign of God's love in our world. Primary though not exclusive emphasis will be on the Roman Catholic tradition. Students will also examine contemporary cultural attitudes toward sexuality, marriage, and the family in the light of Christian theology.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - W03 Contexts: Women & Christianity M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 OEC 208

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

OEC 208

Course Registration Number:

44232 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shirley E. Jordon

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This course explores the ways in which the Christian tradition has profoundly influenced our society's definition of women. It will focus on what some of the major works of this tradition assert about the nature and place of women in their particular historical communities. Students will also read religious literature by women in order to acquire a sense of women's religious experience both throughout history and in the present day. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - W3A Contexts: Women & Christianity M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 OEC 208

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

OEC 208

Course Registration Number:

44233 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shirley E. Jordon

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This course explores the ways in which the Christian tradition has profoundly influenced our society's definition of women. It will focus on what some of the major works of this tradition assert about the nature and place of women in their particular historical communities. Students will also read religious literature by women in order to acquire a sense of women's religious experience both throughout history and in the present day. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 228 - L03 Comparative: InterRel Encounte See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

40563 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Hans S. Gustafson

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” In the last half century religious diversity in the West has rapidly increased, bringing people from different religious traditions into daily contact. This has resulted in new conflicts, sometimes in violence, but also in new collaborations and friendships. Drawing on several approaches to interreligious conflict and relations, this course will examine the dynamic encounters that take place between and among people of different religious identities and ask students to reflect on their own role in religiously complex situations. Students will consider this interreligious reality and their role in it against the backdrop of their own individual relationship to spirituality, faith, and theology. To foster interreligious understanding beyond the classroom, students in this course will spend significant time outside the classroom directly engaging religious diversity. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 2041335-1510- - W - - - -
VSP 1-- - - - - - -
THEO 228 - L3A Comparative: InterRel Encounte See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

40564 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Hans S. Gustafson

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” In the last half century religious diversity in the West has rapidly increased, bringing people from different religious traditions into daily contact. This has resulted in new conflicts, sometimes in violence, but also in new collaborations and friendships. Drawing on several approaches to interreligious conflict and relations, this course will examine the dynamic encounters that take place between and among people of different religious identities and ask students to reflect on their own role in religiously complex situations. Students will consider this interreligious reality and their role in it against the backdrop of their own individual relationship to spirituality, faith, and theology. To foster interreligious understanding beyond the classroom, students in this course will spend significant time outside the classroom directly engaging religious diversity. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 2041335-1510- - W - - - -
VSP 1-- - - - - - -