Integrations in the Humanities

Liberal arts education takes knowledge to be intrinsically valuable and liberating. It produces understanding that illumines and ennobles. The humanities disciplines are traditionally a subset of the disciplines in the liberal arts. The humanities focus on documenting and understanding the human experience; they help students perceive value, discover and construct meaning, and synthesize various sources of knowledge. Without such synthesis, it is impossible to develop an informed view of the whole.

Courses in the area of "Integrations in the Humanities" show how methods of the humanities help integrate ideas and perspectives across disciplines or across communities.

Integration is a goal of humanistic studies generally and a goal also of a Catholic university. As Ex Corde Ecclesiae says: “A University, and especially a Catholic University, ‘has to be a “living union” of individual organisms dedicated to the search for truth … It is necessary to work toward a higher synthesis of knowledge, in which alone lies the possibility of satisfying that thirst for truth which is profoundly inscribed on the heart of the human person’.” [Ex Corde Ecclesiae, 16]

A student may elect both of the required IH courses from IH-designated offerings within a single major only if the student has more than one major.

See Summary of Core Requirements section for detail regarding potential overlap with Integrations in the Humanities and core flagged requirements.

Students must take eight credits.

  • ARTH 202: History of Street Art
  • ARTH 204: Typography and Visual Culture
  • ARTH 265:  Art and Archaeology of Ancient Mesoamerica
  • ARTH 275: Buddhist Art
  • ARTH 304:  Typeface Design
  • ARTH 305: Greek Art and Archaeology
  • ARTH 310: Roman Art and Archaeology
  • ARTH 328: Chinese Sculpture and Architecture
  • ARTH 329: Chinese Painting
  • ARTH 351: Romanticism to Impressionism
  • ARTH 352: Art in the United States
  • ARTH 356: Modernism in European Art
  • CATH 205: Crisis and Development in the Catholic Church
  • CATH 301: The Catholic Vision
  • CATH 308: Woman and Man
  • CATH 340: Church and Culture: The Social Dimension of Catholicism
  • CATH 405: John Henry Newman
  • CATH 406: The Many Worlds of G. K. Chesterton (2 credits)
  • CATH 407: The Many Worlds of G. K. Chesterton (4 credits)
  • CLAS 225: The Classical Hero, Epic and Film
  • CLAS 245: Classical Mythology
  • COJO 370: Intercultural Communication
  • ENGL 201: Texts in Conversation: Perspectives on Genre and Craft
  • ENGL 202: Texts in Conversation: Interdisciplinary Perspectives
  • ENGL 203: Texts in Conversation: Thematic and Intertextual Perspectives
  • ENGL 204: Texts in Conversation: Perspectives on Language, Culture, and Literacy
  • ENGL 214: American Authors I
  • ENGL 217: Multicultural Literature
  • ENGL 221: The Modern Tradition
  • ENGL 297: Modernist Europe
  • ENGL 298: Topics: Introduction to Italian Cinema
  • ENGL 324: Genre Studies: The Healing Art of Drama
  • ENGL 325: Writers Grappling with God: Theology and Literature
  • ENGL 362: Early British Literature: Contexts and Conversations
  • FILM 335: Film Theory and Criticism
  • HIST 211: Women and Families in the Americas
  • HIST 226: Modern Europe Since 1914
  • HIST 227: Global History of Genocide and Ethnic Cleansing in the Twentieth Century
  • HIST 228: Environmental History
  • HIST 349: History of Ottoman Empire
  • HIST 375: Non‐State Actors: Insurgents and NGOs in the Islamic World
  • HONR 480: The Scientific Revolution: When Modern Science Was Born?
  • HONR 480: At the Heart of Time
  • HONR 480: Improvisation as Equipment for Living
  • HONR 480: Matrix of Connectivity: How We Bridge the Gaps
  • JOUR 372: Environmental Journalism
  • PHIL 220: Logic
  • PHIL 235: Philosophy of Art and Beauty
  • PHIL 240: Faith and Doubt
  • PHIL 241: History and Philosophy of Medicine
  • PHIL 245: Politics, Law, and the Common Good
  • PHIL 250: Christian Mysteries from a Philosophical Viewpoint
  • PHIL 254: Biomedical Ethics
  • PHIL 255: Technology and Ethics
  • PHIL 258: Environmental Ethics
  • PHIL 260: Global Philosophy of Religion
  • PHIL 265: Minds, Brains, and Computers
  • PHIL 272: Evolution and Creation
  • PHIL 330: Philosophy of Mind
  • PHIL 357: Political Philosophy
  • PHIL 359: Philosophy of Law
  • PHIL 385: Philosophy of Science
  • PHIL 460: Philosophy of God
  • SPAN 315: Hispanic Linguistics
  • SPAN 335: Introduction to Spanish Literature
  • THEO 221: Bible: [Instructor-Chosen Subtitle]
  • THEO 222: History: [Instructor-Chosen Subtitle]
  • THEO 223: Belief: [Instructor-Chosen Subtitle]
  • THEO 224: Bridges: [Instructor-Chosen Subtitle]
  • THEO 225: Faith & Ethics: [Instructor-Chosen Subtitle]
  • THEO 226: Spirituality: [Instructor-Chosen Subtitle]
  • THEO 227: Contexts: [Instructor-Chosen Subtitle]
  • THEO 228: Comparative: [Instructor-Chosen Subtitle]
  • THEO 229: Professions: [Instructor-Chosen Subtitle]

Fall 2020 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ARTH 265 - L01 Art/Archaeology Ancient Meso - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46643 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

William L. Barnes

ARTH 265 Art and Archaeology of Ancient Mesoamerica: This course introduces students to the art, architecture, and archaeology of the Aztecs, Maya, Olmec, Zapotecs, and their contemporaries in Pre-Columbian America. Participants will explore the rich cultural history of this region (that includes parts of Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, and El Salvador), and investigate how the art, architecture, and archeological remains of Mesoamerican peoples can be used to expand our knowledge of their religious practices, ideology, and societal institutions

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ARTH 356 - L01 Modernism in European Art M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46644 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Craig D. Eliason

Modernist artists strove to find a visual language of expression appropriate to their time; yet many contemporaries found their works incomprehensible, as do many people today. An open-minded and historically informed investigation of modern art helps to make sense of it. This course will explore the history of European painting and sculpture from 1880 to 1940. It will consider the many movements that characterized modernism, such as Post-Impressionism, Symbolism, Fauvism, Cubism, Futurism, Expressionism, Dada, Surrealism, and Constructivism. Issues to be addressed include the rejection of tradition, the development of abstraction, the impact of World War I and its aftermath, the influence of science and technology on art, and the fate of modernism under Hitler's and Stalin's regimes. Particular attention will be paid to the theoretical underpinnings of modern art.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 205 - 01 Crisis and Development - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 KOC 113

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

KOC 113

Course Registration Number:

45976 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Robert G. Kennedy

This course explores from an interdisciplinary perspective the history of the Catholic Church as it interacts with the secular world and is shaped by its dominant personalities and events. No other institution in history has survived, and flourished, for so long and in the face of so many challenges. This course will critically reflect upon the history of the Church, from its origins in the Apostolic Age to the modern period, as a series of cycles with a common pattern of creativity, achievement, and retreat. Students may expect to complete the course with an awareness and understanding of the major personalities and events, secular and ecclesial, that have shaped the life of the Church.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 301 - 01 The Catholic Vision M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 201

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 201

Course Registration Number:

44586 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William J. Junker

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: CATH 101

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 308 - 01 Woman and Man - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 126

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 126

Course Registration Number:

44378 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David P. Deavel

This course examines the definition of "woman" and "man" from both the historical and the philosophical perspective. Readings and discussion center on the question of (1) whether there are important philosophical differences between women and men and (2) whether such differences are natural or socially constructed. The implications of various answers to those questions are then examined, with special attention given to the Catholic tradition's reflections on the nature and ends of marriage, the character of priestly ordination, friendship between women and men, and human sexuality. The purpose of this course is to examine the ways in which thinkers from a wide spectrum have construed male/female relationships. A major component of this course consists in the study of power and the way it operates both in history and in contemporary culture.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 340 - 01 Church&Culture:Soc Dim of Cath - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

46504 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Robert G. Kennedy

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently social and ecclesial. Its specific focus is on the Christian engagement with the world. The course's framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) as described in Centesimus annus. We will examine the ways that Revelation, the sacramental life, and the teachings of the Church call Catholics to seek holiness and to witness to their faith in the world. Specific topics may include social and economic justice, politics and public policy, lay and religious apostolates, education, and marriage and family. Course materials may include resources from philosophy, theology, history, economics, and political science. This course will satisfy the third level Faith and Catholic Tradition core requirement. Prerequisite: CATH 101

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 340 - 02 Vocation of the Entrepreneur - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 201

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 201

Course Registration Number:

47296 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Michael J. Naughton, Michael J. Sarafolean

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently social and ecclesial. Its specific focus is on the Christian engagement with the world. The course's framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) as described in Centesimus annus. We will examine the ways that Revelation, the sacramental life, and the teachings of the Church call Catholics to seek holiness and to witness to their faith in the world. Specific topics may include social and economic justice, politics and public policy, lay and religious apostolates, education, and marriage and family. Course materials may include resources from philosophy, theology, history, economics, and political science. This course will satisfy the third level Faith and Catholic Tradition core requirement. Prerequisite: CATH 101

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 370 - 01 Intercultural Communication M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44297 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Xiaowen Guan

Study of the influence of cultural values on social behavior; examination of theories of intercultural communication; emphasis on effective intercultural interaction. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the old core curriculum and both the Global Perspectives requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement in the new core program.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W01 The American Short Story - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46416 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and peep into our future. As we study the artistic development of the American short story, our process of discovery will be progressive, beginning with some of this country's earliest and most influential short story writers like Irving and Poe and closing with such masters of contemporary fiction as Alice Walker and Jill McCorkle. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W02 The American Short Story - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46417 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and peep into our future. As we study the artistic development of the American short story, our process of discovery will be progressive, beginning with some of this country's earliest and most influential short story writers like Irving and Poe and closing with such masters of contemporary fiction as Alice Walker and Jill McCorkle. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W01 Man-Eating Beasts - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46677 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gordon D. Grice

Literature takes a walk on the wild side when men and women clash with deadly carnivores. We’ll read vintage tales by fiction writers, hunters, and naturalists for the surprising light they throw on race, gender, religion, and especially ecology. Authors may include Erckmann-Chatrian, Ambrose Bierce, and Arthur Conan Doyle. This course integrates basic concepts from biology with our methods. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This fully online course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W02 Man-Eating Beasts - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46676 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gordon D. Grice

Literature takes a walk on the wild side when men and women clash with deadly carnivores. We’ll read vintage tales by fiction writers, hunters, and naturalists for the surprising light they throw on race, gender, religion, and especially ecology. Authors may include Erckmann-Chatrian, Ambrose Bierce, and Arthur Conan Doyle. This course integrates basic concepts from biology with our methods. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This fully online course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W03 Native Amer Lit & Environment See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

46418 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

This course will combine fiction and non-fiction texts that approach the idea of environment and environmental sustainability from a variety of Native American and Indigenous world views, with an emphasis on Minnesota Native nations. In addition to reading and writing about Native literature, this course will strive to connect students to Native American food and farming and the social-ecological systems in which the stories are embedded. If all goes as planned, we’ll be cooking some indigenous recipes and visiting Dream of Wild Health indigenous farming co-op. Texts that will likely make the reading list include Heid Erdrich’s cookbook ORIGINAL LOCAL: INDIGENOUS FOOD, STORIES, AND RECIPES FROM THE UPPER MIDWEST (and we may organize a visit and a cooking class by the author); BRAIDING SWEETGRASS, a non-fiction text by Robin Wall Kimmerer, a Potawatomi woman who is also a biology professor; and the novel SOLAR STORMS by Linda Hogan, a story about four generations of women working to save ancestral land from dam development. Other possible texts include poetry from Leslie Marmon Silko, Joy Harjo, and others; William Apess’s 1835 essay on the “…Unconstitutional Laws of Massachusetts Relative to the Mashpee Tribe”; and selections from Winona LaDuke’s ALL MY RELATIONS, David Treuer’s REZ LIFE, and Vine Deloria, Jr.’s GOD IS RED. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SCB 1040935-1040M - - - - - -
0935-1040- - W - F - -
ENGL 202 - W04 To Heal: Literature & Medicine M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46421 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

This course looks at physicians as writers, thinkers, practitioners, and subjects; we will study texts that offer reflections from a prominent surgeon on his craft in the work of Atul Gawande. We will also explore historical, economic, political, and ethical questions related to medical care by examining how illness and caregiving are depicted in literary texts from several genres: fiction (NEVER LET ME GO), poetry (THE RESURRECTION TRADE), and drama (WIT and THE CLEAN HOUSE). What kinds of emotional and social costs does illness have? How do writers grapple with the moral dimensions of medicine? We will address these and other questions through close textual analysis and discussion; in addition, our course will draw upon the expertise of practitioners within the Minneapolis medical community. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W05 Reading Black Resistance M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 216

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 216

Course Registration Number:

46420 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David C. Williard, David T. Lawrence

This course, team-taught by a historian and a literary scholar, focuses on the long struggle of African Americans for justice and equality in the U.S. Analyzing literary and historical texts, students in this course will learn about and engage in research on African American history and culture. Utilizing historical, literary, and cultural approaches, this interdisciplinary course will immerse students into an exploration of the African American experience from multiple perspectives using dual disciplinary frameworks. For example, students may study Richard Wright’s NATIVE SON, but would read the text within the historical and cultural framework of the Great Migration, connecting Wright’s text not just to other literary texts, but situating it within an historical and cultural context vital to the novel’s creation and essential for its interpretation. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. This course is cross-listed with HIST 292-W01; 20 seats are available in ENGL 202 and five seats are available in HIST 292.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W06 Native Amer Lit & Environment See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

46419 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

This course will combine fiction and non-fiction texts that approach the idea of environment and environmental sustainability from a variety of Native American and Indigenous world views, with an emphasis on Minnesota Native nations. In addition to reading and writing about Native literature, this course will strive to connect students to Native American food and farming and the social-ecological systems in which the stories are embedded. If all goes as planned, we’ll be cooking some indigenous recipes and visiting Dream of Wild Health indigenous farming co-op. Texts that will likely make the reading list include Heid Erdrich’s cookbook ORIGINAL LOCAL: INDIGENOUS FOOD, STORIES, AND RECIPES FROM THE UPPER MIDWEST (and we may organize a visit and a cooking class by the author); BRAIDING SWEETGRASS, a non-fiction text by Robin Wall Kimmerer, a Potawatomi woman who is also a biology professor; and the novel SOLAR STORMS by Linda Hogan, a story about four generations of women working to save ancestral land from dam development. Other possible texts include poetry from Leslie Marmon Silko, Joy Harjo, and others; William Apess’s 1835 essay on the “…Unconstitutional Laws of Massachusetts Relative to the Mashpee Tribe”; and selections from Winona LaDuke’s ALL MY RELATIONS, David Treuer’s REZ LIFE, and Vine Deloria, Jr.’s GOD IS RED. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SCB 1041055-1200M - - - - - -
1055-1200- - W - F - -
ENGL 202 - W07 Noir in Film and Literature M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46675 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shannon F. Scott

This course explores the genre of noir in both film and literature. We will look at “hard-boiled” fiction of the 1930s, German Expressionist film in pre-war Berlin, America during World War II, and blacklisting in Hollywood during the Cold War. Because this course also surveys “neo-noir” literary texts and films, we will at times pull the discussion back into the present, noting how the genre has shifted over time, particularly how female authors such as Megan Abbott, Ruth Ware, Gillian Flynn, and Paula Hawkins currently dominate the noir literary scene. Since this is an interdisciplinary course, we will also examine films and texts in conversation with each other, which means investigating how work transitions or adapts from the page to the screen. Through close reading/viewing, annotating, writing, discussing, and immersing ourselves in the genre of noir we will discover what makes a film or piece of literature irresistibly engaging and resonant. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W08 Literature Inspired by Science M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46423 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Leslie A. Miller

Writers have long looked to the sciences for fresh metaphors, innovative structures, and conceptual models. In this course we will read fiction, poetry, and drama inspired by the sciences and explore how writers build on scientific models and methods to bring new vision to ideas about space, time, matter, and being. Texts may include THE ECOPOETRY ANTHOLOGY, Andrea Barrett’s ARCHANGEL, BEST AMERICAN SCIENCE AND NATURE WRITING, Hope Jahren’s LAB GIRL, Tracy K. Smith’s LIFE ON MARS, Mary Shelley’s FRANKENSTEIN, and Anne Patchett’s STATE OF WONDER. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W10 Amer Manhood: WWII thru #MeToo - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46678 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Brian C. Brown

What does it mean to be a man in America today? According to Ron Swanson’s “Pyramid of Greatness,” live simply, fend for yourself and eat meat. Lots of meat. For generations, men were promised an equally straightforward road map to navigate adolescence through adulthood: college + job + home + family = happily ever after. But that social contract was a fraud. When these basic expectations failed to materialize, many young men responded in predictable ways. Faced with what they perceived as an attempt to usurp their inherent power and authority, they lashed out in anger, sexual violence and self-medication. And now even these destructive behaviors have been exposed for what they are - desperate attempts to control a world that offers no clear path to manhood. So, as we enter a new decade, what defines American Manhood? For an overview of American manhood we’ll read from Jack Donovan’s THE WAY OF MAN. Primary reading sources include Chuck Palahniuk’s look at the apathetic and violent existence of the American male in FIGHT CLUB. We’ll read nonfiction selections BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME by Ta-Nehisi Coates and the recently released memoir KNOW MY NAME by Chanel Miller. And we’ll examine the role of husband, father and survivor in Cormac McCarthy’s post-apocalyptic world of THE ROAD. Supporting material will include plays, short stories and films - such as BOYHOOD, MOONLIGHT and I LOVE YOU, MAN. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal, revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W11 Business & American Identity - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46674 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

This fully online course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W12 Literature of Mind and Brain - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46425 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Emily M. James

This course explores literature’s relationship to the brain, the mind, and cognition. We will consider how writers and artists have registered, challenged, and even shaped developments in neuroscience and cognitive science across the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Topics may include sensation and perception, neurodiversity and neuroatypicality, affect theory, machine learning, neural networks, language acquisition, theory of mind, metaphor, and memory. Writers may include Virginia Woolf, Marcel Proust, Santiago Ramón y Cajal, Oliver Sacks, Jorge Luis Borges, Ian McEwan, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, David Mitchell, Teju Cole, Ali Smith, Michael Davidson, and Naoki Higashida. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W3A Native Amer Lit & Environment See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

47823 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

This course will combine fiction and non-fiction texts that approach the idea of environment and environmental sustainability from a variety of Native American and Indigenous world views, with an emphasis on Minnesota Native nations. In addition to reading and writing about Native literature, this course will strive to connect students to Native American food and farming and the social-ecological systems in which the stories are embedded. If all goes as planned, we’ll be cooking some indigenous recipes and visiting Dream of Wild Health indigenous farming co-op. Texts that will likely make the reading list include Heid Erdrich’s cookbook ORIGINAL LOCAL: INDIGENOUS FOOD, STORIES, AND RECIPES FROM THE UPPER MIDWEST (and we may organize a visit and a cooking class by the author); BRAIDING SWEETGRASS, a non-fiction text by Robin Wall Kimmerer, a Potawatomi woman who is also a biology professor; and the novel SOLAR STORMS by Linda Hogan, a story about four generations of women working to save ancestral land from dam development. Other possible texts include poetry from Leslie Marmon Silko, Joy Harjo, and others; William Apess’s 1835 essay on the “…Unconstitutional Laws of Massachusetts Relative to the Mashpee Tribe”; and selections from Winona LaDuke’s ALL MY RELATIONS, David Treuer’s REZ LIFE, and Vine Deloria, Jr.’s GOD IS RED. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0935-1040M - - - F - -
SCB 1040935-1040- - W - - - -
ENGL 202 - W6A Native Amer Lit & Environment See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

48064 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

This course will combine fiction and non-fiction texts that approach the idea of environment and environmental sustainability from a variety of Native American and Indigenous world views, with an emphasis on Minnesota Native nations. In addition to reading and writing about Native literature, this course will strive to connect students to Native American food and farming and the social-ecological systems in which the stories are embedded. If all goes as planned, we’ll be cooking some indigenous recipes and visiting Dream of Wild Health indigenous farming co-op. Texts that will likely make the reading list include Heid Erdrich’s cookbook ORIGINAL LOCAL: INDIGENOUS FOOD, STORIES, AND RECIPES FROM THE UPPER MIDWEST (and we may organize a visit and a cooking class by the author); BRAIDING SWEETGRASS, a non-fiction text by Robin Wall Kimmerer, a Potawatomi woman who is also a biology professor; and the novel SOLAR STORMS by Linda Hogan, a story about four generations of women working to save ancestral land from dam development. Other possible texts include poetry from Leslie Marmon Silko, Joy Harjo, and others; William Apess’s 1835 essay on the “…Unconstitutional Laws of Massachusetts Relative to the Mashpee Tribe”; and selections from Winona LaDuke’s ALL MY RELATIONS, David Treuer’s REZ LIFE, and Vine Deloria, Jr.’s GOD IS RED. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1055-1200M - - - F - -
SCB 1041055-1200- - W - - - -
ENGL 203 - W01 Perspectives in War Literature - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46679 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Alison L. Underthun-Meilahn

When writing about war, authors who have served in the military have a few literary options: a memoir, poetry, essays, or a work of fiction. This course will focus on exemplary literature written by those who have been in war mainly through fiction, but we will also read poetry and essays as well. We specifically will investigate how veterans have differing perspectives on warfare and the return back to civilian life, while at the same time how many of them share similar perspectives and grapple with the recalibration into civilian life. Through literature we will come to understand how the psyche of veterans is altered via warfare and the impact it has on their lives and families, as well as society at large. We will also look at how contemporary culture, and historically, veterans have been received or perceived as they return home and how their voice has been implicit/explicit in cultural movements (specifically the counter cultural movement of the 1960’s). How society interacts and supports veterans will be linked to our discussions, and highlighted through a service learning component. Veterans will be invited into our classroom to foster and promote dialogue and understanding on how veteran's voices are heard, what they think we hear, and how we, civilians can better be aware or shift our perspective to best support them in society. Guest speakers may include veterans from the Vietnam War, Iraq War(s), Afghanistan War, and perhaps those currently enlisted. We may also have speakers from professionals who work with veterans. Literature we will focus on in this course includes: Kurt Vonnegut's SLAUGHTERHOUSE-FIVE, Tim O'Brien's THE THINGS THEY CARRIED, Jim Northrup's THE REZ ROAD, Joseph Heller's CATCH-22, and Ernest Hemingway's A FAREWELL TO ARMS. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This fully online course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W02 Worldbuilding Story:New Worlds M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46426 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Santiago

We will explore stories that engage in explicit acts of worldbuilding, a term first used to describe science fiction and fantasy writers' invention of languages, geographies, cultures, histories, and mythologies. We will focus on worldbuilding as it applies to writers of multiple genres, including both "literary" fiction and "genre" fiction. Along the way, we will begin to address questions raised by authors who engage in worldbuilding, such as: why diverge from the "real world" in the first place? Is there an ethical price that must be paid in order to imagine a new society? Should worldbuilding be seen as a useful tool for social critique, or is it at heart a practice of escapist entertainment? The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrating the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W03 Worldbuilding Story:New Worlds M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46427 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Santiago

We will explore stories that engage in explicit acts of worldbuilding, a term first used to describe science fiction and fantasy writers' invention of languages, geographies, cultures, histories, and mythologies. We will focus on worldbuilding as it applies to writers of multiple genres, including both "literary" fiction and "genre" fiction. Along the way, we will begin to address questions raised by authors who engage in worldbuilding, such as: why diverge from the "real world" in the first place? Is there an ethical price that must be paid in order to imagine a new society? Should worldbuilding be seen as a useful tool for social critique, or is it at heart a practice of escapist entertainment? The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. We will explore stories that engage in explicit acts of worldbuilding, a term first used to describe science fiction and fantasy writers' invention of languages, geographies, cultures, histories, and mythologies. We will focus on worldbuilding as it applies to writers of multiple genres, including both "literary" fiction and "genre" fiction. Along the way, we will begin to address questions raised by authors who engage in worldbuilding, such as: why diverge from the "real world" in the first place? Is there an ethical price that must be paid in order to imagine a new society? Should worldbuilding be seen as a useful tool for social critique, or is it at heart a practice of escapist entertainment? The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrating the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W04 Utopias in Dystopias M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46680 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucy A. Saliger

Both fictional and real life utopian efforts often emerge under dystopian conditions. Contrary to some notions of utopia as an impossible, perfect "nowhere," these utopias are grounded in a specific 'somewhere' - a time and place that call for better possibilities than the dystopian realities. We will consider examples of these efforts, beginning with Thomas More's foundational text, UTOPIA, and continuing through a mix of texts, film, music, and local organizations (St. Thomas community partners). Noting commonalities and differences as well as our own complicated responses to these necessarily imperfect utopias will help us understand their limitations and contributions. The roles of writing, reading, storytelling, and education will be a crucial part of our examination. Book authors will likely include Sandra Cisneros, David Todd Lawrence, Walter Mosley, and Indra Sinha. As a blended course, work for one of our course meetings is online with flexible timing, while the other is in person. This flexibility will help in scheduling your required community engagement work; you will choose between one of two or three community partners and work with them on-site once a week, giving you the opportunity to establish a relationship, gain new experience, and link that work to our study of utopias. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrating the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - W01 Crit Discourse of Video Games - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46429 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Salvatore Pane

What does it mean to close read a video game? What is the interplay between text, digital media, and rhetoric? Where do games fit in academia? In the Critical Discourse of Video Games, students will interrogate these questions while being introduced to game studies, platform studies, and the digital humanities. Students will learn by weaving together theories of play, reading, writing, and digital creation. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrating the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 214 - L01 American Authors I M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46430 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Andrew J. Scheiber

Where does the popular perception of America as the “New World” come from? How could slavery flourish in a land idealizing freedom? Why were immigrants so feared and reviled? Why did expansionism push out some and make millionaires of others? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings from the beginnings of the American literary tradition to the turn of the twentieth century. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as religious identity, political reform, race, slavery, war, gender, and industrialization. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major, a WAC Writing to Learn requirement, and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement for students in the new core program. Prerequisites: ENGL 121 or ENGL 201, 202, 203 or 204. NOTE: For students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with ENGL 121, you will need to complete an ENGL 201-204 class in order to fulfill that core requirement--this course will not fulfill that requirement. However, students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with an ENGL 201-204 or 206 class may take this course to complete their core literature/writing requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 217 - L01 Multicultural Literature See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

46407 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

What does it mean to be labeled an African American dramatist? A Latino/a poet? A transgender novelist? An Asian American essayist? A Native American environmental writer? How do the varied experiences and backgrounds of authors writing from diverse subject positions inform, mark, and/or transform their writing? How do the works of these writers fit into, conflict with, actively resist, or even redefine the American Literary canon as it has been traditionally understood? These questions and more will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive reading of literature from: a) American communities of color; b) postcolonial peoples; c) immigrant and/or diasporic peoples; or d) LGBTQ communities. This course will focus on the literary and cultural texts of one or more of these groups with an emphasis on the cultural, political, and historical contexts that surround them. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major, and the Human Diversity Requirement in the Core Curriculum. It is pending approval to satisfy the Integration in the Humanities and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirements in the new core program. Prerequisites: ENGL 121 or ENGL 201, 202, 203 or 204. NOTE: For students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with ENGL 121, you will need to complete an ENGL 201-204 class in order to fulfill that core requirement--this course will not fulfill that requirement. However, students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with an ENGL 201-204 or 206 class may take this course to complete their core literature/writing requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 2061335-1510M - - - - - -
1335-1510- - W - - - -
ENGL 217 - L1A Multicultural Literature See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

47809 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

What does it mean to be labeled an African American dramatist? A Latino/a poet? A transgender novelist? An Asian American essayist? A Native American environmental writer? How do the varied experiences and backgrounds of authors writing from diverse subject positions inform, mark, and/or transform their writing? How do the works of these writers fit into, conflict with, actively resist, or even redefine the American Literary canon as it has been traditionally understood? These questions and more will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive reading of literature from: a) American communities of color; b) postcolonial peoples; c) immigrant and/or diasporic peoples; or d) LGBTQ communities. This course will focus on the literary and cultural texts of one or more of these groups with an emphasis on the cultural, political, and historical contexts that surround them. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major, and the Human Diversity Requirement in the Core Curriculum. It is pending approval to satisfy the Integration in the Humanities and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirements in the new core program. Prerequisites: ENGL 121 or ENGL 201, 202, 203 or 204. NOTE: For students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with ENGL 121, you will need to complete an ENGL 201-204 class in order to fulfill that core requirement--this course will not fulfill that requirement. However, students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with an ENGL 201-204 or 206 class may take this course to complete their core literature/writing requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1335-1510M - - - - - -
OEC 2061335-1510- - W - - - -
ENGL 221 - L01 Modern Tradit:European Classic M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 203

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MHC 203

Course Registration Number:

46588 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Doug P. Phillips

Through our study of European literature and some of its most memorable characters— Voltaire’s Candide, Ibsen's Hedda Gabler, Dostoevsky’s Underground Man, Tolstoy's Ivan Ilyich, etc.—we will dig deep into life’s most pressing questions, not least of which is what makes for a good life. Our study will also give us the chance to better understand who we are today in light of the cultural shifts and philosophical drifts that have come before us. In the words of the writer Zadie Smith, we're going to read a lot of good books in this class (all in translation), “concentrating on whatever is most particular to them, in the hope that this might help us understand whatever is most particular to us.” This course satisfies both the Historical Perspectives distribution requirement for English majors and the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing to Learn requirement. This course is pending approval to satisfy the Integration in the Humanities requirement for students in the new core program. Prerequisites: ENGL 121 or ENGL 201, 202, 203 or 204. NOTE: For students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with ENGL 121, you will need to complete an ENGL 201-204 class in order to fulfill that core requirement--this course will not fulfill that requirement. However, students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with an ENGL 201-204 or 206 class may take this course to complete their core literature/writing requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 298 - W01 Introduction to Italian Cinema - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46461 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Salvatore Pane

What is Italian cinema, and what do diverse directors like Fellini, Wertmüller, and Antonioni have to say about topics like fascism, love, and existential despair? Covering everything from neorealism to spaghetti westerns, this course will introduce students to film theory and demonstrate how to close-read movies and analyze them through writing. Potential films include LA DOLCE VITA, ROME OPEN CITY, and ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST. This course counts as an ENGL 200-level elective for English majors/minors, an ENGL 211+ allied course for select business majors, a History/Criticism/Theory course for Film Studies majors and minors, and a WAC Writing Intensive requirement. For students under the new core, this course satisfies both the Integration in the Humanities and the Global Studies requirements. Prerequisites: None. NOTE: Please note that this course DOES NOT count towards the core literature and writing requirement for students who entered St. Thomas prior to Fall 2020 and who started that requirement with an ENGL 201, 202, 203, 204, or 206 class. Finally, this course is cross-listed with FILM 298: there are 12 seats on the ENGL 298 side and 8 seats available on the FILM 298 side.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 324 - L01 The Healing Art of Drama See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

46434 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy M. Muse

Dramatic literature is our genre. Empathy, intimacy, and caregiving our subjects. Questions we’ll be asking include: how does the genre of drama lend itself to the development of empathy, of intimacy, of care? How is meaning negotiated in health, illness, and dramatic literature? Our reading will include theatre theory (e.g., Aristotle, Maria Irene Fornes, Sarah Ruhl), sociological theory on empathy and emotional labor (e.g., Arlie Hochschild, Allison Pugh), and a variety of plays (by Sophocles, Shakespeare, Ruhl, Quiara Alegría Hudes, Jackie Sibblies Drury, Amy Herzog, Caryl Churchill). We will examine case studies of organizations using drama and theater for healing, such as Theater of War and the uses of drama and theatre in medical school and social work training; and students will examine where their English major or minor education can be used in arts, healthcare, and social work settings. This course satisfies the Genre Studies requirement for English with a Creative Writing Emphasis majors and an ENGL 211+ allied requirement for select business majors. It also satisfies the core literature/writing requirement for students who started the current core with an ENGL 201, 202, 203, 204, or 206 class. For students under the new core program, this course is pending approval to count as an Integration in the Humanities course. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or ENGL 201, 202, 203, 204 or 206.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 2091525-1700- T - - - - -
1525-1700- - - R - - -
FILM 298 - W01 Introduction to Italian Cinema - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46506 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Salvatore Pane

What is Italian cinema, and what do diverse directors like Fellini, Wertmüller, and Antonioni have to say about topics like fascism, love, and existential despair? Covering everything from neorealism to spaghetti westerns, this course will introduce students to film theory and demonstrate how to close-read movies and analyze them through writing. Potential films include LA DOLCE VITA, ROME OPEN CITY, and ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST. This course counts as an ENGL 200-level elective for English majors/minors, an ENGL 211+ allied course for select business majors, a History/Criticism/Theory course for Film Studies majors and minors, and a WAC Writing Intensive requirement. For students under the new core, this course satisfies both the Integration in the Humanities and the Global Studies requirements. Prerequisites: None. NOTE: Please note that this course DOES NOT count towards the core literature and writing requirement for students who entered St. Thomas prior to Fall 2020 and who started that requirement with an ENGL 201, 202, 203, 204, or 206 class. Finally, this course is cross-listed with FILM 298: there are 12 seats on the ENGL 298 side and 8 seats available on the FILM 298 side.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 292 - W01 Topics: Reading Black Resist M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 216

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 216

Course Registration Number:

46478 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David C. Williard, David T. Lawrence

This course, team-taught by a historian and a literary scholar, focuses on the long struggle of African Americans for justice and equality in the U.S. Analyzing literary and historical texts, students in this course will learn about and engage in research on African American history and culture. Utilizing historical, literary, and cultural approaches, this interdisciplinary course will immerse students into an exploration of the African American experience from multiple perspectives using dual disciplinary frameworks. For example, students may study Richard Wright’s NATIVE SON, but would read the text within the historical and cultural framework of the Great Migration, connecting Wright’s text not just to other literary texts, but situating it within an historical and cultural context vital to the novel’s creation and essential for its interpretation. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 375 - 01 Non-State Actors Islamic World M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MCH 231

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

MCH 231

Course Registration Number:

46482 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shaherzad R. Ahmadi

As the Ottoman and Qajar empires showed signs of collapse in the late nineteenth century, Middle Eastern and North African intellectuals eagerly adopted western systems of finance, education, and governance. In fact, some burgeoning nation-states even copied, word-for-word, European constitutions. By the mid-twentieth century, however, despots ruled the Middle East and North Africa. The two questions that animate this course are: (1) Why do we see autocracies, and destructive non-state actors, dominating the Islamic world? (2) What role do non-state actors play in producing volatility or maintaining stability? Students address these complex questions for an understanding of the region’s conflicts and the role of the international community in resolving (or exacerbating) humanitarian crises. Prerequisites: One 100-level history course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HONR 480 - 01 HONORS At the Heart of Time - T - - - - - 0955 - 1135 BEC 111

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

BEC 111

Course Registration Number:

45401 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Ora S. Itkin, Stephen J. Laumakis

These interdisciplinary seminars are intended to develop integrating insights through an analysis of topics chosen from different disciplines. Often they are taught by two faculty members or by a visiting lecturer who holds one of the endowed chairs at the university.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 220 - 01 Logic - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 MHC 209

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

MHC 209

Course Registration Number:

44044 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heidi M. Giebel

This course provides students with skills for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating the sorts of reasoning encountered in natural language. Emphasis will be placed on attaining facility with different formal systems for representing and evaluating arguments - including propositional logic, Aristotelian syllogistic, first-order predicate calculus, - as well as on acquiring the ability to apply these systems in the analysis and evaluation of arguments in ordinary and philosophical discourse. This course satisfies one of the core curriculum requirements in “Integrations in the Humanities.” Prerequisite: PHIL 110, 115 or 197.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 240 - 01 Faith and Doubt - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MHC 207

Course Registration Number:

46755 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael W. Rota

This course will be a semester-long introduction to a number of issues relating to faith, doubt, and religious belief. We will focus on the following four questions: Are there good arguments for the existence of God? Are there good arguments against the existence of God? What is faith, and is it rational? And, is there good reason to believe that the faith of the Catholic Church is divinely revealed? In the course of thinking about these questions, we will discuss most or all of the following topics: (a) evidentialist approaches to religious belief, (b) Reformed Epistemology and Alvin Plantinga’s account of the rationality of religious belief, (c) the cosmological argument, (d) the fine-tuning argument, (e) Pascal’s Wager, (f) the argument from evil, (g) the problem of divine hiddenness, (h) the doctrine of Hell, and (i) arguments for the veracity of Catholicism. Heavy emphasis will be placed on the analysis and assessment of arguments. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, 115, or 197.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 254 - 01 Biomedical Ethics - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MHC 209

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MHC 209

Course Registration Number:

47304 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heidi M. Giebel

This course will focus on fascinating and difficult questions in three main areas of medical ethics: doctor-patient relationships, life issues, and social dimensions of medicine. In the doctor-patient section, we will look at issues such as confidentiality of medical records and whether a doctor can withhold information from a patient for his/her own good. In the life issues section, we will touch on the controversies surrounding stem-cell research and human cloning, as well as the more “traditional” issues of abortion and euthanasia. In the social dimensions section of the course, we will evaluate the current state of health care in the U.S. and consider whether or not other nations’ systems are an improvement over ours. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, 115, 197, 214 or 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SPAN 335 - D01 Intro to Spanish Literature M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45571 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jane D. Tar

An introduction to Spanish and Spanish American narrative, drama and poetry. Strongly recommended for students who minor in Spanish. The course is designed to teach students the skills of critical reading and literary analysis. Prerequisites: Successful completion of SPAN 300, 301, 305 or their equivalent with a C- or better in each course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - 01 Bible: Old Testament - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46868 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Kelly M. Wilson

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves the student in an intensive reading and discussion of the Old Testament, also known as the Hebrew scriptures. The course investigates methods of biblical interpretation and the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context. In addition, this course explores the Old Testament as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern) in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - L04 Bible: Old Testament - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 201

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 201

Course Registration Number:

46876 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Paul V. Niskanen

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.”This section involves the student in an intensive reading and discussion of the Old Testament, also known as the Hebrew scriptures. The course investigates methods of biblical interpretation and the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context. In addition, this course explores the Old Testament as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern) in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - L05 Bible: New Testament M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 KOC 113

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

KOC 113

Course Registration Number:

46879 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Commodore M. Combs

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves the student in an intensive historical, literary, and theological reading of major portions of the New Testament in the Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - W02 Bible: Old Testament M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MHC 206

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

MHC 206

Course Registration Number:

46878 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Eugenia O. Gavrilyuk

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.”This section involves the student in an intensive reading and discussion of the Old Testament, also known as the Hebrew scriptures. The course investigates methods of biblical interpretation and the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context. In addition, this course explores the Old Testament as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern) in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - W03 Bible: New Testament See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

46880 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Catherine A. Cory

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves the student in an intensive historical, literary, and theological reading of major portions of the New Testament in the Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JRC LL620815-0920M - - - - - -
-- - W - F - -
THEO 221 - W04 Bible: New Testament See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

46881 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Susan E. Myers

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves the student in an intensive historical, literary, and theological reading of major portions of the New Testament in the Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0955-1135- T - - - - -
JRC 2010955-1135- - - R - - -
THEO 221 - W06 Bible: New Testament See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

46883 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Susan E. Myers

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves the student in an intensive historical, literary, and theological reading of major portions of the New Testament in the Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1525-1700- T - - - - -
JRC 2221525-1700- - - R - - -
THEO 222 - 01 History: American Catholicism M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46914 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Marguerite L. Spencer

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.”This section emphasizes the impact of cultures on one another in the growth of the Catholic community in today's United States. These world and theological views and their practical applications in the piety, politics, and everyday life of Catholics will be the primary focus. By summarizing significant events and characters in the history of the Catholic experience, the student will develop an understanding both of the different ethnic experiences and the theological concerns which created a pluralism among American Catholics that makes the Church of the United States truly catholic.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 222 - L01 History: Medieval Theology See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

46884 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Steven J. McMichael

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves the study of the development of Christian theology from the fall of the Roman Empire until the Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the main themes of the classical Christian views of faith/reason, grace/nature, God/creation in the theologies of such theologians as St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Bonaventure. Other themes that may be treated: the role of monasticism and mendicant life; medieval saints such as St. Francis of Assisi and Catherine of Siena, women's spirituality, mysticism, liturgical developments, religious art and architecture, and the interaction of Christians with Jews and Muslims.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 2051330-1510- T - - - - -
-- - - R - - -
THEO 223 - 01 Belief: The Christian Story See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

46887 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Cara L. Anthony

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section journeys through the whole Christian story, from creation through the drama of sin and salvation to the hope for the age to come. It explores how Christian belief sheds light on contemporary issues such as food sustainability, racial justice, or human cloning.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MCH 2341215-1320M - - - - - -
1215-1320- - - - F - -
-- - - - - - -
THEO 223 - 03 Belief: Thomas Aquinas See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

46889 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Jennifer M. Sanders

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section examines Thomas Aquinas's theological contributions to the Catholic understanding of who God is and how God is related to the universe of human existence. With Aquinas, some of the questions we raise may include: What do we mean when we say "God"? How can human beings know God? Why is there evil and suffering in our universe? Why did God become human and die on a cross? Special attention will be given to Aquinas's life as a Dominican preacher and teacher in the Middle Ages, as well as select contemporary retrievals of Aquinas's systematic theology for responding to the problems and needs of today.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
-- T - - - - -
MHC 2041330-1510- - - R - - -
THEO 223 - L01 Belief: Ancient & Modern - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 KOC 113

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

KOC 113

Course Registration Number:

46890 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Deborah A. Organ

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian doctrines are interrelated with each other and with other beliefs about the world. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant doctrines in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. The course is structured on the classical "system" of the Nicene Creed, and will focus on the ongoing formation of the doctrines of God, Christ, the Spirit, creation, sin, salvation, and Church. Special emphasis will be given to the role of grace in history and human experience.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 223 - W42 HONORS:Belief: God & Happiness - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 206

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 206

Course Registration Number:

47286 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Pavel L. Gavrilyuk

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section addresses the perennial problem of suffering and evil in light of contemporary research on human flourishing and happiness. The central question of the course is whether suffering can play a constructive role in the good life. While some forms of suffering are destructive, other forms of suffering, given the right attitude, can be conducive to the building of character and leading a life that has a richer meaning. The course brings a theological viewpoint to bear on these issues; it also draws on the resources of philosophy, psychology, literature, and history. The written assignments will encourage the students to integrate course material, articulate their own assumptions about suffering and human flourishing, and apply general principles to real-life situations.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 224 - 01 Bridges: Theology & Technology See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

46892 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Barbara K. Sain

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian doctrines are interrelated with each other and with other beliefs about the world. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant doctrines in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. The course is structured on the classical "system" of the Nicene Creed, and will focus on the ongoing formation of the doctrines of God, Christ, the Spirit, creation, sin, salvation, and Church. Special emphasis will be given to the role of grace in history and human experience.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 2041730-1915M - - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
THEO 225 - 01 Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice - T - - - - - 1730 - 2115

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2115

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46901 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Mary K. Twite

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section examines the contributions of Christian faith to reflecting upon, understanding, and resolving issues and ethical questions raised by revolutionary developments in the life sciences, e.g. innovation birth technologies, genetic manipulation and control, human experimentation, the prolonging of life and allocation of scarce medical resources.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 225 - L02 Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 MHC 205

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

MHC 205

Course Registration Number:

46899 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Paul J. Wojda

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.”

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 228 - 03 Comparative: Islam See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

46910 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Fuad S. Naeem

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section is an introduction to the beliefs, practices, and diverse expressions of the religion and traditions of Islam. We will closely study the foundational sources of the Islamic tradition, the Qur’an and the life and legacy of the Prophet Muhammad, and trace the development of Islamic law, theology, spirituality, literature, and art. We will situate Islam as an Abrahamic religion and examine its commonalities, differences, and historical interactions with Christianity and Judaism. Finally, we will analyze contemporary topics such as Muslim responses to the challenges of modernity, Islam in America, and Islam in geopolitics.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1055-1200M - - - F - -
MCH 2351055-1200- - W - - - -

J-Term 2021 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
CATH 340 - 01 Chrch&Cult:Anglo/Latino Encoun See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

10766 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael J. Naughton, Nancy A. Sannerud

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently ecclesial and social. The course’s framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) in relation to how the Church understands “integral human development,” and its contrary of human sin, injustice, suffering, etc. We will examine the relationship between the Anglo and Latino influences in the US Church providing experiences and examples of how the cultural, political and economic spheres of society interact. We will visit a couple of the Latino churches in the Twin Cities engaging the changing face of the Church in Minnesota. We will engage issues such as the growing Latino Church, evangelization and enculturation, historical origins, immigration, especially the undocumented and the problem of poverty and economic development. Depending on Covid restrictions we hope to have several site visits to various places in the local and regional area.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
55S 2070900-1200M T W R - - -
55S 2071200-150010 Jan '21
55S 2070900-1500M T W R F - -
55S 2071800-210018 Jan '21
ENGL 217 - L01 Multicultural Literature - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10669 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

What does it mean to be labeled an African American dramatist? A Latino/a poet? A transgender novelist? An Asian American essayist? A Native American environmental writer? How do the varied experiences and backgrounds of authors writing from diverse subject positions inform, mark, and/or transform their writing? How do the works of these writers fit into, conflict with, actively resist, or even redefine the American Literary canon as it has been traditionally understood? These questions and more will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive reading of literature from: a) American communities of color; b) postcolonial peoples; c) immigrant and/or diasporic peoples; or d) LGBTQ communities. This course will focus on the literary and cultural texts of one or more of these groups with an emphasis on the cultural, political, and historical contexts that surround them. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major, the Human Diversity requirement in the old core curriculum, and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice flag in the new core curriculum. It also completes the core Literature and Writing requirement for those who started with an ENGL 201-204 class in the old core curriculum, satisfies the allied COJO/ENGL requirement for select business students, and fulfills the WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisites: ENGL 121, 190, 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HONR 480 - 03 HONORS Heroes & Heroism - T - R - - - 0900 - 1200 MHC 211

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0900 - 1200

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

10477 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Susan J. Stabile

These interdisciplinary seminars are intended to develop integrating insights through an analysis of topics chosen from different disciplines. Often they are taught by two faculty members or by a visiting lecturer who holds one of the endowed chairs at the university.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - L01 Bible: Old Testament - T W R F - - 0900 - 1200 MHC 205

Days of Week:

- T W R F - -

Time of Day:

0900 - 1200

Location:

MHC 205

Course Registration Number:

10716 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Paul V. Niskanen

This course involves the student in a literary, historical, and theological reading of major portions of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) or New Testament. All sections explore the Bible as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern), examining to varying degrees how the texts have been used in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles. The course also examines elements of power and privilege, both with respect to the social and political positions of the authors and the settings in which the texts were written, and also with respect to how the biblical texts have been appropriated in different time periods and by different communities (in history and today), and used as vehicles of both oppression and liberation. The course investigates the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context, or in their Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts, applying modern methods of biblical interpretation. Students may examine a specialized biblical topic of the instructor’s choosing such as the Pentateuch, historical literature, wisdom literature, prophetic literature, or apocalyptic literature in the Hebrew Bible; or the Gospels, the Letters of Paul, or apocalyptic literature in the New Testament. Courses might focus on a particular theme, such as justice in the Bible, or how Jesus approached forgiveness or nonviolence. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - L02 Bible: New Testament - T W R F - - -

Days of Week:

- T W R F - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10717 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Susan E. Myers

This course involves the student in a literary, historical, and theological reading of major portions of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) or New Testament. All sections explore the Bible as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern), examining to varying degrees how the texts have been used in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles. The course also examines elements of power and privilege, both with respect to the social and political positions of the authors and the settings in which the texts were written, and also with respect to how the biblical texts have been appropriated in different time periods and by different communities (in history and today), and used as vehicles of both oppression and liberation. The course investigates the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context, or in their Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts, applying modern methods of biblical interpretation. Students may examine a specialized biblical topic of the instructor’s choosing such as the Pentateuch, historical literature, wisdom literature, prophetic literature, or apocalyptic literature in the Hebrew Bible; or the Gospels, the Letters of Paul, or apocalyptic literature in the New Testament. Courses might focus on a particular theme, such as justice in the Bible, or how Jesus approached forgiveness or nonviolence. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - W01 Bible: OT Survey - T W R F - - 0900 - 1200

Days of Week:

- T W R F - -

Time of Day:

0900 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10715 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Corrine L. Carvalho

This course involves the student in a literary, historical, and theological reading of major portions of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) or New Testament. All sections explore the Bible as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern), examining to varying degrees how the texts have been used in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles. The course also examines elements of power and privilege, both with respect to the social and political positions of the authors and the settings in which the texts were written, and also with respect to how the biblical texts have been appropriated in different time periods and by different communities (in history and today), and used as vehicles of both oppression and liberation. The course investigates the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context, or in their Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts, applying modern methods of biblical interpretation. Students may examine a specialized biblical topic of the instructor’s choosing such as the Pentateuch, historical literature, wisdom literature, prophetic literature, or apocalyptic literature in the Hebrew Bible; or the Gospels, the Letters of Paul, or apocalyptic literature in the New Testament. Courses might focus on a particular theme, such as justice in the Bible, or how Jesus approached forgiveness or nonviolence. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 222 - L01 History: Early Christian Theol - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10719 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Mark E. DelCogliano

This course introduces students to a historical examination of a particular period or periods of Christian history, such as the emergence and development of the Christian Church in the early centuries, the Middle Ages, or the period of the Reformation, or students may delve into a specialized topic in Christian history with a focus on a topic of the instructor’s choosing, such as Christianity and Nazism, the Second Vatican Council, contemporary Catholic theologians, etc. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 223 - 01 Belief: Ancient & Modern - T W R F - - 0900 - 1200

Days of Week:

- T W R F - -

Time of Day:

0900 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10722 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Mark J. McInroy

This course either introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian teachings relate to each other and to other beliefs about the world, or it focuses on a particular teaching of the Church, such as Christ, salvation, or death and the afterlife. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant teachings in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. Special emphasis is given to the role of grace in history and human experience. All sections explore the ways in which Christian doctrine has influenced and been influenced by the culture in which it is lived, and the role that Christian teachings play in responding to social need. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 223 - L01 Belief: Thomas Aquinas - T W R F - - 0900 - 1200

Days of Week:

- T W R F - -

Time of Day:

0900 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10720 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Jennifer M. Sanders

This course either introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian teachings relate to each other and to other beliefs about the world, or it focuses on a particular teaching of the Church, such as Christ, salvation, or death and the afterlife. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant teachings in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. Special emphasis is given to the role of grace in history and human experience. All sections explore the ways in which Christian doctrine has influenced and been influenced by the culture in which it is lived, and the role that Christian teachings play in responding to social need. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 224 - 01 Bridges: Theology & Genetics - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10723 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Paul J. Wojda

In this course, students will conduct a theological examination of a topic of the instructor’s choosing that is held in conversation with another area of study, such as theology and aesthetics, art, literature film, music, science, psychology, politics, mass media, consumerism, public discourse, technology, or the environment. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 225 - L01 Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10724 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Robert C. Koerpel

This course explores principles, methods, and topics of Christian theological ethics. It addresses the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to understanding the human person; the significance of love, justice, and commitment to the common good in Christian moral life; and the role of the believing community in its relation to culture. Topics might include sex, marriage, and family; crime, justice, and forgiveness; war, peace, and revolution; immigration; environmental sustainability and animal rights; poverty and economic justice, among others. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 226 - 01 Spirituality:Christian Worship - T W R F - - 0900 - 1200

Days of Week:

- T W R F - -

Time of Day:

0900 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10725 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Mary M. Hoden

This course either introduces diverse expressions of Christian spirituality or focuses on topics within a distinctly Christian spirituality according to the discretion of the instructor such as Christian styles of worship, Christian understandings of sacramentality (especially Christian marriage), or stages of spiritual formation. Students will consider methodological issues in the academic study of spirituality. Emphasis is placed on a wide reading in the Christian tradition of both primary and secondary literature in order to assist the student in grasping the integral link between the lived faith of Christians and the theological articulation of that faith. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 226 - L02 Spirituality:Christian Marriag - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10727 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Marguerite L. Spencer

This course either introduces diverse expressions of Christian spirituality or focuses on topics within a distinctly Christian spirituality according to the discretion of the instructor such as Christian styles of worship, Christian understandings of sacramentality (especially Christian marriage), or stages of spiritual formation. Students will consider methodological issues in the academic study of spirituality. Emphasis is placed on a wide reading in the Christian tradition of both primary and secondary literature in order to assist the student in grasping the integral link between the lived faith of Christians and the theological articulation of that faith. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 226 - W01 Spirituality:Christian Marriag - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10729 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Mary K. Twite

This course either introduces diverse expressions of Christian spirituality or focuses on topics within a distinctly Christian spirituality according to the discretion of the instructor such as Christian styles of worship, Christian understandings of sacramentality (especially Christian marriage), or stages of spiritual formation. Students will consider methodological issues in the academic study of spirituality. Emphasis is placed on a wide reading in the Christian tradition of both primary and secondary literature in order to assist the student in grasping the integral link between the lived faith of Christians and the theological articulation of that faith. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - 01 History:Christianity & Nazism - T W R F - - 0900 - 1200

Days of Week:

- T W R F - -

Time of Day:

0900 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10730 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Michael J. Hollerich

In this course, students will explore approaches to theology that emerge out of diverse cultural contexts. Sections may focus on biblical interpretation, dynamics of church life, mission work, or transnational solidarity through the eyes of the marginalized, or they may focus on efforts to articulate and bear witness to the gospel amid new cultures and historical challenges, according to the instructor’s discretion. Sections may focus on experiences of marginalization and oppression as a source for theological reflection for women (giving rise to feminist/womanist/mujerista theologies, for example), or for people of color or indigenous peoples (giving rise to Latin American, African-American, Minjung, and South African liberation theologies, for example), or for economically exploited classes (also giving rise to liberation theologies). This course will thus provide an opportunity to learn how the global Christian community is gaining fresh insights into the gospel that were missed when the dominant perspective on theology reflected primarily the experience of European men, or to learn how claims by Christians have at various times served both to challenge and to reinforce systems of power and privilege. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - 02 Contexts:Women & Hebrew Bible - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10732 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Kelly M. Wilson

In this course, students will explore approaches to theology that emerge out of diverse cultural contexts. Sections may focus on biblical interpretation, dynamics of church life, mission work, or transnational solidarity through the eyes of the marginalized, or they may focus on efforts to articulate and bear witness to the gospel amid new cultures and historical challenges, according to the instructor’s discretion. Sections may focus on experiences of marginalization and oppression as a source for theological reflection for women (giving rise to feminist/womanist/mujerista theologies, for example), or for people of color or indigenous peoples (giving rise to Latin American, African-American, Minjung, and South African liberation theologies, for example), or for economically exploited classes (also giving rise to liberation theologies). This course will thus provide an opportunity to learn how the global Christian community is gaining fresh insights into the gospel that were missed when the dominant perspective on theology reflected primarily the experience of European men, or to learn how claims by Christians have at various times served both to challenge and to reinforce systems of power and privilege. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - L01 Contexts:Justice & Peace - T W R F - - 0900 - 1200

Days of Week:

- T W R F - -

Time of Day:

0900 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10731 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Frederick W. Nairn

In this course, students will explore approaches to theology that emerge out of diverse cultural contexts. Sections may focus on biblical interpretation, dynamics of church life, mission work, or transnational solidarity through the eyes of the marginalized, or they may focus on efforts to articulate and bear witness to the gospel amid new cultures and historical challenges, according to the instructor’s discretion. Sections may focus on experiences of marginalization and oppression as a source for theological reflection for women (giving rise to feminist/womanist/mujerista theologies, for example), or for people of color or indigenous peoples (giving rise to Latin American, African-American, Minjung, and South African liberation theologies, for example), or for economically exploited classes (also giving rise to liberation theologies). This course will thus provide an opportunity to learn how the global Christian community is gaining fresh insights into the gospel that were missed when the dominant perspective on theology reflected primarily the experience of European men, or to learn how claims by Christians have at various times served both to challenge and to reinforce systems of power and privilege. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 228 - 01 Comparative: World Religions - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10735 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Elaine C. MacMillan

This course invites students to explore Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Indigenous worldviews, or other traditions, in relation to Christianity. They may also examine distinctions within a single religious tradition (between Sunni and Shia sects within Islam, for example). Classes may focus on lived practice, modes of inter- and intrareligious dialogue, theologies of religious pluralism, or sacred texts. Students will critically and creatively reflect on the theological opportunities and challenges posed by the reality of religious pluralism in our contemporary world. Pre-requisite: THEO 100.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 228 - 02 Comparative: World Religions - T W R F - - 1300 - 1600 JRC 126

Days of Week:

- T W R F - -

Time of Day:

1300 - 1600

Location:

JRC 126

Course Registration Number:

10736 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Edward T. Ulrich

This course invites students to explore Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Indigenous worldviews, or other traditions, in relation to Christianity. They may also examine distinctions within a single religious tradition (between Sunni and Shia sects within Islam, for example). Classes may focus on lived practice, modes of inter- and intrareligious dialogue, theologies of religious pluralism, or sacred texts. Students will critically and creatively reflect on the theological opportunities and challenges posed by the reality of religious pluralism in our contemporary world. Pre-requisite: THEO 100.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 228 - 03 Comparative: World Religions - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10738 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Carissa S. Wyant

This course invites students to explore Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Indigenous worldviews, or other traditions, in relation to Christianity. They may also examine distinctions within a single religious tradition (between Sunni and Shia sects within Islam, for example). Classes may focus on lived practice, modes of inter- and intrareligious dialogue, theologies of religious pluralism, or sacred texts. Students will critically and creatively reflect on the theological opportunities and challenges posed by the reality of religious pluralism in our contemporary world. Pre-requisite: THEO 100.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 228 - L01 Comparative:Inter Rel Dialogue - T W R F - - 1300 - 1600

Days of Week:

- T W R F - -

Time of Day:

1300 - 1600

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10733 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Steven J. McMichael

This course invites students to explore Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Indigenous worldviews, or other traditions, in relation to Christianity. They may also examine distinctions within a single religious tradition (between Sunni and Shia sects within Islam, for example). Classes may focus on lived practice, modes of inter- and intrareligious dialogue, theologies of religious pluralism, or sacred texts. Students will critically and creatively reflect on the theological opportunities and challenges posed by the reality of religious pluralism in our contemporary world. Pre-requisite: THEO 100.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Spring 2021 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ARTH 305 - L01 Greek Art and Archaeology - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 203

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 203

Course Registration Number:

25494 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Mark D. Stansbury-O'Donnell

A survey of the art and architecture of ancient Greece from the fall of the Bronze Age civilizations to the end of the Hellenistic period. Particular attention will be given to sculpture, vase painting, and the relationship of art to the broader culture, to the art of the ancient Near East and Egypt, and to gender relations in ancient Greece.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 205 - 01 Crisis and Development - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 55S B10

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

24404 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Robert G. Kennedy

This course explores from an interdisciplinary perspective the history of the Catholic Church as it interacts with the secular world and is shaped by its dominant personalities and events. No other institution in history has survived, and flourished, for so long and in the face of so many challenges. This course will critically reflect upon the history of the Church, from its origins in the Apostolic Age to the modern period, as a series of cycles with a common pattern of creativity, achievement, and retreat. Students may expect to complete the course with an awareness and understanding of the major personalities and events, secular and ecclesial, that have shaped the life of the Church.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 301 - 01 The Catholic Vision M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

23002 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William J. Junker

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: CATH 101

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 308 - 01 Woman and Man - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 55S B10

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

25392 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Erika H. Kidd

This course examines the definition of "woman" and "man" from both the historical and the philosophical perspective. Readings and discussion center on the question of (1) whether there are important philosophical differences between women and men and (2) whether such differences are natural or socially constructed. The implications of various answers to those questions are then examined, with special attention given to the Catholic tradition's reflections on the nature and ends of marriage, the character of priestly ordination, friendship between women and men, and human sexuality. The purpose of this course is to examine the ways in which thinkers from a wide spectrum have construed male/female relationships. A major component of this course consists in the study of power and the way it operates both in history and in contemporary culture.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 308 - 02 Woman and Man - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

25421 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Erika H. Kidd

This course examines the definition of "woman" and "man" from both the historical and the philosophical perspective. Readings and discussion center on the question of (1) whether there are important philosophical differences between women and men and (2) whether such differences are natural or socially constructed. The implications of various answers to those questions are then examined, with special attention given to the Catholic tradition's reflections on the nature and ends of marriage, the character of priestly ordination, friendship between women and men, and human sexuality. The purpose of this course is to examine the ways in which thinkers from a wide spectrum have construed male/female relationships. A major component of this course consists in the study of power and the way it operates both in history and in contemporary culture.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 340 - 01 Church&Culture:Soc Dim of Cath - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

25091 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Robert G. Kennedy

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently social and ecclesial. Its specific focus is on the Christian engagement with the world. The course's framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) as described in Centesimus annus. We will examine the ways that Revelation, the sacramental life, and the teachings of the Church call Catholics to seek holiness and to witness to their faith in the world. Specific topics may include social and economic justice, politics and public policy, lay and religious apostolates, education, and marriage and family. Course materials may include resources from philosophy, theology, history, economics, and political science. This course will satisfy the third level Faith and Catholic Tradition core requirement. Prerequisite: CATH 101

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 405 - 01 John Henry Newman M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 55S B10

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

24701 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David P. Deavel

John Henry Newman has been called, somewhat misleadingly, the father of the Second Vatican Council. According to Jarsoslav Pelikan, "(n)ot only to his latter day disciples, ...but to many of those who have drawn other conclusions from his insights, John Henry Newman has become the most important theological thinker of modern times." T.S. Eliot had insisted that he is one of the two most eloquent sermon writers in the English language. Pope Benedict XVI stressed his importance as the theologian of conscience when he presided at his beatification in England. In this course we will examine not only Cardinal Newman's most important theological works focusing on the development of doctrine and the role of conscience in relation to Church authority, but also his philosophical works addressing the relations of faith and reason, his work on university education and selected poetry, meditations and devotions, and sermons.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CLAS 245 - W01 Classical Mythology M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

24740 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth Z. Hepner

Mythology is the embodiment and encoding of the beliefs, principles, and aspirations of ancient cultures. This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to mythology as an introduction and foundation to Classical civilization. Both Greek and Roman myths will be examined from a variety of theoretical perspectives, including aetioligical, structuralist, and psychological theories. Consideration will also be given to the study of literature in translation, art history, religion, and history. The course grade will be principally based on writing assignments and class discussions. ENGL 203 may also be substituted for this course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COMM 370 - 01 Intercultural Communication M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25409 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Xiaowen Guan

Study of the influence of cultural values on social behavior; examination of theories of intercultural communication; emphasis on effective intercultural interaction.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W01 Writers at Work M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25071 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

Writers at Work will examine fiction, nonfiction, drama, and poetry from the point of view of both writer and audience, artist and critic. We will read contemporary literature in each genre, as well as some secondary materials written whenever possible by those same authors. For example, we might read David Mamet's play GLENGARRY, GLEN ROSS and then his craft book ON DIRECTING FILM; Charles Baxter's novel THE FEAST OF LOVE and then his craft book THE ART OF SUBTEXT; Richard Hugo's poetry as well as his craft book THE TRIGGERING TOWN; Annie Dillard and Jo Anne Beard's essays paired with Sven Birkerts' THE ART OF TIME IN MEMOIR; and then various readings paired with THE WRITERS' NOTEBOOK: CRAFT ESSAYS FROM TIN HOUSE. Everyone will both write in and about each genre. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W02 Writers at Work M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25072 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

Writers at Work will examine fiction, nonfiction, drama, and poetry from the point of view of both writer and audience, artist and critic. We will read contemporary literature in each genre, as well as some secondary materials written whenever possible by those same authors. For example, we might read David Mamet's play GLENGARRY, GLEN ROSS and then his craft book ON DIRECTING FILM; Charles Baxter's novel THE FEAST OF LOVE and then his craft book THE ART OF SUBTEXT; Richard Hugo's poetry as well as his craft book THE TRIGGERING TOWN; Annie Dillard and Jo Anne Beard's essays paired with Sven Birkerts' THE ART OF TIME IN MEMOIR; and then various readings paired with THE WRITERS' NOTEBOOK: CRAFT ESSAYS FROM TIN HOUSE. Everyone will both write in and about each genre. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W03 The American Short Story - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25073 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and peep into our future. As we study the artistic development of the American short story, our process of discovery will be progressive, beginning with some of this country's earliest and most influential short story writers like Irving and Poe and closing with such masters of contemporary fiction as Alice Walker and Jill McCorkle. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W04 The American Short Story - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25074 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and peep into our future. As we study the artistic development of the American short story, our process of discovery will be progressive, beginning with some of this country's earliest and most influential short story writers like Irving and Poe and closing with such masters of contemporary fiction as Alice Walker and Jill McCorkle. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W01 Family is Family M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25076 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

Everyone begins as part of a family. But what counts as "family"--only those connected to us through biology or also those connected to us by choice? What kinds of challenges do adopted children face? What kinds of challenges do biological children face when they look at their difficult, aging parents and realize, yes, this could be my future? There are certainly many ways for families to be dysfunctional; what kinds of steps and work are necessary for family to be functional? This course will examine literature devoted to the topic of family in all of its forms. Texts include Henrik Ibsen's A DOLL HOUSE, Heather Raffo's NOURA, Jane Jong Trenka's THE LANGUAGE OF BLOOD, Alison Bechdel's FUN HOME, Natasha Trethewey's MONUMENT, August Wilson's FENCES, and Dominique Morisseau's PIPELINE. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W02 Sports and Social Justice See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25083 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

What is any sports event but a story--multiple stories--playing out before our eyes? Sports by definition involve drama: conflicts in decision making, in relationships, with nature, and, if we believe it possible, conflicts with the supernatural. It's not an accident that some of our greatest metaphors come from the arena of athletics. Through sports we have a way to look at human values--at the best we have to offer and sometimes the worst. We’ll use sports literature to investigate what is just… and what is unjust… and how we discern which is which. In this class, we will read fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry. Books may include GIRL RUNNER, BIG SMOKE, TAKE ME OUT, and BEST AMERICAN SPORTS WRITING 2020. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1215-1320M - W - - - -
1215-1320- - - - F - -
ENGL 202 - W03 Greenest Land: Irish Writing M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25482 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David M. Gardiner

This course examines a body of Irish texts within the framework of the discipline of Irish Studies – a multi-disciplinary field of studies which includes literature, music, visual arts and film that stands adjacent to, but apart from, English studies. Texts will include major authors, musicians and film-makers over the past century to the present. Also, throughout the term, students will have opportunities to be involved with the activities and publications of the UST Center for Irish Studies. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W04 Medical Dramas See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25079 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy M. Muse

In medical schools you’ll now find doctors- and nurses-in-training reading literature and engaging in role-play to learn how to care. This course explores dramatic literature as a tool for healing; in it, we’ll read and write about drama as literary genre, blueprint for performance, and means of understanding ourselves and others. The plays we will encounter illuminate questions about intimacy and care in relationships and the physical and mental traumas of racism, addiction, anxiety, depression, grief, and suicide. Students will have the opportunity to work with local theater artists and to research the effects of our current pandemics on mental health. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0955-1135- T - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 202 - W05 Medical Dramas See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25080 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy M. Muse

In medical schools you’ll now find doctors- and nurses-in-training reading literature and engaging in role-play to learn how to care. This course explores dramatic literature as a tool for healing; in it, we’ll read and write about drama as literary genre, blueprint for performance, and means of understanding ourselves and others. The plays we will encounter illuminate questions about intimacy and care in relationships and the physical and mental traumas of racism, addiction, anxiety, depression, grief, and suicide. Students will have the opportunity to work with local theater artists and to research the effects of our current pandemics on mental health. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1330-1510- T - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 202 - W41 HNRS Sports & Social Justice See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25382 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

What is any sports event but a story--multiple stories--playing out before our eyes? Sports by definition involve drama: conflicts in decision making, in relationships, with nature, and, if we believe it possible, conflicts with the supernatural. It's not an accident that some of our greatest metaphors come from the arena of athletics. Through sports we have a way to look at human values--at the best we have to offer and sometimes the worst. We’ll use sports literature to investigate what is just… and what is unjust… and how we discern which is which. In this class, we will read fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry. Books may include GIRL RUNNER, BIG SMOKE, TAKE ME OUT, and BEST AMERICAN SPORTS WRITING 2020. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This Aquinas Scholars honors course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1055-1200M - W - - - -
1055-1200- - - - F - -
ENGL 202 - W42 HNRS City Lights: Urban Lit See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25383 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Olga L. Herrera

This course explores urban experience through the perspective of writers working in fiction, drama, creative nonfiction, and poetry. It will focus on the way writers in those genres use language and literary devices to address the life and landscape of the city. Students will engage first-hand with the urban environment in the Twin Cities and bring that experience into their analytic and reflective writing for the semester. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This Aquinas Scholars honors course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1055-1200M - - - - - -
1055-1200- - - - F - -
ENGL 202 - W43 HNRS City Lights: Urban Lit See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25752 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Olga L. Herrera

This course explores urban experience through the perspective of writers working in fiction, drama, creative nonfiction, and poetry. It will focus on the way writers in those genres use language and literary devices to address the life and landscape of the city. Students will engage first-hand with the urban environment in the Twin Cities and bring that experience into their analytic and reflective writing for the semester. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This Aquinas Scholars honors course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1055-1200- - W - - - -
1055-1200- - - - F - -
ENGL 203 - W01 Once Upon a Time: Fairy Tales - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25084 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. Bouwman

In this course we'll study a small collection of fairy and folk tales closely, both in their early written sources and later literary re-imaginings. As we read different versions of the stories, we'll ask ourselves how these tales are structured, what audiences they're aimed at, what they might be telling us about the culture of the time, and what they might have to say to us today. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W02 Once Upon a Time: Fairy Tales - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25085 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. Bouwman

In this course we'll study a small collection of fairy and folk tales closely, both in their early written sources and later literary re-imaginings. As we read different versions of the stories, we'll ask ourselves how these tales are structured, what audiences they're aimed at, what they might be telling us about the culture of the time, and what they might have to say to us today. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W51 Home: Living in America (ESL) - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26351 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Suzanne L. Donsky

This English as a Second Language section of ENGL 203 explores how the notion of "home" is represented in literature. It invites students to reflect on what "home" means to them, especially when living overseas. Is it a geographical location (the country and city they were born in and/or live in)? Is it an emotional bond with family members and other people like themselves? Is it a sense of shelter, comfort, safety, and being welcome when they move to a new place? When one is born in a country but moves to another, where is one's home? In this course, we will explore the many ways writers have represented their senses of home and senses of being homeless in a variety of literary works--novels, poems, and drama. We will investigate through our readings and discussions how our senses of home are often bound up with issues such as memory, hope, loss, regionalism, alienation, and globalization. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 227 - 01 Global History Genocide 1900- See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25882 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

The course surveys some of the most heinous mass murders that took place during the twentieth century: 1) The Herero and Nama in German South Africa 2) Armenian Genocide 3) Stalin’s Genocides 4) The Holocaust 5) Mass Killing in Cambodia 6) Rwandan Genocide 7) Ethnic Cleansing in Yugoslavia. The class will critically examine the concepts and terms associated with mass murder. Through careful reading of primary and secondary literature students will investigate why, under what circumstances and by whom these acts were carried out. Students will also seek to understand the responsibilities and responses of local, national, and international communities regarding mass killing. Finally, the course will depict the different ways that we remember these events and commemorate their victims. Prerequisite: One 100-level History course or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0955-1135- T - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
HIST 228 - 01 Environmental History M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25875 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

Humans are part of nature, and yet they have always changed and manipulated it. This course examines the entangled story of human/nature interactions, from the early history of our species up into the twenty-first century. Doing this draws on a range of methods, tools, and skills, including archaeology and anthropology, physical sciences like geology and biology, and the close reading of texts and objects as developed in humanistic disciplines like English, philosophy, and history. Key topics may include the co-evolution of people and other species; the ways that world religions have understood nature; the global mingling of people, plants, animals, and microbes after 1492; responses to pollution and toxicity in the modern world; and the development and politicization of climate science in the 20th-21st centuries.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 228 - 02 Environmental History M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25876 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

Humans are part of nature, and yet they have always changed and manipulated it. This course examines the entangled story of human/nature interactions, from the early history of our species up into the twenty-first century. Doing this draws on a range of methods, tools, and skills, including archaeology and anthropology, physical sciences like geology and biology, and the close reading of texts and objects as developed in humanistic disciplines like English, philosophy, and history. Key topics may include the co-evolution of people and other species; the ways that world religions have understood nature; the global mingling of people, plants, animals, and microbes after 1492; responses to pollution and toxicity in the modern world; and the development and politicization of climate science in the 20th-21st centuries.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JOUR 372 - W01 Environmental Journalism - T - R - - - 1730 - 1915

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25555 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mark R. Neuzil

This course focuses on the communication of mediated information about the environment. Students will examine what makes (and what has made) the environmental stories we tell about ourselves, from writing about agriculture, nature and spirituality to green advertising, the rhetoric of the environmental movement, and environmental movies and music.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 220 - 01 Logic - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

23174 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Sandra L. Menssen

This course provides students with skills for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating the sorts of reasoning encountered in natural language. Emphasis will be placed on attaining facility with different formal systems for representing and evaluating arguments - including propositional logic, Aristotelian syllogistic, first-order predicate calculus, - as well as on acquiring the ability to apply these systems in the analysis and evaluation of arguments in ordinary and philosophical discourse. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 220 - 02 Logic M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

23175 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael J. Winter

This course provides students with skills for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating the sorts of reasoning encountered in natural language. Emphasis will be placed on attaining facility with different formal systems for representing and evaluating arguments - including propositional logic, Aristotelian syllogistic, first-order predicate calculus, - as well as on acquiring the ability to apply these systems in the analysis and evaluation of arguments in ordinary and philosophical discourse. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 220 - 03 Logic M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

24546 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael J. Winter

This course provides students with skills for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating the sorts of reasoning encountered in natural language. Emphasis will be placed on attaining facility with different formal systems for representing and evaluating arguments - including propositional logic, Aristotelian syllogistic, first-order predicate calculus, - as well as on acquiring the ability to apply these systems in the analysis and evaluation of arguments in ordinary and philosophical discourse. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 235 - 01 Politics, Law, and Common Good M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25461 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher H. Toner

A philosophical examination into the origin, nature, purpose, and legitimacy of government and law, especially as these relate to the good of individuals and the common good. Possible questions include: Are human beings by nature political animals? What justifies political and legal authority? What sorts of political regimes can be just and legitimate? Is there a best type of government? Are there universal human rights and, if so, where do they come from? What are the respective roles of legislator, executive, and judge? Can civil disobedience ever be justified? Can violent revolution? Should government and law take stands on questions of morality, religion, and the meaning of life or try to remain neutral in these matters? The course will consider both classical and contemporary reflection on such topics, including from authors within Catholic intellectual tradition in conversation with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 241 - 01 Hist. & Philosophy of Medicine - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25462 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Peter M. Distelzweig

This course presents an integrated, interdisciplinary examination of philosophical developments in the history of medical science and health care. Students will develop a critical and creative perspective on medicine and health care through philosophical exploration of their history, foundations, and purposes. Students will study important episodes and developments in the history of the theory and practice of medicine and explore philosophical analyses of and arguments about the nature of medical knowledge, health, disease and health care. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 258 - 01 Environmental Ethics M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

24548 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Faith G. Pawl

A consideration of the ethical dimensions of human interaction with the environment, including inquiry into the scope and justification of our obligations concerning the environment. Possible topics include: the question of who all (or what all) count as the proper objects of moral consideration, animal welfare, species preservation, conservation, climate change, environmental racism, population pressure, sustainability, and what it means to say that human beings are charged with the care of Creation. Special attention will be given to reflection on these topics from within Catholic intellectual tradition, in dialogue with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 460 - D01 Philosophy of God - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25457 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael W. Rota

Systematic treatment of philosophical arguments concerning the existence and attributes of God. Prerequisite: PHIL 365.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 460 - D02 Philosophy of God - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25458 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mark K. Spencer

Systematic treatment of philosophical arguments concerning the existence and attributes of God. Prerequisite: PHIL 365.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SPAN 315 - L01 Hispanic Linguistics M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

23802 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Tight

An introduction to both contemporary and historical Hispanic linguistics. Descriptive Spanish phonetics and phonology. History of the Spanish language with emphasis on historical sound-change phenomena. Systematic study of dialectal variation in both Spain and Spanish America. Offered in fall semester. Prerequisites: Successful completion of SPAN 301 and 305 or their equivalents with a C- or better in each course, (may be taken simultaneously with SPAN 305).

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - 02 Bible: Old Testament M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26191 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Paul V. Niskanen

This course involves the student in a literary, historical, and theological reading of major portions of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) or New Testament. All sections explore the Bible as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern), examining to varying degrees how the texts have been used in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles. The course also examines elements of power and privilege, both with respect to the social and political positions of the authors and the settings in which the texts were written, and also with respect to how the biblical texts have been appropriated in different time periods and by different communities (in history and today), and used as vehicles of both oppression and liberation. The course investigates the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context, or in their Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts, applying modern methods of biblical interpretation. Students may examine a specialized biblical topic of the instructor’s choosing such as the Pentateuch, historical literature, wisdom literature, prophetic literature, or apocalyptic literature in the Hebrew Bible; or the Gospels, the Letters of Paul, or apocalyptic literature in the New Testament. Courses might focus on a particular theme, such as justice in the Bible, or how Jesus approached forgiveness or nonviolence. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - L05 Bible: New Testament M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26072 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

David T. Landry

This course involves the student in a literary, historical, and theological reading of major portions of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) or New Testament. All sections explore the Bible as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern), examining to varying degrees how the texts have been used in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles. The course also examines elements of power and privilege, both with respect to the social and political positions of the authors and the settings in which the texts were written, and also with respect to how the biblical texts have been appropriated in different time periods and by different communities (in history and today), and used as vehicles of both oppression and liberation. The course investigates the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context, or in their Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts, applying modern methods of biblical interpretation. Students may examine a specialized biblical topic of the instructor’s choosing such as the Pentateuch, historical literature, wisdom literature, prophetic literature, or apocalyptic literature in the Hebrew Bible; or the Gospels, the Letters of Paul, or apocalyptic literature in the New Testament. Courses might focus on a particular theme, such as justice in the Bible, or how Jesus approached forgiveness or nonviolence. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - L06 Bible: New Testament M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26078 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

David T. Landry

This course involves the student in a literary, historical, and theological reading of major portions of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) or New Testament. All sections explore the Bible as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern), examining to varying degrees how the texts have been used in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles. The course also examines elements of power and privilege, both with respect to the social and political positions of the authors and the settings in which the texts were written, and also with respect to how the biblical texts have been appropriated in different time periods and by different communities (in history and today), and used as vehicles of both oppression and liberation. The course investigates the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context, or in their Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts, applying modern methods of biblical interpretation. Students may examine a specialized biblical topic of the instructor’s choosing such as the Pentateuch, historical literature, wisdom literature, prophetic literature, or apocalyptic literature in the Hebrew Bible; or the Gospels, the Letters of Paul, or apocalyptic literature in the New Testament. Courses might focus on a particular theme, such as justice in the Bible, or how Jesus approached forgiveness or nonviolence. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - W03 Bible: Old Testament - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26113 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Eugenia O. Gavrilyuk

This course involves the student in a literary, historical, and theological reading of major portions of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) or New Testament. All sections explore the Bible as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern), examining to varying degrees how the texts have been used in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles. The course also examines elements of power and privilege, both with respect to the social and political positions of the authors and the settings in which the texts were written, and also with respect to how the biblical texts have been appropriated in different time periods and by different communities (in history and today), and used as vehicles of both oppression and liberation. The course investigates the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context, or in their Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts, applying modern methods of biblical interpretation. Students may examine a specialized biblical topic of the instructor’s choosing such as the Pentateuch, historical literature, wisdom literature, prophetic literature, or apocalyptic literature in the Hebrew Bible; or the Gospels, the Letters of Paul, or apocalyptic literature in the New Testament. Courses might focus on a particular theme, such as justice in the Bible, or how Jesus approached forgiveness or nonviolence. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - W04 Bible: Old Testament M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26117 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Eugenia O. Gavrilyuk

This course involves the student in a literary, historical, and theological reading of major portions of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) or New Testament. All sections explore the Bible as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern), examining to varying degrees how the texts have been used in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles. The course also examines elements of power and privilege, both with respect to the social and political positions of the authors and the settings in which the texts were written, and also with respect to how the biblical texts have been appropriated in different time periods and by different communities (in history and today), and used as vehicles of both oppression and liberation. The course investigates the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context, or in their Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts, applying modern methods of biblical interpretation. Students may examine a specialized biblical topic of the instructor’s choosing such as the Pentateuch, historical literature, wisdom literature, prophetic literature, or apocalyptic literature in the Hebrew Bible; or the Gospels, the Letters of Paul, or apocalyptic literature in the New Testament. Courses might focus on a particular theme, such as justice in the Bible, or how Jesus approached forgiveness or nonviolence. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - W07 Bible: New Testament See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26079 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Catherine A. Cory

This course involves the student in a literary, historical, and theological reading of major portions of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) or New Testament. All sections explore the Bible as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern), examining to varying degrees how the texts have been used in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles. The course also examines elements of power and privilege, both with respect to the social and political positions of the authors and the settings in which the texts were written, and also with respect to how the biblical texts have been appropriated in different time periods and by different communities (in history and today), and used as vehicles of both oppression and liberation. The course investigates the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context, or in their Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts, applying modern methods of biblical interpretation. Students may examine a specialized biblical topic of the instructor’s choosing such as the Pentateuch, historical literature, wisdom literature, prophetic literature, or apocalyptic literature in the Hebrew Bible; or the Gospels, the Letters of Paul, or apocalyptic literature in the New Testament. Courses might focus on a particular theme, such as justice in the Bible, or how Jesus approached forgiveness or nonviolence. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0815-0920M - - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
THEO 221 - W7A Bible: New Testament See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26088 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Catherine A. Cory

This course involves the student in a literary, historical, and theological reading of major portions of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) or New Testament. All sections explore the Bible as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern), examining to varying degrees how the texts have been used in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles. The course also examines elements of power and privilege, both with respect to the social and political positions of the authors and the settings in which the texts were written, and also with respect to how the biblical texts have been appropriated in different time periods and by different communities (in history and today), and used as vehicles of both oppression and liberation. The course investigates the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context, or in their Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts, applying modern methods of biblical interpretation. Students may examine a specialized biblical topic of the instructor’s choosing such as the Pentateuch, historical literature, wisdom literature, prophetic literature, or apocalyptic literature in the Hebrew Bible; or the Gospels, the Letters of Paul, or apocalyptic literature in the New Testament. Courses might focus on a particular theme, such as justice in the Bible, or how Jesus approached forgiveness or nonviolence. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0815-0920- - W - - - -
-- - - - - - -
THEO 222 - L01 History: Early Christian Theol M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26125 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Mark E. DelCogliano

This course introduces students to a historical examination of a particular period or periods of Christian history, such as the emergence and development of the Christian Church in the early centuries, the Middle Ages, or the period of the Reformation, or students may delve into a specialized topic in Christian history with a focus on a topic of the instructor’s choosing, such as Christianity and Nazism, the Second Vatican Council, contemporary Catholic theologians, etc. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 222 - L02 History: Early Christian Theo M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26126 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Mark E. DelCogliano

This course introduces students to a historical examination of a particular period or periods of Christian history, such as the emergence and development of the Christian Church in the early centuries, the Middle Ages, or the period of the Reformation, or students may delve into a specialized topic in Christian history with a focus on a topic of the instructor’s choosing, such as Christianity and Nazism, the Second Vatican Council, contemporary Catholic theologians, etc. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 222 - L03 History: Medieval Theology See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26128 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Steven J. McMichael

This course introduces students to a historical examination of a particular period or periods of Christian history, such as the emergence and development of the Christian Church in the early centuries, the Middle Ages, or the period of the Reformation, or students may delve into a specialized topic in Christian history with a focus on a topic of the instructor’s choosing, such as Christianity and Nazism, the Second Vatican Council, contemporary Catholic theologians, etc. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1215-1320M - - - - - -
1215-1320- - W - F - -
THEO 222 - L04 History: Medieval Theology See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26138 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Steven J. McMichael

This course introduces students to a historical examination of a particular period or periods of Christian history, such as the emergence and development of the Christian Church in the early centuries, the Middle Ages, or the period of the Reformation, or students may delve into a specialized topic in Christian history with a focus on a topic of the instructor’s choosing, such as Christianity and Nazism, the Second Vatican Council, contemporary Catholic theologians, etc. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1335-1440M - - - - - -
1335-1440- - W - F - -
THEO 222 - L3A History: Medieval History See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26148 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Steven J. McMichael

This course introduces students to a historical examination of a particular period or periods of Christian history, such as the emergence and development of the Christian Church in the early centuries, the Middle Ages, or the period of the Reformation, or students may delve into a specialized topic in Christian history with a focus on a topic of the instructor’s choosing, such as Christianity and Nazism, the Second Vatican Council, contemporary Catholic theologians, etc. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1215-1320M - - - F - -
1215-1320- - W - - - -
THEO 222 - L4A History: Medieval Theology See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26144 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Steven J. McMichael

This course introduces students to a historical examination of a particular period or periods of Christian history, such as the emergence and development of the Christian Church in the early centuries, the Middle Ages, or the period of the Reformation, or students may delve into a specialized topic in Christian history with a focus on a topic of the instructor’s choosing, such as Christianity and Nazism, the Second Vatican Council, contemporary Catholic theologians, etc. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1335-1440M - - - F - -
1335-1440- - W - - - -
THEO 222 - W05 History: Reformation M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26156 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Shirley E. Jordon

This course introduces students to a historical examination of a particular period or periods of Christian history, such as the emergence and development of the Christian Church in the early centuries, the Middle Ages, or the period of the Reformation, or students may delve into a specialized topic in Christian history with a focus on a topic of the instructor’s choosing, such as Christianity and Nazism, the Second Vatican Council, contemporary Catholic theologians, etc. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 223 - 01 Belief: The Christian Story M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26194 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Cara L. Anthony

This course either introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian teachings relate to each other and to other beliefs about the world, or it focuses on a particular teaching of the Church, such as Christ, salvation, or death and the afterlife. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant teachings in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. Special emphasis is given to the role of grace in history and human experience. All sections explore the ways in which Christian doctrine has influenced and been influenced by the culture in which it is lived, and the role that Christian teachings play in responding to social need. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 223 - 02 Belief: The Christian Story M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26196 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Cara L. Anthony

This course either introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian teachings relate to each other and to other beliefs about the world, or it focuses on a particular teaching of the Church, such as Christ, salvation, or death and the afterlife. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant teachings in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. Special emphasis is given to the role of grace in history and human experience. All sections explore the ways in which Christian doctrine has influenced and been influenced by the culture in which it is lived, and the role that Christian teachings play in responding to social need. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 223 - L03 Belief: Ancient & Modern - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26157 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Deborah A. Organ

This course either introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian teachings relate to each other and to other beliefs about the world, or it focuses on a particular teaching of the Church, such as Christ, salvation, or death and the afterlife. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant teachings in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. Special emphasis is given to the role of grace in history and human experience. All sections explore the ways in which Christian doctrine has influenced and been influenced by the culture in which it is lived, and the role that Christian teachings play in responding to social need. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 223 - L04 Belief: Ancient & Modern See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26158 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Barbara K. Sain

This course either introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian teachings relate to each other and to other beliefs about the world, or it focuses on a particular teaching of the Church, such as Christ, salvation, or death and the afterlife. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant teachings in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. Special emphasis is given to the role of grace in history and human experience. All sections explore the ways in which Christian doctrine has influenced and been influenced by the culture in which it is lived, and the role that Christian teachings play in responding to social need. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0955-1135- T - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
THEO 223 - L05 Belief: Ancient & Modern See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26192 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Barbara K. Sain

This course either introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian teachings relate to each other and to other beliefs about the world, or it focuses on a particular teaching of the Church, such as Christ, salvation, or death and the afterlife. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant teachings in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. Special emphasis is given to the role of grace in history and human experience. All sections explore the ways in which Christian doctrine has influenced and been influenced by the culture in which it is lived, and the role that Christian teachings play in responding to social need. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1330-1510- T - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
THEO 223 - L06 Belief: Ancient & Modern - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26343 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Deborah A. Organ

This course either introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian teachings relate to each other and to other beliefs about the world, or it focuses on a particular teaching of the Church, such as Christ, salvation, or death and the afterlife. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant teachings in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. Special emphasis is given to the role of grace in history and human experience. All sections explore the ways in which Christian doctrine has influenced and been influenced by the culture in which it is lived, and the role that Christian teachings play in responding to social need. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 224 - 01 Bridges: Theology & Beauty M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26204 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Mark J. McInroy

In this course, students will conduct a theological examination of a topic of the instructor’s choosing that is held in conversation with another area of study, such as theology and aesthetics, art, literature film, music, science, psychology, politics, mass media, consumerism, public discourse, technology, or the environment. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 224 - 02 Bridges: Theology & Politics - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26208 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Michael J. Hollerich

In this course, students will conduct a theological examination of a topic of the instructor’s choosing that is held in conversation with another area of study, such as theology and aesthetics, art, literature film, music, science, psychology, politics, mass media, consumerism, public discourse, technology, or the environment. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 224 - 03 Bridges: Theology & Politics - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26211 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Michael J. Hollerich

In this course, students will conduct a theological examination of a topic of the instructor’s choosing that is held in conversation with another area of study, such as theology and aesthetics, art, literature film, music, science, psychology, politics, mass media, consumerism, public discourse, technology, or the environment. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 224 - 41 HONORS:Bridges Theology Beauty M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26206 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Mark J. McInroy

In this course, students will conduct a theological examination of a topic of the instructor’s choosing that is held in conversation with another area of study, such as theology and aesthetics, art, literature film, music, science, psychology, politics, mass media, consumerism, public discourse, technology, or the environment. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 224 - W05 Bridges:Theology & Environment M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26198 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Cara L. Anthony, Thomas A. Hickson

In this course, students will conduct a theological examination of a topic of the instructor’s choosing that is held in conversation with another area of study, such as theology and aesthetics, art, literature film, music, science, psychology, politics, mass media, consumerism, public discourse, technology, or the environment. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 224 - W06 Bridges: Theology in Film - - W - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26200 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Robert C. Koerpel

In this course, students will conduct a theological examination of a topic of the instructor’s choosing that is held in conversation with another area of study, such as theology and aesthetics, art, literature film, music, science, psychology, politics, mass media, consumerism, public discourse, technology, or the environment. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 224 - W07 Bridges:Theology & Science M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26202 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Brian Zuelke

In this course, students will conduct a theological examination of a topic of the instructor’s choosing that is held in conversation with another area of study, such as theology and aesthetics, art, literature film, music, science, psychology, politics, mass media, consumerism, public discourse, technology, or the environment. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 225 - 07 Faith & Ethics: Bioethics - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26248 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Paul J. Wojda

This course explores principles, methods, and topics of Christian theological ethics. It addresses the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to understanding the human person; the significance of love, justice, and commitment to the common good in Christian moral life; and the role of the believing community in its relation to culture. Topics might include sex, marriage, and family; crime, justice, and forgiveness; war, peace, and revolution; immigration; environmental sustainability and animal rights; poverty and economic justice, among others. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 225 - L03 Faith & Ethics; Love & Justice M - W - - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26215 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Robert C. Koerpel

This course explores principles, methods, and topics of Christian theological ethics. It addresses the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to understanding the human person; the significance of love, justice, and commitment to the common good in Christian moral life; and the role of the believing community in its relation to culture. Topics might include sex, marriage, and family; crime, justice, and forgiveness; war, peace, and revolution; immigration; environmental sustainability and animal rights; poverty and economic justice, among others. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 225 - L04 Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26216 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Robert C. Koerpel

This course explores principles, methods, and topics of Christian theological ethics. It addresses the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to understanding the human person; the significance of love, justice, and commitment to the common good in Christian moral life; and the role of the believing community in its relation to culture. Topics might include sex, marriage, and family; crime, justice, and forgiveness; war, peace, and revolution; immigration; environmental sustainability and animal rights; poverty and economic justice, among others. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 225 - L05 Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26217 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Amy M. Levad

This course explores principles, methods, and topics of Christian theological ethics. It addresses the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to understanding the human person; the significance of love, justice, and commitment to the common good in Christian moral life; and the role of the believing community in its relation to culture. Topics might include sex, marriage, and family; crime, justice, and forgiveness; war, peace, and revolution; immigration; environmental sustainability and animal rights; poverty and economic justice, among others. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0800-0940- T - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
THEO 225 - L06 Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26218 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Amy M. Levad

This course explores principles, methods, and topics of Christian theological ethics. It addresses the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to understanding the human person; the significance of love, justice, and commitment to the common good in Christian moral life; and the role of the believing community in its relation to culture. Topics might include sex, marriage, and family; crime, justice, and forgiveness; war, peace, and revolution; immigration; environmental sustainability and animal rights; poverty and economic justice, among others. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0955-1040- T - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
THEO 226 - 01 Spirituality:ChristianMarriage - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26396 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Mary K. Twite

This course either introduces diverse expressions of Christian spirituality or focuses on topics within a distinctly Christian spirituality according to the discretion of the instructor such as Christian styles of worship, Christian understandings of sacramentality (especially Christian marriage), or stages of spiritual formation. Students will consider methodological issues in the academic study of spirituality. Emphasis is placed on a wide reading in the Christian tradition of both primary and secondary literature in order to assist the student in grasping the integral link between the lived faith of Christians and the theological articulation of that faith. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 226 - 02 Spirituality:Christian Marriag - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26397 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Mary K. Twite

This course either introduces diverse expressions of Christian spirituality or focuses on topics within a distinctly Christian spirituality according to the discretion of the instructor such as Christian styles of worship, Christian understandings of sacramentality (especially Christian marriage), or stages of spiritual formation. Students will consider methodological issues in the academic study of spirituality. Emphasis is placed on a wide reading in the Christian tradition of both primary and secondary literature in order to assist the student in grasping the integral link between the lived faith of Christians and the theological articulation of that faith. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - 01 Contexts: Justice & Peace - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26234 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Carissa S. Wyant

In this course, students will explore approaches to theology that emerge out of diverse cultural contexts. Sections may focus on biblical interpretation, dynamics of church life, mission work, or transnational solidarity through the eyes of the marginalized, or they may focus on efforts to articulate and bear witness to the gospel amid new cultures and historical challenges, according to the instructor’s discretion. Sections may focus on experiences of marginalization and oppression as a source for theological reflection for women (giving rise to feminist/womanist/mujerista theologies, for example), or for people of color or indigenous peoples (giving rise to Latin American, African-American, Minjung, and South African liberation theologies, for example), or for economically exploited classes (also giving rise to liberation theologies). This course will thus provide an opportunity to learn how the global Christian community is gaining fresh insights into the gospel that were missed when the dominant perspective on theology reflected primarily the experience of European men, or to learn how claims by Christians have at various times served both to challenge and to reinforce systems of power and privilege. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - 02 Contexts: Nazism & Apartheid See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26235 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Kimberly J. Vrudny

In this course, students will explore approaches to theology that emerge out of diverse cultural contexts. Sections may focus on biblical interpretation, dynamics of church life, mission work, or transnational solidarity through the eyes of the marginalized, or they may focus on efforts to articulate and bear witness to the gospel amid new cultures and historical challenges, according to the instructor’s discretion. Sections may focus on experiences of marginalization and oppression as a source for theological reflection for women (giving rise to feminist/womanist/mujerista theologies, for example), or for people of color or indigenous peoples (giving rise to Latin American, African-American, Minjung, and South African liberation theologies, for example), or for economically exploited classes (also giving rise to liberation theologies). This course will thus provide an opportunity to learn how the global Christian community is gaining fresh insights into the gospel that were missed when the dominant perspective on theology reflected primarily the experience of European men, or to learn how claims by Christians have at various times served both to challenge and to reinforce systems of power and privilege. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0935-1040- - - - F - -
-- - - - - - -
THEO 227 - 03 Contexts: Nazism & Apartheid See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26236 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Kimberly J. Vrudny

In this course, students will explore approaches to theology that emerge out of diverse cultural contexts. Sections may focus on biblical interpretation, dynamics of church life, mission work, or transnational solidarity through the eyes of the marginalized, or they may focus on efforts to articulate and bear witness to the gospel amid new cultures and historical challenges, according to the instructor’s discretion. Sections may focus on experiences of marginalization and oppression as a source for theological reflection for women (giving rise to feminist/womanist/mujerista theologies, for example), or for people of color or indigenous peoples (giving rise to Latin American, African-American, Minjung, and South African liberation theologies, for example), or for economically exploited classes (also giving rise to liberation theologies). This course will thus provide an opportunity to learn how the global Christian community is gaining fresh insights into the gospel that were missed when the dominant perspective on theology reflected primarily the experience of European men, or to learn how claims by Christians have at various times served both to challenge and to reinforce systems of power and privilege. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1055-1200- - - - F - -
-- - - - - - -
THEO 227 - 04 Contexts: Women & Hebrew Bible - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26238 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Kelly M. Wilson

In this course, students will explore approaches to theology that emerge out of diverse cultural contexts. Sections may focus on biblical interpretation, dynamics of church life, mission work, or transnational solidarity through the eyes of the marginalized, or they may focus on efforts to articulate and bear witness to the gospel amid new cultures and historical challenges, according to the instructor’s discretion. Sections may focus on experiences of marginalization and oppression as a source for theological reflection for women (giving rise to feminist/womanist/mujerista theologies, for example), or for people of color or indigenous peoples (giving rise to Latin American, African-American, Minjung, and South African liberation theologies, for example), or for economically exploited classes (also giving rise to liberation theologies). This course will thus provide an opportunity to learn how the global Christian community is gaining fresh insights into the gospel that were missed when the dominant perspective on theology reflected primarily the experience of European men, or to learn how claims by Christians have at various times served both to challenge and to reinforce systems of power and privilege. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - L05 Contexts; Justice and Peace - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26220 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Frederick W. Nairn

In this course, students will explore approaches to theology that emerge out of diverse cultural contexts. Sections may focus on biblical interpretation, dynamics of church life, mission work, or transnational solidarity through the eyes of the marginalized, or they may focus on efforts to articulate and bear witness to the gospel amid new cultures and historical challenges, according to the instructor’s discretion. Sections may focus on experiences of marginalization and oppression as a source for theological reflection for women (giving rise to feminist/womanist/mujerista theologies, for example), or for people of color or indigenous peoples (giving rise to Latin American, African-American, Minjung, and South African liberation theologies, for example), or for economically exploited classes (also giving rise to liberation theologies). This course will thus provide an opportunity to learn how the global Christian community is gaining fresh insights into the gospel that were missed when the dominant perspective on theology reflected primarily the experience of European men, or to learn how claims by Christians have at various times served both to challenge and to reinforce systems of power and privilege. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - W06 Contexts: Bible & Culture - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26221 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Corrine L. Carvalho

In this course, students will explore approaches to theology that emerge out of diverse cultural contexts. Sections may focus on biblical interpretation, dynamics of church life, mission work, or transnational solidarity through the eyes of the marginalized, or they may focus on efforts to articulate and bear witness to the gospel amid new cultures and historical challenges, according to the instructor’s discretion. Sections may focus on experiences of marginalization and oppression as a source for theological reflection for women (giving rise to feminist/womanist/mujerista theologies, for example), or for people of color or indigenous peoples (giving rise to Latin American, African-American, Minjung, and South African liberation theologies, for example), or for economically exploited classes (also giving rise to liberation theologies). This course will thus provide an opportunity to learn how the global Christian community is gaining fresh insights into the gospel that were missed when the dominant perspective on theology reflected primarily the experience of European men, or to learn how claims by Christians have at various times served both to challenge and to reinforce systems of power and privilege. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - W07 Contexts: Bible & Culture - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26223 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Corrine L. Carvalho

In this course, students will explore approaches to theology that emerge out of diverse cultural contexts. Sections may focus on biblical interpretation, dynamics of church life, mission work, or transnational solidarity through the eyes of the marginalized, or they may focus on efforts to articulate and bear witness to the gospel amid new cultures and historical challenges, according to the instructor’s discretion. Sections may focus on experiences of marginalization and oppression as a source for theological reflection for women (giving rise to feminist/womanist/mujerista theologies, for example), or for people of color or indigenous peoples (giving rise to Latin American, African-American, Minjung, and South African liberation theologies, for example), or for economically exploited classes (also giving rise to liberation theologies). This course will thus provide an opportunity to learn how the global Christian community is gaining fresh insights into the gospel that were missed when the dominant perspective on theology reflected primarily the experience of European men, or to learn how claims by Christians have at various times served both to challenge and to reinforce systems of power and privilege. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - W08 Contexts: Liberation Theology M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26225 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Richard L. Cogill

In this course, students will explore approaches to theology that emerge out of diverse cultural contexts. Sections may focus on biblical interpretation, dynamics of church life, mission work, or transnational solidarity through the eyes of the marginalized, or they may focus on efforts to articulate and bear witness to the gospel amid new cultures and historical challenges, according to the instructor’s discretion. Sections may focus on experiences of marginalization and oppression as a source for theological reflection for women (giving rise to feminist/womanist/mujerista theologies, for example), or for people of color or indigenous peoples (giving rise to Latin American, African-American, Minjung, and South African liberation theologies, for example), or for economically exploited classes (also giving rise to liberation theologies). This course will thus provide an opportunity to learn how the global Christian community is gaining fresh insights into the gospel that were missed when the dominant perspective on theology reflected primarily the experience of European men, or to learn how claims by Christians have at various times served both to challenge and to reinforce systems of power and privilege. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - W09 Contexts: Liberation Theology M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26227 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Richard L. Cogill

In this course, students will explore approaches to theology that emerge out of diverse cultural contexts. Sections may focus on biblical interpretation, dynamics of church life, mission work, or transnational solidarity through the eyes of the marginalized, or they may focus on efforts to articulate and bear witness to the gospel amid new cultures and historical challenges, according to the instructor’s discretion. Sections may focus on experiences of marginalization and oppression as a source for theological reflection for women (giving rise to feminist/womanist/mujerista theologies, for example), or for people of color or indigenous peoples (giving rise to Latin American, African-American, Minjung, and South African liberation theologies, for example), or for economically exploited classes (also giving rise to liberation theologies). This course will thus provide an opportunity to learn how the global Christian community is gaining fresh insights into the gospel that were missed when the dominant perspective on theology reflected primarily the experience of European men, or to learn how claims by Christians have at various times served both to challenge and to reinforce systems of power and privilege. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - W10 Contexts; Liberation Theology See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26229 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Ry O. Siggelkow

In this course, students will explore approaches to theology that emerge out of diverse cultural contexts. Sections may focus on biblical interpretation, dynamics of church life, mission work, or transnational solidarity through the eyes of the marginalized, or they may focus on efforts to articulate and bear witness to the gospel amid new cultures and historical challenges, according to the instructor’s discretion. Sections may focus on experiences of marginalization and oppression as a source for theological reflection for women (giving rise to feminist/womanist/mujerista theologies, for example), or for people of color or indigenous peoples (giving rise to Latin American, African-American, Minjung, and South African liberation theologies, for example), or for economically exploited classes (also giving rise to liberation theologies). This course will thus provide an opportunity to learn how the global Christian community is gaining fresh insights into the gospel that were missed when the dominant perspective on theology reflected primarily the experience of European men, or to learn how claims by Christians have at various times served both to challenge and to reinforce systems of power and privilege. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1525-170001 Feb '21
1525-1700- T - R - - -
THEO 227 - W11 Contexts: Liberation Theology See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26231 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Ry O. Siggelkow

In this course, students will explore approaches to theology that emerge out of diverse cultural contexts. Sections may focus on biblical interpretation, dynamics of church life, mission work, or transnational solidarity through the eyes of the marginalized, or they may focus on efforts to articulate and bear witness to the gospel amid new cultures and historical challenges, according to the instructor’s discretion. Sections may focus on experiences of marginalization and oppression as a source for theological reflection for women (giving rise to feminist/womanist/mujerista theologies, for example), or for people of color or indigenous peoples (giving rise to Latin American, African-American, Minjung, and South African liberation theologies, for example), or for economically exploited classes (also giving rise to liberation theologies). This course will thus provide an opportunity to learn how the global Christian community is gaining fresh insights into the gospel that were missed when the dominant perspective on theology reflected primarily the experience of European men, or to learn how claims by Christians have at various times served both to challenge and to reinforce systems of power and privilege. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1330-1510- T - R - - -
1330-1510- T - R - - -
THEO 227 - W12 Contexts: Women & Christianity M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26233 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Shirley E. Jordon

In this course, students will explore approaches to theology that emerge out of diverse cultural contexts. Sections may focus on biblical interpretation, dynamics of church life, mission work, or transnational solidarity through the eyes of the marginalized, or they may focus on efforts to articulate and bear witness to the gospel amid new cultures and historical challenges, according to the instructor’s discretion. Sections may focus on experiences of marginalization and oppression as a source for theological reflection for women (giving rise to feminist/womanist/mujerista theologies, for example), or for people of color or indigenous peoples (giving rise to Latin American, African-American, Minjung, and South African liberation theologies, for example), or for economically exploited classes (also giving rise to liberation theologies). This course will thus provide an opportunity to learn how the global Christian community is gaining fresh insights into the gospel that were missed when the dominant perspective on theology reflected primarily the experience of European men, or to learn how claims by Christians have at various times served both to challenge and to reinforce systems of power and privilege. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 228 - 01 Comparative: Qu'ran & Prophet See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26241 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Fuad S. Naeem

This course invites students to explore Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Indigenous worldviews, or other traditions, in relation to Christianity. They may also examine distinctions within a single religious tradition (between Sunni and Shia sects within Islam, for example). Classes may focus on lived practice, modes of inter- and intrareligious dialogue, theologies of religious pluralism, or sacred texts. Students will critically and creatively reflect on the theological opportunities and challenges posed by the reality of religious pluralism in our contemporary world. Pre-requisite: THEO 100.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
-M - - - - - -
1330-1510- - W - - - -
THEO 228 - L01 Comparative World Religions See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26063 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Edward T. Ulrich

This course invites students to explore Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Indigenous worldviews, or other traditions, in relation to Christianity. They may also examine distinctions within a single religious tradition (between Sunni and Shia sects within Islam, for example). Classes may focus on lived practice, modes of inter- and intrareligious dialogue, theologies of religious pluralism, or sacred texts. Students will critically and creatively reflect on the theological opportunities and challenges posed by the reality of religious pluralism in our contemporary world. Pre-requisite: THEO 100.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0935-1040M - - - - - -
0935-1040- - W - F - -
THEO 228 - L02 Comparative World Religions See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26064 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Edward T. Ulrich

This course invites students to explore Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Indigenous worldviews, or other traditions, in relation to Christianity. They may also examine distinctions within a single religious tradition (between Sunni and Shia sects within Islam, for example). Classes may focus on lived practice, modes of inter- and intrareligious dialogue, theologies of religious pluralism, or sacred texts. Students will critically and creatively reflect on the theological opportunities and challenges posed by the reality of religious pluralism in our contemporary world. Pre-requisite: THEO 100.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1215-1320M - - - - - -
1215-1320- - W - F - -
THEO 228 - L03 Comparative World Religion See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26065 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Edward T. Ulrich

This course invites students to explore Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Indigenous worldviews, or other traditions, in relation to Christianity. They may also examine distinctions within a single religious tradition (between Sunni and Shia sects within Islam, for example). Classes may focus on lived practice, modes of inter- and intrareligious dialogue, theologies of religious pluralism, or sacred texts. Students will critically and creatively reflect on the theological opportunities and challenges posed by the reality of religious pluralism in our contemporary world. Pre-requisite: THEO 100.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1335-1440M - - - - - -
1335-1440- - W - F - -
THEO 228 - L04 Comparative: World Religions - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26240 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Carissa S. Wyant

This course invites students to explore Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Indigenous worldviews, or other traditions, in relation to Christianity. They may also examine distinctions within a single religious tradition (between Sunni and Shia sects within Islam, for example). Classes may focus on lived practice, modes of inter- and intrareligious dialogue, theologies of religious pluralism, or sacred texts. Students will critically and creatively reflect on the theological opportunities and challenges posed by the reality of religious pluralism in our contemporary world. Pre-requisite: THEO 100.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 228 - L05 Comparative: Interfaith Encntr - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26250 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Hans S. Gustafson

This course invites students to explore Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Indigenous worldviews, or other traditions, in relation to Christianity. They may also examine distinctions within a single religious tradition (between Sunni and Shia sects within Islam, for example). Classes may focus on lived practice, modes of inter- and intrareligious dialogue, theologies of religious pluralism, or sacred texts. Students will critically and creatively reflect on the theological opportunities and challenges posed by the reality of religious pluralism in our contemporary world. Pre-requisite: THEO 100.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 228 - L1A Comparative: World Religions See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26345 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Edward T. Ulrich

This course invites students to explore Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Indigenous worldviews, or other traditions, in relation to Christianity. They may also examine distinctions within a single religious tradition (between Sunni and Shia sects within Islam, for example). Classes may focus on lived practice, modes of inter- and intrareligious dialogue, theologies of religious pluralism, or sacred texts. Students will critically and creatively reflect on the theological opportunities and challenges posed by the reality of religious pluralism in our contemporary world. Pre-requisite: THEO 100.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0935-1040M - - - F - -
0935-1040- - W - - - -
THEO 228 - L2A Comparative: World Religions See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26348 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Edward T. Ulrich

This course invites students to explore Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Indigenous worldviews, or other traditions, in relation to Christianity. They may also examine distinctions within a single religious tradition (between Sunni and Shia sects within Islam, for example). Classes may focus on lived practice, modes of inter- and intrareligious dialogue, theologies of religious pluralism, or sacred texts. Students will critically and creatively reflect on the theological opportunities and challenges posed by the reality of religious pluralism in our contemporary world. Pre-requisite: THEO 100.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1215-1320M - - - F - -
1215-1320- - W - - - -
THEO 228 - L3A Comparative: World Religions See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26349 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Edward T. Ulrich

This course invites students to explore Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Indigenous worldviews, or other traditions, in relation to Christianity. They may also examine distinctions within a single religious tradition (between Sunni and Shia sects within Islam, for example). Classes may focus on lived practice, modes of inter- and intrareligious dialogue, theologies of religious pluralism, or sacred texts. Students will critically and creatively reflect on the theological opportunities and challenges posed by the reality of religious pluralism in our contemporary world. Pre-requisite: THEO 100.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1335-1440M - - - F - -
1335-1440- - W - - - -
THEO 240 - W05 Prot & Catholic Reformation M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

23966 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shirley E. Jordon

An investigation of the origins of the Protestant tradition through the writings of Martin Luther, John Calvin, Ulrich Zwingli, and the Radical reformers, among others. This course also examines the Roman Catholic response, especially as articulated by Ignatius of Loyola, Teresa of Avila, and the Council of Trent. Attention will be given to the theological issues which emerged, as well as views on marriage and family life, religious and political authority, and the status of women. Prerequisite: THEO 101

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)