Integrations in the Humanities

Liberal arts education takes knowledge to be intrinsically valuable and liberating. It produces understanding that illumines and ennobles. The humanities disciplines are traditionally a subset of the disciplines in the liberal arts. The humanities focus on documenting and understanding the human experience; they help students perceive value, discover and construct meaning, and synthesize various sources of knowledge. Without such synthesis, it is impossible to develop an informed view of the whole.

Courses in the area of "Integrations in the Humanities" show how methods of the humanities help integrate ideas and perspectives across disciplines or across communities.

Integration is a goal of humanistic studies generally and a goal also of a Catholic university. As Ex Corde Ecclesiae says: “A University, and especially a Catholic University, ‘has to be a “living union” of individual organisms dedicated to the search for truth … It is necessary to work toward a higher synthesis of knowledge, in which alone lies the possibility of satisfying that thirst for truth which is profoundly inscribed on the heart of the human person’.” [Ex Corde Ecclesiae, 16]

A student may elect both of the required IH courses from IH-designated offerings within a single major only if the student has more than one major.

See Summary of Core Requirements section for detail regarding potential overlap with Integrations in the Humanities and core flagged requirements.

Students must take eight credits.

  • ARTH 202: History of Street Art
  • ARTH 204: Typography and Visual Culture
  • ARTH 265:  Art and Archaeology of Ancient Mesoamerica
  • ARTH 275: Buddhist Art
  • ARTH 304:  Typeface Design
  • ARTH 305: Greek Art and Archaeology
  • ARTH 310: Roman Art and Archaeology
  • ARTH 328: Chinese Sculpture and Architecture
  • ARTH 329: Chinese Painting
  • ARTH 351: Romanticism to Impressionism
  • ARTH 352: Art in the United States
  • ARTH 356: Modernism in European Art
  • CATH 205: Crisis and Development in the Catholic Church
  • CATH 301: The Catholic Vision
  • CATH 308: Woman and Man
  • CATH 340: Church and Culture: The Social Dimension of Catholicism
  • CATH 405: John Henry Newman
  • CATH 406: The Many Worlds of G. K. Chesterton (2 credits)
  • CATH 407: The Many Worlds of G. K. Chesterton (4 credits)
  • CLAS 225: The Classical Hero, Epic and Film
  • CLAS 245: Classical Mythology
  • COJO 370: Intercultural Communication
  • ENGL 201: Texts in Conversation: Perspectives on Genre and Craft
  • ENGL 202: Texts in Conversation: Interdisciplinary Perspectives
  • ENGL 203: Texts in Conversation: Thematic and Intertextual Perspectives
  • ENGL 204: Texts in Conversation: Perspectives on Language, Culture, and Literacy
  • ENGL 214: American Authors I
  • ENGL 217: Multicultural Literature
  • ENGL 221: The Modern Tradition
  • ENGL 297: Modernist Europe
  • ENGL 298: Topics: Introduction to Italian Cinema
  • ENGL 324: Genre Studies: The Healing Art of Drama
  • ENGL 325: Writers Grappling with God: Theology and Literature
  • ENGL 362: Early British Literature: Contexts and Conversations
  • FILM 335: Film Theory and Criticism
  • HIST 211: Women and Families in the Americas
  • HIST 226: Modern Europe Since 1914
  • HIST 227: Global History of Genocide and Ethnic Cleansing in the Twentieth Century
  • HIST 228: Environmental History
  • HIST 349: History of Ottoman Empire
  • HIST 375: Non‐State Actors: Insurgents and NGOs in the Islamic World
  • HONR 480: The Scientific Revolution: When Modern Science Was Born?
  • HONR 480: At the Heart of Time
  • HONR 480: Improvisation as Equipment for Living
  • HONR 480: Matrix of Connectivity: How We Bridge the Gaps
  • JOUR 372: Environmental Journalism
  • PHIL 220: Logic
  • PHIL 235: Philosophy of Art and Beauty
  • PHIL 240: Faith and Doubt
  • PHIL 241: History and Philosophy of Medicine
  • PHIL 245: Politics, Law, and the Common Good
  • PHIL 250: Christian Mysteries from a Philosophical Viewpoint
  • PHIL 254: Biomedical Ethics
  • PHIL 255: Technology and Ethics
  • PHIL 258: Environmental Ethics
  • PHIL 260: Global Philosophy of Religion
  • PHIL 265: Minds, Brains, and Computers
  • PHIL 272: Evolution and Creation
  • PHIL 330: Philosophy of Mind
  • PHIL 357: Political Philosophy
  • PHIL 359: Philosophy of Law
  • PHIL 385: Philosophy of Science
  • PHIL 460: Philosophy of God
  • SPAN 315: Hispanic Linguistics
  • SPAN 335: Introduction to Spanish Literature
  • THEO 221: Bible: [Instructor-Chosen Subtitle]
  • THEO 222: History: [Instructor-Chosen Subtitle]
  • THEO 223: Belief: [Instructor-Chosen Subtitle]
  • THEO 224: Bridges: [Instructor-Chosen Subtitle]
  • THEO 225: Faith & Ethics: [Instructor-Chosen Subtitle]
  • THEO 226: Spirituality: [Instructor-Chosen Subtitle]
  • THEO 227: Contexts: [Instructor-Chosen Subtitle]
  • THEO 228: Comparative: [Instructor-Chosen Subtitle]
  • THEO 229: Professions: [Instructor-Chosen Subtitle]

Spring 2021 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ARTH 251 - 01 Museum Studies: Practices M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25492 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Vanessa A. Rousseau

This course provides an investigation of the critical issues facing museums in the 21st century. Museum missions, practices, and resources will be interwoven with a discussion of audience, communication, and collaboration. This course will provide an opportunity for discussions with museum professionals. Partnerships with regional museums will provide hands-on project opportunities during the semester.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ARTH 270 - 01 Pacific Art M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25491 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Gretchen M. Burau

This course covers traditional as well as contemporary sculpture, painting, architecture, and body arts of Melanesia, Island Southeast Asia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. Students will learn how material culture, along with the concepts of mana and tapu sustained highly stratified cultures in places such as Hawaii and New Zealand . They will also study more egalitarian societies in which cultures maintained a balanced relationship with their environment through beliefs and social practices. Examples of such societies include the Asmat, Komoro, and culture groups that inhabit the Geelvink Bay region. Students will have the opportunity to work with objects from the American Museum of Asmat Art at the University of St. Thomas (AMAA@UST).

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ARTH 297 - W01 Topics-Street Art - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25493 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Heather M. Shirey

The subject matter of these courses will vary from year to year, but will not duplicate existing courses. Descriptions of these courses are available in the Online Printable Schedule, View Searchable Class Schedule

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ARTH 305 - L01 Greek Art and Archaeology See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25494 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Mark D. Stansbury-O'Donnell

A survey of the art and architecture of ancient Greece from the fall of the Bronze Age civilizations to the end of the Hellenistic period. Particular attention will be given to sculpture, vase painting, and the relationship of art to the broader culture, to the art of the ancient Near East and Egypt, and to gender relations in ancient Greece.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 2031330-1510- T - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
ARTH 305 - L1A Greek Art and Archaeology See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26458 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mark D. Stansbury-O'Donnell

A survey of the art and architecture of ancient Greece from the fall of the Bronze Age civilizations to the end of the Hellenistic period. Particular attention will be given to sculpture, vase painting, and the relationship of art to the broader culture, to the art of the ancient Near East and Egypt, and to gender relations in ancient Greece.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 2031330-1510- - - R - - -
-- - - - - - -
CATH 205 - 01 Crisis and Development - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MHC 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MHC 207

Course Registration Number:

24404 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Robert G. Kennedy

This course explores from an interdisciplinary perspective the history of the Catholic Church as it interacts with the secular world and is shaped by its dominant personalities and events. No other institution in history has survived, and flourished, for so long and in the face of so many challenges. This course will critically reflect upon the history of the Church, from its origins in the Apostolic Age to the modern period, as a series of cycles with a common pattern of creativity, achievement, and retreat. Students may expect to complete the course with an awareness and understanding of the major personalities and events, secular and ecclesial, that have shaped the life of the Church.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 301 - D01 The Catholic Vision M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

23002 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William J. Junker

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: CATH 101

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 308 - 01 Woman and Man - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25392 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Erika H. Kidd

This course examines the definition of "woman" and "man" from both the historical and the philosophical perspective. Readings and discussion center on the question of (1) whether there are important philosophical differences between women and men and (2) whether such differences are natural or socially constructed. The implications of various answers to those questions are then examined, with special attention given to the Catholic tradition's reflections on the nature and ends of marriage, the character of priestly ordination, friendship between women and men, and human sexuality. The purpose of this course is to examine the ways in which thinkers from a wide spectrum have construed male/female relationships. A major component of this course consists in the study of power and the way it operates both in history and in contemporary culture.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 308 - 02 Woman and Man - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25421 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Erika H. Kidd

This course examines the definition of "woman" and "man" from both the historical and the philosophical perspective. Readings and discussion center on the question of (1) whether there are important philosophical differences between women and men and (2) whether such differences are natural or socially constructed. The implications of various answers to those questions are then examined, with special attention given to the Catholic tradition's reflections on the nature and ends of marriage, the character of priestly ordination, friendship between women and men, and human sexuality. The purpose of this course is to examine the ways in which thinkers from a wide spectrum have construed male/female relationships. A major component of this course consists in the study of power and the way it operates both in history and in contemporary culture.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 340 - 01 Church&Culture:Soc Dim of Cath - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 MHC 205

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

MHC 205

Course Registration Number:

25091 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Robert G. Kennedy

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently social and ecclesial. Its specific focus is on the Christian engagement with the world. The course's framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) as described in Centesimus annus. We will examine the ways that Revelation, the sacramental life, and the teachings of the Church call Catholics to seek holiness and to witness to their faith in the world. Specific topics may include social and economic justice, politics and public policy, lay and religious apostolates, education, and marriage and family. Course materials may include resources from philosophy, theology, history, economics, and political science. This course will satisfy the third level Faith and Catholic Tradition core requirement. Prerequisite: CATH 101

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 340 - 02 Church&Culture:Soc Dim of Cath - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

26561 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Robert G. Kennedy

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently social and ecclesial. Its specific focus is on the Christian engagement with the world. The course's framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) as described in Centesimus annus. We will examine the ways that Revelation, the sacramental life, and the teachings of the Church call Catholics to seek holiness and to witness to their faith in the world. Specific topics may include social and economic justice, politics and public policy, lay and religious apostolates, education, and marriage and family. Course materials may include resources from philosophy, theology, history, economics, and political science. This course will satisfy the third level Faith and Catholic Tradition core requirement. Prerequisite: CATH 101

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 405 - 01 John Henry Newman M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 201

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 201

Course Registration Number:

24701 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David P. Deavel

John Henry Newman has been called, somewhat misleadingly, the father of the Second Vatican Council. According to Jarsoslav Pelikan, "(n)ot only to his latter day disciples, ...but to many of those who have drawn other conclusions from his insights, John Henry Newman has become the most important theological thinker of modern times." T.S. Eliot had insisted that he is one of the two most eloquent sermon writers in the English language. Pope Benedict XVI stressed his importance as the theologian of conscience when he presided at his beatification in England. In this course we will examine not only Cardinal Newman's most important theological works focusing on the development of doctrine and the role of conscience in relation to Church authority, but also his philosophical works addressing the relations of faith and reason, his work on university education and selected poetry, meditations and devotions, and sermons.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 405 - 02 John Henry Newman M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 OEC 201

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

OEC 201

Course Registration Number:

26562 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David P. Deavel

John Henry Newman has been called, somewhat misleadingly, the father of the Second Vatican Council. According to Jarsoslav Pelikan, "(n)ot only to his latter day disciples, ...but to many of those who have drawn other conclusions from his insights, John Henry Newman has become the most important theological thinker of modern times." T.S. Eliot had insisted that he is one of the two most eloquent sermon writers in the English language. Pope Benedict XVI stressed his importance as the theologian of conscience when he presided at his beatification in England. In this course we will examine not only Cardinal Newman's most important theological works focusing on the development of doctrine and the role of conscience in relation to Church authority, but also his philosophical works addressing the relations of faith and reason, his work on university education and selected poetry, meditations and devotions, and sermons.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CLAS 245 - W01 Classical Mythology M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

24740 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth Z. Hepner

Mythology is the embodiment and encoding of the beliefs, principles, and aspirations of ancient cultures. This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to mythology as an introduction and foundation to Classical civilization. Both Greek and Roman myths will be examined from a variety of theoretical perspectives, including aetioligical, structuralist, and psychological theories. Consideration will also be given to the study of literature in translation, art history, religion, and history. The course grade will be principally based on writing assignments and class discussions. ENGL 203 may also be substituted for this course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COMM 370 - 01 Intercultural Communication M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25409 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Xiaowen Guan

Study of the influence of cultural values on social behavior; examination of theories of intercultural communication; emphasis on effective intercultural interaction.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W01 Writers at Work See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25071 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laurie E. Lindeen

Writers at Work will examine fiction, nonfiction, drama, and poetry from the point of view of both writer and audience, artist and critic. We will read contemporary literature in each genre, as well as some secondary materials written whenever possible by those same authors. For example, we might read David Mamet's play GLENGARRY, GLEN ROSS and then his craft book ON DIRECTING FILM; Charles Baxter's novel THE FEAST OF LOVE and then his craft book THE ART OF SUBTEXT; Richard Hugo's poetry as well as his craft book THE TRIGGERING TOWN; Annie Dillard and Jo Anne Beard's essays paired with Sven Birkerts' THE ART OF TIME IN MEMOIR; and then various readings paired with THE WRITERS' NOTEBOOK: CRAFT ESSAYS FROM TIN HOUSE. Everyone will both write in and about each genre. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1335-1510M - W - - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 201 - W02 Writers at Work See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25072 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

Writers at Work will examine fiction, nonfiction, drama, and poetry from the point of view of both writer and audience, artist and critic. We will read contemporary literature in each genre, as well as some secondary materials written whenever possible by those same authors. For example, we might read David Mamet's play GLENGARRY, GLEN ROSS and then his craft book ON DIRECTING FILM; Charles Baxter's novel THE FEAST OF LOVE and then his craft book THE ART OF SUBTEXT; Richard Hugo's poetry as well as his craft book THE TRIGGERING TOWN; Annie Dillard and Jo Anne Beard's essays paired with Sven Birkerts' THE ART OF TIME IN MEMOIR; and then various readings paired with THE WRITERS' NOTEBOOK: CRAFT ESSAYS FROM TIN HOUSE. Everyone will both write in and about each genre. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204.Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1525-1700M - W - - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 201 - W03 The American Short Story See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25073 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and peep into our future. As we study the artistic development of the American short story, our process of discovery will be progressive, beginning with some of this country's earliest and most influential short story writers like Irving and Poe and closing with such masters of contemporary fiction as Alice Walker and Jill McCorkle. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0800-0940- T - R - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 201 - W04 The American Short Story See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25074 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and peep into our future. As we study the artistic development of the American short story, our process of discovery will be progressive, beginning with some of this country's earliest and most influential short story writers like Irving and Poe and closing with such masters of contemporary fiction as Alice Walker and Jill McCorkle. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0955-1135- T - R - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 202 - W01 Family is Family See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25076 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

Everyone begins as part of a family. But what counts as "family"--only those connected to us through biology or also those connected to us by choice? What kinds of challenges do adopted children face? What kinds of challenges do biological children face when they look at their difficult, aging parents and realize, yes, this could be my future? There are certainly many ways for families to be dysfunctional; what kinds of steps and work are necessary for family to be functional? This course will examine literature devoted to the topic of family in all of its forms. Texts include Henrik Ibsen's A DOLL HOUSE, Heather Raffo's NOURA, Jane Jong Trenka's THE LANGUAGE OF BLOOD, Alison Bechdel's FUN HOME, Natasha Trethewey's MONUMENT, August Wilson's FENCES, and Dominique Morisseau's PIPELINE. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1055-1200M - W - F - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 202 - W02 Sports and Social Justice See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25083 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

What is any sports event but a story--multiple stories--playing out before our eyes? Sports by definition involve drama: conflicts in decision making, in relationships, with nature, and, if we believe it possible, conflicts with the supernatural. It's not an accident that some of our greatest metaphors come from the arena of athletics. Through sports we have a way to look at human values--at the best we have to offer and sometimes the worst. We’ll use sports literature to investigate what is just… and what is unjust… and how we discern which is which. In this class, we will read fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry. Books may include GIRL RUNNER, BIG SMOKE, TAKE ME OUT, and BEST AMERICAN SPORTS WRITING 2020. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MCH 1141215-1320M - W - - - -
1215-1320- - - - F - -
ENGL 202 - W03 Greenest Land: Irish Writing M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 MCH 111

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

MCH 111

Course Registration Number:

25482 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David M. Gardiner

This course examines a body of Irish texts within the framework of the discipline of Irish Studies – a multi-disciplinary field of studies which includes literature, music, visual arts and film that stands adjacent to, but apart from, English studies. Texts will include major authors, musicians and film-makers over the past century to the present. Also, throughout the term, students will have opportunities to be involved with the activities and publications of the UST Center for Irish Studies. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W04 Medical Dramas See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25079 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Alison L. Underthun-Meilahn

In medical schools you’ll now find doctors- and nurses-in-training reading literature and engaging in role-play to learn how to care. This course explores dramatic literature as a tool for healing; in it, we’ll read and write about drama as literary genre, blueprint for performance, and means of understanding ourselves and others. The plays we will encounter illuminate questions about intimacy and care in relationships and the physical and mental traumas of racism, addiction, anxiety, depression, grief, and suicide. Students will have the opportunity to work with local theater artists and to research the effects of our current pandemics on mental health. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0955-1135- T - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 202 - W05 Medical Dramas See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25080 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy M. Muse

In medical schools you’ll now find doctors- and nurses-in-training reading literature and engaging in role-play to learn how to care. This course explores dramatic literature as a tool for healing; in it, we’ll read and write about drama as literary genre, blueprint for performance, and means of understanding ourselves and others. The plays we will encounter illuminate questions about intimacy and care in relationships and the physical and mental traumas of racism, addiction, anxiety, depression, grief, and suicide. Students will have the opportunity to work with local theater artists and to research the effects of our current pandemics on mental health. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1330-1510- T - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 202 - W06 Sports & Social Justice See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25382 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

What is any sports event but a story--multiple stories--playing out before our eyes? Sports by definition involve drama: conflicts in decision making, in relationships, with nature, and, if we believe it possible, conflicts with the supernatural. It's not an accident that some of our greatest metaphors come from the arena of athletics. Through sports we have a way to look at human values--at the best we have to offer and sometimes the worst. We’ll use sports literature to investigate what is just… and what is unjust… and how we discern which is which. In this class, we will read fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry. Books may include GIRL RUNNER, BIG SMOKE, TAKE ME OUT, and BEST AMERICAN SPORTS WRITING 2020. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MCH 1141055-1200M - W - - - -
1055-1200- - - - F - -
ENGL 202 - W42 HNRS City Lights: Urban Lit See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25383 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Olga L. Herrera

This course explores urban experience through the perspective of writers working in fiction, drama, creative nonfiction, and poetry. It will focus on the way writers in those genres use language and literary devices to address the life and landscape of the city. Students will engage first-hand with the urban environment in the Twin Cities and bring that experience into their analytic and reflective writing for the semester. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This Aquinas Scholars honors course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 2091055-1200M - - - - - -
1055-1200- - - - F - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 202 - W43 HNRS City Lights: Urban Lit See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25752 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Olga L. Herrera

This course explores urban experience through the perspective of writers working in fiction, drama, creative nonfiction, and poetry. It will focus on the way writers in those genres use language and literary devices to address the life and landscape of the city. Students will engage first-hand with the urban environment in the Twin Cities and bring that experience into their analytic and reflective writing for the semester. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This Aquinas Scholars honors course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 2091055-1200- - W - - - -
1055-1200- - - - F - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 203 - W01 Once Upon a Time: Fairy Tales - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25084 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. Bouwman

In this course we'll study a small collection of fairy and folk tales closely, both in their early written sources and later literary re-imaginings. As we read different versions of the stories, we'll ask ourselves how these tales are structured, what audiences they're aimed at, what they might be telling us about the culture of the time, and what they might have to say to us today. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W02 Once Upon a Time: Fairy Tales - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25085 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. Bouwman

In this course we'll study a small collection of fairy and folk tales closely, both in their early written sources and later literary re-imaginings. As we read different versions of the stories, we'll ask ourselves how these tales are structured, what audiences they're aimed at, what they might be telling us about the culture of the time, and what they might have to say to us today. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 211 - L01 British Authors I M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 MCH 115

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

MCH 115

Course Registration Number:

25070 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Raymond N. MacKenzie

How have heroic ideals changed from Beowulf to the 18th century? How did marriage evolve from an arrangement between tribes and families to love between two people? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings in the British literary tradition in the period from approximately 900-1780. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as war and conflict, the history of love, humor and satire, social reform, religious reform and the rights of the individual. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives and Early British Literature distribution requirements in the English major and a WAC Writing to Learn requirement. It also counts as a core literature/writing course for students in the old core who started that core with an ENGL 201-204 class. Permission is also being sought to count this as an Integration in the Humanities course as well. Prerequisite: ENGL 121, 190, 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 371 - L01 19th Century American Lit - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25069 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Andrew J. Scheiber

This course provides an in-depth exploration of a select group of texts or authors from 19th-Century American Literature, a time of national expansion, civil war and restoration. Selected texts and authors (such as Hawthorne, Brown, Sedgewick, Chesnutt, Douglass, Freeman, James) will be studied in terms of a particular historical, cultural, or other context, or in terms of a convergence with authors or texts from other literary traditions or intellectual disciplines. This course fulfills both the Contexts and Convergences and Early American Literature distribution requirements in the English major, the core literature/writing requirement for students under the old core who started with an ENGL 201-204 class, an Integration in the Humanities requirement in the new core, and a WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 121, 190, 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
FILM 300 - L01 World Cinema - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

23766 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Juli A. Kroll

In this course, students will view, discuss, and read and write about feature-length films from Africa, Asia, the Americas, Europe, and possibly India and/or the Middle East. Following critical viewing of films both in and outside of class, students will engage in critical reflection, discussion, and analytical writing as a way of practicing the art of film analysis. This course asks students to think critically about the ways in which cinema engages the world as a form of entertainment, as art, as historical document, and as an instrument of social change. The course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement of the core curriculum at UST by addressing issues of race, ethnicity, gender, and geopolitical status. It scrutinizes the ways in which institutionalized and structural power and privilege are reflected in the subject matter, creation, and audience reception of film.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
FILM 300 - L02 World Cinema - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26677 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Juli A. Kroll

In this course, students will view, discuss, and read and write about feature-length films from Africa, Asia, the Americas, Europe, and possibly India and/or the Middle East. Following critical viewing of films both in and outside of class, students will engage in critical reflection, discussion, and analytical writing as a way of practicing the art of film analysis. This course asks students to think critically about the ways in which cinema engages the world as a form of entertainment, as art, as historical document, and as an instrument of social change. The course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement of the core curriculum at UST by addressing issues of race, ethnicity, gender, and geopolitical status. It scrutinizes the ways in which institutionalized and structural power and privilege are reflected in the subject matter, creation, and audience reception of film.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 227 - 01 Global History of Genocide See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25882 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

The course surveys some of the most heinous mass murders that took place during the twentieth century: 1) The Herero and Nama in German South Africa 2) Armenian Genocide 3) Stalin’s Genocides 4) The Holocaust 5) Mass Killing in Cambodia 6) Rwandan Genocide 7) Ethnic Cleansing in Yugoslavia. The class will critically examine the concepts and terms associated with mass murder. Through careful reading of primary and secondary literature students will investigate why, under what circumstances and by whom these acts were carried out. Students will also seek to understand the responsibilities and responses of local, national, and international communities regarding mass killing. Finally, the course will depict the different ways that we remember these events and commemorate their victims. Prerequisite: One 100-level History course or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0955-1135- T - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
HIST 228 - 01 Environmental History M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25875 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

Humans are part of nature, and yet they have always changed and manipulated it. This course examines the entangled story of human/nature interactions, from the early history of our species up into the twenty-first century. Doing this draws on a range of methods, tools, and skills, including archaeology and anthropology, physical sciences like geology and biology, and the close reading of texts and objects as developed in humanistic disciplines like English, philosophy, and history. Key topics may include the co-evolution of people and other species; the ways that world religions have understood nature; the global mingling of people, plants, animals, and microbes after 1492; responses to pollution and toxicity in the modern world; and the development and politicization of climate science in the 20th-21st centuries.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 228 - 02 Environmental History M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25876 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

Humans are part of nature, and yet they have always changed and manipulated it. This course examines the entangled story of human/nature interactions, from the early history of our species up into the twenty-first century. Doing this draws on a range of methods, tools, and skills, including archaeology and anthropology, physical sciences like geology and biology, and the close reading of texts and objects as developed in humanistic disciplines like English, philosophy, and history. Key topics may include the co-evolution of people and other species; the ways that world religions have understood nature; the global mingling of people, plants, animals, and microbes after 1492; responses to pollution and toxicity in the modern world; and the development and politicization of climate science in the 20th-21st centuries.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HONR 480 - 02 HONORS Improvisation for Life - T - - - - - 1525 - 1700 BIN 119

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

BIN 119

Course Registration Number:

24064 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Bernard J. Armada, Christopher S. Kachian

These interdisciplinary seminars are intended to develop integrating insights through an analysis of topics chosen from different disciplines. Often they are taught by two faculty members or by a visiting lecturer who holds one of the endowed chairs at the university.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JOUR 372 - W01 Environmental Journalism - T - R - - - 1730 - 1915 MHC 206

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

MHC 206

Course Registration Number:

25555 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mark R. Neuzil

This course focuses on the communication of mediated information about the environment. Students will examine what makes (and what has made) the environmental stories we tell about ourselves, from writing about agriculture, nature and spirituality to green advertising, the rhetoric of the environmental movement, and environmental movies and music.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 220 - 01 Logic - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

23174 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Sandra L. Menssen

This course provides students with skills for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating the sorts of reasoning encountered in natural language. Emphasis will be placed on attaining facility with different formal systems for representing and evaluating arguments - including propositional logic, Aristotelian syllogistic, and first-order predicate calculus - as well as on acquiring the ability to apply these systems in the analysis and evaluation of arguments in ordinary and philosophical discourse. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, 115 or 197.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 220 - 02 Logic M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MCH 234

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

MCH 234

Course Registration Number:

23175 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael J. Winter

This course provides students with skills for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating the sorts of reasoning encountered in natural language. Emphasis will be placed on attaining facility with different formal systems for representing and evaluating arguments - including propositional logic, Aristotelian syllogistic, and first-order predicate calculus - as well as on acquiring the ability to apply these systems in the analysis and evaluation of arguments in ordinary and philosophical discourse. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, 115 or 197.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 220 - 03 Logic M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MCH 234

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MCH 234

Course Registration Number:

24546 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael J. Winter

This course provides students with skills for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating the sorts of reasoning encountered in natural language. Emphasis will be placed on attaining facility with different formal systems for representing and evaluating arguments - including propositional logic, Aristotelian syllogistic, and first-order predicate calculus - as well as on acquiring the ability to apply these systems in the analysis and evaluation of arguments in ordinary and philosophical discourse. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, 115 or 197.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 235 - 01 Politics, Law, and Common Good M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 101B

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 101B

Course Registration Number:

25461 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher H. Toner

A philosophical examination into the origin, nature, purpose, and legitimacy of government and law, especially as these relate to the good of individuals and the common good. Possible questions include: Are human beings by nature political animals? What justifies political and legal authority? What sorts of political regimes can be just and legitimate? Is there a best type of government? Are there universal human rights and, if so, where do they come from? What are the respective roles of legislator, executive, and judge? Can civil disobedience ever be justified? Can violent revolution? Should government and law take stands on questions of morality, religion, and the meaning of life or try to remain neutral in these matters? The course will consider both classical and contemporary reflection on such topics, including from authors within Catholic intellectual tradition in conversation with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, 115 or 197.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 241 - 01 Hist. & Philosophy of Medicine See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25462 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Peter M. Distelzweig

Develop a critical and creative perspective on medicine and health care through philosophical exploration of their history, foundations, and purposes. Study important episodes and developments in the history of the theory and practice of medicine and explore philosophical analyses of and arguments about the nature of medical knowledge, health, disease and health care. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, 115 or 197.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MCH 1110800-0940- T - R - - -
0800-0940- T - R - - -
-- - - - - - -
PHIL 258 - 01 Environmental Ethics M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 KOC 113

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

KOC 113

Course Registration Number:

24548 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Faith G. Pawl

This course will consider the ethical dimensions of human interaction with the environment. We will begin by considering what various philosophical perspectives have to say about the scope of and justification for our obligations concerning the environment. This will require that we think about who all (or what all) count as the proper objects of moral consideration. We will explore issues such as animal welfare, conservation, species preservation, climate change, population pressure, and sustainability, all with an eye toward deciding how individuals and communities should respond to the various environmental challenges we face today. To achieve these goals, the course will deal with both ethical theory and practical case studies. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, 115 or 197 or 214 or 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 460 - D01 Philosophy of God - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC LL62

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC LL62

Course Registration Number:

25457 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael W. Rota

A careful examination of a number of philosophical arguments concerning the existence and attributes of God. We’ll start with a section on God’s nature, focusing on debates about the attributes of divine simplicity, immutability, and eternity and on God’s knowledge of the future. In the second section, we’ll consider reasons in favor of belief in God, beginning with a brief examination of Reformed Epistemology (the idea that belief in God can be rational even in the absence of good arguments for the existence of God), and then proceed to more detailed examinations of Pascal’s Wager, Cosmological arguments, Design arguments (especially the fine-tuning argument), and Moral arguments for the existence of God. Finally, in the third section, we’ll examine objections to the rationality of belief in God. We will briefly explore the problem of contingency for religious belief (if you were born elsewhere, elsewhen, your religious beliefs would probably have been very different) and the argument from divine hiddenness (if God existed, He would have made Himself obvious to all), and then turn to an in-depth examination of the problem of evil. Prerequisite: PHIL 220 and PHIL 365.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 460 - D02 Philosophy of God - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC LL62

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC LL62

Course Registration Number:

25458 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mark K. Spencer

The highest branch of philosophy, and the branch of philosophy that most helps us reach our natural end as human persons, is natural theology or philosophy of God. In this course, we will consider some central issues in philosophy of God. The class will begin by considering arguments for the existence of God and other ways in which we can naturally know God, especially perceiving God by perceiving beauty. Next, we will turn to arguments regarding attributes of God that can be known by human reason, such as divine goodness, simplicity, and freedom. Finally, we will consider issues having to do with the relation between creatures and God, such as creation, conservation, providence, and predestination. We will read from Thomas Aquinas’ Summa theologiae and from authors in the non-Thomistic Catholic, analytic, Reformed, Byzantine, Hindu, and polytheistic traditions, as well as from those who object in various ways to theism. Writing a major paper and preparing for a public presentation will be a central focus of the course. Prerequisite: PHIL 220 and PHIL 365.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SPAN 315 - L01 Hispanic Linguistics M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

23802 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Tight

An introduction to both contemporary and historical Hispanic linguistics. Descriptive Spanish phonetics and phonology. History of the Spanish language with emphasis on historical sound-change phenomena. Systematic study of dialectal variation in both Spain and Spanish America. Offered in fall semester. Prerequisites: Successful completion of SPAN 301 and 305 or their equivalents with a C- or better in each course, (may be taken simultaneously with SPAN 305).

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - 02 Bible: Old Testament - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 101B

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 101B

Course Registration Number:

26191 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Paul V. Niskanen

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section will involve students in an examination of biblical prophetic activity and prophetic texts within their ancient Near Eastern context. Biblical texts will include both narratives about the prophets, and collections of oracles in the prophetic books. The course includes an examination of the nature and function of prophetic activity from a cross-cultural perspective, the historical background of the prophets, as well as the literary forms and Israelite traditions utilized in the oracles. It will be seen that this background is essential to any discussion of the theology of the prophets.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - L05 Bible: New Testament M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26072 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

David T. Landry

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves the student in an intensive historical, literary, and theological reading of major portions of the New Testament in the Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - L06 Bible: New Testament M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26078 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

David T. Landry

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves the student in an intensive historical, literary, and theological reading of major portions of the New Testament in the Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - W03 Bible: Old Testament - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MCH 111

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MCH 111

Course Registration Number:

26113 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Eugenia O. Gavrilyuk

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves the student in an intensive historical, literary, and theological reading of major portions of the Old Testament in its ancient Israelite context and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - W04 Bible: Old Testament M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MCH 109

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MCH 109

Course Registration Number:

26117 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Eugenia O. Gavrilyuk

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves the student in an intensive historical, literary, and theological reading of major portions of the Old Testament in its ancient Israelite context and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - W07 Bible: New Testament See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26079 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Catherine A. Cory

This course involves the student in a literary, historical, and theological reading of major portions of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) or New Testament. All sections explore the Bible as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern), examining to varying degrees how the texts have been used in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles. The course also examines elements of power and privilege, both with respect to the social and political positions of the authors and the settings in which the texts were written, and also with respect to how the biblical texts have been appropriated in different time periods and by different communities (in history and today), and used as vehicles of both oppression and liberation. The course investigates the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context, or in their Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts, applying modern methods of biblical interpretation. Students may examine a specialized biblical topic of the instructor’s choosing such as the Pentateuch, historical literature, wisdom literature, prophetic literature, or apocalyptic literature in the Hebrew Bible; or the Gospels, the Letters of Paul, or apocalyptic literature in the New Testament. Courses might focus on a particular theme, such as justice in the Bible, or how Jesus approached forgiveness or nonviolence. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0815-0920M - - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
THEO 221 - W7A Bible: New Testament See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26088 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Catherine A. Cory

This course involves the student in a literary, historical, and theological reading of major portions of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) or New Testament. All sections explore the Bible as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern), examining to varying degrees how the texts have been used in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles. The course also examines elements of power and privilege, both with respect to the social and political positions of the authors and the settings in which the texts were written, and also with respect to how the biblical texts have been appropriated in different time periods and by different communities (in history and today), and used as vehicles of both oppression and liberation. The course investigates the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context, or in their Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts, applying modern methods of biblical interpretation. Students may examine a specialized biblical topic of the instructor’s choosing such as the Pentateuch, historical literature, wisdom literature, prophetic literature, or apocalyptic literature in the Hebrew Bible; or the Gospels, the Letters of Paul, or apocalyptic literature in the New Testament. Courses might focus on a particular theme, such as justice in the Bible, or how Jesus approached forgiveness or nonviolence. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JRC 2220815-0920- - W - - - -
-- - - - - - -
THEO 222 - L01 History: Early Christian Theo - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26125 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Mark E. DelCogliano

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core."

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 222 - L02 History: Early Christian Theo - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26126 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Mark E. DelCogliano

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 222 - L03 History: Medieval Theology See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26128 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Steven J. McMichael

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves the study of the development of Christian theology from the fall of the Roman Empire until the Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the main themes of the classical Christian views of faith/reason, grace/nature, God/creation in the theologies of such theologians as St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Bonaventure. Other themes that may be treated: the role of monasticism and mendicant life; medieval saints such as St. Francis of Assisi and Catherine of Siena, women's spirituality, mysticism, liturgical developments, religious art and architecture, and the interaction of Christians with Jews and Muslims.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JRC LL011215-1320M - - - - - -
1215-1320- - W - F - -
THEO 222 - L04 History: Medieval Theology See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26138 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Steven J. McMichael

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves the study of the development of Christian theology from the fall of the Roman Empire until the Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the main themes of the classical Christian views of faith/reason, grace/nature, God/creation in the theologies of such theologians as St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Bonaventure. Other themes that may be treated: the role of monasticism and mendicant life; medieval saints such as St. Francis of Assisi and Catherine of Siena, women's spirituality, mysticism, liturgical developments, religious art and architecture, and the interaction of Christians with Jews and Muslims.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 2021335-1440M - - - - - -
1335-1440- - W - F - -
THEO 222 - L3A History: Medieval History See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26148 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Steven J. McMichael

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves the study of the development of Christian theology from the fall of the Roman Empire until the Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the main themes of the classical Christian views of faith/reason, grace/nature, God/creation in the theologies of such theologians as St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Bonaventure. Other themes that may be treated: the role of monasticism and mendicant life; medieval saints such as St. Francis of Assisi and Catherine of Siena, women's spirituality, mysticism, liturgical developments, religious art and architecture, and the interaction of Christians with Jews and Muslims.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1215-1320M - - - F - -
JRC LL011215-1320- - W - - - -
THEO 222 - L4A History: Medieval Theology See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26144 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Steven J. McMichael

This course introduces students to a historical examination of a particular period or periods of Christian history, such as the emergence and development of the Christian Church in the early centuries, the Middle Ages, or the period of the Reformation, or students may delve into a specialized topic in Christian history with a focus on a topic of the instructor’s choosing, such as Christianity and Nazism, the Second Vatican Council, contemporary Catholic theologians, etc. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1335-1440M - - - F - -
MHC 2021335-1440- - W - - - -
THEO 222 - W05 History: Reformation M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26156 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Shirley E. Jordon

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves an investigation of the origins of the Protestant tradition through the writings of Martin Luther, John Calvin, Ulrich Zwingli, and the Radical reformers, among others. We will also examine the Roman Catholic response, especially as articulated by Ignatius of Loyola, Teresa of Avila, and the Council of Trent. Attention will be given to the theological issues which emerged, as well as views on marriage and family life, religious and political authority, and the status of women.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 223 - 01 Belief: The Christian Story M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 ASC 378S

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

ASC 378S

Course Registration Number:

26194 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Cara L. Anthony

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section journeys through the whole Christian story, from creation through the drama of sin and salvation to the hope for the age to come. It explores how Christian belief sheds light on contemporary issues such as food sustainability, racial justice, or human cloning.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 223 - 02 Belief: The Christian Story M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 101B

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 101B

Course Registration Number:

26196 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Cara L. Anthony

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section journeys through the whole Christian story, from creation through the drama of sin and salvation to the hope for the age to come. It explores how Christian belief sheds light on contemporary issues such as food sustainability, racial justice, or human cloning.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 223 - L03 Belief: Ancient & Modern - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 201

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 201

Course Registration Number:

26157 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Deborah A. Organ

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian doctrines are interrelated with each other and with other beliefs about the world. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant doctrines in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. The course is structured on the classical "system" of the Nicene Creed, and will focus on the ongoing formation of the doctrines of God, Christ, the Spirit, creation, sin, salvation, and Church. Special emphasis will be given to the role of grace in history and human experience.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 223 - L04 Belief: Ancient & Modern See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26158 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Barbara K. Sain

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian doctrines are interrelated with each other and with other beliefs about the world. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant doctrines in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. The course is structured on the classical "system" of the Nicene Creed, and will focus on the ongoing formation of the doctrines of God, Christ, the Spirit, creation, sin, salvation, and Church. Special emphasis will be given to the role of grace in history and human experience.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
KOC 1130955-1135- T - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
THEO 223 - L05 Belief: Ancient & Modern See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26192 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Barbara K. Sain

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian doctrines are interrelated with each other and with other beliefs about the world. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant doctrines in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. The course is structured on the classical "system" of the Nicene Creed, and will focus on the ongoing formation of the doctrines of God, Christ, the Spirit, creation, sin, salvation, and Church. Special emphasis will be given to the role of grace in history and human experience.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 2011330-1510- T - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
THEO 223 - L06 Belief: Ancient & Modern - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 201

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 201

Course Registration Number:

26343 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Deborah A. Organ

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian doctrines are interrelated with each other and with other beliefs about the world. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant doctrines in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. The course is structured on the classical "system" of the Nicene Creed, and will focus on the ongoing formation of the doctrines of God, Christ, the Spirit, creation, sin, salvation, and Church. Special emphasis will be given to the role of grace in history and human experience.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 224 - 01 Bridges: Theology & Beauty M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26204 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Mark J. McInroy

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section examines a variety of theological approaches to aesthetic questions, both ancient and modern. Is beauty "in the eye of the beholder"? Are "beauty" and "prettiness" synonymous? Are "beauty" and "ugliness" opposites? Might beauty still be considered a transcendental aspect of being along with the true and the good? Is it possible that Beauty is a name for God, or a means by which God reveals God's self in the created order? It also explores the implications of varying answers to these questions for the arts, and for lives of faith.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 224 - 02 Bridges: Theology & Politics - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26208 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Michael J. Hollerich

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section is a theological investigation of changing relationships between Christianity and the political order, principally in religious terms as understood by Christians themselves but also from the vantage point of government. Emphasis in the first half of the course is on the foundational events of the New Testament and the early Christian era, and in the second half on Christianity's experience with secular and democratic modernity in America. The aim of the course is to measure the effect, in changing historical contexts, of persecution, establishment, and disestablishment, on a religion which professes both to be rooted in transcendent reality, and to have direct implications for life in this world. Primary readings from scripture, ancient and modern theology, speeches, sermons, Supreme Court decisions, and political, sociological and religious reflections on the American experiment with democracy and freedom of religion.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 224 - 03 Bridges: Theology & Politics - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26211 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Michael J. Hollerich

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section is a theological investigation of changing relationships between Christianity and the political order, principally in religious terms as understood by Christians themselves but also from the vantage point of government. Emphasis in the first half of the course is on the foundational events of the New Testament and the early Christian era, and in the second half on Christianity's experience with secular and democratic modernity in America. The aim of the course is to measure the effect, in changing historical contexts, of persecution, establishment, and disestablishment, on a religion which professes both to be rooted in transcendent reality, and to have direct implications for life in this world. Primary readings from scripture, ancient and modern theology, speeches, sermons, Supreme Court decisions, and political, sociological and religious reflections on the American experiment with democracy and freedom of religion.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 224 - 41 HONORS Bridges: Theo & Beauty M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26206 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Mark J. McInroy

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section examines a variety of theological approaches to aesthetic questions, both ancient and modern. Is beauty "in the eye of the beholder"? Are "beauty" and "prettiness" synonymous? Are "beauty" and "ugliness" opposites? Might beauty still be considered a transcendental aspect of being along with the true and the good? Is it possible that Beauty is a name for God, or a means by which God reveals God's self in the created order? It also explores the implications of varying answers to these questions for the arts, and for lives of faith.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 224 - W05 Bridges: Theo & Environment M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 MCH 234

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

MCH 234

Course Registration Number:

26198 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Cara L. Anthony, Thomas A. Hickson

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section examines Christian theological and moral reflection on the relation between human activity and the natural environment. It will address environmental issues that are of mutual concern to theologians and the natural or social sciences; thus it will study scientific analysis along with theological perspectives. The course will also review contemporary practices and/or policies that address environmental problems.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 224 - W06 Bridges: Theology and Film See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26200 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Robert C. Koerpel

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section explores the relationship between theology and film by teaching students the skills they need to be critical theological viewers of films. This course will operate under the assumption that, because films function as vehicles for ideas, they offer fruitful ground for theological reflection.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 2061730-2115- - W - - - -
-- - W - - - -
MHC 2061730-2115- - W - - - -
-- - W - - - -
MHC 2061730-2115- - W - - - -
-- - W - - - -
MHC 2061730-2115- - W - - - -
-- - W - - - -
MHC 2061730-2115- - W - - - -
-- - W - - - -
MHC 2061730-2115- - W - - - -
-- - W - - - -
MHC 2061730-2115- - W - - - -
-- - W - - - -
THEO 224 - W07 Bridges: Theology & Science M - W - - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 203

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MHC 203

Course Registration Number:

26202 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Brian Zuelke

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section is an introduction to the interrelationship between Christian theology (the understanding of the Christian faith), and the natural sciences. It explores the relationship between scientific and theological methods and modes of knowledge, and considers some of the central topics of Christian theology - God, creation, providence, resurrections, and afterlife - in the light of modern scientific evidence and theories.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 225 - 07 Faith & Ethics: Bioethics - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26248 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Paul J. Wojda

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” What difference does Christian faith make to the asking and answering of the clinical, policy/legal, cultural, and philosophical questions prompted by ongoing developments in the life sciences and medicine? What is the role of the church, and of the theological inquiry it fosters, in the increasingly global debates over the direction of biomedical research and healthcare? This course pursues these questions in the context of current debates over a range of issues in contemporary bioethics, including the nature of "bioethics" itself. Does the church need bioethics? Does bioethics need the church?

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 225 - L03 Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26215 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Robert C. Koerpel

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.”

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 2051335-1510M - - - - - -
-- - W - - - -
THEO 225 - L04 Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26216 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Robert C. Koerpel

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.”

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 2041525-1700M - - - - - -
-- - W - - - -
THEO 225 - L05 Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26217 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Amy M. Levad

This course explores principles, methods, and topics of Christian theological ethics. It addresses the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to understanding the human person; the significance of love, justice, and commitment to the common good in Christian moral life; and the role of the believing community in its relation to culture. Topics might include sex, marriage, and family; crime, justice, and forgiveness; war, peace, and revolution; immigration; environmental sustainability and animal rights; poverty and economic justice, among others. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0800-0940- T - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
THEO 225 - L06 Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26218 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Amy M. Levad

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.”

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0955-1040- T - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
THEO 226 - 01 Spirituality:ChristianMarriage - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26396 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Mary K. Twite

This course either introduces diverse expressions of Christian spirituality or focuses on topics within a distinctly Christian spirituality according to the discretion of the instructor such as Christian styles of worship, Christian understandings of sacramentality (especially Christian marriage), or stages of spiritual formation. Students will consider methodological issues in the academic study of spirituality. Emphasis is placed on a wide reading in the Christian tradition of both primary and secondary literature in order to assist the student in grasping the integral link between the lived faith of Christians and the theological articulation of that faith. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - 01 Contexts: Justice & Peace - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26234 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Carissa S. Wyant

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves an examination of the views of various religions and ideologies on issues of justice and peace, with special attention to the Catholic and other Christian teachings on such issues as war and peace, violence, economic justice, the environment, criminal justice, and social justice. Special attention is given to how fundamental presuppositions and principles of each group studied affect their views on justice and peace, and contribute to or hinder dialogue and peaceful interaction with other groups. In addition to Christianity, students will study (at least) one far eastern worldview (e.g. Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism), one tribal religion (Native American, African), Islam, and one secular worldview (e.g. Marxism, capitalism, secular humanism). Students are required to investigate one worldview in depth through a semester-long research project.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - 02 Contexts: Nazism & Apartheid See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26235 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Kimberly J. Vrudny

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section will focus on the patterns that emerged in both contexts—Germany under Hitler; South Africa under apartheid: economic anxiety; the rise of nationalism; the election of a tyrant; theological rationales for tyranny, torture, and even genocide; theological and artistic resistance; the complicated role of Catholicism in each setting; and legal processes in the aftermath.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0935-1040- - - - F - -
-- - - - - - -
THEO 227 - 03 Contexts: Nazism & Apartheid See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26236 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Kimberly J. Vrudny

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section will focus on the patterns that emerged in both contexts—Germany under Hitler; South Africa under apartheid: economic anxiety; the rise of nationalism; the election of a tyrant; theological rationales for tyranny, torture, and even genocide; theological and artistic resistance; the complicated role of Catholicism in each setting; and legal processes in the aftermath.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1055-1200- - - - F - -
-- - - - - - -
THEO 227 - 04 Contexts: Women & Hebrew Bible - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26238 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Kelly M. Wilson

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This course examines women in the Hebrew Bible by reconstructing the status and roles of women during the biblical periods, investigating the conceptions of gender in the text, and analyzing the history of biblical interpretation. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - W06 Contexts: Bible & Culture - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26221 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Corrine L. Carvalho

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This course examines the interaction between biblical interpretation and diverse contemporary cultures. The course defines multiculturalism broadly to include race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, class, and/or religion. The course has three goals: a reconstruction of the cultural context of the ancient world; an examination of challenges posed by cultural theories; and the impact diverse readings have for contemporary theologies based on the Bible. This section of the course will focus on the Hebrew Bible.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - W07 Contexts: Bible & Culture - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26223 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Corrine L. Carvalho

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This course examines the interaction between biblical interpretation and diverse contemporary cultures. The course defines multiculturalism broadly to include race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, class, and/or religion. The course has three goals: a reconstruction of the cultural context of the ancient world; an examination of challenges posed by cultural theories; and the impact diverse readings have for contemporary theologies based on the Bible. This section of the course will focus on the Hebrew Bible.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - W08 Contexts: Liberation Theology M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26225 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Richard L. Cogill

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section explores the meaning and practical significance of Christ’s message of liberation in the twenty-first century, examining theologies that have emerged out of a context of struggle (e.g., black & black feminist/womanist theology, South African theology, Latina/o theology, minjung theology, and queer theology).

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - W09 Contexts: Liberation Theology M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26227 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Richard L. Cogill

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section takes seriously James H. Cone's message in his 1969 work, Black Theology and Black Power, that "Black Power is Christ's central message to twentieth-century America." It explores the meaning and practical significance of Christ’s message of liberation in the twenty-first century, examining theologies that have emerged out of a context of struggle (e.g., black & black feminist/womanist theology, South African theology, Latina/o theology, minjung theology, and queer theology).

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - W10 Contexts: Liberation Theology See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26229 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Ry O. Siggelkow

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section takes seriously James H. Cone's message in his 1969 work, Black Theology and Black Power, that "Black Power is Christ's central message to twentieth-century America." It explores the meaning and practical significance of Christ’s message of liberation in the twenty-first century, examining theologies that have emerged out of a context of struggle (e.g., black & black feminist/womanist theology, South African theology, Latina/o theology, minjung theology, and queer theology).This section takes seriously James H. Cone's message in his 1969 work, Black Theology and Black Power, that "Black Power is Christ's central message to twentieth-century America." It explores the meaning and practical significance of Christ’s message of liberation in the twenty-first century, examining theologies that have emerged out of a context of struggle (e.g., black & black feminist/womanist theology, South African theology, Latina/o theology, minjung theology, and queer theology).

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 2091525-1700- T - R - - -
1525-1700- T - R - - -
THEO 227 - W11 Contexts: Liberation Theology See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26231 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Ry O. Siggelkow

This section takes seriously James H. Cone's message in his 1969 work, Black Theology and Black Power, that "Black Power is Christ's central message to twentieth-century America." It explores the meaning and practical significance of Christ’s message of liberation in the twenty-first century, examining theologies that have emerged out of a context of struggle (e.g., black & black feminist/womanist theology, South African theology, Latina/o theology, minjung theology, and queer theology).

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 2091330-1510- T - R - - -
1330-1510- T - R - - -
THEO 228 - 01 Comparative: Qur'an & Prophet See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26241 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Fuad S. Naeem

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section provides an introduction to the foundational sources of Islam: its sacred scripture, the Qur’an, and its founder, the Prophet Muhammad. We will study the language, themes, and multiple interpretations of the Qur'an, and its role in Muslim ritual, social, intellectual, spiritual, artistic, and political life. We will examine contemporary interpretations of the Qur’an on questions of pluralism, politics, and gender. We will pay close attention to the Abrahamic historical and theological context of the Qur’an and the Prophet and their relationship with Biblical traditions and how revelation and prophecy have been understood and debated by Muslims, Christians, and Jews.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1330-1510M - - - - - -
JRC LL621330-1510- - W - - - -
THEO 228 - L01 Comparative: World Religions See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26063 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Edward T. Ulrich

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section examines the theological themes of Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, and Native American religions. These themes will be studied alongside Christianity, clarifying similarities and differences.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JRC 4140935-1040M - - - - - -
0935-1040- - W - F - -
THEO 228 - L02 Comparative: World Religions See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26064 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Edward T. Ulrich

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section examines the theological themes of Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, and Native American religions. These themes will be studied alongside Christianity, clarifying similarities and differences.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JRC 4141215-1320M - - - - - -
1215-1320- - W - F - -
THEO 228 - L03 Comparative: World Religion See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26065 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Edward T. Ulrich

This course invites students to explore Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Indigenous worldviews, or other traditions, in relation to Christianity. They may also examine distinctions within a single religious tradition (between Sunni and Shia sects within Islam, for example). Classes may focus on lived practice, modes of inter- and intrareligious dialogue, theologies of religious pluralism, or sacred texts. Students will critically and creatively reflect on the theological opportunities and challenges posed by the reality of religious pluralism in our contemporary world. Pre-requisite: THEO 100.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JRC 4141335-1440M - - - - - -
1335-1440- - W - F - -
THEO 228 - L04 Comparative: World Religions - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26240 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Carissa S. Wyant

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section is a comparison of the teachings and practices of Christianity with the teachings and practices of selected non-Christian religions, for example, American Indian (Lakota), Judaism, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism. The aim of the course will be to clarify similarities and differences between Christianity and other religions, to reflect on the problem posed by religious pluralism in modern culture, and to develop a Christian theology of world religions.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 228 - L1A Comparative: World Religions See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26345 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Edward T. Ulrich

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section examines the theological themes of Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, and Native American religions. These themes will be studied alongside Christianity, clarifying similarities and differences.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0935-1040M - - - F - -
JRC 4140935-1040- - W - - - -
THEO 228 - L2A Comparative: World Religions See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26348 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Edward T. Ulrich

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section examines the theological themes of Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, and Native American religions. These themes will be studied alongside Christianity, clarifying similarities and differences.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1215-1320M - - - F - -
JRC 4141215-1320- - W - - - -
THEO 228 - L3A Comparative: World Religions See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26349 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Edward T. Ulrich

This course invites students to explore Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Indigenous worldviews, or other traditions, in relation to Christianity. They may also examine distinctions within a single religious tradition (between Sunni and Shia sects within Islam, for example). Classes may focus on lived practice, modes of inter- and intrareligious dialogue, theologies of religious pluralism, or sacred texts. Students will critically and creatively reflect on the theological opportunities and challenges posed by the reality of religious pluralism in our contemporary world. Pre-requisite: THEO 100.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1335-1440M - - - F - -
JRC 4141335-1440- - W - - - -
THEO 229 - D01 Professions: Faith & Law M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26244 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Marguerite L. Spencer

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section will attempt to fashion a paradigm for the Christian practice of law through a close reading of a variety of theological texts, treaties, case studies and rules of professional conduct. If to work is to share in the creative activity of God, then what specific challenge does this pose for an attorney given the grinding realities of the legal profession? If to be a professional is to live out a tripartite relationship between self, client, and a higher standard, then how does an attorney determine, much less respond to, such a standard? Emphasis will be placed on the meaning of justice, law, rights and responsibilities. An ethic of care that fosters the development of a compassionate world and a common life will be emphasized.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 240 - W05 Prot & Catholic Reformation M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

23966 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shirley E. Jordon

An investigation of the origins of the Protestant tradition through the writings of Martin Luther, John Calvin, Ulrich Zwingli, and the Radical reformers, among others. This course also examines the Roman Catholic response, especially as articulated by Ignatius of Loyola, Teresa of Avila, and the Council of Trent. Attention will be given to the theological issues which emerged, as well as views on marriage and family life, religious and political authority, and the status of women. Prerequisite: THEO 101

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2021 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 201 - W01 The American Short Story See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

30819 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and peep into our future. As we study the artistic development of the American short story, our process of discovery will be progressive, beginning with some of this country's earliest and most influential short story writers like Irving and Poe and closing with such masters of contemporary fiction as Alice Walker and Jill McCorkle. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1730-1930- T - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 201 - W02 Horror Literature & Film See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

30844 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shannon F. Scott

Many fans, critics, and creators agree that we are living in a Golden Age of Horror. From dark or weird fiction by Gwendolyn Kiste and Helen Oyeyemi to horror films with a social justice agenda, such as GET OUT (Jordan Peele, 2017) and PARASITE (Bong Joon-ho 2019), the genre is proving to be finely crafted and character-driven. In this course, the horror genre will be explored historically and psychologically. What frightens you? Jump scares? Gore? An invisible enemy? Horror explores the human condition through the emotion of fear—fear of pain, disease, isolation, of being lost, consumed, or prey to supernatural forces. However, horror also teaches us how to handle those fears. We will survey horror from early tales like BLUEBEARD to Gothic classics by Poe, Stoker, and Stevenson in the nineteenth century, then shift to German Expressionist films, horror heavy hitters like Stephen King and Ramsey Campbell, and American slasher films. We will conclude with recent trends in horror fiction and film by Carmen Maria Machado, Asa Nonami, and Ana Lily Amirpour. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1800-2000- - W - - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 201 - W03 Science Fiction Origins - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30846 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gordon D. Grice

This course traces the history of science fiction from its beginnings into the early 20th century, focusing especially on evolution, relativity, and the stories they inspired. Authors may include Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, Fitz-James O’Brien, Ambrose Bierce, H. G. Wells, and H. P. Lovecraft. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W01 Behind Bars: Prison Literature See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

30857 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucy A. Saliger

The difficult contradictions in our criminal justice system – one that purportedly aims to reduce violence and crime, keep us safe, and promote justice – hide in plain sight. As a society, we may or may not know the contradictory realities: the violence and injustices that occur in our jails and prisons, disparities in legal representation and sentencing, and a host of tangled methods and aims often in conflict with one another. While "crime" shows keep certain stories ever present in our societal imagination, they tend to obscure deeper stories. In this class, we'll attempt to enter into those deeper stories using both media and texts; writers may include Michelle Alexander, Jimmy Santiago Baca, Angela Davis, Johann Hari, Martin Luther King, and Leonard Peltier. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1800-2000- - W - - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 203 - W01 Secrets, Lies, & Deceptions - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30842 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jeannie L. Hofmeister

“Tell all the truth but tell it slant—” American poet, Emily Dickinson suggests that the truth is often deliberately distorted. Are there times when the blunt truth is too painful to hear? Are some lies justified? Conversely, throughout history people have lied for their own gain or simply for the thrill of knowing they have the power to deceive. Are there consequences for deliberate acts of deception? In this course, we will examine how writers explore this human characteristic and discuss what we can learn about ourselves by considering the theme of lies and deception in literature. Possible texts include: “Wakefield” by Nathaniel Hawthorne, WHITE IVY by Susie Yang, THE ADVENTURES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and DOUBT by John Patrick Shanley. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 203 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 202, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W02 Literary Villains - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30843 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

In most cultures, readers tend to identify with heroes and hope that their goodness will triumph over the evil antagonist. However, every now and then, readers find the villain of the text far more appealing than its hero or heroine – the villain could be more intriguing than a hero, feature more human, relatable characteristics, could provide a reader with an opportunity to live vicariously through them, or a number of other reasons. Throughout the semester, we’ll read texts that future both classic and contemporary texts that are well-known for their villains, such as Iago (William Shakespeare’s OTHELLO), Tom Ripley (Patricia Highsmith’s THE TALENTED MR. RIPLEY), Brigid O’Shaughnessy (Dashiell Hammett’s THE MALTESE FALCON), and Anton Chigurh (Cormac McCarthy’s NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN), examine the cultural context for each text and villain, and analyze what it is about these characters that makes readers want to root for them. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 203 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 202, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W03 Summer Game: Baseball Lit See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

30845 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael Raimondi

Bernard Malamud (author of THE NATURAL) once wrote: "The whole history of baseball has the quality of mythology." This course will examine baseball literature as we read from a variety of writings about our baseball heroes, both the men and the women, who played the game that we call "our national pastime." We will look at our country's romanticism with baseball and how writers who wrote about it helped give the sport its mythological dimensions. Selections will include essays, short stories, and poetry by authors who loved the game. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 203 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 202, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1730-1930- - - R - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 215 - L01 American Authors II - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30821 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew B. Harrison

How did the modern warfare of World War I change those who fought and those who stayed at home? Why did so many of the best American artists flee to Paris? How did the traditionalism and stability of the 1950s lead to the radicalism and rebellion of the 60s? How has technology, from the typewriter to the internet, reshaped literature? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework though extensive readings in American literature from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as progress and innovation, war, the “lost generation,” the New Woman, race, and conformity and individuality. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major and a WAC Writing Intensive requirement. Approval is currently being sought to count as one that meets the Integrations in the Humanities requirement (not guaranteed). Prerequisites: ENGL 121 or 190. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
FILM 300 - L01 World Cinema - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30862 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Juli A. Kroll

In this course, students will view, discuss, and read and write about feature-length films from Africa, Asia, the Americas, Europe, and possibly India and/or the Middle East. Following critical viewing of films both in and outside of class, students will engage in critical reflection, discussion, and analytical writing as a way of practicing the art of film analysis. This course asks students to think critically about the ways in which cinema engages the world as a form of entertainment, as art, as historical document, and as an instrument of social change. The course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement of the core curriculum at UST by addressing issues of race, ethnicity, gender, and geopolitical status. It scrutinizes the ways in which institutionalized and structural power and privilege are reflected in the subject matter, creation, and audience reception of film.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HONR 480 - 01 HONORS Scientific Revolution - T - R - - - 1300 - 1500 OSS 127

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1300 - 1500

Location:

OSS 127

Course Registration Number:

30621 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Peter M. Distelzweig

These interdisciplinary seminars are intended to develop integrating insights through an analysis of topics chosen from different disciplines. Often they are taught by two faculty members or by a visiting lecturer who holds one of the endowed chairs at the university.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 240 - 01 Faith and Doubt - - - - - - - - VSP

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

VSP

Course Registration Number:

30883 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mathew Lu

This course examines philosophical arguments for and against the existence of God and for the claim that the Christian faith, in particular, has been revealed by God; it also considers how faith, reason, and doubt are related. Possible questions include: Are there any good arguments for God’s existence? Does the evil in the world make it unlikely there is a God? Are faith and reason (including the findings of science) compatible? Could it be reasonable to believe in certain foundational Christian claims such as that Jesus is divine, that Jesus founded and gave authority to the church, and that the Bible is the word of God? Does the plurality of religions undermine the particular claims of any one of them? Can one make religious commitments in a state of doubt about the evidence? Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - L01 Bible: Old Testament M T W R - - - 1015 - 1215 JRC 126

Days of Week:

M T W R - - -

Time of Day:

1015 - 1215

Location:

JRC 126

Course Registration Number:

30921 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Paul V. Niskanen

This course involves the student in a literary, historical, and theological reading of major portions of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) or New Testament. All sections explore the Bible as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern), examining to varying degrees how the texts have been used in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles. The course also examines elements of power and privilege, both with respect to the social and political positions of the authors and the settings in which the texts were written, and also with respect to how the biblical texts have been appropriated in different time periods and by different communities (in history and today), and used as vehicles of both oppression and liberation. The course investigates the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context, or in their Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts, applying modern methods of biblical interpretation. Students may examine a specialized biblical topic of the instructor’s choosing such as the Pentateuch, historical literature, wisdom literature, prophetic literature, or apocalyptic literature in the Hebrew Bible; or the Gospels, the Letters of Paul, or apocalyptic literature in the New Testament. Courses might focus on a particular theme, such as justice in the Bible, or how Jesus approached forgiveness or nonviolence. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 223 - 02 Belief: Ancient and Modern M - W - - - - 1215 - 1615

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1615

Location:

Course Registration Number:

31085 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mark J. McInroy

This section introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian doctrines are interrelated with each other and with other beliefs about the world. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant doctrines in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. The course is structured on the classical "system" of the Nicene Creed, and will focus on the ongoing formation of the doctrines of God, Christ, the Spirit, creation, sin, salvation, and Church. Special emphasis will be given to the role of grace in history and human experience.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 225 - W01 Faith & Ethics: Bioethics - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30923 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paul J. Wojda

This course explores principles, methods, and topics of Christian theological ethics. It addresses the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to understanding the human person; the significance of love, justice, and commitment to the common good in Christian moral life; and the role of the believing community in its relation to culture. Topics might include sex, marriage, and family; crime, justice, and forgiveness; war, peace, and revolution; immigration; environmental sustainability and animal rights; poverty and economic justice, among others. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 225 - W02 Faith & Ethics: Bioethics - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30924 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paul J. Wojda

This course explores principles, methods, and topics of Christian theological ethics. It addresses the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to understanding the human person; the significance of love, justice, and commitment to the common good in Christian moral life; and the role of the believing community in its relation to culture. Topics might include sex, marriage, and family; crime, justice, and forgiveness; war, peace, and revolution; immigration; environmental sustainability and animal rights; poverty and economic justice, among others. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 226 - L01 Spirituality:Christian Marriag - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30934 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Marguerite L. Spencer

This course either introduces diverse expressions of Christian spirituality or focuses on topics within a distinctly Christian spirituality according to the discretion of the instructor such as Christian styles of worship, Christian understandings of sacramentality (especially Christian marriage), or stages of spiritual formation. Students will consider methodological issues in the academic study of spirituality. Emphasis is placed on a wide reading in the Christian tradition of both primary and secondary literature in order to assist the student in grasping the integral link between the lived faith of Christians and the theological articulation of that faith. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - L03 Contexts: Church in Lat Am - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30932 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Deborah A. Organ

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” In this section, we will study the forms that Christianity has taken in Latin America (with a special focus on Mexico), from the period of the Mayans, to the Spanish Conquest up to the modern-day. The course will include contextual analysis of key people and movements related to the Church in Latin America. Students will examine multiple aspects of their own contexts, and reflect on how those impact their study.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - W01 Contexts: Justice and Peace - T - R - - - 0800 - 1200

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30928 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Frederick W. Nairn

In this course, students will explore approaches to theology that emerge out of diverse cultural contexts. Sections may focus on biblical interpretation, dynamics of church life, mission work, or transnational solidarity through the eyes of the marginalized, or they may focus on efforts to articulate and bear witness to the gospel amid new cultures and historical challenges, according to the instructor’s discretion. Sections may focus on experiences of marginalization and oppression as a source for theological reflection for women (giving rise to feminist/womanist/mujerista theologies, for example), or for people of color or indigenous peoples (giving rise to Latin American, African-American, Minjung, and South African liberation theologies, for example), or for economically exploited classes (also giving rise to liberation theologies). This course will thus provide an opportunity to learn how the global Christian community is gaining fresh insights into the gospel that were missed when the dominant perspective on theology reflected primarily the experience of European men, or to learn how claims by Christians have at various times served both to challenge and to reinforce systems of power and privilege. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 228 - L01 Comparative: World Religions - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30925 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Elaine C. MacMillan

This course invites students to explore Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Indigenous worldviews, or other traditions, in relation to Christianity. They may also examine distinctions within a single religious tradition (between Sunni and Shia sects within Islam, for example). Classes may focus on lived practice, modes of inter- and intrareligious dialogue, theologies of religious pluralism, or sacred texts. Students will critically and creatively reflect on the theological opportunities and challenges posed by the reality of religious pluralism in our contemporary world. Pre-requisite: THEO 100.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Fall 2021 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ARTH 250 - L01 Museum Studies: Collections - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

43819 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Vanessa A. Rousseau

In this course, museum successes and failures will be examined in relation to the broad topics of exhibition design, collecting, politics, tourism, museum organizational structures, architecture, and education. The course combines thematic and theoretical classroom discussions with practical and experiential museum components. This course will provide an opportunity for discussions with museum professionals. Partnerships with regional museums will provide hands-on project opportunities during the semester.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ARTH 250 - L1A Museum Studies: Collections - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45246 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Vanessa A. Rousseau

In this course, museum successes and failures will be examined in relation to the broad topics of exhibition design, collecting, politics, tourism, museum organizational structures, architecture, and education. The course combines thematic and theoretical classroom discussions with practical and experiential museum components. This course will provide an opportunity for discussions with museum professionals. Partnerships with regional museums will provide hands-on project opportunities during the semester.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ARTH 330 - 01 Churches/Mosques 1st Millen - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45249 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Vanessa A. Rousseau

This course examines the formation and development of the first Christian and Islamic art and architecture during the first millennium C.E. of Europe and the Mediterranean. The class will examine the development of religious structures for these new religions, the role of visual images in both religious and secular contexts, and the influences that these cultures exerted on each other. Areas to be covered include: the Early Christian period; the Germanic, Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Scandinavian cultures of the sixth to eighth centuries; the Carolingian and Ottonian periods; Byzantine art and architecture; Islamic art and architecture.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ARTH 330 - 1A Churches/Mosques 1st Millen - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45250 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Vanessa A. Rousseau

This course examines the formation and development of the first Christian and Islamic art and architecture during the first millennium C.E. of Europe and the Mediterranean. The class will examine the development of religious structures for these new religions, the role of visual images in both religious and secular contexts, and the influences that these cultures exerted on each other. Areas to be covered include: the Early Christian period; the Germanic, Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Scandinavian cultures of the sixth to eighth centuries; the Carolingian and Ottonian periods; Byzantine art and architecture; Islamic art and architecture.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 205 - 01 Crisis and Development - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

43930 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Robert G. Kennedy

This course explores from an interdisciplinary perspective the history of the Catholic Church as it interacts with the secular world and is shaped by its dominant personalities and events. No other institution in history has survived, and flourished, for so long and in the face of so many challenges. This course will critically reflect upon the history of the Church, from its origins in the Apostolic Age to the modern period, as a series of cycles with a common pattern of creativity, achievement, and retreat. Students may expect to complete the course with an awareness and understanding of the major personalities and events, secular and ecclesial, that have shaped the life of the Church.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 301 - 01 The Catholic Vision M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

43205 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William J. Junker

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: CATH 101

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 308 - 01 Sex, Gender, and Catholicism M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 55S B10

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

43090 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David P. Deavel

This course examines the topics of sex, gender, and Catholicism at various points of intersection. Drawing on a variety of Catholic and non-Catholic historical, philosophical, and literary lenses on these topics, this course gives special attention to under-represented voices, as well as to the teachings, practices, and institutional reality of the Catholic Church. Readings may cover topics such as friendship, sexuality, priestly ordination, marriage, erotic desire, parenthood, and more. Readings offer an opportunity to examine preconceptions, stereotypes, and assumptions surrounding these topics. Attention is also given to the exercise of power (including institutional power, and power based on gender), both historically and in contemporary culture. This course aims to deepen, diversify, and inform students’ imaginations on these topics and their connection to diversity, inclusion, and social justice. Prerequiste: CATH 101.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 308 - 02 Sex, Gender, and Catholicism - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 55S

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

55S

Course Registration Number:

45526 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

William J. Junker

This course examines the topics of sex, gender, and Catholicism at various points of intersection. Drawing on a variety of Catholic and non-Catholic historical, philosophical, and literary lenses on these topics, this course gives special attention to under-represented voices, as well as to the teachings, practices, and institutional reality of the Catholic Church. Readings may cover topics such as friendship, sexuality, priestly ordination, marriage, erotic desire, parenthood, and more. Readings offer an opportunity to examine preconceptions, stereotypes, and assumptions surrounding these topics. Attention is also given to the exercise of power (including institutional power, and power based on gender), both historically and in contemporary culture. This course aims to deepen, diversify, and inform students’ imaginations on these topics and their connection to diversity, inclusion, and social justice. Prerequiste: CATH 101.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 340 - 01 Church&Culture:Soc Dim of Cath - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 55S B10

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

40237 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Robert G. Kennedy

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently social and ecclesial. Its specific focus is on the Christian engagement with the world. The course's framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) as described in Centesimus annus. We will examine the ways that Revelation, the sacramental life, and the teachings of the Church call Catholics to seek holiness and to witness to their faith in the world. Specific topics may include social and economic justice, politics and public policy, lay and religious apostolates, education, and marriage and family. Course materials may include resources from philosophy, theology, history, economics, and political science.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 340 - 03 Vocation of the Entrepreneur - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44372 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Martin W. Schlag, Michael J. Sarafolean

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently social and ecclesial. Its specific focus is on the Christian engagement with the world. The course's framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) as described in Centesimus annus. We will examine the ways that Revelation, the sacramental life, and the teachings of the Church call Catholics to seek holiness and to witness to their faith in the world. Specific topics may include social and economic justice, politics and public policy, lay and religious apostolates, education, and marriage and family. Course materials may include resources from philosophy, theology, history, economics, and political science.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CLAS 225 - W01 Classical Hero & Film M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

40383 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lorina N. Quartarone

This Course focuses on analyzing and understanding Classical epic poetry, the ancient presentation of heroic figures and heroic exploits, and recognizing the influence of epic/heroic literature on the modern storytelling device of film. While the genre of epic is central to the course, other genres (both literary and cinematic) which present he-roic figures, e.g., tragedy, history, comedy, action, fantasy, will also be explored. Analyzing the works read or viewed via writing and class discussion will constitute the primary course activities; students will engage in reading, viewing and writing outside of class, while class time will include some writing, viewing and discussion. In order to allow am-ple time for discussion and analysis, the majority of films in their entirety will be viewed outside of class. The course grade will be based substantially on written analysis (i.e., essays, papers) of the texts and films studied. ENGL 203 may also be substituted for this course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CLAS 225 - W1A Classical Hero & Film M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44227 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Lorina N. Quartarone

This Course focuses on analyzing and understanding Classical epic poetry, the ancient presentation of heroic figures and heroic exploits, and recognizing the influence of epic/heroic literature on the modern storytelling device of film. While the genre of epic is central to the course, other genres (both literary and cinematic) which present he-roic figures, e.g., tragedy, history, comedy, action, fantasy, will also be explored. Analyzing the works read or viewed via writing and class discussion will constitute the primary course activities; students will engage in reading, viewing and writing outside of class, while class time will include some writing, viewing and discussion. In order to allow am-ple time for discussion and analysis, the majority of films in their entirety will be viewed outside of class. The course grade will be based substantially on written analysis (i.e., essays, papers) of the texts and films studied. ENGL 203 may also be substituted for this course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CLAS 245 - 01 Classical Mythology M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45342 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Mythology is the embodiment and encoding of the beliefs, principles, and aspirations of ancient cultures. This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to mythology as an introduction and foundation to Classical civilization. Both Greek and Roman myths will be examined from a variety of theoretical perspectives, including aetioligical, structuralist, and psychological theories. Consideration will also be given to the study of literature in translation, art history, religion, and history. The course grade will be principally based on writing assignments and class discussions. ENGL 203 may also be substituted for this course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CLAS 245 - 01A Classical Mythology M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45343 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Mythology is the embodiment and encoding of the beliefs, principles, and aspirations of ancient cultures. This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to mythology as an introduction and foundation to Classical civilization. Both Greek and Roman myths will be examined from a variety of theoretical perspectives, including aetioligical, structuralist, and psychological theories. Consideration will also be given to the study of literature in translation, art history, religion, and history. The course grade will be principally based on writing assignments and class discussions. ENGL 203 may also be substituted for this course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CLAS 245 - 01B Classical Mythology M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45344 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Mythology is the embodiment and encoding of the beliefs, principles, and aspirations of ancient cultures. This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to mythology as an introduction and foundation to Classical civilization. Both Greek and Roman myths will be examined from a variety of theoretical perspectives, including aetioligical, structuralist, and psychological theories. Consideration will also be given to the study of literature in translation, art history, religion, and history. The course grade will be principally based on writing assignments and class discussions. ENGL 203 may also be substituted for this course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COMM 370 - 01 Intercultural Communication See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44031 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Audra K. Nuru

This course examines the influence of culture on our own and others’ communication. Students will be introduced to different aspects and levels of culture, including basic principles and theories that explain cultural differences on the group level, and challenges in intercultural communication, such as stereotypes, ethnocentrism, conflicting ethical standards, and racial disparities. Through lectures, discussions and first-hand practice, students are expected to form global perspectives and become more competent in intercultural communication. Students are advised to take the course either during or after the sophomore year.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0800-0940- - - R - - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
ENGL 201 - W01 The Play's the Thing: Drama See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

41343 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

Get your ticket, merch, and concessions, because we'll be heading to the theater! This semester, we're going to experience family drama--well, read dramas that explore the various relationships inside and between families. We'll travel across the ocean (figuratively) to watch Shakespeare's Globe perform AS YOU LIKE IT. We will explore a classic play, Ibsen'sA DOLL'S HOUSE, rewritten by two modern authors, Lucas Hnath (A DOLL'S HOUSE, PART 2) and Heather Raffo (NOURA); the latter two plays have been performed recently at the Jungle and Guthrie Theater, so we will watch the scenes available from these local performances. Greek tragedy also obtains a modern rewrite in Sarah Ruhl's EURYDICE and August Wilson's FENCES. In our final play, Dominique Morisseau's PIPELINE, the threat of black juvenile incarceration meets the determination of a loving mother; Penumbra Theatre offered a stellar performance of this work. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1055-1200M - - - F - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
ENGL 201 - W02 Literature of the Strange See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

41386 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Leslie A. Miller

Mariane Moore's definition of good poems as "Imaginary Gardens with real toads in them" suggests that the relationship between the imagined and the real is not only fundamental to literary works, but often a shifting balance. In this course, we'll read poetry, drama, fiction and critical work that features calculated departures from straightforward realism, and examine why and how literary writers have pressured realism toward the fantastical and the surreal. Texts for the course may include works such as Carmen Maria Machado’s THE BODY AND OTHER STORIES; Shakespeare's THE TEMPEST; Laura Kasischke's SPACE IN CHAINS; Katherine Dunn’s GEEK LOVE; Mary Shelley's FRANKENSTEIN; Matthea Harvey’s IF THE TABLOIDS ARE TRUE, WHO ARE YOU; Toni Morrison’s SULA; as well as selected shorter works from Margaret Atwood, John Keats, Shirley Jackson, Wallace Stevens, and John Barthelme among others. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1335-1510M - - - - - -
VSP 1335-1510- - W - - - -
ENGL 202 - W01 Wild Writing: Natural World - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44145 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gordon D. Grice

Since the days of Leonardo da Vinci, writers of natural history have straddled science and literature in their attempts to understand the world. We'll read and analyze the works of great naturalists and incorporate some of their strategies--empirical observation, reporting, academic research, memoir--into our own writing. Authors may include Italian biologist Francesco Redi; French naturalist Jean-Henri Fabre; U.S. poet Robert Frost; and others. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W02 Wild Writing: Natural World - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44146 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gordon D. Grice

Since the days of Leonardo da Vinci, writers of natural history have straddled science and literature in their attempts to understand the world. We'll read and analyze the works of great naturalists and incorporate some of their strategies--empirical observation, reporting, academic research, memoir--into our own writing. Authors may include Italian biologist Francesco Redi; French naturalist Jean-Henri Fabre; U.S. poet Robert Frost; and others. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W03 Existential America M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44122 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Doug P. Phillips

In this course we will examine a body of work that traffics in such existential themes as freedom and responsibility, authenticity and bad faith, anguish and abandonment, identity and subjectivity, and choice and commitment. While some of our readings will reach beyond our own shores (Sartre, Beauvoir, Camus, Kafka, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, and Kierkegaard), we will mostly focus on works by 20th-century American writers: Palahniuk's FIGHT CLUB, Krakauer's INTO THE WILD, O'Connor's A GOOD MAN IS HARD TO FIND, Baldwin's THE FIRE NEXT TIME, Salinger's The CATCHER IN THE RYE, McCarthy's NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN -- to name but a possible few. In the words of Zadie Smith, we're going to read a selection of very good books in this course, concentrating on whatever is most particular to them in the hope that this might help us understand whatever is most particular to us. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W05 Business & American Identity See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44123 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

This course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1215-1320M - - - - - -
VSP 1215-1320- - W - - - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
ENGL 202 - W06 Business & American Identity See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44124 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

This course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1335-1440M - - - - - -
VSP 1335-1440- - W - - - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
ENGL 202 - W07 Literature Looks at Medicine - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44125 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Barbara K. Olson

Hospitals, psychiatric wards, laboratories, operating tables, sick beds – all scenes presenting dilemmas of empathy and ethics for patients, doctors, and loved ones. We’ll read perspectives from both care givers and care needers: reflections from physicians on their craft as well as memoir, drama, and fiction about patients in the throes of illness. Writers may include Kopit, Taylor, Jamieson, Plath, Hawthorne, Edson, Pomerance, Fadiman, Williams, Gawande, and Mukherjee. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W08 Literature Looks at Medicine - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44126 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Barbara K. Olson

Hospitals, psychiatric wards, laboratories, operating tables, sick beds – all scenes presenting dilemmas of empathy and ethics for patients, doctors, and loved ones. We’ll read perspectives from both care givers and care needers: reflections from physicians on their craft as well as memoir, drama, and fiction about patients in the throes of illness. Writers may include Kopit, Taylor, Jamieson, Plath, Hawthorne, Edson, Pomerance, Fadiman, Williams, Gawande, and Mukherjee. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W09 Native Amer Lit & Environment - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

41379 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

This course will combine fiction and non-fiction texts that approach the idea of environment and environmental sustainability from a variety of Native American and Indigenous world views, with an emphasis on Minnesota Native nations. In addition to reading and writing about Native literature, this course will strive to connect students to Native American food and farming and the social-ecological systems in which the stories are embedded. If all goes as planned, we’ll be cooking some indigenous recipes and visiting Dream of Wild Health indigenous farming co-op. Texts that will likely make the reading list include Heid Erdrich’s cookbook ORIGINAL LOCAL: INDIGENOUS FOOD, STORIES, AND RECIPES FROM THE UPPER MIDWEST (and we may organize a visit and a cooking class by the author); BRAIDING SWEETGRASS, a non-fiction text by Robin Wall Kimmerer, a Potawatomi woman who is also a biology professor; and the novel SOLAR STORMS by Linda Hogan, a story about four generations of women working to save ancestral land from dam development. Other possible texts include poetry from Leslie Marmon Silko, Joy Harjo, and others; William Apess’s 1835 essay on the “…Unconstitutional Laws of Massachusetts Relative to the Mashpee Tribe”; and selections from Winona LaDuke’s ALL MY RELATIONS, David Treuer’s REZ LIFE, and Vine Deloria, Jr.’s GOD IS RED. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W10 Native Amer Lit & Environment - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

41380 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

This course will combine fiction and non-fiction texts that approach the idea of environment and environmental sustainability from a variety of Native American and Indigenous world views, with an emphasis on Minnesota Native nations. In addition to reading and writing about Native literature, this course will strive to connect students to Native American food and farming and the social-ecological systems in which the stories are embedded. If all goes as planned, we’ll be cooking some indigenous recipes and visiting Dream of Wild Health indigenous farming co-op. Texts that will likely make the reading list include Heid Erdrich’s cookbook ORIGINAL LOCAL: INDIGENOUS FOOD, STORIES, AND RECIPES FROM THE UPPER MIDWEST (and we may organize a visit and a cooking class by the author); BRAIDING SWEETGRASS, a non-fiction text by Robin Wall Kimmerer, a Potawatomi woman who is also a biology professor; and the novel SOLAR STORMS by Linda Hogan, a story about four generations of women working to save ancestral land from dam development. Other possible texts include poetry from Leslie Marmon Silko, Joy Harjo, and others; William Apess’s 1835 essay on the “…Unconstitutional Laws of Massachusetts Relative to the Mashpee Tribe”; and selections from Winona LaDuke’s ALL MY RELATIONS, David Treuer’s REZ LIFE, and Vine Deloria, Jr.’s GOD IS RED. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W11 Literature of Mind and Brain See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

41385 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Emily M. James

This course explores literature’s relationship to the brain, the mind, and cognition. We will consider how writers and artists have registered, challenged, and even shaped developments in neuroscience and cognitive science across the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Topics may include sensation and perception, neurodiversity and neuroatypicality, affect theory, machine learning, neural networks, language acquisition, theory of mind, metaphor, and memory. Writers may include Virginia Woolf, Marcel Proust, Santiago Ramón y Cajal, Oliver Sacks, Jorge Luis Borges, Ian McEwan, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, David Mitchell, Teju Cole, Ali Smith, Michael Davidson, and Naoki Higashida. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1330-1510- - - R - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 202 - W12 Native Amer Lit & Envrionment - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44343 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

This course will combine fiction and non-fiction texts that approach the idea of environment and environmental sustainability from a variety of Native American and Indigenous world views, with an emphasis on Minnesota Native nations. In addition to reading and writing about Native literature, this course will strive to connect students to Native American food and farming and the social-ecological systems in which the stories are embedded. If all goes as planned, we’ll be cooking some indigenous recipes and visiting Dream of Wild Health indigenous farming co-op. Texts that will likely make the reading list include Heid Erdrich’s cookbook ORIGINAL LOCAL: INDIGENOUS FOOD, STORIES, AND RECIPES FROM THE UPPER MIDWEST (and we may organize a visit and a cooking class by the author); BRAIDING SWEETGRASS, a non-fiction text by Robin Wall Kimmerer, a Potawatomi woman who is also a biology professor; and the novel SOLAR STORMS by Linda Hogan, a story about four generations of women working to save ancestral land from dam development. Other possible texts include poetry from Leslie Marmon Silko, Joy Harjo, and others; William Apess’s 1835 essay on the “…Unconstitutional Laws of Massachusetts Relative to the Mashpee Tribe”; and selections from Winona LaDuke’s ALL MY RELATIONS, David Treuer’s REZ LIFE, and Vine Deloria, Jr.’s GOD IS RED. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W5A Business & American Identity See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44186 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

This course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
VSP 1215-1320M - - - - - -
1215-1320- - W - - - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
ENGL 202 - W6A Business & American Identity See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44187 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

This course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
VSP 1335-1440M - - - - - -
1335-1440- - W - - - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
ENGL 202 - W7A Literature Looks at Medicine - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44329 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Barbara K. Olson

Hospitals, psychiatric wards, laboratories, operating tables, sick beds – all scenes presenting dilemmas of empathy and ethics for patients, doctors, and loved ones. We’ll read perspectives from both care givers and care needers: reflections from physicians on their craft as well as memoir, drama, and fiction about patients in the throes of illness. Writers may include Kopit, Taylor, Jamieson, Plath, Hawthorne, Edson, Pomerance, Fadiman, Williams, Gawande, and Mukherjee. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W8A Literature Looks at Medicine - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44339 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Barbara K. Olson

Hospitals, psychiatric wards, laboratories, operating tables, sick beds – all scenes presenting dilemmas of empathy and ethics for patients, doctors, and loved ones. We’ll read perspectives from both care givers and care needers: reflections from physicians on their craft as well as memoir, drama, and fiction about patients in the throes of illness. Writers may include Kopit, Taylor, Jamieson, Plath, Hawthorne, Edson, Pomerance, Fadiman, Williams, Gawande, and Mukherjee. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W9A Native Amer Lit & Envrionment - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44342 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

This course will combine fiction and non-fiction texts that approach the idea of environment and environmental sustainability from a variety of Native American and Indigenous world views, with an emphasis on Minnesota Native nations. In addition to reading and writing about Native literature, this course will strive to connect students to Native American food and farming and the social-ecological systems in which the stories are embedded. If all goes as planned, we’ll be cooking some indigenous recipes and visiting Dream of Wild Health indigenous farming co-op. Texts that will likely make the reading list include Heid Erdrich’s cookbook ORIGINAL LOCAL: INDIGENOUS FOOD, STORIES, AND RECIPES FROM THE UPPER MIDWEST (and we may organize a visit and a cooking class by the author); BRAIDING SWEETGRASS, a non-fiction text by Robin Wall Kimmerer, a Potawatomi woman who is also a biology professor; and the novel SOLAR STORMS by Linda Hogan, a story about four generations of women working to save ancestral land from dam development. Other possible texts include poetry from Leslie Marmon Silko, Joy Harjo, and others; William Apess’s 1835 essay on the “…Unconstitutional Laws of Massachusetts Relative to the Mashpee Tribe”; and selections from Winona LaDuke’s ALL MY RELATIONS, David Treuer’s REZ LIFE, and Vine Deloria, Jr.’s GOD IS RED. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W01 Final Frontier: Mars & Beyond M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44129 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher J. Hassel

How do global politics influence our desire to explore space? How does space exploration impact our theological viewpoints of the universe? What roles might nation-states and corporations play in future space endeavors? Focusing on the human yearning to explore space, as well as current efforts to put humans on Mars in the near future, this class will attempt to answer these questions by examining a variety of literary forms including fiction, science fiction, poetry, nonfiction prose, and biography. Likely works to be studied include Tracy K. Smith’s LIFE ON MARS, Mary Doria Russell’s THE SPARROW, and Andy Weir's THE MARTIAN. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 203 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 202, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W02 Final Frontier: Mars & Beyond M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44130 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher J. Hassel

How do global politics influence our desire to explore space? How does space exploration impact our theological viewpoints of the universe? What roles might nation-states and corporations play in future space endeavors? Focusing on the human yearning to explore space, as well as current efforts to put humans on Mars in the near future, this class will attempt to answer these questions by examining a variety of literary forms including fiction, science fiction, poetry, nonfiction prose, and biography. Likely works to be studied include Tracy K. Smith’s LIFE ON MARS, Mary Doria Russell’s THE SPARROW, and Andy Weir's THE MARTIAN. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 203 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 202, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W03 The Road Not Taken See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

41345 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jeannie L. Hofmeister

Drugs, alcohol, lies and deception. Why do some young adults wander down the wrong road? Robert Frost’s poem suggests that either road is “really about the same,” but is that truly the case? Young adults confront a wide variety of unique issues and challenges as they mature. The consequences of their self-destructive decisions often result in ruined lives. Possible texts may include: Selected works by Nathaniel Hawthorne and poetry by Robert Frost, EVERYTHING I NEVER TOLD YOU by Celeste Ng, ORDINARY GRACE by William Kent Krueger, A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT by Norman Maclean, and SIX DEGREES OF SEPARATION by John Guare. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 203 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 202, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1215-1320M - W - - - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
ENGL 214 - L01 American Authors I See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

41381 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Andrew J. Scheiber

Where does the popular perception of America as the “New World” come from? How could slavery flourish in a land idealizing freedom? Why were immigrants so feared and reviled? Why did expansionism push out some and make millionaires of others? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings from the beginnings of the American literary tradition to the turn of the twentieth century. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as religious identity, political reform, race, slavery, war, gender, and industrialization. This course fulfills both the Historical Perspectives and the Early American Literature requirements in the English major, the Historical Perspectives requirement for English with a Creative Writing Emphasis students, a literature course for English with a Professional Writing Emphasis students, and a requirement for students in the English with a Secondary Education major. It also satisfies an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Prerequisites: ENGL 121, 190, or ENGL 201-204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0935-1040M - - - - - -
VSP 0935-1040- - W - F - -
ENGL 220 - L01 The Classical Tradition - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

41359 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy M. Muse

What might it mean to speak of “the classical tradition?” What does that include and exclude? And how does it matter to us today? From the ancient Greek gods in their serenity to the howls of the damned in Dante’s vision of the afterlife, whether mythological or theological, the works to be studied engage us in the most fundamental questions about what it means to be human. Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings of representative texts of Western literature in translation from ancient Greece to the Renaissance, including some interactions of the European traditions with ancient or medieval Asian, Mesopotamian, or Middle Eastern literatures. Authors may include Homer, Aeschylus, Sappho, Virgil, Dante, Rumi, Marie de France, and Christine de Pizan. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major and the English with a Creative Writing Emphasis major, a literature requirement for students in the English with a Professional Writing Emphasis major, and a requirement for students in the English with a Secondary Education major. It also satisfies an Integrations in the Humanities requirement and a Global Perspectives requirement for students under the new core program. Prerequisites: ENGL 121, 190, or ENGL 201-204. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 220 - L1A The Classical Tradition - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44345 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy M. Muse

What might it mean to speak of “the classical tradition?” What does that include and exclude? And how does it matter to us today? From the ancient Greek gods in their serenity to the howls of the damned in Dante’s vision of the afterlife, whether mythological or theological, the works to be studied engage us in the most fundamental questions about what it means to be human. Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings of representative texts of Western literature in translation from ancient Greece to the Renaissance, including some interactions of the European traditions with ancient or medieval Asian, Mesopotamian, or Middle Eastern literatures. Authors may include Homer, Aeschylus, Sappho, Virgil, Dante, Rumi, Marie de France, and Christine de Pizan. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major and the English with a Creative Writing Emphasis major, a literature requirement for students in the English with a Professional Writing Emphasis major, and a requirement for students in the English with a Secondary Education major. It also satisfies an Integrations in the Humanities requirement and a Global Perspectives requirement for students under the new core program. Prerequisites: ENGL 121, 190, or ENGL 201-204. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 341 - L01 African American Women's Lit See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

41383 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

At the start of her novel MAMA DAY, Gloria Naylor writes, "someone who didn't know how to ask wouldn't know how to listen." Audre Lorde, in "The Master's Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master's House," questions, "What does it mean when the tools of a racist patriarchy are used to examine the fruits of that same patriarchy? It means that only the most narrow perimeters of change are possible and allowable." Both writers call on their readers to approach African-American women's texts with humility, openness, and curiosity. They call upon readers to find new tools to dismantle racism, sexism, homophobia, and all the intersecting forms of racism that blight our lives. In this course, we will be "integrating" across communities and across time as we explore women's lived experience of the American racial and gender divide. We will be moving chronologically from the poetry of Gwendolyn Brooks during the Civil Rights era to the prose and poetry of Audre Lorde, where racial and second-wave feminist concerns intersect. We will study issues of black and mixed-race identity, questions of body image, and the painful realities of colorism in Toni Morrison's THE BLUEST EYE (1970), Gloria Naylor's MAMA DAY (1988), and Natasha Trethewey's MONUMENT (2018). The course will end with contemporary treatments of the economics, politics, and sociology of race intersecting with gender in Dominique Morisseau's THE DETROIT PROJECT and PIPELINE, Claudia Rankine's CITIZEN and THE WHITE CARD. This course satisfies the Diversity Literature requirement for English majors and English with a Professional Writing Emphasis students; a literature requirement for English with a Creative Writing students; the Human Diversity core requirement (old core); the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice core requirement (new core); and Integrations in the Humanities (new core). It also satisfies a major and minor requirement for the Women, Gender, & Sexuality Studies program. Prerequisite: ENGL 121, 190, or ENGL 201-204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0935-1040M - - - F - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
ENGL 364 - L01 18th Century British Lit - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

41384 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Raymond N. MacKenzie

This course provides an in-depth exploration of a select group of texts or authors from British literature of the eighteenth century, the age of Englightenment and a time of exploration that launched industrialization, capitalism, the slave trade, imperialism, and the police force and prisons, as well as the vibrant new genres of the novel, biography, and the first comprehensive dictionary. Selected texts or authors (such as Behn, Defoe, Fielding, Pope, Haywood, and Austen) will be studied in terms of a particular historical, cultural, or other context, or in terms of a convergence with authors or texts from other literary traditions or intellectual disciplines. Examples might include bawdy dramas vs. elegant novels of manners, “secret histories” of disguise and mistaken identity, criminal biographies and moral philosophy, and how to choose a marriage partner. This course fulfills the Contexts and Convergences and an Early British Literature requirement in the English major and a literature requirement for students in the English with a Creative Writing and English with a Professional Writing Emphasis majors. In addition, it also satisfies an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 121, 190 or ENGL 201-204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 366 - L01 The Victorian Sensation Novel - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45265 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

M. A. Easley

Bigamy, jewel heists, revenge murders, hysteria, and disinherited children. The sensation novel was a product of mid-Victorian anxieties about the “hidden crimes” of the upper classes. Whereas in the early part of the century crime was viewed as a threat posed by the lower orders, by the 1860s, criminal behavior was seen as the “dark secret” hidden beneath the façade of the perfect upper-class home. In this course, we will investigate the development of the sensation novel from the 1860s to the fin de siècle, including novels by writers such as Mary Braddon, Wilkie Collins, Ellen Wood, and Charles Reade. We will also explore how the sensation novel emerged from the periodical press – reportage of actual crimes that shocked a nation. In addition, we will examine the ways sensation novels were adapted to the stage in wildly popular melodramas of the period. This course satisfies the Contexts and Convergences requirement for English majors and counts as a literature course for English with a Creative Writing emphasis and English with a Professional Writing emphasis students. It also satisfies an Integrations in the Humanities requirement for students under the new core program. Prerequisite: ENGL 121, 190, or ENGL 201-204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 366 - L1A The Victorian Sensation Novel - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45266 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

M. A. Easley

Bigamy, jewel heists, revenge murders, hysteria, and disinherited children. The sensation novel was a product of mid-Victorian anxieties about the “hidden crimes” of the upper classes. Whereas in the early part of the century crime was viewed as a threat posed by the lower orders, by the 1860s, criminal behavior was seen as the “dark secret” hidden beneath the façade of the perfect upper-class home. In this course, we will investigate the development of the sensation novel from the 1860s to the fin de siècle, including novels by writers such as Mary Braddon, Wilkie Collins, Ellen Wood, and Charles Reade. We will also explore how the sensation novel emerged from the periodical press – reportage of actual crimes that shocked a nation. In addition, we will examine the ways sensation novels were adapted to the stage in wildly popular melodramas of the period. This course satisfies the Contexts and Convergences requirement for English majors and counts as a literature course for English with a Creative Writing emphasis and English with a Professional Writing emphasis students. It also satisfies an Integrations in the Humanities requirement for students under the new core program. Prerequisite: ENGL 121, 190, or ENGL 201-204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
FILM 335 - W01 Film Theory and Criticism See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44169 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Juli A. Kroll

This course trains students in the use of a wide range of film theory and criticism as tools for interpreting film and media as texts, as narrative, as works of art, as historical artifacts, as political expression, as semiotic systems, as mediums of identity and social change, and more. Building on knowledge and skills learned in FILM 200 Introduction to Film, students will learn a range of compelling critical methods for the analysis of film and media, including many of the following: auteur theory; psychoanalysis; feminism, gender and masculinity studies; Marxism; cultural studies; queer theory; audience reception and star studies; postcolonialism; genre analysis; and race and ethnicity, among others. Film Theory and Criticism will help situate you as informed, critically engaged viewers of global film and media texts and practices. Each area of film criticism will be accompanied by a screening of a film or films that elucidate main points of the area of film theory that is the focus for that week. Through the combination of canonical theoretical approaches and more contemporary angles developed since the 1970s, this course will provide you with skills necessary to interpret films as collaborative art works, as technical artifacts, as sociocultural and ideological productions, and as products of a globalized media world. Prerequisite: Film 200 or instructor permission.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1330-1510- T - - - - -
1330-1510- - - R - - -
FILM 335 - W1A Film Theory and Criticism See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44782 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Juli A. Kroll

This course trains students in the use of a wide range of film theory and criticism as tools for interpreting film and media as texts, as narrative, as works of art, as historical artifacts, as political expression, as semiotic systems, as mediums of identity and social change, and more. Building on knowledge and skills learned in FILM 200 Introduction to Film, students will learn a range of compelling critical methods for the analysis of film and media, including many of the following: auteur theory; psychoanalysis; feminism, gender and masculinity studies; Marxism; cultural studies; queer theory; audience reception and star studies; postcolonialism; genre analysis; and race and ethnicity, among others. Film Theory and Criticism will help situate you as informed, critically engaged viewers of global film and media texts and practices. Each area of film criticism will be accompanied by a screening of a film or films that elucidate main points of the area of film theory that is the focus for that week. Through the combination of canonical theoretical approaches and more contemporary angles developed since the 1970s, this course will provide you with skills necessary to interpret films as collaborative art works, as technical artifacts, as sociocultural and ideological productions, and as products of a globalized media world. Prerequisite: Film 200 or instructor permission.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1330-1510- T - - - - -
1330-1510- - - R - - -
HIST 292 - W02 Topics: Reading Black Resist M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

40216 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David C. Williard, David T. Lawrence

This course, team-taught by a historian and a literary scholar, focuses on the long struggle of African Americans for justice and equality in the U.S. Analyzing literary and historical texts, students in this course will learn about and engage in research on African American history and culture. Utilizing historical, literary, and cultural approaches, this interdisciplinary course will immerse students into an exploration of the African American experience from multiple perspectives using dual disciplinary frameworks. For example, students may study Richard Wright’s NATIVE SON, but would read the text within the historical and cultural framework of the Great Migration, connecting Wright’s text not just to other literary texts, but situating it within an historical and cultural context vital to the novel’s creation and essential for its interpretation. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JPST 275 - W01 Qualitative Methods M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

40519 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael C. Klein

This course introduces students to qualitative research theories, methods, and techniques focused on representing voices of women, people of color, people in poverty and others that are marginalized or excluded from dominant culture. Specifically, students will gain familiarity with the qualitative social science methods of interviews, ethnography, documentary research, and focus groups. Throughout the course, students will be guided through the process of designing and conducting their own unique research projects meanwhile learning from ongoing research with their instructors and partner organizations. In addition to training in data collection techniques, analysis, and varied epistemologies, the course thoroughly explores the ethics of research with marginalized communities and the ways in which research can and does relate to social change. Together, participants in this course will co-create a teaching/learning community wherein we all critically analyze and respectfully value each person’s individual and particular contributions as well as our diverse understandings of social reality and how we position ourselves in the multiple worlds in which we live and work.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 220 - 01 Logic - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42872 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heidi M. Giebel

This course provides students with skills for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating the sorts of reasoning encountered in natural language. Emphasis will be placed on attaining facility with different formal systems for representing and evaluating arguments - including propositional logic, Aristotelian syllogistic, first-order predicate calculus, - as well as on acquiring the ability to apply these systems in the analysis and evaluation of arguments in ordinary and philosophical discourse. This course satisfies one of the core curriculum requirements in “Integrations in the Humanities.” Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 235 - 01 Politics, Law, and Common Good M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44012 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephen J. Heaney

Political philosophy and law are intimately connected to ethics, and to an underlying theory of the human person. Some say that political philosophy is an extension of ethics or morality; others hold that, without law, there is no morality. Which is it? Are human beings naturally political animals? From where does the authority to make law arise? What is the origin of property? What constitutes justice? What is the relation between a political system and the good of its individual citizens? What is this “common good” we keep hearing about? Are there better and worse forms of government? We will examine philosophical works on these topics from ancient to recent, with particular attention to the Catholic intellectual tradition. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 240 - 01 Faith and Doubt - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

40442 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mark K. Spencer

Many religions, including Christianity, ask people to have faith that God exists and has acted in human history. Yet it often seems more reasonable to doubt that religious claims are true. In this course, we will consider whether it can be reasonable to have faith in religious claims and how doubt can help a person come to a more mature faith. The course will be divided into two parts, each of which will address a source of religious doubt. In the first part, we will discuss the relation between faith, doubt, and science. In light of modern scientific findings (especially the theory of evolution), can it be reasonable to believe that God exists, created the world, and has intervened in history? In the second part, we will discuss the relation between faith, doubt, and suffering. In the face of widespread horrendous suffering and moral evil, can it be reasonable to believe that a good God exists and cares for human beings? Special attention will be paid to the suffering that results from the experience of finding the world to be ultimately meaningless. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 260 - 01 Global Philosophy of Religion - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44010 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

John D. Kronen

Many people today say they are “spiritual but not religious”, meaning that they reject organized religion, with its “dogmas” and doctrine of God as “an old man in the sky.” But the great religions of the world have engendered powerful philosophical theologies, offering sophisticated accounts of the ultimate, spiritual reality and of its relation to humans and to the world, developing these accounts in astonishingly rich ways. Some have argued that the ultimate reality must be personal i.e., must be a being who is able to act on purpose for reasons, and that a person need not be limited in any way. Some have argued that the ultimate reality must transcend personality, must be the ground of being which is not itself a being. Some have argued that the there can only be one uncreated being, while some have argued that the evil in the world requires that God, who is perfectly good and the creator of all good things, must be opposed by an uncreated spirit of evil which He will, nonetheless, defeat in the end. Some have argued that the ultimate good for humans must consist in loving union with a God of love and all other finite spirits, while others have held that it can only consist in a realization that one’s inner self is the very same as the Self of all, the Self which is Being-Consciousness-Bliss. Furthermore, the greatest philosophical theology humans have produced was not detached from religion or purported revelatory texts, but grew up, in an organic way, from a deep, and philosophically informed, meditation on them. This course explores Western and non-Western philosophical accounts of the nature of the ultimate reality and of the relation of humans to that reality and, by doing this, seeks to show that the currently popular distinction between “religion” and “spirituality” is based on nothing more than an ignorance of the profound, and varied, religious philosophies developed by thinkers who were adherents of the great world religions. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 265 - 40 HONR: Minds Brains & Computers M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44014 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jonathan E. Stoltz

A philosophical examination of the mind from both classical and contemporary perspectives. Content that may be covered includes: the relation between the mind and the body/brain, theories of the soul and how it relates to mind and brain, theories of personal identity over time, free will, mental causation, functionalist theories of intelligence, computer/artificial intelligence, and the nature of consciousness. The course considers reflection on these topics from within both Catholic intellectual tradition and other traditions and perspectives, and engages contemporary philosophical work informed by brain and computer science. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197, and HONORS.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 359 - 01 Philosophy of Law M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44015 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Rose Mary H. Lemmons

This course is structured as a seminar to promote the analysis and evaluation of key legal concepts and arguments in the philosophy of law. Topics include the ways in which law can compel action, justify the punishment of criminals, structure government, organize society, and promote--or harm--the common good. Other topics include the source, nature, and scope of law; unalienable rights; American natural law; the proper principles of legal interpretation and reasoning; and the legal challenges arising from cultural dissent, conscientious objection, and civil disobedience. Attention will be given to both classical and contemporary authors. Prerequisite: PHIL 214; or PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197, and one other PHIL course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SPAN 335 - D01 Intro to Spanish Literature - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

43762 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Irene Domingo

An introduction to Spanish and Spanish American narrative, drama and poetry. Strongly recommended for students who minor in Spanish. The course is designed to teach students the skills of critical reading and literary analysis. Prerequisites: Successful completion of SPAN 300, 301, 305 or their equivalent with a C- or better in each course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SPAN 335 - D1A Intro to Spanish Literature - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44512 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Irene Domingo

An introduction to Spanish and Spanish American narrative, drama and poetry. Strongly recommended for students who minor in Spanish. The course is designed to teach students the skills of critical reading and literary analysis. Prerequisites: Successful completion of SPAN 300, 301, 305 or their equivalent with a C- or better in each course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - W01 Bible: Old Testament M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

40538 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Eugenia O. Gavrilyuk

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section involves the student in an intensive reading and discussion of the Old Testament, also known as the Hebrew scriptures. The course investigates methods of biblical interpretation and the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context. In addition, this course explores the Old Testament as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern) in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - W04 Bible: New Testament - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

40542 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

John W. Martens

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section involves the student in an intensive historical, literary, and theological reading of major portions of the New Testament in the Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - W3A Bible: New Testament - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45317 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

John W. Martens

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 221 - W4A Bible: New Testament - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45319 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

John W. Martens

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 222 - L01 History: Medieval Theology See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

40545 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Steven J. McMichael

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section involves the study of the development of Christian theology from the fall of the Roman Empire until the Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the main themes of the classical Christian views of faith/reason, grace/nature, God/creation in the theologies of such theologians as St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Bonaventure. Other themes that may be treated: the role of monasticism and mendicant life; medieval saints such as St. Francis of Assisi and Catherine of Siena, women's spirituality, mysticism, liturgical developments, religious art and architecture, and the interaction of Christians with Jews and Muslims.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1330-1510- T - - - - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
THEO 222 - L02 History: Early Christian Theo See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

40568 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mark E. DelCogliano

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1055-1200- - - - F - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
THEO 222 - L03 History: Early Christian Theo See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44575 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mark E. DelCogliano

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0815-0920- - - - F - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
THEO 222 - L04 History: Early Christian Theo See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44576 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mark E. DelCogliano

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0935-1040- - - - F - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
THEO 223 - L01 Belief: Ancient & Modern - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

40550 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Deborah A. Organ

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian doctrines are interrelated with each other and with other beliefs about the world. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant doctrines in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. The course is structured on the classical "system" of the Nicene Creed, and will focus on the ongoing formation of the doctrines of God, Christ, the Spirit, creation, sin, salvation, and Church. Special emphasis will be given to the role of grace in history and human experience.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 223 - L03 Belief: Ancient & Modern - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

40547 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Deborah A. Organ

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian doctrines are interrelated with each other and with other beliefs about the world. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant doctrines in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. The course is structured on the classical "system" of the Nicene Creed, and will focus on the ongoing formation of the doctrines of God, Christ, the Spirit, creation, sin, salvation, and Church. Special emphasis will be given to the role of grace in history and human experience.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 224 - 01 Bridges: Theology & Politics - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

40553 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael J. Hollerich

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section is a theological investigation of changing relationships between Christianity and the political order, principally in religious terms as understood by Christians themselves but also from the vantage point of government. Emphasis in the first half of the course is on the foundational events of the New Testament and the early Christian era, and in the second half on Christianity's experience with secular and democratic modernity in America. The aim of the course is to measure the effect, in changing historical contexts, of persecution, establishment, and disestablishment, on a religion which professes both to be rooted in transcendent reality, and to have direct implications for life in this world. Primary readings from scripture, ancient and modern theology, speeches, sermons, Supreme Court decisions, and political, sociological and religious reflections on the American experiment with democracy and freedom of religion.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 224 - L01 Bridges: Theo & Technology See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44281 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Barbara K. Sain

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section examines how technology shapes our identities and our relationships with nature, other people, and the transcendent. Does technology bring us closer to the natural world or make it harder to experience it? Does it help or hinder our relationships with other people and with God? We’ll look at historical examples, such as the impact of electric lights, and current technologies, like virtual reality and prosthetic enhancements of the body. The course readings will include a range of voices from Christian theology, from ancient to modern times, that offer insight on sharing a meaningful human life with others and discerning the presence of the divine in work, leisure, silence, and the natural world.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1730-1930M - - - - - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
THEO 224 - W02 HONORS Bridges: Theology & Sci M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44280 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Philip A. Rolnick

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section is an introduction to the interrelationship between Christian theology (the understanding of the Christian faith), and the natural sciences. It explores the relationship between scientific and theological methods and modes of knowledge, and considers some of the central topics of Christian theology - God, creation, providence, resurrections, and afterlife - in the light of modern scientific evidence and theories.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 225 - L01 Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

40554 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Bernard V. Brady

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 225 - L02 Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44218 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paul J. Wojda

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 225 - L03 Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice M - - - - - - 1730 - 2115

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2115

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44236 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Robert C. Koerpel

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This course is an introduction to the principles, methods and topics of Christian theological ethics. The following themes will be addressed: the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to the understanding of the human person (including freedom, sin, conscience, character and grace); the role of the believing community in its relation to culture; and the connection of worship and spirituality to the Christian moral life. Some application will be made to selected issues in personal, professional and social ethics.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 225 - L04 Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44238 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Robert C. Koerpel

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This course is an introduction to the principles, methods and topics of Christian theological ethics. The following themes will be addressed: the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to the understanding of the human person (including freedom, sin, conscience, character and grace); the role of the believing community in its relation to culture; and the connection of worship and spirituality to the Christian moral life. Some application will be made to selected issues in personal, professional and social ethics.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 225 - L2A Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45296 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paul J. Wojda

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 225 - W03 Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice - T - - - - - 1730 - 2115

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2115

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45297 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mary K. Twite

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 225 - W05 HONORS: Faith & Ethics - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45400 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mary K. Twite

This course explores principles, methods, and topics of Christian theological ethics. It addresses the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to understanding the human person; the significance of love, justice, and commitment to the common good in Christian moral life; and the role of the believing community in its relation to culture. Topics might include sex, marriage, and family; crime, justice, and forgiveness; war, peace, and revolution; immigration; environmental sustainability and animal rights; poverty and economic justice, among others.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 225 - W1A Faith & Ethics: Bioethics M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

40556 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paul J. Wojda

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section examines the contributions of Christian faith to reflecting upon, understanding, and resolving issues and ethical questions raised by revolutionary developments in the life sciences, e.g. innovation birth technologies, genetic manipulation and control, human experimentation, the prolonging of life and allocation of scarce medical resources.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 226 - L01 Spirituality: ChristianWorship M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

40557 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mary M. Hoden

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section examines worship as the sanctification of time, space, and life. It includes a comparison and contrast of Eastern (Orthodox) and Western (Lutheran, Anglican, Reformed, Baptist, Methodist, Quaker, Frontier, Pentecostal) worship practices with those of Roman Catholics.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 226 - L02 Spirituality: ChristianWorship M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44210 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mary M. Hoden

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section examines worship as the sanctification of time, space, and life. It includes a comparison and contrast of Eastern (Orthodox) and Western (Lutheran, Anglican, Reformed, Baptist, Methodist, Quaker, Frontier, Pentecostal) worship practices with those of Roman Catholics.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 226 - L03 Spirituality: Christ Marriage M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44278 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Marguerite L. Spencer

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section is designed to acquaint students with the theology of Christian marriage, understood as covenant relationship and as sacrament, that is, an effective sign of God's love in our world. Primary though not exclusive emphasis will be on the Roman Catholic tradition. Students will also examine contemporary cultural attitudes toward sexuality, marriage, and the family in the light of Christian theology.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 226 - W02 Spirituality: Christ Marriage - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44213 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paul V. Niskanen

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section is designed to acquaint students with the theology of Christian marriage, understood as covenant relationship and as sacrament, that is, an effective sign of God's love in our world. Primary though not exclusive emphasis will be on the Roman Catholic tradition. Students will also examine contemporary cultural attitudes toward sexuality, marriage, and the family in the light of Christian theology.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - L01 Contexts: Women & Hebrew Bible - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

40559 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelly M. Wilson

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This course examines women in the Hebrew Bible by reconstructing the status and roles of women during the biblical periods, investigating the conceptions of gender in the text, and analyzing the history of biblical interpretation. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - L04 Contexts: Nazism & Apartheid - - - - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

- - - - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

40631 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kimberly J. Vrudny

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section will focus on the patterns that emerged in both contexts—Germany under Hitler; South Africa under apartheid: economic anxiety; the rise of nationalism; the election of a tyrant; theological rationales for tyranny, torture, and even genocide; theological and artistic resistance; the complicated role of Catholicism in each setting; and legal processes in the aftermath.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - W03 Contexts: Women & Christianity M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44232 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shirley E. Jordon

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This course explores the ways in which the Christian tradition has profoundly influenced our society's definition of women. It will focus on what some of the major works of this tradition assert about the nature and place of women in their particular historical communities. Students will also read religious literature by women in order to acquire a sense of women's religious experience both throughout history and in the present day. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - W05 Contexts: Justice & Peace See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44286 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jennifer M. Sanders

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section involves an examination of the views of various religions and ideologies on issues of justice and peace, with special attention to the Catholic and other Christian teachings on such issues as war and peace, violence, economic justice, the environment, criminal justice, and social justice. Special attention is given to how fundamental presuppositions and principles of each group studied affect their views on justice and peace, and contribute to or hinder dialogue and peaceful interaction with other groups. In addition to Christianity, students will study (at least) one far eastern worldview (e.g. Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism), one tribal religion (Native American, African), Islam, and one secular worldview (e.g. Marxism, capitalism, secular humanism). Students are required to investigate one worldview in depth through a semester-long research project.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1055-1200- - W - F - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
THEO 227 - W3A Contexts: Women & Christianity M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44233 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shirley E. Jordon

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This course explores the ways in which the Christian tradition has profoundly influenced our society's definition of women. It will focus on what some of the major works of this tradition assert about the nature and place of women in their particular historical communities. Students will also read religious literature by women in order to acquire a sense of women's religious experience both throughout history and in the present day. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 228 - L01 Comparative: World Religions See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

40565 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elaine C. MacMillan

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section is a comparison of the teachings and practices of Christianity with the teachings and practices of selected non-Christian religions, for example, American Indian (Lakota), Judaism, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism. The aim of the course will be to clarify similarities and differences between Christianity and other religions, to reflect on the problem posed by religious pluralism in modern culture, and to develop a Christian theology of world religions.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0800-0940- - - R - - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
THEO 228 - L02 Comparative: World Religions See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

40562 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elaine C. MacMillan

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section is a comparison of the teachings and practices of Christianity with the teachings and practices of selected non-Christian religions, for example, American Indian (Lakota), Judaism, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism. The aim of the course will be to clarify similarities and differences between Christianity and other religions, to reflect on the problem posed by religious pluralism in modern culture, and to develop a Christian theology of world religions.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0955-1135- - - R - - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
THEO 228 - L03 Comparative: InterRel Encounte See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

40563 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Hans S. Gustafson

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” In the last half century religious diversity in the West has rapidly increased, bringing people from different religious traditions into daily contact. This has resulted in new conflicts, sometimes in violence, but also in new collaborations and friendships. Drawing on several approaches to interreligious conflict and relations, this course will examine the dynamic encounters that take place between and among people of different religious identities and ask students to reflect on their own role in religiously complex situations. Students will consider this interreligious reality and their role in it against the backdrop of their own individual relationship to spirituality, faith, and theology. To foster interreligious understanding beyond the classroom, students in this course will spend significant time outside the classroom directly engaging religious diversity. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1335-1510- - W - - - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
THEO 228 - L04 Comparative: Dialogue 4 Peace M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44168 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ali Chamseddine

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This course will explore the questions: What is peacebuilding? What is conflict resolution? And what role does religion play in them? By exploring these questions, it will be apparent that dialogue can be a tool for transformative peacebuilding and inclusive solutions to conflicts. Students in this course will learn the history of interreligious dialogue as well as the practical aspects of interreligious dialogue and how they fit within the framework of conflict resolution and peacebuilding.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 228 - L05 Comparative: Encounter & Clash - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44199 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Ali Chamseddine

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” The Catholic Church is a pioneer in dialogue. Throughout history, the Catholic Church has been involved in both clashes and encounters with Christian dominations and monotheistic religions. Through exploring various clashes and encounters, this course will illustrate the Catholic Church’s involvement in the ecumenical movement and the advancement of interreligious dialogue. Taught by Prof. Ali Chamseddine, the course will focus specifically on the encounters and clashes between the Catholic Church and Protestantism as well as the Catholic Church with Judaism and Islam.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 228 - L06 Comparative: Encounter & Clash - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44200 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ali Chamseddine

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” The Catholic Church is a pioneer in dialogue. Throughout history, the Catholic Church has been involved in both clashes and encounters with Christian dominations and monotheistic religions. Through exploring various clashes and encounters, this course will illustrate the Catholic Church’s involvement in the ecumenical movement and the advancement of interreligious dialogue. Taught by Prof. Ali Chamseddine, the course will focus specifically on the encounters and clashes between the Catholic Church and Protestantism as well as the Catholic Church with Judaism and Islam.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 228 - L3A Comparative: InterRel Encounte See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

40564 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Hans S. Gustafson

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” In the last half century religious diversity in the West has rapidly increased, bringing people from different religious traditions into daily contact. This has resulted in new conflicts, sometimes in violence, but also in new collaborations and friendships. Drawing on several approaches to interreligious conflict and relations, this course will examine the dynamic encounters that take place between and among people of different religious identities and ask students to reflect on their own role in religiously complex situations. Students will consider this interreligious reality and their role in it against the backdrop of their own individual relationship to spirituality, faith, and theology. To foster interreligious understanding beyond the classroom, students in this course will spend significant time outside the classroom directly engaging religious diversity. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1335-1510- - W - - - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
THEO 228 - L4A Comparative: Dialogue 4 Peace M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45259 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ali Chamseddine

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 228 - L6A Comparative: Encounter & Clash - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45302 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ali Chamseddine

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” The Catholic Church is a pioneer in dialogue. Throughout history, the Catholic Church has been involved in both clashes and encounters with Christian dominations and monotheistic religions. Through exploring various clashes and encounters, this course will illustrate the Catholic Church’s involvement in the ecumenical movement and the advancement of interreligious dialogue. Taught by Prof. Ali Chamseddine, the course will focus specifically on the encounters and clashes between the Catholic Church and Protestantism as well as the Catholic Church with Judaism and Islam.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 228 - W01 Comparative: World Religions - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44082 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Carissa S. Wyant

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section examines the theological themes of Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, and Native American religions. These themes will be studied alongside Christianity, clarifying similarities and differences.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 228 - W03 Comparative Islam/Christianity See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44243 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Fuad S. Naeem

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” In this course, we will examine, compare, and contrast the key texts, theological and ethical perspectives, and historical trajectories of Islam and Christianity. We will look at the Abrahamic roots of the two religious traditions, their variant interpretations of major Biblical and Qur’anic stories and texts, and the commonalities and differences in their theological and ethical perspectives. We will also study the long and often conflictual historical interaction of the two traditions and their responses to modernity. Topics may include Islamic and Christian views of: God, Jesus, the Virgin Mary, humanity, sin, prophecy, scripture, tradition, commandments and laws, rituals, religious authority, and secularism and modernity.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
VSP 1335-1510M - - - - - -
1335-1510- - W - - - -
THEO 229 - 01 Professions: Faith & MGMT - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44294 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Martin W. Schlag, Michael J. Sarafolean

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 300 - 01 SW: Theology and Politics - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44221 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael J. Hollerich

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 300 - L04 SW: Nazism & Apartheid - - - - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

- - - - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44106 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kimberly J. Vrudny

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 422 - 01 Christ Faith & Mgmt Profesn - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45399 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Martin W. Schlag, Michael J. Sarafolean

NOTE: This course is for students on the “old core.” Students on the new core should take any THEO 221-229 if they are choosing to take the third required course on philosophical and theological reasoning in Theology. What is a good manager and how does he or she contribute to the common good? This course pursues these questions within the Christian social tradition broadly understood through an exploration of the theological relationship between work as a vocation and leisure as contemplation. Within this theological context, the course examines the financial, organizational, technological, and cultural forces that managers and organizations encounter daily. Prerequisite: one 200-level or 300-level THEO course

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)