Signature Work

The Signature Work experience advances the mission of St. Thomas by asking upper-class students to integratively engage with a topic that is relevant to the mission, convictions, and vision of St. Thomas. This experience is intended to be a culmination of students’ time at St. Thomas: Students showcase their ability to integrate and consciously reflect on their learning from across their years at St. Thomas in an interdisciplinary manner.

The St. Thomas Signature Work experience addresses the Integrative and Applied Learning aspects of the American Association of College and Universities’ (AAC&U) Essential Learning Outcomes. Signature Work focuses on “synthesis and advanced accomplishment across general and specialized studies” as “demonstrated through the application of knowledge, skills, and responsibilities to new settings and complex problems” (Paul Gaston, General Education & Liberal Learning, 2010, p. 9). Culminating experiences such as Signature Work are listed by the AAC&U as high-impact practices.

Students must have already completed 80 credits of course work before taking a Signature Work Course.

A student’s major may require a specific course which satisfies the Signature Work requirement. However, if a student’s major does not require a specific Signature Work course, a student may take a Signature Work course in the field of their choosing.

A Signature Work course may also meet another (any other) core requirement.

Students must take one course:

Some sections of a course may carry the Signature Work flag while others do not. Students should use ClassFinder to determine which course sections satisfy the Signature Work requirement in the term for which you are completing the requirement. 

Fall 2022 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ACCT 410 - 01 Advanced Accounting - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MCH 232

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MCH 232

Course Registration Number:

43247 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ozer Asdemir

The special accounting considerations of consolidated financial statements are considered in depth. Additional topics include foreign operations, partnerships, governments, and nonprofit organizations. Prerequisites: ACCT 312 and senior standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BLAW 320 - L01 Compliance in Business Orgs M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 MCH 115

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MCH 115

Course Registration Number:

43282 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Susan A. Supina

This course will examine the compliance function from a legal, ethical, functional and organizational perspective. It will consider the compliance function in contemporary business settings and industries, such as finance, health care, insurance, and retail. Practices of key regulatory agencies such as the Federal Trade Commission, Securities and Exchange Commission will be discussed along with contemporary regulatory statutes such as the FTC Act, Dodd-Frank, Sarbanes-Oxley, etc. The course will also examine key compliance processes and the means to ensure that compliance efforts are effective. Topics include audits and other internal governance approaches for discovering compliance problems in a timely fashion; investigations; reporting; mitigation; regulatory responses; and remediation. Prerequisites: BLAW 300, 301, 302, 303 or 304 and BETH 300 or BETH 301 and 80 completed credits.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 301 - 02 The Catholic Vision M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 55S B10

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

43214 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David N. Foote

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: CATH 101

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CISC 480 - D01 Senior Capstone M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OSS 434

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OSS 434

Course Registration Number:

40153 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Ryan Hardt

The senior capstone course provides computer science majors the opportunity to integrate the knowledge that they have gained from across the curriculum. Students will work in groups to design, document, and implement a large-sized software project. During this process, students will be exposed to programming team organization, software development practices, as well as tools that facilitate the development of software systems. Prerequisites: Senior standing and a minimum grade of C- or better in: CISC 350, CISC 340, and CISC 380 (which 380 may be taken concurrently)

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGR 480 - 01 Engineer Design Clinic I M - W - - - - 1455 - 1710 OWS 150

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1455 - 1710

Location:

OWS 150

Course Registration Number:

40851 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Deborah M. Besser, Heather D. Orser, Tiffany D. Ling

Serves as the first capstone course. Student design teams, under the direction of a faculty coordinator, will develop engineering solutions to practical, open-ended design projects conceived to demonstrate the value of prior basic science and engineering courses. Ethical, social, economic and safety issues in engineering practice will be considered as well. Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in either (ENGR 320, 350, 371, and 381) or (ENGR 331, 346, and 410) or (CISC 231, ENGR 345, and concurrent-registration in-or prior completion of-ENGR 431) or (ENGR 362, 364, and 368)

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENTR 450 - 01 Entr:Management/Strategy M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 MCH 106

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MCH 106

Course Registration Number:

43343 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

James J. Ebben

[This course will be delivered in a Prof + Prof model. A St. Thomas faculty member will co-teach the class with a seasoned executive leader.] This is the Entrepreneurship Concentration capstone course. This course builds upon previous coursework, drawing together critical concepts including opportunity identification, business modeling, financial modeling, and market/industry research skills. Through lecture, case discussion, and extensive use of the Hotwash Process, students polish their critical thinking and creative problem solving skills. The primary deliverable is a Fundable Business Plan. Prerequisites: ENTR 100 or 200 or 260; and ENTR 250 or 350; and ENTR 370; and BUSN 202 or CISC 200 and 80 completed credits.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
FINC 430 - 01 Financial Intermediaries M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 MCH 109

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MCH 109

Course Registration Number:

43372 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David O. Vang

Concepts, practices and organization for financial management of various financial intermediaries. Asset-liabilities management, duration, swaps, hedges and other concepts will be covered. Banks will be the primary area for study, but the course also will look at other institutions including insurance, funds and thrifts. The course will be based on text, lectures, guest speakers, computer modeling, a bank simulation and examination. Prerequisites: FINC 324 or FINC 325; ECON 251 and ECON 252; MATH 109 or 111 or 113; And 80 completed credits.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
FINC 430 - 02 Financial Intermediaries M - - - - - - 1730 - 2115 MCH 109

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2115

Location:

MCH 109

Course Registration Number:

43373 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David O. Vang

Concepts, practices and organization for financial management of various financial intermediaries. Asset-liabilities management, duration, swaps, hedges and other concepts will be covered. Banks will be the primary area for study, but the course also will look at other institutions including insurance, funds and thrifts. The course will be based on text, lectures, guest speakers, computer modeling, a bank simulation and examination. Prerequisites: FINC 324 or FINC 325; ECON 251 and ECON 252; MATH 109 or 111 or 113; And 80 completed credits.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
IDSC 333 - 01 Liberal Arts Business Studies M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 227

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 227

Course Registration Number:

41597 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Raymond N. MacKenzie

In accord with the Renaissance Program's commitment to foster the integration of theoretical and practical learning, the design of this course is to promot the investigation of some theme or problem having a particularly interdisciplinary focus. This course will rely upon concepts and models stemming from both theoretical and practical sources in an attempt to further integrate aspects of these distinct branches of higher learning. Among the types of issues or topics that could fall within the scope of this course are: the meaning and value of work; the nature and place of technology; the relationship of individual to community; views of self - as worker and theoretician; models and parameters of authority. Prerequisites: 80 completed credits

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JOUR 480 - D01 Journalism and Media Ethics - T - R - - - 1730 - 1915 OEC 303

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

OEC 303

Course Registration Number:

40162 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mark R. Neuzil

This capstone seminar for graduating seniors explores ethical issues that confront professionals in journalism and other fields of mass media, and their audiences. Students explore theoretical perspectives on ethics, work from case studies to understand professional ethical standards, discuss current ethical issues, work in teams to perfect oral and written ethical analysis skills and write an individual thesis paper. Prerequisites: graduating seniors only and permission of department chair.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MGMT 480 - D01 Strategic Management - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MCH 115

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MCH 115

Course Registration Number:

43410 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ernest L. Owens

This course examines organizational issues from an integrative perspective. It draws on concepts from the entire business curriculum to view the organization as a whole. The focus of the course is to have you view the organization from the perspective of the president, rather than that of a manager of a particular function (e.g., VP of marketing). It examines the development of core competence and a sustainable competitive advantage as part of an organization's strategic planning process. Prerequisite: OPMT 300 or OPMT 310; FINC 310 or FINC 321; MGMT 200 or MGMT 305; MKTG 200 or MKTG 300; BETH 300 or BETH 301; and CISC 200 or BUSN 202; and senior standing. Note: Students who receive credit for MGMT 480 may not receive credit for MGMT 395.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MKTG 430 - D01 Marketing Management See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

43464 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jamal A. Al-Khatib

Small Business Institute clients present student teams with business problems that require solutions. Student teams diagnose the client’s problem and craft and present a solution to the client. Time is divided between reviewing and integrating the students’ marketing background, facilitating the student contact with the client, and providing consulting to the client. Prerequisites: MKTG 340; MKTG 370 (May be taken concurrently); one additional Marketing elective; BETH 300 or 301; BUSN 202 or CISC 200; and Senior standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MCH 1000955-113508 Sep '22
0955-1135- T - R - - -
MKTG 430 - D02 Marketing Management See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

43465 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jamal A. Al-Khatib

Small Business Institute clients present student teams with business problems that require solutions. Student teams diagnose the client’s problem and craft and present a solution to the client. Time is divided between reviewing and integrating the students’ marketing background, facilitating the student contact with the client, and providing consulting to the client. Prerequisites: MKTG 340; MKTG 370 (May be taken concurrently); one additional Marketing elective; BETH 300 or 301; BUSN 202 or CISC 200; and Senior standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MCH 1001330-151008 Sep '22
1330-1510- T - R - - -
NSCI 450 - 01 Integrative Neuroscience - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC LL45

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC LL45

Course Registration Number:

41652 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jenne M. Westberry

If we are to understand how behavior is guided by environmental cues, we must first understand how sensory information about the world is represented and processed in brain. In this seminar-style course, we will examine the neural organization of sensory systems, particularly the organization of cortical structures. We will first explore how various organizational strategies are used in different systems to perform specific functions, leading to the focus of our course: how information from different sensory modalities is integrated in higher-order cortical areas, and how this integration ultimately influences behavior. Prerequisite: C- or better in any two neuroscience elective courses or permission of the instructor and 80 completed credits

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
NSCI 450 - 51 Integrative Neuroscience/LAB M - - - - - - 1330 - 1730 OWS 381

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1730

Location:

OWS 381

Course Registration Number:

41653 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Jenne M. Westberry

If we are to understand how behavior is guided by environmental cues, we must first understand how sensory information about the world is represented and processed in brain. In this seminar-style course, we will examine the neural organization of sensory systems, particularly the organization of cortical structures. We will first explore how various organizational strategies are used in different systems to perform specific functions, leading to the focus of our course: how information from different sensory modalities is integrated in higher-order cortical areas, and how this integration ultimately influences behavior. Prerequisite: C- or better in any two neuroscience elective courses or permission of the instructor and 80 completed credits

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 422 - 01 History of Psych in Context M - W - - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 209

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MHC 209

Course Registration Number:

40947 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ann Johnson

This course explores psychology's past with a special focus on events representing the discipline's sustained interest in applying science to enhance human welfare. From its early days, U.S. psychologists have applied our discipline's knowledge to solve social problems. This course examines psychology's complicity, in its early years, with questionable cultural practices and unjust social norms (e.g. the eugenics movement, racial bias). We also study the social/historical context surrounding psychology's early applications. The goal is to promote reflection on the place of psychology in the broader culture and raise awareness of the complexities inherent in using science to solve social problems, in the service of preparing students to be "morally responsible leaders who think critically, act wisely, and work skillfully to advance the common good." Prerequisites: Senior standing and declared Psychology major

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 422 - 02 History of Psych in Context M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 209

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 209

Course Registration Number:

41329 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ann Johnson

This course explores psychology's past with a special focus on events representing the discipline's sustained interest in applying science to enhance human welfare. From its early days, U.S. psychologists have applied our discipline's knowledge to solve social problems. This course examines psychology's complicity, in its early years, with questionable cultural practices and unjust social norms (e.g. the eugenics movement, racial bias). We also study the social/historical context surrounding psychology's early applications. The goal is to promote reflection on the place of psychology in the broader culture and raise awareness of the complexities inherent in using science to solve social problems, in the service of preparing students to be "morally responsible leaders who think critically, act wisely, and work skillfully to advance the common good." Prerequisites: Senior standing and declared Psychology major

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 422 - 03 History of Psych in Context - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 206

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 206

Course Registration Number:

42637 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ann Johnson

This course explores psychology's past with a special focus on events representing the discipline's sustained interest in applying science to enhance human welfare. From its early days, U.S. psychologists have applied our discipline's knowledge to solve social problems. This course examines psychology's complicity, in its early years, with questionable cultural practices and unjust social norms (e.g. the eugenics movement, racial bias). We also study the social/historical context surrounding psychology's early applications. The goal is to promote reflection on the place of psychology in the broader culture and raise awareness of the complexities inherent in using science to solve social problems, in the service of preparing students to be "morally responsible leaders who think critically, act wisely, and work skillfully to advance the common good." Prerequisites: Senior standing and declared Psychology major

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOCI 480 - W01 Seminar in Criminal Justice - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 SCB 140

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

SCB 140

Course Registration Number:

41089 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jessica P. Hodge

The senior seminar serves as a capstone experience for students to address several central issues in the study of crime and justice. The major focus is to build upon students knowledge from previous courses with a focus upon an integration of knowledge from material learned throughout the major. Students will complete a final project that demonstrates an in-depth understanding of a criminal justice topic that could lead to future work in the criminal justice field. Prerequisite: SOCI 210 and 312 or permission of instructor

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOWK 405 - 01 Sr Field Pract & Integ Sem I M - - - - - - 1525 - 1700 SCB 130

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

SCB 130

Course Registration Number:

41756 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Eva M. Solomonson

Senior Fieldwork complements the student’s academic work through practical experiences in a social work agency, institution or department. Under the supervision of an agency field instructor, the student learns social work tasks and functions while applying theory to actual social work situations. Students participate in an on-campus seminar with other senior social work majors while in placement. The placement is approximately 15-20 hours per week throughout two consecutive terms (fall and spring semesters). Concurrent registration in SOWK 401 is required. SOWK 405 is the fall course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOWK 405 - 02 Sr Field Pract & Integ Sem I - - - R - - - 1525 - 1700 SCB 130

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

SCB 130

Course Registration Number:

41757 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Catrice M. O'Neal

Senior Fieldwork complements the student’s academic work through practical experiences in a social work agency, institution or department. Under the supervision of an agency field instructor, the student learns social work tasks and functions while applying theory to actual social work situations. Students participate in an on-campus seminar with other senior social work majors while in placement. The placement is approximately 15-20 hours per week throughout two consecutive terms (fall and spring semesters). Concurrent registration in SOWK 401 is required. SOWK 405 is the fall course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 300 - D02 SignatureWork:Nazism&Apartheid - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

43192 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kimberly J. Vrudny

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This section will focus on patterns that emerged in both contexts—Germany under Hitler; South Africa under apartheid: economic anxiety; the rise of nationalism; the election of a tyrant; theological rationales for tyranny, torture, and even genocide; theological and artistic resistance; the complicated role of Catholicism; and legal processes in the aftermath.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 300 - L05 Signature Work:Justice & Peace - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

43212 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Carissa S. Wyant

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This section involves an examination of the views of various religions and ideologies on issues of justice and peace, with special attention to the Catholic and other Christian teachings on such issues as war and peace, violence, economic justice, the environment, criminal justice, and social justice. Special attention is given to how fundamental presuppositions and principles of each group studied affect their views on justice and peace, and contribute to or hinder dialogue and peaceful interaction with other groups. In addition to Christianity, students will study (at least) one far eastern worldview (e.g. Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism), one tribal religion (Native American, African), Islam, and one secular worldview (e.g. Marxism, capitalism, secular humanism). Students are required to investigate one worldview in depth through a semester-long research project.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 300 - W01 Signature Work: God - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 308

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MHC 308

Course Registration Number:

42062 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Cara L. Anthony

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This course will explore various approaches to God and God's relationship to humankind, including perspectives written by people traditionally on the margins of theological research. A central question for this section will be how God responds to injustice. This course explores the role of scripture, history, tradition and experience in the understanding of God. It examines both old and new theologies, asking key theological questions such as, “What difference does it make how people picture God?” “How could a good God create a world where evil and suffering are possible?” or “If God has a plan for the world, are we free to make our own choices?”

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 300 - W03 Signature Work: Theology & Art M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 246

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

43209 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Cynthia D. Sautter

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. Through the ages, the relationship between theology and the arts has been mutually enriching, resulting in some of the world's masterpieces of visual art, architecture, music, and literature. The relationship, too, has been strained by iconoclastic movements which express fear that the arts tempt people with idolatry. In this course, students will consider the theological dimensions of the complex relationship between theology and the arts. Emphasis on historical periods, themes, doctrines, intersections, and types of art will vary according to the expertise of the instructors. This section will examine not only Christian theology and art, but also consider the arts in Judaism, Islam, Asian and African traditions.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 300 - W04 Signature Work: Theology & Art M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 JRC 222

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

43210 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Eugenia O. Gavrilyuk

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. Through the ages, the relationship between theology and the arts has been mutually enriching, resulting in some of the world's masterpieces of visual art, architecture, music, and literature. The relationship, too, has been strained by iconoclastic movements which express fear that the arts tempt people with idolatry. In this course, students will consider the theological dimensions of the complex relationship between theology and the arts. Emphasis on historical periods, themes, doctrines, intersections, and types of art will vary according to the expertise of the instructors.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-term 2023 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
BIOL 484 - 01 Complex Issues in Human Health See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

10320 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Jennifer M. Illig

Investigation of selected problems in biology at an advanced level, involving student presentations based on the primary literature. The subject will vary and will be announced in the annual Class Schedule.. These courses may, with approval of the department chair, be used to fulfill the 400-level requirement for the major. Prerequisite: Upper-class standing and permission of the instructor and 80 completed credits.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
VSP 11000-1200- T - R - - -
VSP 1-- - - - - - -
THEO 300 - D01 Signature: Justice & Peace - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10312 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Carissa S. Wyant

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This section involves an examination of the views of various religions and ideologies on issues of justice and peace, with special attention to the Catholic and other Christian teachings on such issues as war and peace, violence, economic justice, the environment, criminal justice, and social justice. Special attention is given to how fundamental presuppositions and principles of each group studied affect their views on justice and peace, and contribute to or hinder dialogue and peaceful interaction with other groups. In addition to Christianity, students will study (at least) one far eastern worldview (e.g. Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism), one tribal religion (Native American, African), Islam, and one secular worldview (e.g. Marxism, capitalism, secular humanism). Students are required to investigate one worldview in depth through a semester-long research project.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 300 - D02 Signature: Theology & Art - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10313 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Cynthia D. Sautter

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. Through the ages, the relationship between theology and the arts has been mutually enriching, resulting in some of the world's masterpieces of visual art, architecture, music, and literature. The relationship, too, has been strained by iconoclastic movements which express fear that the arts tempt people with idolatry. In this course, students will consider the theological dimensions of the complex relationship between theology and the arts. Emphasis on historical periods, themes, doctrines, intersections, and types of art will vary according to the expertise of the instructors. This section will examine not only Christian theology and art, but also consider the arts in Judaism, Islam, Asian and African traditions. Prerequisite: one 200-level or 300-level THEO course, one Art History course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Spring 2023 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ACCT 410 - 01 Advanced Accounting - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22038 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Richard S. Sathe

The special accounting considerations of consolidated financial statements are considered in depth. Additional topics include foreign operations, partnerships, governments, and nonprofit organizations. Prerequisites: ACCT 312 and senior standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ACCT 410 - 02 Advanced Accounting - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22039 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Richard S. Sathe

The special accounting considerations of consolidated financial statements are considered in depth. Additional topics include foreign operations, partnerships, governments, and nonprofit organizations. Prerequisites: ACCT 312 and senior standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BCOM 435 - 01 Mgmt Priorities and BCOM M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22048 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael C. Porter

This course is designed to develop greater insight into the relationship between communicators and management and leadership. By understanding the mindset of senior leaders and managers through a series of texts, case histories, articles, and classroom discussion, students will develop an understanding of the many variables and considerations linking communication strategy to organizational in decision making. In addition to understanding the mindset and priorities of senior leadership and management, students will learn and review a variety of communications strategies and tactics that can be employed to best meet the unique needs of a situation and thereby effectively contribute to communication necessary to organizational success, as seen by senior level leadership. Prerequisite: Senior standing, MKTG 201 & 320, plus one JOUR/DIMA/STCM 2XX or higher 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 328 - 01 Envr. Toxicology & Health - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20660 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Dalma Martinovic, Jennifer M. Illig

There is increasing public interest and concern over the connections between environmental quality and human health. This course will explore these connections by providing an introduction to the multidisciplinary field of environmental toxicology- the study of the adverse effects of chemical, biological, and physical agents in the environment on living organisms, including humans. Topics will cover global and local problems including issues of environmental justice and future approaches to sustainably mitigate the major environmental health problems in industrialized and developing countries. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: (BIOL 101 OR 102 OR 105 OR 207, BIOL 208 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209) OR ESCI 310 OR PUBH 300   OR Completion or co-enrollment in ENGR 368 OR Completion or co-enrollment in ENGR 361 OR Completion or co-enrollment in CISC 260 OR CISC 360 OR STAT 320 OR STAT 333 OR ECON 315 OR Permission of the instructor plus 80 completed credits.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 484 - D01 Complex Issues in Human Health See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

22581 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Jennifer M. Illig

Investigation of selected problems in biology at an advanced level, involving student presentations based on the primary literature. The subject will vary and will be announced in the annual Class Schedule.. These courses may, with approval of the department chair, be used to fulfill the 400-level requirement for the major. Prerequisite: Upper-class standing and permission of the instructor and 80 completed credits.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1330-1510- T - - - - -
VSP 1-- - - - - - -
CATH 301 - 02 The Catholic Vision M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21953 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: CATH 101

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 301 - 04 The Catholic Vision M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 55S B10

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

22295 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: CATH 101

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CISC 480 - D01 Senior Capstone M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OSS 415

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OSS 415

Course Registration Number:

20748 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ryan Hardt

The senior capstone course provides computer science majors the opportunity to integrate the knowledge that they have gained from across the curriculum. Students will work in groups to design, document, and implement a large-sized software project. During this process, students will be exposed to programming team organization, software development practices, as well as tools that facilitate the development of software systems. Prerequisites: Senior standing and a minimum grade of C- or better in: CISC 350, CISC 340, and CISC 380 (which 380 may be taken concurrently)

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CISC 480 - D02 Senior Capstone M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OSS 415

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OSS 415

Course Registration Number:

21853 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ryan Hardt

The senior capstone course provides computer science majors the opportunity to integrate the knowledge that they have gained from across the curriculum. Students will work in groups to design, document, and implement a large-sized software project. During this process, students will be exposed to programming team organization, software development practices, as well as tools that facilitate the development of software systems. Prerequisites: Senior standing and a minimum grade of C- or better in: CISC 350, CISC 340, and CISC 380 (which 380 may be taken concurrently)

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COMM 480 - 01 Capstone: Communication Ethics - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21465 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Bernard J. Armada

This capstone seminar for graduating seniors explores ethical issues that confront communication professionals and audiences. Students explore theoretical perspectives on communication ethics, work from case studies to understand professional ethical standards, discuss current ethical issues in communication, work in teams to perfect oral and written ethical analysis skills, and write an individual thesis paper. Prerequisite: senior standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
DATA 400 - 01 Data Analytics Capstone - - - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22664 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Staff

This seminar is designed to fulfill the senior capstone experience in Data Analytics. It brings together students from all domain areas to fine-tune their data communication skills, broaden their understanding of data analytics, and produce a portfolio of work. The seminar primarily focuses on the communication and dissemination of data analytic work, which may vary by domain. This course should be completed in the final Spring semester prior to graduation. Prerequisites: Senior standing, DATA 200, COMM 100, and one of the following: STAT 320, STAT 333, or ECON 315. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
DIMA 480 - D01 Digital Media for Common Good M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 303

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 303

Course Registration Number:

21269 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Yayu Feng

This class represents the culmination of learning in the program and provides a capstone involving the planning and creation of a large-scale digital media project within the student's area of emphasis and a professional demo reel or portfolio, including components dealing with the ethical responsibilities of media producers and how the student’s work reflects those responsibilities. It is required of all majors. Prerequisite: Senior Standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
EDUC 431 - 01 Learning Design with Tech See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

22542 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Staff

This course examines learning theories, philosophies and their implications on the use of technology, as well as the history and development of learning technologies. Additionally, students will examine current trends and future challenges in education technology. Students will learn a variety of learning technologies and advocate sound integration of technology into curriculum. Issues on the design, development, and implementation of technology will be discussed. Students will integrate learning technologies into their curriculum planning in the specific content areas that address student needs and meet with the technology or content standards. As a capstone project, students will develop a portfolio to reflect upon the knowledge and skills acquired through their major. Prerequisites: EDUC 460 or 463, which can be taken concurrently, and 80 completed credits.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1015-111504 Feb '23
1015-111511 Mar '23
1015-111506 May '23
ENGL 405 - D01 Advanced Creative Writing - - W - - - - 1800 - 2115

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2115

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20400 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Leslie A. Miller

This advanced course will focus on the student’s development of a substantial body of work in a chosen genre: poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction. Students will review their previous writing, do further exploration of a chosen genre, and produce significant new work in that genre. Reading will include theoretical and creative texts. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisite: ENGL 321 or 322 or 323 or permission of instructor based on examination of a portfolio, and 80 completed credits.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 481 - D01 Capstone:Toni Morrison M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21956 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Olga L. Herrera

As a capstone seminar, ENGL 481 is designed to synthesize the intellectual experiences of the English major within the whole of the undergraduate curriculum, and to serve as a transition between undergraduate liberal arts education and the next steps in students' lives in graduate school or other career paths in the humanities. Students in this course will synthesize their disciplinary skills by exploring a particular literary problem or issue in depth; they will focus on, and write about, their own postgraduate vocational plans and aspirations within the field of English or related postgraduate endeavors. Prerequisite: Completion of five English courses at or beyond ENGL 211, including ENGL 280; or, for non-majors, permission of the instructor and department chair.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENTR 450 - 01 Entr:Management/Strategy - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22115 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Danielle Ailts Campeau

This is the Entrepreneurship Concentration capstone course. This course builds upon previous coursework, drawing together critical concepts including opportunity identification, business modeling, financial modeling, and market/industry research skills. Through lecture, case discussion, and extensive use of the Hotwash Process, students polish their critical thinking and creative problem solving skills. The primary deliverable is a Fundable Business Plan. Prerequisites: ENTR 100 or 200 or 260; and ENTR 250 or 350; and ENTR 370; and BUSN 202 or CISC 200 and 80 completed credits.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENTR 450 - 02 Entr:Management/Strategy - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22116 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Danielle Ailts Campeau

This is the Entrepreneurship Concentration capstone course. This course builds upon previous coursework, drawing together critical concepts including opportunity identification, business modeling, financial modeling, and market/industry research skills. Through lecture, case discussion, and extensive use of the Hotwash Process, students polish their critical thinking and creative problem solving skills. The primary deliverable is a Fundable Business Plan. Prerequisites: ENTR 100 or 200 or 260; and ENTR 250 or 350; and ENTR 370; and BUSN 202 or CISC 200 and 80 completed credits.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENVR 401 - D01 Field Seminar - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20228 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anthony J. Siebenaler-Ransom

A capstone course that combines field experience with classroom seminar. Student teams will conduct collaborative broadly interdisciplinary analyses of selected environmental problems. Field-based projects are chosen by the students in consultation with course instructor. Classroom seminars are used for exchange of information between teams and for discussion of readings pertinent to individual research projects or, more broadly, to the interdisciplinary character of environmental problem-solving. Each team produces a major paper that examines the selected problems through humanities, natural-science and social-science lenses. This class is cross-listed with, and is equivalent to, GEOG 402. Prerequisite: ENVR151, ENVR212, plus 20 credits from the 28 required competency credits in the major need to be completed before taking ENVR 401.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ESCI 430 - D01 Senior Research Seminar - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20572 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Eric J. Chapman

This course is designed to fulfill the senior capstone experience in Environmental Science. It brings together students from all the environmental science concentrations (biology, chemistry, and geology) to complete interdisciplinary research projects where students can integrate the knowledge gained in their distinct, yet complementary disciplinary tracks. The course will be a mix of research and seminar format designed to give students significant opportunities to practice the methods of scholarship and modes of communication used by environmental scientists. This course should be completed in the final Spring semester prior to graduation. Four laboratory hours per week. This course is a lecture-lab format, students registering for ESCI 430-D01 must also register for ESCI 430-D51. Prerequisite: ESCI 310 or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ESCI 430 - D51 Senior Research Seminar LAB See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

21351 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Eric J. Chapman

This course is designed to fulfill the senior capstone experience in Environmental Science. It brings together students from all the environmental science concentrations (biology, chemistry, and geology) to complete interdisciplinary research projects where students can integrate the knowledge gained in their distinct, yet complementary disciplinary tracks. The course will be a mix of research and seminar format designed to give students significant opportunities to practice the methods of scholarship and modes of communication used by environmental scientists. This course should be completed in the final Spring semester prior to graduation. Four laboratory hours per week, 2 in-person and 2 asynchronous online lab hours. Prerequisite: ESCI 310 or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1525-1725- T - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
EXSC 449 - D01 Research Seminar - T - - - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22342 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

John A. Korak

This course is designed to teach research methodology specific to the field of Exercise Science. Students are required to engage in hands-on research focused on an area of interest in the field of Exercise Science. Students will learn research skills, through locating primary literature sources, formulating a research question, conducting an original research study, and presenting it in several formats. Prerequisite: EXSC 426 and EXSC 432 and 80 completed credits.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
EXSC 449 - D02 Research Seminar - - - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22449 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

John A. Korak

This course is designed to teach research methodology specific to the field of Exercise Science. Students are required to engage in hands-on research focused on an area of interest in the field of Exercise Science. Students will learn research skills, through locating primary literature sources, formulating a research question, conducting an original research study, and presenting it in several formats. Prerequisite: EXSC 426 and EXSC 432 and 80 completed credits.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
FINC 430 - 01 Financial Intermediaries - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22144 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David O. Vang

Concepts, practices and organization for financial management of various financial intermediaries. Asset-liabilities management, duration, swaps, hedges and other concepts will be covered. Banks will be the primary area for study, but the course also will look at other institutions including insurance, funds and thrifts. The course will be based on text, lectures, guest speakers, computer modeling, a bank simulation and examination. Prerequisites: FINC 324 or FINC 325; ECON 251 and ECON 252; MATH 109 or 111 or 113; And 80 completed credits.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
FINC 430 - 02 Financial Intermediaries - T - - - - - 1730 - 2115

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2115

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22145 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David O. Vang

Concepts, practices and organization for financial management of various financial intermediaries. Asset-liabilities management, duration, swaps, hedges and other concepts will be covered. Banks will be the primary area for study, but the course also will look at other institutions including insurance, funds and thrifts. The course will be based on text, lectures, guest speakers, computer modeling, a bank simulation and examination. Prerequisites: FINC 324 or FINC 325; ECON 251 and ECON 252; MATH 109 or 111 or 113; And 80 completed credits.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 410 - D01 Hydrogeology M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OSS 120

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OSS 120

Course Registration Number:

22003 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jeni A. McDermott

This course focuses on groundwater and how geology influences its recharge, movement, storage, and withdrawal. The course will cover basic concepts of surface- and subsurface water flow, aquifer properties, well testing, heterogeneity in aquifers, groundwater chemistry and contamination, the role of groundwater in geological processes, and regional groundwater systems. Examples, labs, and projects will focus on groundwater in Minnesota and its immediate surroundings. This course is a lecture-lab format, students registering for GEOL 410-D01 must also register for GEOL 410-D51. Prerequisites: one of GEOL 102, 110, 111, 113, 114, 115, 161, 162, or 163 or permission of instructor plus 80 completed credits.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 410 - D51 Hydrogeology LAB M - - - - - - 1335 - 1635 OSS 120

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1635

Location:

OSS 120

Course Registration Number:

22004 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Jeni A. McDermott

This course focuses on groundwater and how geology influences its recharge, movement, storage, and withdrawal. The course will cover basic concepts of surface- and subsurface water flow, aquifer properties, well testing, heterogeneity in aquifers, groundwater chemistry and contamination, the role of groundwater in geological processes, and regional groundwater systems. Examples, labs, and projects will focus on groundwater in Minnesota and its immediate surroundings. This course is a lecture-lab format, students registering for GEOL 410-D51 must also register for GEOL 410-D01. Prerequisites: one of GEOL 102, 110, 111, 113, 114, 115, 161, 162, or 163 or permission of instructor plus 80 completed credits.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JOUR 480 - D01 Journalism and Media Ethics - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 303

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 303

Course Registration Number:

21280 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mark R. Neuzil

This capstone seminar for graduating seniors explores ethical issues that confront professionals in journalism and other fields of mass media, and their audiences. Students explore theoretical perspectives on ethics, work from case studies to understand professional ethical standards, discuss current ethical issues, work in teams to perfect oral and written ethical analysis skills and write an individual thesis paper. Prerequisites: graduating seniors only and permission of department chair.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JOUR 480 - D02 Journalism and Media Ethics - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 303

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 303

Course Registration Number:

22471 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Yayu Feng

This capstone seminar for graduating seniors explores ethical issues that confront professionals in journalism and other fields of mass media, and their audiences. Students explore theoretical perspectives on ethics, work from case studies to understand professional ethical standards, discuss current ethical issues, work in teams to perfect oral and written ethical analysis skills and write an individual thesis paper. Prerequisites: graduating seniors only and permission of department chair.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MGMT 430 - 01 Global Strategy & Management M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22298 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mary M. Maloney

Companies face an increasing variety of choices about where to locate different value-creating activities. This course explores the opportunities and challenges associated with conducting business in a global context. The goal of this course is to provide the foundations for understanding the external global environment facing a multinational enterprise (MNE), and the internal challenges of managing an MNE. Specifically, this course examines the following topics: the forces behind globalization, the different cultural, political, legal and economic environments in which global businesses operate, the tradeoffs between global and local strategies, the alternatives available for coordinating activity in an MNE, and the unique challenges involved with managing people in a globally dispersed organization. Prerequisites: MGMT 305 and MKTG 300 or MGMT 200 and MGMT 391; BETH 300 or BETH 301; plus two courses (minimum of six credits) from the following: IBUS 450, IBUS 460, or IBUS 470; and BUSN 202 or CISC 200; and Senior standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MGMT 460 - D01 Human Resource Strategy M - - - - - - 1730 - 2115

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2115

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22181 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Leslie K. Vatne

This course focuses on the theories, concepts, research, and practice of human capital management that impacts employee behavior. Topics include systems theory, globalization, leading a contemporary human resource function, human resource careers, human capital strategy, human resource best practices, human resource analytics, and ROI analysis. Offered spring semester. Prerequisites: MGMT 360 or (MGMT 365 and MGMT 367); MGMT 362; BLAW 301, 302, 303 or BLAW 314; BETH 300 or 301; and BUSN 202 or CISC 200; and Senior Standing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MGMT 480 - D01 Strategic Management M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22182 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

K. D. Hirschey

This course examines organizational issues from an integrative perspective. It draws on concepts from the entire business curriculum to view the organization as a whole. The focus of the course is to have you view the organization from the perspective of the president, rather than that of a manager of a particular function (e.g., VP of marketing). It examines the development of core competence and a sustainable competitive advantage as part of an organization's strategic planning process. Prerequisite: OPMT 300 or OPMT 310; FINC 310 or FINC 321; MGMT 200 or MGMT 305; MKTG 200 or MKTG 300; BETH 300 or BETH 301; and CISC 200 or BUSN 202; and senior standing. Note: Students who receive credit for MGMT 480 may not receive credit for MGMT 395.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MGMT 480 - D02 Strategic Management - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22183 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ernest L. Owens

This course examines organizational issues from an integrative perspective. It draws on concepts from the entire business curriculum to view the organization as a whole. The focus of the course is to have you view the organization from the perspective of the president, rather than that of a manager of a particular function (e.g., VP of marketing). It examines the development of core competence and a sustainable competitive advantage as part of an organization's strategic planning process. Prerequisite: OPMT 300 or OPMT 310; FINC 310 or FINC 321; MGMT 200 or MGMT 305; MKTG 200 or MKTG 300; BETH 300 or BETH 301; and CISC 200 or BUSN 202; and senior standing. Note: Students who receive credit for MGMT 480 may not receive credit for MGMT 395.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MGMT 482 - D01 Leadership Capstone - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22184 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ernest L. Owens

This capstone course integrates and applies leadership knowledge, skills, character, and competencies. The course provides opportunities to think more systematically about leadership and organizations, its application, and the personal competencies needed for leadership success. The course is designed as an experiential, collaborative team exercise of leadership in a project-based setting. Students will learn about organizational leadership and management as well as develop their capacity for leading through principled initiative and influence. Prerequisites: MGMT 382; One of MGMT 360 or 388; OR MGMT 383 and MGMT 384 and MGMT 394; BETH 300 or BETH 301; Senior Standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MKTG 430 - D01 Marketing Management See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

22239 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jamal A. Al-Khatib

Small Business Institute clients present student teams with business problems that require solutions. Student teams diagnose the client’s problem and craft and present a solution to the client. Time is divided between reviewing and integrating the students’ marketing background, facilitating the student contact with the client, and providing consulting to the client. Prerequisites: MKTG 340; MKTG 370 (May be taken concurrently); one additional Marketing elective; BETH 300 or 301; BUSN 202 or CISC 200; and Senior standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0800-094031 Jan '23
0800-0940- T - R - - -
MKTG 430 - D02 Marketing Management See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

22240 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jamal A. Al-Khatib

Small Business Institute clients present student teams with business problems that require solutions. Student teams diagnose the client’s problem and craft and present a solution to the client. Time is divided between reviewing and integrating the students’ marketing background, facilitating the student contact with the client, and providing consulting to the client. Prerequisites: MKTG 340; MKTG 370 (May be taken concurrently); one additional Marketing elective; BETH 300 or 301; BUSN 202 or CISC 200; and Senior standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0955-113531 Jan '23
0955-1135- T - R - - -
MKTG 430 - D03 Marketing Management M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22241 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael R. Hoffman

Small Business Institute clients present student teams with business problems that require solutions. Student teams diagnose the client’s problem and craft and present a solution to the client. Time is divided between reviewing and integrating the students’ marketing background, facilitating the student contact with the client, and providing consulting to the client. Prerequisites: MKTG 340; MKTG 370 (May be taken concurrently); one additional Marketing elective; BETH 300 or 301; BUSN 202 or CISC 200; and Senior standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MKTG 430 - D04 Marketing Management M - - - - - - 1730 - 2115

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2115

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22242 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael R. Hoffman

Small Business Institute clients present student teams with business problems that require solutions. Student teams diagnose the client’s problem and craft and present a solution to the client. Time is divided between reviewing and integrating the students’ marketing background, facilitating the student contact with the client, and providing consulting to the client. Prerequisites: MKTG 340; MKTG 370 (May be taken concurrently); one additional Marketing elective; BETH 300 or 301; BUSN 202 or CISC 200; and Senior standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MKTG 430 - D05 Marketing Management - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22243 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kim R. Sovell

Small Business Institute clients present student teams with business problems that require solutions. Student teams diagnose the client’s problem and craft and present a solution to the client. Time is divided between reviewing and integrating the students’ marketing background, facilitating the student contact with the client, and providing consulting to the client. Prerequisites: MKTG 340; MKTG 370 (May be taken concurrently); one additional Marketing elective; BETH 300 or 301; BUSN 202 or CISC 200; and Senior standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 300 - 01 Philosophical Discussions - - - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21563 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Mathew Lu

A 2-credit discussion-based course taking up a variety of philosophical questions over the semester designed to connect and integrate different branches of human knowledge within and beyond the discipline of philosophy.  The course satisfies the core curriculum Signature Work requirement in line with the university’s mission.  Assignments include producing an e-portfolio in which students will reflect on three pieces of work, including one from outside the student’s major.  Students are encouraged to connect themes from their e-portfolio to topics discussed in the course.  Students of all majors welcome. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or 115, one additional philosophy course and 80 credits completed.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 301 - 01 Sig.Wk:Disability&HumanDignity See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

22438 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gloria R. Frost

PHIL 301 is a signature work course in philosophy, open to all students.  Topics vary from section to section, but all sections focus on issues relevant to our university’s mission.  Various sections will, therefore, focus on questions concerning such things as the nature and dignity of human beings, what makes for a meaningful human life, the compatibility of faith and reason, what makes for a just society, or the application of ethical principles, to a variety of settings and professions, for the sake of the common good.  The course provides students the opportunity to reflect on and integrate knowledge acquired throughout their academic career, and to approach problems through multiple disciplinary lenses.  Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and 80 credits completed

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
VSP -- T - - - - -
0955-1135- - - R - - -
PHIL 301 - 02 Sig.Wk:Politics Law CommonGood - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22584 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephen J. Heaney

PHIL 301 is a signature work course in philosophy, open to all students.  Topics vary from section to section, but all sections focus on issues relevant to our university’s mission.  Various sections will, therefore, focus on questions concerning such things as the nature and dignity of human beings, what makes for a meaningful human life, the compatibility of faith and reason, what makes for a just society, or the application of ethical principles, to a variety of settings and professions, for the sake of the common good.  The course provides students the opportunity to reflect on and integrate knowledge acquired throughout their academic career, and to approach problems through multiple disciplinary lenses.  Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and 80 credits completed

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 301 - 03 Sig.Wk: PhilosophyArt & Beauty - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22440 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mark K. Spencer

PHIL 301 is a signature work course in philosophy, open to all students.  Topics vary from section to section, but all sections focus on issues relevant to our university’s mission.  Various sections will, therefore, focus on questions concerning such things as the nature and dignity of human beings, what makes for a meaningful human life, the compatibility of faith and reason, what makes for a just society, or the application of ethical principles, to a variety of settings and professions, for the sake of the common good.  The course provides students the opportunity to reflect on and integrate knowledge acquired throughout their academic career, and to approach problems through multiple disciplinary lenses.  Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and 80 credits completed

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 301 - 04 Sig.Wk.: Technology & Ethics M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22442 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael J. Winter

PHIL 301 is a signature work course in philosophy, open to all students.  Topics vary from section to section, but all sections focus on issues relevant to our university’s mission.  Various sections will, therefore, focus on questions concerning such things as the nature and dignity of human beings, what makes for a meaningful human life, the compatibility of faith and reason, what makes for a just society, or the application of ethical principles, to a variety of settings and professions, for the sake of the common good.  The course provides students the opportunity to reflect on and integrate knowledge acquired throughout their academic career, and to approach problems through multiple disciplinary lenses.  Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and 80 credits completed

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 301 - 05 Sig.Wk.: Environmental Ethics - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22439 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heidi M. Giebel

PHIL 301 is a signature work course in philosophy, open to all students.  Topics vary from section to section, but all sections focus on issues relevant to our university’s mission.  Various sections will, therefore, focus on questions concerning such things as the nature and dignity of human beings, what makes for a meaningful human life, the compatibility of faith and reason, what makes for a just society, or the application of ethical principles, to a variety of settings and professions, for the sake of the common good.  The course provides students the opportunity to reflect on and integrate knowledge acquired throughout their academic career, and to approach problems through multiple disciplinary lenses.  Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and 80 credits completed

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 301 - 06 Sig.Wk:Evolution and Creation M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22441 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Peter M. Distelzweig

PHIL 301 is a signature work course in philosophy, open to all students.  Topics vary from section to section, but all sections focus on issues relevant to our university’s mission.  Various sections will, therefore, focus on questions concerning such things as the nature and dignity of human beings, what makes for a meaningful human life, the compatibility of faith and reason, what makes for a just society, or the application of ethical principles, to a variety of settings and professions, for the sake of the common good.  The course provides students the opportunity to reflect on and integrate knowledge acquired throughout their academic career, and to approach problems through multiple disciplinary lenses.  Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and 80 credits completed

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 301 - D7 Sig.Wk.: Philosophy of God - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22585 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mark K. Spencer

PHIL 301 is a signature work course in philosophy, open to all students.  Topics vary from section to section, but all sections focus on issues relevant to our university’s mission.  Various sections will, therefore, focus on questions concerning such things as the nature and dignity of human beings, what makes for a meaningful human life, the compatibility of faith and reason, what makes for a just society, or the application of ethical principles, to a variety of settings and professions, for the sake of the common good.  The course provides students the opportunity to reflect on and integrate knowledge acquired throughout their academic career, and to approach problems through multiple disciplinary lenses.  Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and 80 credits completed

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 301 - D8 Sig.Wk.: Philosophy of God - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22586 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael W. Rota

PHIL 301 is a signature work course in philosophy, open to all students.  Topics vary from section to section, but all sections focus on issues relevant to our university’s mission.  Various sections will, therefore, focus on questions concerning such things as the nature and dignity of human beings, what makes for a meaningful human life, the compatibility of faith and reason, what makes for a just society, or the application of ethical principles, to a variety of settings and professions, for the sake of the common good.  The course provides students the opportunity to reflect on and integrate knowledge acquired throughout their academic career, and to approach problems through multiple disciplinary lenses.  Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and 80 credits completed

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
POLS 400 - 01 Signature Work Capstone M - - - - - - 1335 - 1510

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21757 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Renee L. Buhr

This course is intended to give political science majors and those in related fields an opportunity to reflect and to look forward. A number of class sessions will be dedicated to particular subfields of political science. POLS faculty will discuss the opportunities and challenges in their respective subfields, and will provide you with opportunities to think critically about crucial, timely issues that those subfields are uniquely positioned to address today and into the future. Other sessions will provide you with guidance and time to work on an interdisciplinary portfolio of work and accompanying integrative essay reflecting on your liberal arts training at UST. Prerequisites: Completion of at least two 300-level POLS courses or permission of instructor and 80 completed credits.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOCI 474 - 01 Soci Theory & Praxis: Capstone M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20834 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

An examination of classical and contemporary theories in sociology, including functionalism, conflict theory, and symbolic interaction. Theories are explored in an applied manner to develop the ability to understand/solve social problems and issues in a sociological context. Key sociological principles and concepts will be utilized in the completion of a significant scholarly research project. Careers and preparation for graduate school will also be addressed. Prerequisite: SOCI 100 and SOCI 210 and 80 completed credits.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOWK 406 - 01 Sr Field Pract & Integ Sem II M - - - - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20406 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Eva M. Solomonson

See description for SOWK 405. SOWK 406 is the spring course. Concurrent registration in SOWK 402 is required.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOWK 406 - 02 Sr Field Pract & Integ Sem II - - - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20563 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Catrice M. O'Neal

See description for SOWK 405. SOWK 406 is the spring course. Concurrent registration in SOWK 402 is required.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
STCM 480 - 01 Capstone: Campaigns - - - R - - - 1800 - 2130

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2130

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22428 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paul G. Omodt

This capstone course will integrate content knowledge with experiential skills to develop strategic communication campaigns. Students will work with clients in teams to identify client’s goals, develop advertising, public relations, and media strategies, and set measures to evaluate the effectiveness of campaigns, while maintaining relationships with key audiences. Prerequisites: Graduating seniors or permission of department chair or program director

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 300 - D03 Signature: Faith & Law M - - - - - - 1730 - 2115

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2115

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21470 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Marguerite L. Spencer

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If to work is to share in the creative activity of God, then what specific challenge does this pose for an attorney given the grinding realities of the legal profession? If to be a professional is to live out a tripartite relationship between self, client, and a higher standard, then how does an attorney determine, much less respond to such a standard? Through a close reading of a variety of theological texts, treaties, case studies and rules of professional conduct, this course will address these questions and, in so doing, attempt to fashion a paradigm for the Christian practice of law. Within this paradigm, emphasis will be placed on the meaning of justice, law, rights and responsibilities. An ethic of care that fosters the development of a compassionate world and a common life will be emphasized.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 300 - L04 Signature: Nazism & Apartheid - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21469 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kimberly J. Vrudny

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This section will focus on the patterns that emerged in both contexts—Germany under Hitler; South Africa under apartheid: economic anxiety; the rise of nationalism; the election of a tyrant; theological rationales for tyranny, torture, and even genocide; theological and artistic resistance; the complicated role of Catholicism in each setting; and legal processes in the aftermath.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 300 - L41 HNRS Signature: Theo & Beauty - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21466 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mark J. McInroy

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. Is beauty "in the eye of the beholder"? Are "beauty" and "prettiness" synonymous? Are "beauty" and "ugliness" opposites? Might beauty still be considered a transcendental aspect of being along with the true and the good? Is it possible that Beauty is a name for God, or a means by which God reveals God's self in the created order? This course examines a variety of theological approaches to these questions, both ancient and modern. It also explores the implications of varying answers to these questions for the arts, and for lives of faith. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)