Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice

The study of human diversity, inclusion, and social justice is an important component of a liberal arts education. It exposes us to the richness of human aspirations and achievements, and strengthens our understanding of the essential and equal dignity of all human beings. It provides vantage points for reflection upon our own experiences, beliefs, and practices. It forces us to confront instances of oppression, and to recognize that the experiences, beliefs,

and practices of various people and cultures have been at times misrepresented or underrepresented in academic discourse and in the discourse of American society. It shows us how particular interests and privileges may contribute to misrepresentation or underrepresentation. It helps us make the world more just, more peaceful, and more harmonious.

The University of St. Thomas values the study of diversity, inclusiveness, and social justice also because it is basic to Catholic education. Following the radical call of the gospel, the Church demands justice for the vulnerable and for the economically, socially, and politically oppressed: “Since all men and women possessed of a rational soul and created in the image of God have the same nature and origin,” Gaudium et Spes tells us, “the basic equality which they all share needs to be increasingly recognized” and “every type of discrimination affecting the fundamental rights of the person … should be overcome.”

Finally, the University of St. Thomas believes it is important for students to explore issues of diversity, inclusion, and social justice because it wants its graduates to be successful, as well as informed and ethical actors in a diverse society. If graduates of St. Thomas are to be successful, they must understand the significance of human diversity, inclusion, and social justice for a

wide field of human interactions, from those associated with responsible citizenship to those involved in the practice of their chosen professions and disciplines. DISJ core-flagged courses are part of a series of DISJ touchpoints in the core curriculum stretching from the first days of orientation to reflective capstone work, and including curricular and co-curricular components.

A course may satisfy DISJ and the Integrations in the Humanities requirement; however, a single course cannot satisfy both DISJ and a core-area requirement (other than Integrations in the Humanities) for the same student.

Students must take four credits.

Some sections of a course may carry the DISJ flag while others do not. Students should use ClassFinder to determine which course sections satisfy the DISJ requirement in the term for which you are completing the requirement.  

Spring 2021 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
AMCD 200 - L01 American Culture:Power/Identit - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25384 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kanishka Chowdhury

AMCD 200, American Culture:Power/Identity: (This course was originally titled ACST 200: Introduction to American Culture and Difference; the name change has been submitted as an information item to the UCC). In AMCD 200, students learn about the historical and theoretical foundations of Cultural Studies as an academic discipline and use cultural theory to analyze a variety of cultural products and representations. In this course, students look specifically at dominant and subversive constructions of gender, race, ethnicity, national and sexual identities, and how these constructions are deployed through cultural practices and productions such as sports, film and television, folklore and popular culture, youth subcultures, music, and so on. For example, the course may contain units on "nation" and the creation of American mythologies; the process of hero-making in American history; stereotypes and the representation of race and ethnicity in television and film; representations of gender and sexuality in advertising; as well as a section on American music from jazz, blues, folk and roots music, to rock and roll, punk, and hip-hop.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ARTH 297 - W01 Topics-Street Art - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25493 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Heather M. Shirey

The subject matter of these courses will vary from year to year, but will not duplicate existing courses. Descriptions of these courses are available in the Online Printable Schedule, View Searchable Class Schedule

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
EDUC 329 - 01 Diverse Learners & Families M - W - - - - 0955 - 1135 MOH 318

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MOH 318

Course Registration Number:

24138 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Eleni Roulis

This course is designed to equip prospective teachers with the knowledge, instructional practices, and dispositions to successfully manage diverse classrooms, using their understanding of multiple learning modalities and all types of diversity to promote all students' personal and academic achievement. The course engages candidates with issues such as race, class, gender, exceptionality, oppression, and discrimination while examining the crucial role of educators in influencing positive, systematic change for social justice.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W02 Sports and Social Justice See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25083 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

What is any sports event but a story--multiple stories--playing out before our eyes? Sports by definition involve drama: conflicts in decision making, in relationships, with nature, and, if we believe it possible, conflicts with the supernatural. It's not an accident that some of our greatest metaphors come from the arena of athletics. Through sports we have a way to look at human values--at the best we have to offer and sometimes the worst. We’ll use sports literature to investigate what is just… and what is unjust… and how we discern which is which. In this class, we will read fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry. Books may include GIRL RUNNER, BIG SMOKE, TAKE ME OUT, and BEST AMERICAN SPORTS WRITING 2020. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MCH 1141215-1320M - W - - - -
1215-1320- - - - F - -
ENGL 202 - W06 Sports & Social Justice See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25382 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

What is any sports event but a story--multiple stories--playing out before our eyes? Sports by definition involve drama: conflicts in decision making, in relationships, with nature, and, if we believe it possible, conflicts with the supernatural. It's not an accident that some of our greatest metaphors come from the arena of athletics. Through sports we have a way to look at human values--at the best we have to offer and sometimes the worst. We’ll use sports literature to investigate what is just… and what is unjust… and how we discern which is which. In this class, we will read fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry. Books may include GIRL RUNNER, BIG SMOKE, TAKE ME OUT, and BEST AMERICAN SPORTS WRITING 2020. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MCH 1141055-1200M - W - - - -
1055-1200- - - - F - -
ENGL 218 - L01 Lit by Women:Critical Hist See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25063 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

From Sappho to Austen to Woolf to Morrison – women have been rendering the world into exquisite words for centuries. But how has the writing of women served as a critique of patriarchy? What impact has women’s writing had on important cultural and political movements such as abolition, suffrage, and environmentalism? In what ways has the writing of women been more radical than polite, more aggressive than demure, more confrontational than deferential? How have women consistently defied the limiting expectations of them through the creation of some of the most experimental, risky, and defiant works of literature in existence? These questions and more will be explored in this course, which focuses on the history of literature by women. While it will concentrate mainly on British and American women writers, the course will also address the work of non-western writers. Ultimately, this course will examine gender and its role in both the composition and reading of literary texts. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives and Diversity Literature requirements in the English major and a core Human Diversity requirement for students in the old core. It also counts towards the Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies major/minor and a WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Permission is being sought to count this course as a Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice class in the new core.. Prerequisite: ENGL 121, 190, 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0935-1040M - W - F - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 297 - L01 Race/Represent: Cntmp US Film - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25480 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kanishka Chowdhury

In this course, we will consider the complex constructions of “race” in American film, addressing the following questions: how has the category of “race” been historically constructed, represented, and reproduced in American film? Why are dominant representations often so far removed from peoples’ “real” lives? How is the production of contemporary representations connected to the ways in which we continue to think about race? How do filmmakers resist static representations of race in the present, creating complex and liberating ways to rethink race, especially through its intersections with questions connected to gender, class, and sexuality? Looking at a range of films, from Spike Lee’s “classic” DO THE RIGHT THING to more recent films, such as Aurora Guerrero’s MOSQUITA Y MARI, Dee Rees’s PARIAH, and Isabel Sandoval’s LINGUA FRANCA, as well as analyzing essays by Sherman Alexie, Ta-nehisi Coates, Toni Morrison, Sofia Quintero, and Karen Tei Yamashita, among others, this course will address the complexities of these and other questions. This class satisfies a WAC Writing to Learn requirement, a Film Studies History and Analysis requirement, an English Department Diversity distribution requirement, and both a core Human Diversity requirement and Literature/Writing requirement for students under the old core program. This course also satisfies a Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice under the new core. This is a cross-listed course, with eight seats on the ENGL 297 side and 12 seats on the FILM 297 side. Prerequisite: ENGL 121, 190, 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 390 - L01 James Baldwin/Cntmp Black Wrtr M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25477 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David T. Lawrence

James Baldwin has often been recognized as a major voice of African American literature during the twentieth century, but recently, that voice has re-emerged with an uncanny timeliness in the twenty-first, referenced by contemporary writers and commentators to illuminate the shadowy terrain of race and culture that continues to befuddle Americans today. Baldwin’s voice has not re-appeared from nowhere; it has long been with us, for nearly seventy years lodging a relentless critique of racism and injustice in American culture and society. It is no surprise then, that an entire generation of writers has been influenced by Baldwin’s perceptive eye and incisive language. From Pulitzer prize-winning playwright Suzan-Lori Parks to his cultural inheritor Ta-Nehisi Coates, Baldwin’s influence has been prominent and lasting. This course will consider the ongoing literary conversation between Baldwin and his artistic children. In addition to Baldwin, writers will include Jesmyn Ward, Coates, Parks, Kevin Young, Kiesi Laymon, Claudia Rankine, and Teju Cole. In addition to satisfying the old core Human Diversity requirement, this course also satisfies the Contexts and Convergences distribution requirement and the Diversity Literature area requirement for English majors. It also satisfies a WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 121, 190, 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
FILM 297 - L01 Race/Represent: Cntmp US Film - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25481 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kanishka Chowdhury

In this course, we will consider the complex constructions of “race” in American film, addressing the following questions: how has the category of “race” been historically constructed, represented, and reproduced in American film? Why are dominant representations often so far removed from peoples’ “real” lives? How is the production of contemporary representations connected to the ways in which we continue to think about race? How do filmmakers resist static representations of race in the present, creating complex and liberating ways to rethink race, especially through its intersections with questions connected to gender, class, and sexuality? Looking at a range of films, from Spike Lee’s “classic” DO THE RIGHT THING to more recent films, such as Aurora Guerrero’s MOSQUITA Y MARI, Dee Rees’s PARIAH, and Isabel Sandoval’s LINGUA FRANCA, as well as analyzing essays by Sherman Alexie, Ta-nehisi Coates, Toni Morrison, Sofia Quintero, and Karen Tei Yamashita, among others, this course will address the complexities of these and other questions. This class satisfies a WAC Writing to Learn requirement, a Film Studies History and Analysis requirement, an English Department Diversity distribution requirement, and both a core Human Diversity requirement and Literature/Writing requirement for students under the old core program. This course also satisfies a Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement under the new core. This is a cross-listed course, with eight seats on the ENGL 297 side and 12 seats on the FILM 297 side. Prerequisite: ENGL 121, 190, 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JPST 375 - D01 Conflict Analysis & Transform - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25901 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy C. Finnegan

An introduction to issues surrounding conflict and the resolution of conflict in today's world focusing primarily on its contextual manifestation at the international, regional and intrastate levels. The course will explore important structural, social and psychological explanations of conflict. Attention will be given to ethnic and nationalist themes surrounding conflicts and their resolution at the intrastate and international levels. The course will examine how different types of intervention affect conflicts (the media, force, other types of third party intervention). Effective methods that foster an environment conducive to resolving or managing disputes will be studied. As part of the final task, the course will critically study how institutions such as power-sharing arrangements, federalism, and the rule of law figure into establishing a lasting basis for peaceful co-existence. For Justice and Peace Studies majors doing a concentration in Conflict Transformation, the course will complement JPST 370 Conflict Mediation, but there are no prerequisites and the course is open to students in other majors.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MUSC 230 - W01 Music of the United States M - W - - - - 1530 - 1700 BEC LL07

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1530 - 1700

Location:

BEC LL07

Course Registration Number:

26460 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Sarah C. Schmalenberger

This course focuses on the study of music in the United States within its historical, cultural, and sociological contexts. The course will develop skills in critical listening analysis using appropriate musical terminology, to describe both aural and written traditions of music. Repertoire to be explored include homeland traditions of cultures and population groups brought over through migration/immigration, blends of popular and concert traditions, and new and emerging styles unique to the United States. Historical, cultural, and social contexts will facilitate and understanding of how music reflects particular identities, ideas, values, and issues among population groups in the United States.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MUSC 230 - W1A Music of the United States M - W - - - - 1530 - 1700 BEC LL07

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1530 - 1700

Location:

BEC LL07

Course Registration Number:

26834 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Sarah C. Schmalenberger

This course focuses on the study of music in the United States within its historical, cultural, and sociological contexts. The course will develop skills in critical listening analysis using appropriate musical terminology, to describe both aural and written traditions of music. Repertoire to be explored include homeland traditions of cultures and population groups brought over through migration/immigration, blends of popular and concert traditions, and new and emerging styles unique to the United States. Historical, cultural, and social contexts will facilitate and understanding of how music reflects particular identities, ideas, values, and issues among population groups in the United States.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOCI 297 - 01 Hate Crime - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

24510 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jessica P. Hodge

Although they have long existed in the U.S., the term “hate crime” is a relatively new addition to the social, political, and legal domains. The purpose of this course is to examine the institutionalization of hate crime law within our legal system. In doing so, we explore the causes, manifestations, and consequences of hate crimes by asking a series of interrelated questions.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOCI 350 - 01 Social Inequality:Priv & Power See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

23381 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laura Fischer

This course identifies and investigates the following topics: general principles of stratification, theoretical explanations by which inequality emerges and is maintained, the relationship between social class and other forms of inequality in the United States including gender, race, and changes in social hierarchy over time. The course will explore issues such as poverty, welfare, occupational prestige, meritocracy, and class prestige. Although primary focus is on the United States, the course also examines global inequality. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior Standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0815-0920M - - - - - -
0815-0920- - W - - - -
0815-0920- - - - F - -
SOCI 350 - 01A Social Inequality:Priv & Power See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25628 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laura Fischer

This course identifies and investigates the following topics: general principles of stratification, theoretical explanations by which inequality emerges and is maintained, the relationship between social class and other forms of inequality in the United States including gender, race, and changes in social hierarchy over time. The course will explore issues such as poverty, welfare, occupational prestige, meritocracy, and class prestige. Although primary focus is on the United States, the course also examines global inequality. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior Standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0815-0920M - - - - - -
0815-0920- - W - - - -
0815-0920- - - - F - -
SOCI 350 - 01B Social Inequality:Priv & Power See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25631 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laura Fischer

This course identifies and investigates the following topics: general principles of stratification, theoretical explanations by which inequality emerges and is maintained, the relationship between social class and other forms of inequality in the United States including gender, race, and changes in social hierarchy over time. The course will explore issues such as poverty, welfare, occupational prestige, meritocracy, and class prestige. Although primary focus is on the United States, the course also examines global inequality. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior Standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0815-0920M - - - - - -
0815-0920- - W - - - -
0815-0920- - - - F - -
SOWK 240 - 01 People & Environment: Theories - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

25389 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Andrea A. Nesmith

This a theory-driven course focusing on metacognition- training students to think about the way we think. The course takes a multidisciplinary approach to theoretical knowledge, introducing students to many ways of understanding how humans behave in, impact, and are impacted by multiple environments. Students learn to apply theories to understand human behavior in regard to their social and natural environments as well as reciprocal impact of humans and their environments. Theories are examined through a multidimensional framework constituting biological, psychological, spiritual, socio-cultural, political, environmental, and economic factors. Emphasis is on these factors within and between multiple systems: individual, family, small group, organization, community, and society, including political, economic, and natural systems. The course consists of five modules: interpersonal relations and empowerment, social systems, political and economic systems, social and environmental justice, and multiculturalism. The course investigates the multiple dimensions and intersections of diversity including gender, race/ethnicity, age, religion, ability, sexual orientation, nationality, and global and international perspectives. Students leave the class with a holistic understanding of the human experience within the environments that surround them. Recommended prerequisite or concurrent registration: SOWK 181 (or 281 under the old course number); Required Prerequisites: PSYC 202, or consent of the program director. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - 01 Contexts: Justice & Peace - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26234 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Carissa S. Wyant

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves an examination of the views of various religions and ideologies on issues of justice and peace, with special attention to the Catholic and other Christian teachings on such issues as war and peace, violence, economic justice, the environment, criminal justice, and social justice. Special attention is given to how fundamental presuppositions and principles of each group studied affect their views on justice and peace, and contribute to or hinder dialogue and peaceful interaction with other groups. In addition to Christianity, students will study (at least) one far eastern worldview (e.g. Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism), one tribal religion (Native American, African), Islam, and one secular worldview (e.g. Marxism, capitalism, secular humanism). Students are required to investigate one worldview in depth through a semester-long research project.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - W08 Contexts: Liberation Theology M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26225 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Richard L. Cogill

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section explores the meaning and practical significance of Christ’s message of liberation in the twenty-first century, examining theologies that have emerged out of a context of struggle (e.g., black & black feminist/womanist theology, South African theology, Latina/o theology, minjung theology, and queer theology).

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - W09 Contexts: Liberation Theology M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26227 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Richard L. Cogill

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section takes seriously James H. Cone's message in his 1969 work, Black Theology and Black Power, that "Black Power is Christ's central message to twentieth-century America." It explores the meaning and practical significance of Christ’s message of liberation in the twenty-first century, examining theologies that have emerged out of a context of struggle (e.g., black & black feminist/womanist theology, South African theology, Latina/o theology, minjung theology, and queer theology).

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - W10 Contexts: Liberation Theology See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26229 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Ry O. Siggelkow

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section takes seriously James H. Cone's message in his 1969 work, Black Theology and Black Power, that "Black Power is Christ's central message to twentieth-century America." It explores the meaning and practical significance of Christ’s message of liberation in the twenty-first century, examining theologies that have emerged out of a context of struggle (e.g., black & black feminist/womanist theology, South African theology, Latina/o theology, minjung theology, and queer theology).This section takes seriously James H. Cone's message in his 1969 work, Black Theology and Black Power, that "Black Power is Christ's central message to twentieth-century America." It explores the meaning and practical significance of Christ’s message of liberation in the twenty-first century, examining theologies that have emerged out of a context of struggle (e.g., black & black feminist/womanist theology, South African theology, Latina/o theology, minjung theology, and queer theology).

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 2091525-1700- T - R - - -
1525-1700- T - R - - -
THEO 227 - W11 Contexts: Liberation Theology See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

26231 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Ry O. Siggelkow

This section takes seriously James H. Cone's message in his 1969 work, Black Theology and Black Power, that "Black Power is Christ's central message to twentieth-century America." It explores the meaning and practical significance of Christ’s message of liberation in the twenty-first century, examining theologies that have emerged out of a context of struggle (e.g., black & black feminist/womanist theology, South African theology, Latina/o theology, minjung theology, and queer theology).

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 2091330-1510- T - R - - -
1330-1510- T - R - - -
THEO 229 - D01 Professions: Faith & Law M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

26244 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Marguerite L. Spencer

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section will attempt to fashion a paradigm for the Christian practice of law through a close reading of a variety of theological texts, treaties, case studies and rules of professional conduct. If to work is to share in the creative activity of God, then what specific challenge does this pose for an attorney given the grinding realities of the legal profession? If to be a professional is to live out a tripartite relationship between self, client, and a higher standard, then how does an attorney determine, much less respond to, such a standard? Emphasis will be placed on the meaning of justice, law, rights and responsibilities. An ethic of care that fosters the development of a compassionate world and a common life will be emphasized.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THTR 223 - L01 Hist of American Theater See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25696 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shanan M. Custer

Development of theater in the United States from its 17th century roots to the present, with special attention to contemporary American drama. Emphasis on the connections between theater and culture. This course satisfies the core Fine Arts and Human Diversity requirements in the old core program. For students in the new core, this course satisfies the core Fine Arts requirement OR the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice (DISJ) requirement in the new core as well (note: students cannot receive credit for both the core Fine Arts requirement and DISJ). Finally, this course also satisfies a WAC Writing to Learn requirement for both core programs.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JRC 4011215-1320M - - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
THTR 223 - L1A Hist of American Theater See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

25698 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shanan M. Custer

Development of theater in the United States from its 17th century roots to the present, with special attention to contemporary American drama. Emphasis on the connections between theater and culture. This course satisfies the core Fine Arts and Human Diversity requirements in the old core program. For students in the new core, this course satisfies the core Fine Arts requirement OR the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice (DISJ) requirement in the new core as well (note: students cannot receive credit for both the core Fine Arts requirement and DISJ). Finally, this course also satisfies a WAC Writing to Learn requirement for both core programs.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JRC 4011215-1320- - W - - - -
-- - - - - - -

Summer 2021 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 315 - L01 Race, Gender, and Technology - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30818 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Fernando Sanchez

Historically, technical and professional writers have been principally responsible for contributing documentation to technological products and processes. Among the primary reasons for needing to create documentation are 1) ensuring that users understand and can work products safely and 2) complying with regulations that help to meet these goals. With that in mind, this course asks students to consider the following questions: How are individuals impacted by technological products and processes? Who is responsible for creating technological processes and products and what responsibilities they have to users who come from marginalized communities? How do marginalized users of technology usurp technological affordances to create, build, and communicate within a community network? Specifically, we will explore how women, LGBT individuals, and BIPOC communities are depicted, represented and affected by technologies when there is a disconnect between technology designers and users. In addition, students will come away with a better understanding of how marginalized communities circumvent constraints to accomplish their own goals through the use of technologies across various contexts (medical, health, communication, political, etc.). Exploring these domains will help students to pay better attention to user needs as they pursue post-graduation opportunities across such disciplines as writing, engineering, health, business, and law. This course satisfies both a WAC Writing in to Learn requirement and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 121, 190, 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 226 - L01 Spirituality:Christian Marriag - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30934 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Marguerite L. Spencer

This course either introduces diverse expressions of Christian spirituality or focuses on topics within a distinctly Christian spirituality according to the discretion of the instructor such as Christian styles of worship, Christian understandings of sacramentality (especially Christian marriage), or stages of spiritual formation. Students will consider methodological issues in the academic study of spirituality. Emphasis is placed on a wide reading in the Christian tradition of both primary and secondary literature in order to assist the student in grasping the integral link between the lived faith of Christians and the theological articulation of that faith. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Fall 2021 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
AMCD 200 - L01 American Culture:Power/Identit M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

40445 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David T. Lawrence

AMCD 200, American Culture:Power/Identity: (This course was originally titled ACST 200: Introduction to American Culture and Difference; the name change has been submitted as an information item to the UCC). In AMCD 200, students learn about the historical and theoretical foundations of Cultural Studies as an academic discipline and use cultural theory to analyze a variety of cultural products and representations. In this course, students look specifically at dominant and subversive constructions of gender, race, ethnicity, national and sexual identities, and how these constructions are deployed through cultural practices and productions such as sports, film and television, folklore and popular culture, youth subcultures, music, and so on. For example, the course may contain units on "nation" and the creation of American mythologies; the process of hero-making in American history; stereotypes and the representation of race and ethnicity in television and film; representations of gender and sexuality in advertising; as well as a section on American music from jazz, blues, folk and roots music, to rock and roll, punk, and hip-hop.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COMM 326 - W01 Communication in Pop Culture - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44028 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Bernard J. Armada

This course focuses on the creation and use of rhetoric in public persuasion settings, including social movements and political campaigns. The diversity of rhetorical acts examined may include campaign ads, speeches, films, advertisements, music, memorials, architecture and other nonverbal strategies. Topics of study may include: The rhetoric of domination and resistance, national identity formation, and the rhetoric of public memory.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
EDUC 329 - 01 Diverse Learners & Families See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44509 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Eleni Roulis

This course is designed to equip prospective teachers with the knowledge, instructional practices, and dispositions to successfully manage diverse classrooms, using their understanding of multiple learning modalities and all types of diversity to promote all students' personal and academic achievement. The course engages candidates with issues such as race, class, gender, exceptionality, oppression, and discrimination while examining the crucial role of educators in influencing positive, systematic change for social justice.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MOH 3181400-1540M - W - - - -
VMP 1400-1540M - W - - - -
ENGL 202 - W05 Business & American Identity See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44123 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

This course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1215-1320M - - - - - -
VSP 1215-1320- - W - - - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
ENGL 202 - W06 Business & American Identity See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44124 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

This course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1335-1440M - - - - - -
VSP 1335-1440- - W - - - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
ENGL 202 - W5A Business & American Identity See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44186 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

This course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
VSP 1215-1320M - - - - - -
1215-1320- - W - - - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
ENGL 202 - W6A Business & American Identity See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44187 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

This course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
VSP 1335-1440M - - - - - -
1335-1440- - W - - - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
ENGL 341 - L01 African American Women's Lit See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

41383 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

At the start of her novel MAMA DAY, Gloria Naylor writes, "someone who didn't know how to ask wouldn't know how to listen." Audre Lorde, in "The Master's Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master's House," questions, "What does it mean when the tools of a racist patriarchy are used to examine the fruits of that same patriarchy? It means that only the most narrow perimeters of change are possible and allowable." Both writers call on their readers to approach African-American women's texts with humility, openness, and curiosity. They call upon readers to find new tools to dismantle racism, sexism, homophobia, and all the intersecting forms of racism that blight our lives. In this course, we will be "integrating" across communities and across time as we explore women's lived experience of the American racial and gender divide. We will be moving chronologically from the poetry of Gwendolyn Brooks during the Civil Rights era to the prose and poetry of Audre Lorde, where racial and second-wave feminist concerns intersect. We will study issues of black and mixed-race identity, questions of body image, and the painful realities of colorism in Toni Morrison's THE BLUEST EYE (1970), Gloria Naylor's MAMA DAY (1988), and Natasha Trethewey's MONUMENT (2018). The course will end with contemporary treatments of the economics, politics, and sociology of race intersecting with gender in Dominique Morisseau's THE DETROIT PROJECT and PIPELINE, Claudia Rankine's CITIZEN and THE WHITE CARD. This course satisfies the Diversity Literature requirement for English majors and English with a Professional Writing Emphasis students; a literature requirement for English with a Creative Writing students; the Human Diversity core requirement (old core); the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice core requirement (new core); and Integrations in the Humanities (new core). It also satisfies a major and minor requirement for the Women, Gender, & Sexuality Studies program. Prerequisite: ENGL 121, 190, or ENGL 201-204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0935-1040M - - - F - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
HIST 292 - 01 Topics:Native American History - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

41394 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephen R. Hausmann

This course provides an overview of Indigenous history in North America from the long era before European contact to the present day. Content will include the stories of well-known individuals and topics such as Sitting Bull and the Battle at the Little Bighorn, as well as lesser-known figures and events such as Susan La Flesche Picotte and the Alcatraz Occupation. We will also examine events central to American national history from the perspective of “facing East from Indian Country” to learn how Native people across North America played crucial roles in, and were affected by, historical trends and events. These include the age of empires and revolutions in the 18th century, American expansion and conquest in the nineteenth century, and globalization and the Cold War in the twentieth century. Finally, the course ends with a discussion of the recent Indigenous past during the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, including the highly publicized #NODAPL protests on the Standing Rock Reservation in 2016 and 2017 and the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on reservation communities.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 292 - 01A Topics:Native American History - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44709 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephen R. Hausmann

This course provides an overview of Indigenous history in North America from the long era before European contact to the present day. Content will include the stories of well-known individuals and topics such as Sitting Bull and the Battle at the Little Bighorn, as well as lesser-known figures and events such as Susan La Flesche Picotte and the Alcatraz Occupation. We will also examine events central to American national history from the perspective of “facing East from Indian Country” to learn how Native people across North America played crucial roles in, and were affected by, historical trends and events. These include the age of empires and revolutions in the 18th century, American expansion and conquest in the nineteenth century, and globalization and the Cold War in the twentieth century. Finally, the course ends with a discussion of the recent Indigenous past during the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, including the highly publicized #NODAPL protests on the Standing Rock Reservation in 2016 and 2017 and the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on reservation communities.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MGMT 385 - 01 Inclusive Leadership - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45087 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Michelle M. Thom

Leaders, both with and without formal management titles, need to appreciate the diverse people internal and external to their organizations and society at large. It is critical that leaders step up to design and deliver effective programs of inclusion in their organizations. Culturally competent leaders think critically about these programs and practice inclusion at individual, interpersonal, team, organization, and community levels. This requires foundational knowledge, skills, and attitudes applied in diverse domestic and global contexts. This course introduces a range of perspectives to explore topics including, but not limited to, human diversity; inclusive cultures; social identity and perception; power and privilege; and models and paradigms for interpersonal and organizational inclusion. Prerequisites: MGMT 200 or MGMT 305 and Junior standing. Note: Students who receive credit for MGMT 385 may not receive credit for MGMT 388

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MGMT 385 - 01A Inclusive Leadership - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45088 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Michelle M. Thom

Leaders, both with and without formal management titles, need to appreciate the diverse people internal and external to their organizations and society at large. It is critical that leaders step up to design and deliver effective programs of inclusion in their organizations. Culturally competent leaders think critically about these programs and practice inclusion at individual, interpersonal, team, organization, and community levels. This requires foundational knowledge, skills, and attitudes applied in diverse domestic and global contexts. This course introduces a range of perspectives to explore topics including, but not limited to, human diversity; inclusive cultures; social identity and perception; power and privilege; and models and paradigms for interpersonal and organizational inclusion. Prerequisites: MGMT 200 or MGMT 305 and Junior standing. Note: Students who receive credit for MGMT 385 may not receive credit for MGMT 388

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 205 - L01 Psychology of Women See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

43777 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Britain A. Scott

An examination of physiological, experiential, and social factors affecting the psychological development of women and their status as adults. Addresses diversity among women and how factors such as class and race intersect with historical and contemporary gender inequalities in women's lives. Topics include: biological and social influences on the development of gender, research on sex-related differences in psychological traits and cognitive abilities, media image and stereotypes of women, close relationships and sexuality, mothering, employment, aging, violence against women, and psychological health. Prerequisite: PSYC 111

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1335-1415M - W - - - -
VSP 1335-1510- - - - - - -
PSYC 205 - L1A Psychology of Women See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

45285 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Britain A. Scott

An examination of physiological, experiential, and social factors affecting the psychological development of women and their status as adults. Addresses diversity among women and how factors such as class and race intersect with historical and contemporary gender inequalities in women's lives. Topics include: biological and social influences on the development of gender, research on sex-related differences in psychological traits and cognitive abilities, media image and stereotypes of women, close relationships and sexuality, mothering, employment, aging, violence against women, and psychological health. Prerequisite: PSYC 111

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1425-1510M - W - - - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
SOCI 251 - W01 Race and Ethnicity See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

42893 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Patricia L. Maddox

Race and ethnicity as significant components of U.S. social structure; the cognitive and normative aspects of culture which maintain and effect varying manifestations of social distance, tension, prejudice and discrimination between majority and minorities at both micro and macro levels, nationally and internationally. This course meets a requirement in American Cultural Studies and Justice and Peace Studies. Prerequisite: sophomore standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1055-1200M - W - - - -
VSP -- - - - F - -
SOCI 354 - 01 Sex in Society M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44019 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Patricia L. Maddox

Sexuality as a social construction is explored with a specific focus on cultural and institutional influences including the family, economy, religion, government, and the media. Current research findings are discussed within the context of historical change in American sexual behavior, attitudes and research methodologies. This course meets a requirement in Family Studies. Prerequisite: SOCI 100 or 110

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOWK 391 - 01 Social Policy for Change - T - R - - - 1335 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

43060 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Andrea A. Nesmith

This course equips students to understand and critically analyze current and past social policies. Policy alternatives are explored with a focus on the values and attitudes as well as the societal, economic and political dynamics from which they originate. Roles and responsibilities of citizens and professionals in formulating and implementing policies responsive to actual social needs are addressed. Prerequisite: SOWK 181 (or 281 under the old course number) or consent of the Program Director.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 226 - L03 Spirituality: Christ Marriage M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44278 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Marguerite L. Spencer

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section is designed to acquaint students with the theology of Christian marriage, understood as covenant relationship and as sacrament, that is, an effective sign of God's love in our world. Primary though not exclusive emphasis will be on the Roman Catholic tradition. Students will also examine contemporary cultural attitudes toward sexuality, marriage, and the family in the light of Christian theology.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - W03 Contexts: Women & Christianity M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44232 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shirley E. Jordon

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This course explores the ways in which the Christian tradition has profoundly influenced our society's definition of women. It will focus on what some of the major works of this tradition assert about the nature and place of women in their particular historical communities. Students will also read religious literature by women in order to acquire a sense of women's religious experience both throughout history and in the present day. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - W3A Contexts: Women & Christianity M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44233 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shirley E. Jordon

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This course explores the ways in which the Christian tradition has profoundly influenced our society's definition of women. It will focus on what some of the major works of this tradition assert about the nature and place of women in their particular historical communities. Students will also read religious literature by women in order to acquire a sense of women's religious experience both throughout history and in the present day. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 228 - L03 Comparative: InterRel Encounte See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

40563 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Hans S. Gustafson

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” In the last half century religious diversity in the West has rapidly increased, bringing people from different religious traditions into daily contact. This has resulted in new conflicts, sometimes in violence, but also in new collaborations and friendships. Drawing on several approaches to interreligious conflict and relations, this course will examine the dynamic encounters that take place between and among people of different religious identities and ask students to reflect on their own role in religiously complex situations. Students will consider this interreligious reality and their role in it against the backdrop of their own individual relationship to spirituality, faith, and theology. To foster interreligious understanding beyond the classroom, students in this course will spend significant time outside the classroom directly engaging religious diversity. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1335-1510- - W - - - -
VSP -- - - - - - -
THEO 228 - L3A Comparative: InterRel Encounte See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

40564 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Hans S. Gustafson

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” In the last half century religious diversity in the West has rapidly increased, bringing people from different religious traditions into daily contact. This has resulted in new conflicts, sometimes in violence, but also in new collaborations and friendships. Drawing on several approaches to interreligious conflict and relations, this course will examine the dynamic encounters that take place between and among people of different religious identities and ask students to reflect on their own role in religiously complex situations. Students will consider this interreligious reality and their role in it against the backdrop of their own individual relationship to spirituality, faith, and theology. To foster interreligious understanding beyond the classroom, students in this course will spend significant time outside the classroom directly engaging religious diversity. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1335-1510- - W - - - -
VSP -- - - - - - -