Writing Across the Curriculum

The mission of the Writing Across the Curriculum program is to create a culture of writing at the University of St. Thomas, enabling students to think critically, to engage deeply in their learning, and to write with confidence, precision, and grace.

Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) classes fall into three categories:

  • Writing Intensive (WI)

Students learn to practice writing as a process:  generating and developing ideas, offering helpful feedback to others, using feedback from instructors and peers to revise drafts, and editing near-final drafts. This writing process is used to promote critical thinking as well  as to produce quality academic writing. WI classes are typically offered in the core curriculum.

  • Writing to Learn (WTL)

Students complete a series of informal, low-stakes writing assignments that promote critical thinking and facilitate learning course content. WTL classes are offered throughout the curriculum.

  • Writing in the Disciplines (WID)

Students learn the genres and conventions of writing in their major fields of study and the rationales behind them. The writing process is supported at critical stages of development and includes instructor feedback on drafts. WID classes are offered in the major.

 

Students must complete a minimum of two (2) Writing Intensive classes*, one (1) Writing to Learn class, and one (1) Writing in the Disciplines class to fulfill the Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.
*At least one Writing Intensive course must be outside of the department of English.

WAC class offerings vary by term and are identifiable by the section number:

  • Writing Intensive sections will begin with a 'W'
  • Writing to Learn sections will begin with an 'L'
  • Writing in the Disciplines sections will begin with a 'D'

 

For more information you may also refer to the Writing Across the Curriculum website:  http://www.stthomas.edu/wac/

 

Spring 2021 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
AMCD 200 - L01 American Culture:Power/Identit - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25384 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kanishka Chowdhury

AMCD 200, American Culture:Power/Identity: (This course was originally titled ACST 200: Introduction to American Culture and Difference; the name change has been submitted as an information item to the UCC). In AMCD 200, students learn about the historical and theoretical foundations of Cultural Studies as an academic discipline and use cultural theory to analyze a variety of cultural products and representations. In this course, students look specifically at dominant and subversive constructions of gender, race, ethnicity, national and sexual identities, and how these constructions are deployed through cultural practices and productions such as sports, film and television, folklore and popular culture, youth subcultures, music, and so on. For example, the course may contain units on "nation" and the creation of American mythologies; the process of hero-making in American history; stereotypes and the representation of race and ethnicity in television and film; representations of gender and sexuality in advertising; as well as a section on American music from jazz, blues, folk and roots music, to rock and roll, punk, and hip-hop.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ARTH 297 - W01 Topics-Street Art - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25493 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Heather M. Shirey

The subject matter of these courses will vary from year to year, but will not duplicate existing courses. Descriptions of these courses are available in the Online Printable Schedule, View Searchable Class Schedule

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
EDUC 329 - 01 Diverse Learners & Families M - W - - - - 0955 - 1135 MOH 318

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MOH 318

Course Registration Number:

24138 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Eleni Roulis

This course is designed to equip prospective teachers with the knowledge, instructional practices, and dispositions to successfully manage diverse classrooms, using their understanding of multiple learning modalities and all types of diversity to promote all students' personal and academic achievement. The course engages candidates with issues such as race, class, gender, exceptionality, oppression, and discrimination while examining the crucial role of educators in influencing positive, systematic change for social justice.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 218 - L01 Lit by Women:Critical Hist See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25063 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

From Sappho to Austen to Woolf to Morrison – women have been rendering the world into exquisite words for centuries. But how has the writing of women served as a critique of patriarchy? What impact has women’s writing had on important cultural and political movements such as abolition, suffrage, and environmentalism? In what ways has the writing of women been more radical than polite, more aggressive than demure, more confrontational than deferential? How have women consistently defied the limiting expectations of them through the creation of some of the most experimental, risky, and defiant works of literature in existence? These questions and more will be explored in this course, which focuses on the history of literature by women. While it will concentrate mainly on British and American women writers, the course will also address the work of non-western writers. Ultimately, this course will examine gender and its role in both the composition and reading of literary texts. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives and Diversity Literature requirements in the English major and a core Human Diversity requirement for students in the old core. It also counts towards the Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies major/minor and a WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Permission is being sought to count this course as a Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice class in the new core.. Prerequisite: ENGL 121, 190, 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0935-1040M - W - F - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 297 - L01 Race/Represent: Cntmp US Film - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25480 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kanishka Chowdhury

In this course, we will consider the complex constructions of “race” in American film, addressing the following questions: how has the category of “race” been historically constructed, represented, and reproduced in American film? Why are dominant representations often so far removed from peoples’ “real” lives? How is the production of contemporary representations connected to the ways in which we continue to think about race? How do filmmakers resist static representations of race in the present, creating complex and liberating ways to rethink race, especially through its intersections with questions connected to gender, class, and sexuality? Looking at a range of films, from Spike Lee’s “classic” DO THE RIGHT THING to more recent films, such as Aurora Guerrero’s MOSQUITA Y MARI, Dee Rees’s PARIAH, and Isabel Sandoval’s LINGUA FRANCA, as well as analyzing essays by Sherman Alexie, Ta-nehisi Coates, Toni Morrison, Sofia Quintero, and Karen Tei Yamashita, among others, this course will address the complexities of these and other questions. This class satisfies a WAC Writing to Learn requirement, a Film Studies History and Analysis requirement, an English Department Diversity distribution requirement, and both a core Human Diversity requirement and Literature/Writing requirement for students under the old core program. This course also satisfies a Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice under the new core. This is a cross-listed course, with eight seats on the ENGL 297 side and 12 seats on the FILM 297 side. Prerequisite: ENGL 121, 190, 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 390 - L01 James Baldwin/Cntmp Black Wrtr M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25477 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David T. Lawrence

James Baldwin has often been recognized as a major voice of African American literature during the twentieth century, but recently, that voice has re-emerged with an uncanny timeliness in the twenty-first, referenced by contemporary writers and commentators to illuminate the shadowy terrain of race and culture that continues to befuddle Americans today. Baldwin’s voice has not re-appeared from nowhere; it has long been with us, for nearly seventy years lodging a relentless critique of racism and injustice in American culture and society. It is no surprise then, that an entire generation of writers has been influenced by Baldwin’s perceptive eye and incisive language. From Pulitzer prize-winning playwright Suzan-Lori Parks to his cultural inheritor Ta-Nehisi Coates, Baldwin’s influence has been prominent and lasting. This course will consider the ongoing literary conversation between Baldwin and his artistic children. In addition to Baldwin, writers will include Jesmyn Ward, Coates, Parks, Kevin Young, Kiesi Laymon, Claudia Rankine, and Teju Cole. In addition to satisfying the old core Human Diversity requirement, this course also satisfies the Contexts and Convergences distribution requirement and the Diversity Literature area requirement for English majors. It also satisfies a WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 121, 190, 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
FILM 297 - L01 Race/Represent: Cntmp US Film - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25481 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kanishka Chowdhury

In this course, we will consider the complex constructions of “race” in American film, addressing the following questions: how has the category of “race” been historically constructed, represented, and reproduced in American film? Why are dominant representations often so far removed from peoples’ “real” lives? How is the production of contemporary representations connected to the ways in which we continue to think about race? How do filmmakers resist static representations of race in the present, creating complex and liberating ways to rethink race, especially through its intersections with questions connected to gender, class, and sexuality? Looking at a range of films, from Spike Lee’s “classic” DO THE RIGHT THING to more recent films, such as Aurora Guerrero’s MOSQUITA Y MARI, Dee Rees’s PARIAH, and Isabel Sandoval’s LINGUA FRANCA, as well as analyzing essays by Sherman Alexie, Ta-nehisi Coates, Toni Morrison, Sofia Quintero, and Karen Tei Yamashita, among others, this course will address the complexities of these and other questions. This class satisfies a WAC Writing to Learn requirement, a Film Studies History and Analysis requirement, an English Department Diversity distribution requirement, and both a core Human Diversity requirement and Literature/Writing requirement for students under the old core program. This course also satisfies a Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement under the new core. This is a cross-listed course, with eight seats on the ENGL 297 side and 12 seats on the FILM 297 side. Prerequisite: ENGL 121, 190, 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JPST 375 - D01 Conflict Analysis & Transform - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25901 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy C. Finnegan

An introduction to issues surrounding conflict and the resolution of conflict in today's world focusing primarily on its contextual manifestation at the international, regional and intrastate levels. The course will explore important structural, social and psychological explanations of conflict. Attention will be given to ethnic and nationalist themes surrounding conflicts and their resolution at the intrastate and international levels. The course will examine how different types of intervention affect conflicts (the media, force, other types of third party intervention). Effective methods that foster an environment conducive to resolving or managing disputes will be studied. As part of the final task, the course will critically study how institutions such as power-sharing arrangements, federalism, and the rule of law figure into establishing a lasting basis for peaceful co-existence. For Justice and Peace Studies majors doing a concentration in Conflict Transformation, the course will complement JPST 370 Conflict Mediation, but there are no prerequisites and the course is open to students in other majors.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MUSC 230 - W01 Music of the United States M - W - - - - 1530 - 1700 BEC LL07

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1530 - 1700

Location:

BEC LL07

Course Registration Number:

26460 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Sarah C. Schmalenberger

This course focuses on the study of music in the United States within its historical, cultural, and sociological contexts. The course will develop skills in critical listening analysis using appropriate musical terminology, to describe both aural and written traditions of music. Repertoire to be explored include homeland traditions of cultures and population groups brought over through migration/immigration, blends of popular and concert traditions, and new and emerging styles unique to the United States. Historical, cultural, and social contexts will facilitate and understanding of how music reflects particular identities, ideas, values, and issues among population groups in the United States.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MUSC 230 - W1A Music of the United States M - W - - - - 1530 - 1700 BEC LL07

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1530 - 1700

Location:

BEC LL07

Course Registration Number:

26834 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Sarah C. Schmalenberger

This course focuses on the study of music in the United States within its historical, cultural, and sociological contexts. The course will develop skills in critical listening analysis using appropriate musical terminology, to describe both aural and written traditions of music. Repertoire to be explored include homeland traditions of cultures and population groups brought over through migration/immigration, blends of popular and concert traditions, and new and emerging styles unique to the United States. Historical, cultural, and social contexts will facilitate and understanding of how music reflects particular identities, ideas, values, and issues among population groups in the United States.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOCI 297 - 01 Hate Crime - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

24510 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jessica P. Hodge

Although they have long existed in the U.S., the term “hate crime” is a relatively new addition to the social, political, and legal domains. The purpose of this course is to examine the institutionalization of hate crime law within our legal system. In doing so, we explore the causes, manifestations, and consequences of hate crimes by asking a series of interrelated questions.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOCI 350 - 01 Social Inequality:Priv & Power See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

23381 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laura Fischer

This course identifies and investigates the following topics: general principles of stratification, theoretical explanations by which inequality emerges and is maintained, the relationship between social class and other forms of inequality in the United States including gender, race, and changes in social hierarchy over time. The course will explore issues such as poverty, welfare, occupational prestige, meritocracy, and class prestige. Although primary focus is on the United States, the course also examines global inequality. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior Standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0815-0920M - - - - - -
0815-0920- - W - - - -
0815-0920- - - - F - -
SOCI 350 - 01A Social Inequality:Priv & Power See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25628 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laura Fischer

This course identifies and investigates the following topics: general principles of stratification, theoretical explanations by which inequality emerges and is maintained, the relationship between social class and other forms of inequality in the United States including gender, race, and changes in social hierarchy over time. The course will explore issues such as poverty, welfare, occupational prestige, meritocracy, and class prestige. Although primary focus is on the United States, the course also examines global inequality. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior Standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0815-0920M - - - - - -
0815-0920- - W - - - -
0815-0920- - - - F - -
SOCI 350 - 01B Social Inequality:Priv & Power See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25631 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laura Fischer

This course identifies and investigates the following topics: general principles of stratification, theoretical explanations by which inequality emerges and is maintained, the relationship between social class and other forms of inequality in the United States including gender, race, and changes in social hierarchy over time. The course will explore issues such as poverty, welfare, occupational prestige, meritocracy, and class prestige. Although primary focus is on the United States, the course also examines global inequality. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior Standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0815-0920M - - - - - -
0815-0920- - W - - - -
0815-0920- - - - F - -
THEO 227 - 01 Contexts: Justice & Peace - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26234 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Carissa S. Wyant

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves an examination of the views of various religions and ideologies on issues of justice and peace, with special attention to the Catholic and other Christian teachings on such issues as war and peace, violence, economic justice, the environment, criminal justice, and social justice. Special attention is given to how fundamental presuppositions and principles of each group studied affect their views on justice and peace, and contribute to or hinder dialogue and peaceful interaction with other groups. In addition to Christianity, students will study (at least) one far eastern worldview (e.g. Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism), one tribal religion (Native American, African), Islam, and one secular worldview (e.g. Marxism, capitalism, secular humanism). Students are required to investigate one worldview in depth through a semester-long research project.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - W08 Contexts: Liberation Theology M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26225 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Richard L. Cogill

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section explores the meaning and practical significance of Christ’s message of liberation in the twenty-first century, examining theologies that have emerged out of a context of struggle (e.g., black & black feminist/womanist theology, South African theology, Latina/o theology, minjung theology, and queer theology).

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - W09 Contexts: Liberation Theology M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26227 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Richard L. Cogill

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section takes seriously James H. Cone's message in his 1969 work, Black Theology and Black Power, that "Black Power is Christ's central message to twentieth-century America." It explores the meaning and practical significance of Christ’s message of liberation in the twenty-first century, examining theologies that have emerged out of a context of struggle (e.g., black & black feminist/womanist theology, South African theology, Latina/o theology, minjung theology, and queer theology).

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - W10 Contexts: Liberation Theology See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26229 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Ry O. Siggelkow

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section takes seriously James H. Cone's message in his 1969 work, Black Theology and Black Power, that "Black Power is Christ's central message to twentieth-century America." It explores the meaning and practical significance of Christ’s message of liberation in the twenty-first century, examining theologies that have emerged out of a context of struggle (e.g., black & black feminist/womanist theology, South African theology, Latina/o theology, minjung theology, and queer theology).This section takes seriously James H. Cone's message in his 1969 work, Black Theology and Black Power, that "Black Power is Christ's central message to twentieth-century America." It explores the meaning and practical significance of Christ’s message of liberation in the twenty-first century, examining theologies that have emerged out of a context of struggle (e.g., black & black feminist/womanist theology, South African theology, Latina/o theology, minjung theology, and queer theology).

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 2091525-1700- T - R - - -
1525-1700- T - R - - -
THEO 227 - W11 Contexts: Liberation Theology See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26231 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Ry O. Siggelkow

This section takes seriously James H. Cone's message in his 1969 work, Black Theology and Black Power, that "Black Power is Christ's central message to twentieth-century America." It explores the meaning and practical significance of Christ’s message of liberation in the twenty-first century, examining theologies that have emerged out of a context of struggle (e.g., black & black feminist/womanist theology, South African theology, Latina/o theology, minjung theology, and queer theology).

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 2091330-1510- T - R - - -
1330-1510- T - R - - -
THEO 229 - D01 Professions: Faith & Law M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26244 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Marguerite L. Spencer

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section will attempt to fashion a paradigm for the Christian practice of law through a close reading of a variety of theological texts, treaties, case studies and rules of professional conduct. If to work is to share in the creative activity of God, then what specific challenge does this pose for an attorney given the grinding realities of the legal profession? If to be a professional is to live out a tripartite relationship between self, client, and a higher standard, then how does an attorney determine, much less respond to, such a standard? Emphasis will be placed on the meaning of justice, law, rights and responsibilities. An ethic of care that fosters the development of a compassionate world and a common life will be emphasized.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THTR 223 - L01 Hist of American Theater See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25696 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shanan M. Custer

Development of theater in the United States from its 17th century roots to the present, with special attention to contemporary American drama. Emphasis on the connections between theater and culture. This course satisfies the core Fine Arts and Human Diversity requirements in the old core program. For students in the new core, this course satisfies the core Fine Arts requirement OR the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice (DISJ) requirement in the new core as well (note: students cannot receive credit for both the core Fine Arts requirement and DISJ). Finally, this course also satisfies a WAC Writing to Learn requirement for both core programs.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BEC 1131215-1320M - - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
THTR 223 - L1A Hist of American Theater See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25698 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shanan M. Custer

Development of theater in the United States from its 17th century roots to the present, with special attention to contemporary American drama. Emphasis on the connections between theater and culture. This course satisfies the core Fine Arts and Human Diversity requirements in the old core program. For students in the new core, this course satisfies the core Fine Arts requirement OR the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice (DISJ) requirement in the new core as well (note: students cannot receive credit for both the core Fine Arts requirement and DISJ). Finally, this course also satisfies a WAC Writing to Learn requirement for both core programs.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BEC 1131215-1320- - W - - - -
-- - - - - - -