Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice

The study of human diversity, inclusion, and social justice is an important component of a liberal arts education. It exposes us to the richness of human aspirations and achievements, and strengthens our understanding of the essential and equal dignity of all human beings. It provides vantage points for reflection upon our own experiences, beliefs, and practices. It forces us to confront instances of oppression, and to recognize that the experiences, beliefs, and practices of various people and cultures have been at times misrepresented or underrepresented in academic discourse and in the discourse of American society. It shows us how particular interests and privileges may contribute to misrepresentation or underrepresentation. It helps us make the world more just, more peaceful, and more harmonious.

The University of St. Thomas values the study of diversity, inclusiveness, and social justice also because it is basic to Catholic education. Following the radical call of the gospel, the Church demands justice for the vulnerable and for the economically, socially, and politically oppressed: “Since all men and women possessed of a rational soul and created in the image of God have the same nature and origin,” Gaudium et Spes tells us, “the basic equality which they all share needs to be increasingly recognized” and “every type of discrimination affecting the fundamental rights of the person … should be overcome.”

Finally, the University of St. Thomas believes it is important for students to explore issues of diversity, inclusion, and social justice because it wants its graduates to be successful, as well as informed and ethical actors in a diverse society. If graduates of St. Thomas are to be successful, they must understand the significance of human diversity, inclusion, and social justice for a wide field of human interactions, from those associated with responsible citizenship to those involved in the practice of their chosen professions and disciplines. DISJ core-flagged courses are part of a series of DISJ touchpoints in the core curriculum stretching from the first days of orientation to reflective capstone work, and including curricular and co-curricular components.

Courses which satisfy the DISJ core-flag requirement devote the majority of course content to exploring topics of diversity, inclusion and social justice specifically in the context of the United States.

A course may satisfy DISJ and the Integrations in the Humanities requirement; however, a single course cannot satisfy both DISJ and a core-area requirement (other than Integrations in the Humanities) for the same student.
Students must take four credits.

Some sections of a course may carry the DISJ flag while others do not. Students should use ClassFinder to determine which course sections satisfy the DISJ requirement in the term for which you are completing the requirement.

Spring 2024 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
AMCD 200 - L01 American Culture:Power/Identit - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 126

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 126

Course Registration Number:

21067 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kanishka Chowdhury

AMCD 200, American Culture:Power/Identity: (This course was originally titled ACST 200: Introduction to American Culture and Difference; the name change has been submitted as an information item to the UCC). In AMCD 200, students learn about the historical and theoretical foundations of Cultural Studies as an academic discipline and use cultural theory to analyze a variety of cultural products and representations. In this course, students look specifically at dominant and subversive constructions of gender, race, ethnicity, national and sexual identities, and how these constructions are deployed through cultural practices and productions such as sports, film and television, folklore and popular culture, youth subcultures, music, and so on. For example, the course may contain units on "nation" and the creation of American mythologies; the process of hero-making in American history; stereotypes and the representation of race and ethnicity in television and film; representations of gender and sexuality in advertising; as well as a section on American music from jazz, blues, folk and roots music, to rock and roll, punk, and hip-hop.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ARTH 202 - L01 History of Street Art See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

21493 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Heather M. Shirey

Street art—including graffiti, murals, and other installations in public space—provides expressive avenues for marginalized voices, shapes urban space, and promotes competing visions of community development. In contrast to art that is created for museums or the commercial art market, street art is uniquely positioned to engage with social issues from a critical perspective. This class will involve an analysis of street art projects from the United States, situated in comparison with projects from around the world. Topics to explored include the history of street art over time (from its origins in graffiti to contemporary mural festivals); the impetus for street art in communities in the USA and globally; models for creating, preserving, and presenting street art; the institutionalization of street art; street art as it relates to diversity and inclusion; and, ultimately, the potential for street art to play a role in social change.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 4140800-0940- T - - - - -
VSP 1-- - - R - - -
BIOL 275 - 01 Born this way? M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MHC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

MHC 210

Course Registration Number:

22563 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jerry F. Husak, Patricia L. Maddox

While discussions of gender and its social construction have become common in our culture, there is less discussion of whether there are actually binary “biological sexes” that impact those conversations. In addition, while we have made many inclusive efforts in understanding the LGBTQIA+ community, our larger society correlates sexual orientation to biology leaving us to ask: are queer folks born that way and does it stay fixed throughout our lives? This course explores the convergence of sociology and biology in how we define gender, sex, sexual orientation, and sexual behavior as continua instead of binaries as once previously believed. Topics are examined in developmental order from conception to adulthood and include current issues relevant to the LGBTQIA+ community and society at-large. The course also considers these topics in non-human animals to ask ‘what is normal?’ in nature. This will be a BIOL - SOCI crosslisted course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 474 - D01 Biology of Global Health Sem See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

20614 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kenichi W. Okamoto, Robert G. Wallace

This seminar, required for all senior Biology of Global Health majors, challenges students to examine the multiple aspects of global health in a unifying manner. In this seminar, students will integrate experiential learning with current research and broad applications of global health, and will complete a capstone project focusing on a global health issue. This senior capstone course allows students majoring in Biology of Global Health to analyze specific issues and problems using the knowledge and understanding gained by completing the other required courses in the program. This course does not fulfill the Biology B.A. or Biology B.S. requirement for a 400-level course. Prerequisite: Senior status as a declared Biology of Global Health major.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1525-1755M - - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
COMM 328 - D01 Comm of Race, Class & Gender - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21077 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Pamela H. Nettleton

This course focuses on theories and research of the historical and contemporary correlation between gender, race, class, and communicative practices, including rhetorical practice and mass communication content. It includes the influence of gender and racial stereotypes on public speech and debate, political campaigns and communication, organizational leadership, news coverage and advertising. Topics include: gendered perceptions of credibility; who is allowed to communicate and who is silenced due to class and racial privilege; and the impact of gender, race and class stereotypes about human nature, expertise, and abilities on individuals and groups that want to participate in public culture and communication. Students analyze and evaluate their own communicative styles in light of course readings and activities.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COMM 328 - D02 Comm of Race, Class & Gender - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

23057 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Pamela H. Nettleton

This course focuses on theories and research of the historical and contemporary correlation between gender, race, class, and communicative practices, including rhetorical practice and mass communication content. It includes the influence of gender and racial stereotypes on public speech and debate, political campaigns and communication, organizational leadership, news coverage and advertising. Topics include: gendered perceptions of credibility; who is allowed to communicate and who is silenced due to class and racial privilege; and the impact of gender, race and class stereotypes about human nature, expertise, and abilities on individuals and groups that want to participate in public culture and communication. Students analyze and evaluate their own communicative styles in light of course readings and activities.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COMM 340 - W01 Television Criticism - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21403 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Pamela H. Nettleton

This course will provide students with the opportunity to understand television as a text situation in a cultural context. It will examine television from a critical perspective, review a wide variety of program genres and incorporate several theoretical orientations to the qualitative analysis of TV. Students, along with reading about and discussion of critical perspectives, watch programs such as comedies, dramas, news, advertisements, miniseries, etc., and write several critical analyses of the programs.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COMM 340 - W02 Television Criticism - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22296 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Pamela H. Nettleton

This course will provide students with the opportunity to understand television as a text situation in a cultural context. It will examine television from a critical perspective, review a wide variety of program genres and incorporate several theoretical orientations to the qualitative analysis of TV. Students, along with reading about and discussion of critical perspectives, watch programs such as comedies, dramas, news, advertisements, miniseries, etc., and write several critical analyses of the programs.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ECON 331 - 02 Economic Inequality M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 319

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 319

Course Registration Number:

22691 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Tyler C. Schipper

Economic Inequality focuses on two types of inequality often studied by economists: income and wealth inequality. The course will illustrate how inequality in the U.S. has evolved over time, and how it compares to other countries. It puts particular emphasis on using data and modeling to explain the origins of inequality and explore the impacts of policies aimed to address it. The course highlights how inequality relates to demographics such as race, gender, and education. Finally, it explores hard questions about whether inequality is unavoidable, whether it matters, and what can be done about it. Prerequisites: ECON 251 and ECON 252

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
EDUC 329 - 01 Diversity & Cultural Comp M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 MHC 305H

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

MHC 305H

Course Registration Number:

22382 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Chelda Smith Kondo

This course is designed to equip students with the knowledge, practices, and dispositions to humanize those who are historically underserved. The course engages students with issues such as race, intersectionality, class, gender, exceptionality, oppression, and discrimination while examining the crucial role of educators in influencing positive, systematic change for social justice.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
EDUC 329 - 02 Diversity & Cultural Comp - - W - - - - 1630 - 2000 MHC 305H

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1630 - 2000

Location:

MHC 305H

Course Registration Number:

22556 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Chelda Smith Kondo

This course is designed to equip students with the knowledge, practices, and dispositions to humanize those who are historically underserved. The course engages students with issues such as race, intersectionality, class, gender, exceptionality, oppression, and discrimination while examining the crucial role of educators in influencing positive, systematic change for social justice.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W01 The American Short Story See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

21911 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and speak to our future. In keeping with our diverse American heritage, stories have been chosen from a broad cross-section of literary and cultural traditions. Alongside canonical authors such as Nathaniel Hawthorne and Ernest Hemingway, we read the works of Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Louise Erdrich, Kate Chopin, and others, examining how these diverse voices diverge from, resist, and transform the traditional American short story canon. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement; an Integrations in the Humanities requirement; and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MCH 1060800-0940- T - - - - -
VSP 1-- - - - - - -
ENGL 201 - W02 The American Short Story See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

21912 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and speak to our future. In keeping with our diverse American heritage, stories have been chosen from a broad cross-section of literary and cultural traditions. Alongside canonical authors such as Nathaniel Hawthorne and Ernest Hemingway, we read the works of Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Louise Erdrich, Kate Chopin, and others, examining how these diverse voices diverge from, resist, and transform the traditional American short story canon. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement; an Integrations in the Humanities requirement; and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MCH 1060955-1135- T - - - - -
VSP 1-- - - - - - -
ENGL 202 - W01 Business & American Identity M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 227

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

JRC 227

Course Registration Number:

22404 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

This course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement; an Integrations in the Humanities requirement; and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W02 Sports & Social Justice M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 301

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

21937 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

What is any sports event but a story--multiple stories--playing out before our eyes? Sports by definition involve drama: conflicts in decision making, in relationships, with nature, and, if we believe it possible, conflicts with the supernatural. It's not an accident that some of our greatest metaphors come from the arena of athletics. Through sports we have a way to look at human values--at the best we have to offer and sometimes the worst. We’ll use sports literature to investigate what is just… and what is unjust… and how we discern which is which. In this class, we will read fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry. Books may include CARRIE SOTO IS BACK, BIG SMOKE, TAKE ME OUT, and THE YEAR'S BEST SPORTS WRITING anthology. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement; an Integrations in the Humanities requirement; and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W03 Sports & Social Justice - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 KOC LL05

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

KOC LL05

Course Registration Number:

22303 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

What is any sports event but a story--multiple stories--playing out before our eyes? Sports by definition involve drama: conflicts in decision making, in relationships, with nature, and, if we believe it possible, conflicts with the supernatural. It's not an accident that some of our greatest metaphors come from the arena of athletics. Through sports we have a way to look at human values--at the best we have to offer and sometimes the worst. We’ll use sports literature to investigate what is just… and what is unjust… and how we discern which is which. In this class, we will read fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry. Books may include CARRIE SOTO IS BACK, BIG SMOKE, TAKE ME OUT, and THE YEAR'S BEST SPORTS WRITING anthology. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement; an Integrations in the Humanities requirement; and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W04 LGBTQ+ Literature See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

22407 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Melissa J. Hendrickx

This course will primarily focus on LGBTQ+ literature from the Stonewall riots to the present-day. We will investigate whether this genre of literature has a particular aesthetic or shares common thematic elements. Special attention will be given to BIPOC writers and how LGBTQ+ writing disrupts common conventions of gender, sexuality, relationships, and identity, and the role that storytelling has played in the queer community. The writing load for this course is 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement, an Integrations in the Humanities requirement, and a Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. It also satisfies a requirement for the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies major and minor. Please note that ENGL 203 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 202, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JRC 2270800-0940- - - R - - -
VSP 1-- - - - - - -
ENGL 214 - L01 American Authors I - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 227

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 227

Course Registration Number:

21924 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. Bouwman

Where does the popular perception of America as the “New World” come from? How could slavery flourish in a land idealizing freedom? Why were immigrants so feared and reviled? Why did expansionism push out some and make millionaires of others? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings from the beginnings of the American literary tradition to the turn of the twentieth century. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as religious identity, political reform, race, slavery, war, gender, and industrialization. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major, an Integration in the Humanities requirement, a Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement, and a WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 481 - D01 Dark Nature:Ecogothic Amer Lit - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 301

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

22293 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laura R. Zebuhr

The wallpaper in The Yellow Wallpaper looks like mushrooms. Frederick Douglass repeatedly compares a specific despair he felt while enslaved to being trapped in the earth. The falling Usher mansion gets swallowed by a lake in Poe’s famous story. While none of these well-known texts have been considered "nature writing," ecocriticism has recently introduced a concept of the "ecogothic" to account for such moments where nature gets linked to fear and anxiety, violence and horror. It’s argued that the ecogothic dread is born not just of the desire to survive and to thrive in a hostile, outdoor environment, but of something far more sinister. That is, a desire to more than thrive, a desire for control over other things, other beings, and ultimately other human beings. With this in mind and some help from geography, history, and Black and queer ecocriticism, we will look at how an idea of "the natural world" as well as binaries like self/other, human/animal, and living/dead were forged not merely alongside but with those of race, gender, and sexuality. Our literary focus will be American and transnational literary texts of the long 19th century that wrestle with and resist these dark desires and may include narratives of captivity and enslavement like Mary Prince’s, short stories by the likes of Poe, Hawthorne, and Chesnutt, and even the work of authors seemingly enchanted by nature such as Dickinson and Thoreau. This course satisfies a Signature Work requirement, a Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement, a WAC Writing in the Discipline requirement, and an early American Literature requirement for English majors. Prerequisite: Five English courses at or beyond ENGL 211, including ENGL 280, or instructor permission for all other majors/minors.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 228 - 01 Environmental History M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 222

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

21848 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

Humans are part of nature, and yet they have always changed and manipulated it. This course examines the entangled story of human/nature interactions, from the early history of our species up into the twenty-first century. Doing this draws on a range of methods, tools, and skills, including archaeology and anthropology, physical sciences like geology and biology, and the close reading of texts and objects as developed in humanistic disciplines like English, philosophy, and history. Key topics may include the co-evolution of people and other species; the ways that world religions have understood nature; the global mingling of people, plants, animals, and microbes after 1492; responses to pollution and toxicity in the modern world; and the development and politicization of climate science in the 20th-21st centuries.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HONR 480 - L03 HONORS Leading From Margins M - - - - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 209

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 209

Course Registration Number:

20695 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Jennifer R. Prichard, Patricia L. Maddox

These interdisciplinary seminars are intended to develop integrating insights through an analysis of topics chosen from different disciplines. Often they are taught by two faculty members or by a visiting lecturer who holds one of the endowed chairs at the university.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HONR 481 - 07 HONORS Praxis of Race & Racism - - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 452

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 452

Course Registration Number:

21589 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Amy C. Finnegan, David T. Lawrence

These interdisciplinary seminars are intended to develop integrating insights through an analysis of topics chosen from different disciplines. Often they are taught by two faculty members or by a visiting lecturer who holds one of the endowed chairs at the university.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JPST 280 - 03 Active Nonviolence M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 454

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

OEC 454

Course Registration Number:

22619 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ry O. Siggelkow

Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JPST 280 - W01 Active Nonviolence - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 452

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 452

Course Registration Number:

20224 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael C. Klein

Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JPST 280 - W02 Active Nonviolence - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 208

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 208

Course Registration Number:

22617 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy C. Finnegan

Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JPST 296 - 01 Making Art for Social Justice - - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 209

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 209

Course Registration Number:

22618 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Michael C. Klein

Students will explore the intersections of art and social justice with a focus on visual arts and social movements in the Twin Cities. Topics of study will include public art, protest art, expression and censorship, issues of art access and accessibility, social movement theory, aesthetic theory, and the Twin Cities as a unique space for social practice art. The class will collaborate with Nikki McComb who uses art to push for social change. In 2016, she launched her #Enough campaign — an artistic effort to end gun violence in Minneapolis and surrounding areas through #ArtIsMyWeapon exhibitions and projects.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JPST 375 - D01 Conflict Analysis & Transform - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MHC 207

Course Registration Number:

21203 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy C. Finnegan

This course is an introduction to the issues surrounding social conflict. It centers on equipping students with the theory and skills of conflict analysis and processes of engaging in conflict on the global, local and interpersonal levels. It contrasts a traditional conflict resolution model with conflict transformation, a paradigm that appreciates how conflict and violence are connected to underlying issues of justice. The course introduces students to a wide range of conflict transformation processes such as negotiation, mediation, dialogue, facilitation, restorative justice and conflict advocacy. It provides students with the opportunities to participate in these processes and explore potential vocational paths in the field of conflict transformation. As a component of the practice of the skills taught in this course, students organize and lead the annual World Cafe, a university-wide interdisciplinary dialogue. Throughout, the course engages students in a process of rigorous reflection of the ethics involved in engaging conflict. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MGMT 384 - L01 Project Management - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 MCH 115

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

MCH 115

Course Registration Number:

22125 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ernest L. Owens

This course presents the concepts, techniques, and behavioral skills needed for managing projects effectively. The course introduces students to a project's life cycle (from project definition and goals to completion of the project) and the behavioral dynamics that need to be managed to achieve success. Project leaders need to fulfill multiple roles on a project including managing the timeline, meeting project specifications, resource budgeting and creating a sustainable project culture. Prerequisites: MGMT 200 or MGMT 305; and OPMT 300 or OPMT 200; and Junior standing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MGMT 385 - 01 Inclusive Leadership - T - R - - - 1730 - 1915 MCH 234

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

MCH 234

Course Registration Number:

22126 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Kris Donnelly

Leaders, both with and without formal management titles, need to appreciate the diverse people internal and external to their organizations and society at large. It is critical that leaders step up to design and deliver effective programs of inclusion in their organizations. Culturally competent leaders think critically about these programs and practice inclusion at individual, interpersonal, team, organization, and community levels. This requires foundational knowledge, skills, and attitudes applied in diverse domestic and global contexts. This course introduces a range of perspectives to explore topics including, but not limited to, human diversity; inclusive cultures; social identity and perception; power and privilege; and models and paradigms for interpersonal and organizational inclusion. Prerequisites: MGMT 200 or MGMT 305 and Junior standing. Note: Students who receive credit for MGMT 385 may not receive credit for MGMT 388

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MGMT 385 - 02 Inclusive Leadership - T - R - - - 1730 - 1915 MCH 234

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

MCH 234

Course Registration Number:

22127 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Kris Donnelly

Leaders, both with and without formal management titles, need to appreciate the diverse people internal and external to their organizations and society at large. It is critical that leaders step up to design and deliver effective programs of inclusion in their organizations. Culturally competent leaders think critically about these programs and practice inclusion at individual, interpersonal, team, organization, and community levels. This requires foundational knowledge, skills, and attitudes applied in diverse domestic and global contexts. This course introduces a range of perspectives to explore topics including, but not limited to, human diversity; inclusive cultures; social identity and perception; power and privilege; and models and paradigms for interpersonal and organizational inclusion. Prerequisites: MGMT 200 or MGMT 305 and Junior standing. Note: Students who receive credit for MGMT 385 may not receive credit for MGMT 388

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MKTG 255 - 01 Multicultural & Inclusive Mktg M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 203

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 203

Course Registration Number:

22277 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Minerva J. Purvis

The purpose of this course will be to help students appreciate the presence and understand the nuisances and similarities of various subcultures within the United States. From targeting and segmenting customers to developing partnerships, the class will discuss how these may impact American marketing practices and trends. Realizing that a subculture is any group that shares a set of attitudes, values and goals, this course will consider not only ethnic subcultures but religious, sexual orientation & gender identity, ability, and generational subcultures. Students will be exposed to concepts such as cultural capital, intercultural penetration, intersectionality, historical context and other concepts of culture and identity as they learn how individuals and organizations can effectively and responsibly engage with multiple diverse stakeholders. Prerequisites: MKTG 200

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MUSC 230 - W01 Music of the United States - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 BEC 111

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

BEC 111

Course Registration Number:

21309 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Sarah C. Schmalenberger

This course focuses on the study of music in the United States within its historical, cultural, and sociological contexts. The course will develop skills in critical listening analysis using appropriate musical terminology, to describe both aural and written traditions of music. Repertoire to be explored include homeland traditions of cultures and population groups brought over through migration/immigration, blends of popular and concert traditions, and new and emerging styles unique to the United States. Historical, cultural, and social contexts will facilitate and understanding of how music reflects particular identities, ideas, values, and issues among population groups in the United States.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MUSC 230 - W02 Music of the United States M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 BEC 111

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

BEC 111

Course Registration Number:

23076 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Sarah C. Schmalenberger

This course focuses on the study of music in the United States within its historical, cultural, and sociological contexts. The course will develop skills in critical listening analysis using appropriate musical terminology, to describe both aural and written traditions of music. Repertoire to be explored include homeland traditions of cultures and population groups brought over through migration/immigration, blends of popular and concert traditions, and new and emerging styles unique to the United States. Historical, cultural, and social contexts will facilitate and understanding of how music reflects particular identities, ideas, values, and issues among population groups in the United States.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 230 - 01 Disability and Human Dignity - - - - - - - - VSP

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

VSP

Course Registration Number:

22244 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gloria R. Frost

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability. Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability. This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course. Some of the central questions examined in the course include: What is disability? Is disability merely a medical condition? In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources? Does disability itself make a person worse off or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse? How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US? What is the basis for human dignity? What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities? Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 230 - 02 Disability and Human Dignity - - - - - - - - VSP

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

VSP

Course Registration Number:

23031 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gloria R. Frost

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability.  Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability.  This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course.   Some of the central questions examined in the course include:  What is disability?  Is disability merely a medical condition?  In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources?  Does disability itself make a person worse off or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse?  How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US?  What is the basis for human dignity?  What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities?  Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisite: PHIL 110

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 231 - W01 Philosophies of Social Justice M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MHC 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MHC 207

Course Registration Number:

22246 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Thomas D. Feeney

Action to achieve social justice depends, ultimately, on an understanding of what social justice is. What makes a society just? How is a just society ordered? What does social justice look like up close? If our society is not currently just, how may we justly make it so? This course considers competing (though sometimes overlapping) accounts of social justice that are of continuing relevance today, such as those found in the traditions of classical liberalism, socialism, Catholicism, and critical theory. One goal is to understand where such accounts agree, where they disagree, and why. Another goal is to appreciate how such traditions have animated and continue to animate the pursuit of justice, especially for marginalized persons in the United States. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 231 - W02 Philosophies of Social Justice M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MHC 207

Course Registration Number:

22247 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Thomas D. Feeney

Action to achieve social justice depends, ultimately, on an understanding of what social justice is. What makes a society just? How is a just society ordered? What does social justice look like up close? If our society is not currently just, how may we justly make it so? This course considers competing (though sometimes overlapping) accounts of social justice that are of continuing relevance today, such as those found in the traditions of classical liberalism, socialism, Catholicism, and critical theory. One goal is to understand where such accounts agree, where they disagree, and why. Another goal is to appreciate how such traditions have animated and continue to animate the pursuit of justice, especially for marginalized persons in the United States. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 301 - 01 Sig.Wk:Disability & Human Dig. - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22245 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gloria R. Frost

This Signature Work section of Disability and Human Dignity is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability. Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability. This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course. Some of the central questions examined in the course include: What is disability? Is disability merely a medical condition? In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources? Does disability itself make a person worse off or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse? How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US? What is the basis for human dignity? What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities? Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 197; and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 301 - 11 Sig.Wk:Disability & Human Dig. - - - - - - - - VSP

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

VSP

Course Registration Number:

23032 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gloria R. Frost

PHIL 301 is a signature work course in philosophy, open to all students.  Topics vary from section to section, but all sections focus on issues relevant to our university’s mission.  Various sections will, therefore, focus on questions concerning such things as the nature and dignity of human beings, what makes for a meaningful human life, the compatibility of faith and reason, what makes for a just society, or the application of ethical principles, to a variety of settings and professions, for the sake of the common good.  The course provides students the opportunity to reflect on and integrate knowledge acquired throughout their academic career, and to approach problems through multiple disciplinary lenses.  Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and 80 credits completed

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 301 - W02 Sig.Wk: Phil of Social Justice M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MHC 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MHC 207

Course Registration Number:

22302 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Thomas D. Feeney

Action to achieve social justice depends, ultimately, on an understanding of what social justice is. What makes a society just? How is a just society ordered? What does social justice look like up close? If our society is not currently just, how may we justly make it so? This Signature Work section of Philosophies of Social Justice considers competing (though sometimes overlapping) accounts of social justice that are of continuing relevance today, such as those found in the traditions of classical liberalism, socialism, Catholicism, and critical theory. One goal is to understand where such accounts agree, where they disagree, and why. Another goal is to appreciate how such traditions have animated and continue to animate the pursuit of justice, especially for marginalized persons in the United States. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 197; and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 301 - W03 SigWk: Phil of Social Justice M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MHC 207

Course Registration Number:

22333 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Thomas D. Feeney

Action to achieve social justice depends, ultimately, on an understanding of what social justice is. What makes a society just? How is a just society ordered? What does social justice look like up close? If our society is not currently just, how may we justly make it so? This course considers competing (though sometimes overlapping) accounts of social justice that are of continuing relevance today, such as those found in the traditions of classical liberalism, socialism, Catholicism, and critical theory. One goal is to understand where such accounts agree, where they disagree, and why. Another goal is to appreciate how such traditions have animated and continue to animate the pursuit of justice, especially for marginalized persons in the United States. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 197; and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 207 - 01 Drugs and Behavior - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC LL62

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC LL62

Course Registration Number:

20837 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mari S. Gades

The course surveys some basic facts and principles of administration, absorption, transport, action, deactivation and elimination of drugs. Various classes of drugs; their effects on mood, behavior, and consciousness; their use and misuse; and phenomena of chemical dependency and its treatment modalities are discussed. Lectures, readings, films, tapes and invited speakers are employed. Prerequisite: PSYC 111

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 298 - 02 Psychology of Immigration - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MHC 211

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

22576 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daewon Kim

This seminar class is designed to provide: a history of immigration to US, the current status & issues of US immigrants, social issues within the US immigrant groups, general & specific topics for particular immigrant groups including White, Asians, Latinx, Black, Arab immigrants, refugees, and undocumented immigrants, and the issues within the Native American/American Indian community.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOCI 275 - 01 Born This Way? M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MHC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

MHC 210

Course Registration Number:

22564 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jerry F. Husak, Patricia L. Maddox

While discussions of gender and its social construction have become common in our culture, there is less discussion of whether there are actually binary “biological sexes” that impact those conversations. In addition, while we have made many inclusive efforts in understanding the LGBTQIA+ community, our larger society correlates sexual orientation to biology leaving us to ask: are queer folks born that way and does it stay fixed throughout our lives? This course explores the convergence of sociology and biology in how we define gender, sex, sexual orientation, and sexual behavior as continua instead of binaries as once previously believed. Topics are examined in developmental order from conception to adulthood and include current issues relevant to the LGBTQIA+ community and society at-large. The course also considers these topics in non-human animals to ask ‘what is normal?’ in nature. This will be a BIOL - SOCI crosslisted course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOCI 304 - 01 Adolescence in Society M - W - - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MHC 210

Course Registration Number:

22613 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Patricia L. Maddox

The transition between childhood and adulthood is examined using a general sociological framework and including life course, socioeconomic, and systems theories. Particular attention is given to the social construction of adolescence; institutional contexts (family, education, employment) of adolescent relationships with parents, peers, and others; gender and sexual socialization in society; cultures of achievement and risk; social diversity. This course meets a requirement in Family Studies and in Women's Studies. Prerequisite: SOCI 100 or permission of the instructor

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOCI 350 - 01 Social Inequality:Priv & Power See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

22733 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Haiyi Liu

This course identifies and investigates the following topics: general principles of stratification, theoretical explanations by which inequality emerges and is maintained, the relationship between social class and other forms of inequality in the United States including gender, race, and changes in social hierarchy over time. The course will explore issues such as poverty, welfare, occupational prestige, meritocracy, and class prestige. Although primary focus is on the United States, the course also examines global inequality. Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 110 and must be Junior or Senior Standing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JRC LL620815-0920M - W - - - -
-- - - - F - -
SOWK 240 - 01 People & Environment: Theories - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MHC 208

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MHC 208

Course Registration Number:

21068 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Renee A. Hepperlen

This a theory-driven course focusing on metacognition- training students to think about the way we think. The course takes a multidisciplinary approach to theoretical knowledge, introducing students to many ways of understanding how humans behave in, impact, and are impacted by multiple environments. Students learn to apply theories to understand human behavior in regard to their social and natural environments as well as reciprocal impact of humans and their environments. Theories are examined through a multidimensional framework constituting biological, psychological, spiritual, socio-cultural, political, environmental, and economic factors. Emphasis is on these factors within and between multiple systems: individual, family, small group, organization, community, and society, including political, economic, and natural systems. The course consists of five modules: interpersonal relations and empowerment, social systems, political and economic systems, social and environmental justice, and multiculturalism. The course investigates the multiple dimensions and intersections of diversity including gender, race/ethnicity, age, religion, ability, sexual orientation, nationality, and global and international perspectives. Students leave the class with a holistic understanding of the human experience within the environments that surround them. Recommended prerequisite or concurrent registration: SOWK 181 (or 281 under the old course number); Required Prerequisites: PSYC 202, or consent of the program director. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SPAN 301 - W01 Adv Written Spanish & Culture - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 210

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

20229 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paola B. Ehrmantraut

Intensive practice in written Spanish using selected materials to acquire a high level of competence in writing Spanish. This writing course aims to improve technique, expand syntactic depth, increase vocabulary and learn good writing through a process approach involving stages of idea development, thesis construction, structural development, bibliographic notation, evaluation of ideas and rewriting of the text. Lectures and class discussions are based on major topics that relate to the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Written skills will be assessed. Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 300 or its equivalent with a C- or better.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
STCM 250 - L01 Science, Media & Social Impact M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 SCC 238

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

SCC 238

Course Registration Number:

21632 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

April A. Eichmeier

This course will introduce students to foundational concepts in science and its social impacts through discussion of the scientific method, boundaries of science, media construction of science, and the contribution of science in trust building and decision-making in various contexts. The course is designed to help students gain understanding and knowledge of contextual factors that shaped science and the uneven impacts on traditionally marginalized groups. Coursework will help students develop diverse and critical perspectives of communication about science concerning marginalized communities. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 228 - L04 Comparative: InterRel Encounte - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21274 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Hans S. Gustafson

In the last half century religious diversity in the West has rapidly increased, bringing people from different religious traditions into daily contact. This has resulted in new conflicts, sometimes in violence, but also in new collaborations and friendships. Drawing on several approaches to interreligious conflict and relations, this course will examine the dynamic encounters that take place between and among people of different religious identities and ask students to reflect on their own role in religiously complex situations. Students will consider this interreligious reality and their role in it against the backdrop of their own individual relationship to spirituality, faith, and theology. To foster interreligious understanding beyond the classroom, students in this course will spend significant time outside the classroom directly engaging religious diversity. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 229 - L01 Professions: Faith & Law M - - - - - - 1730 - 2115 JRC 247

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2115

Location:

JRC 247

Course Registration Number:

21610 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Marguerite L. Spencer

If to work is to share in the creative activity of God, then what specific challenge does this pose for an attorney given the grinding realities of the legal profession? If to be a professional is to live out a tripartite relationship between self, client, and a higher standard, then how does an attorney determine, much less respond to such a standard? Through a close reading of a variety of theological texts, treaties, case studies and rules of professional conduct, this course will address these questions and, in so doing, attempt to fashion a paradigm for the Christian practice of law. Within this paradigm, emphasis will be placed on the meaning of justice, law, rights and responsibilities. An ethic of care that fosters the development of a compassionate world and a common life will be emphasized.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 300 - D02 SW Professions: Faith & Law M - - - - - - 1730 - 2115 JRC 401

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2115

Location:

JRC 401

Course Registration Number:

22381 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Marguerite L. Spencer

Open to all students, not only theology majors, the signature work in theology course is designed as a capstone experience to integrate a student’s entire college career, bringing fullness of expression to the University’s efforts through the liberal arts core to educate morally responsible leaders who, grounded in the Catholic intellectual tradition, think critically, act wisely, and work skillfully to advance the common good. There are two types of signature work in theology: signature work that is focused on contemporary challenges, or signature work that is focused on faith and the professions. Signature work that is focused on contemporary challenges will invite students to conduct research and/or experiential learning around matters of pressing concern according to the instructor’s discretion, such as fostering understanding across lines of religious difference; cultivating interfaith leadership; searching for beauty; establishing justice and peace; or responding to contemporary challenges such as environmental sustainability, immigration, or mass incarceration. Signature work that is focused on vocation may explore the integration of theology with a profession of the instructor’s choosing, such as the management professions, the legal professions, the medical professions, the public health professions, the psychological professions, or the engineering professions. Prerequisites: THEO 100 and a student must have at least 80 credits completed.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2024 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
COMM 378 - L01 Comm & Underrep Families - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30306 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Audra K. Nuru

Given that demographic changes, immigration patterns, transnational adoption, new U.S. Supreme Court rulings impacting LGBTQ+ families, and the addition of a multiracial option on the 2010 Census have all contributed to changes in the ways that individuals and families identify, are formed, and are (re)negotiated, it is of critical importance to examine scholarship highlighting these diverse (and often underrepresented) family forms. Families in the United States today are faced with opportunities and challenges that have never been experienced by families before. The first 21 years of this century have produced large social, civil, and technological changes that impact not only the communication among family members, but has also impacted larger societal discourses about what constitutes “family.” Although family communication scholars have long called for the inclusion of more diverse samples in family research, to date this research remains very limited in the understanding of family functioning, relationships, and processes in families of color, LGBTQ families, transnational and neo-ethnic families, discourse dependent families, and other family forms. To this end, this course examines the communicative experiences of contemporary and underrepresented families.  

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W01 The American Short Story - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30336 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and speak to our future. In keeping with our diverse American heritage, stories have been chosen from a broad cross-section of literary and cultural traditions. Alongside canonical authors such as Nathaniel Hawthorne and Ernest Hemingway, we read the works of Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Louise Erdrich, Kate Chopin, and others, examining how these diverse voices diverge from, resist, and transform the traditional American short story canon. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement; an Integrations in the Humanities requirement; and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 315 - W01 Race, Sexuality, & Technology - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30338 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Fernando Sanchez

Historically, technical and professional writers have been principally responsible for contributing documentation to technological products and processes. Among the primary reasons for needing to create documentation are 1) ensuring that users understand and can work products safely and 2) complying with regulations that help to meet these goals. With that in mind, this course asks students to consider the following questions: How are individuals impacted by technological products and processes? Who is responsible for creating technological processes and products and what responsibilities they have to users who come from marginalized communities? How do marginalized users of technology usurp technological affordances to create, build, and communicate within a community network? Specifically, we will explore how women, LGBT individuals, and BIPOC communities are depicted, represented and affected by technologies when there is a disconnect between technology designers and users. In addition, students will come away with a better understanding of how marginalized communities circumvent constraints to accomplish their own goals through the use of technologies across various contexts (medical, health, communication, political, etc.). Exploring these domains will help students to pay better attention to user needs as they pursue post-graduation opportunities across such disciplines as writing, engineering, health, business, and law. This course satisfies a WAC Writing in to Learn requirement. an Integrations in the Humanities requirement, and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
FAST 378 - L01 Comm & Underrep Families - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30307 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Audra K. Nuru

Given that demographic changes, immigration patterns, transnational adoption, new U.S. Supreme Court rulings impacting LGBTQ+ families, and the addition of a multiracial option on the 2010 Census have all contributed to changes in the ways that individuals and families identify, are formed, and are (re)negotiated, it is of critical importance to examine scholarship highlighting these diverse (and often underrepresented) family forms. Families in the United States today are faced with opportunities and challenges that have never been experienced by families before. The first 21 years of this century have produced large social, civil, and technological changes that impact not only the communication among family members, but has also impacted larger societal discourses about what constitutes “family.” Although family communication scholars have long called for the inclusion of more diverse samples in family research, to date this research remains very limited in the understanding of family functioning, relationships, and processes in families of color, LGBTQ families, transnational and neo-ethnic families, discourse dependent families, and other family forms. To this end, this course examines the communicative experiences of contemporary and underrepresented families.  

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MGMT 385 - 01 Inclusive Leadership See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

30182 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Tonya L. Hampton

Leaders, both with and without formal management titles, need to appreciate the diverse people internal and external to their organizations and society at large. It is critical that leaders step up to design and deliver effective programs of inclusion in their organizations. Culturally competent leaders think critically about these programs and practice inclusion at individual, interpersonal, team, organization, and community levels. This requires foundational knowledge, skills, and attitudes applied in diverse domestic and global contexts. This course introduces a range of perspectives to explore topics including, but not limited to, human diversity; inclusive cultures; social identity and perception; power and privilege; and models and paradigms for interpersonal and organizational inclusion. Prerequisites: MGMT 200 or MGMT 305 and Junior standing. Note: Students who receive credit for MGMT 385 may not receive credit for MGMT 388

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1800-2030- - W - - - -
-- - - - - - -
MUSC 230 - 01 Music of the United States - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30539 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Sarah C. Schmalenberger

This course focuses on the study of music in the United States within its historical, cultural, and sociological contexts. The course will develop skills in critical listening analysis using appropriate musical terminology, to describe both aural and written traditions of music. Repertoire to be explored include homeland traditions of cultures and population groups brought over through migration/immigration, blends of popular and concert traditions, and new and emerging styles unique to the United States. Historical, cultural, and social contexts will facilitate and understanding of how music reflects particular identities, ideas, values, and issues among population groups in the United States.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 230 - 01 Disability and Human Dignity - - - - - - - - VSP

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

VSP

Course Registration Number:

30461 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gloria R. Frost

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability. Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability. This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course. Some of the central questions examined in the course include: What is disability? Is disability merely a medical condition? In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources? Does disability itself make a person worse off or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse? How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US? What is the basis for human dignity? What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities? Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 301 - 01 Sig.Wk:Disability & Human Dig. - - - - - - - - VSP

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

VSP

Course Registration Number:

30466 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gloria R. Frost

This Signature Work section of Disability and Human Dignity is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability. Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability. This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course. Some of the central questions examined in the course include: What is disability? Is disability merely a medical condition? In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources? Does disability itself make a person worse off or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse? How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US? What is the basis for human dignity? What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities? Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115; and at least 80 credits completed.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 226 - L01 Spirituality:Christian Marriag - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30498 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Marguerite L. Spencer

This section is designed to acquaint students with the theology of Christian marriage, understood as covenant relationship and as sacrament, that is, an effective sign of God's love in our world. Primary though not exclusive emphasis will be on the Roman Catholic tradition. Students will also examine contemporary cultural attitudes toward sexuality, marriage, and the family in the light of Christian theology.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Fall 2024 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
AMCD 200 - L01 American Culture:Power/Identit - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 246

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

40218 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kanishka Chowdhury

AMCD 200, American Culture:Power/Identity: (This course was originally titled ACST 200: Introduction to American Culture and Difference; the name change has been submitted as an information item to the UCC). In AMCD 200, students learn about the historical and theoretical foundations of Cultural Studies as an academic discipline and use cultural theory to analyze a variety of cultural products and representations. In this course, students look specifically at dominant and subversive constructions of gender, race, ethnicity, national and sexual identities, and how these constructions are deployed through cultural practices and productions such as sports, film and television, folklore and popular culture, youth subcultures, music, and so on. For example, the course may contain units on "nation" and the creation of American mythologies; the process of hero-making in American history; stereotypes and the representation of race and ethnicity in television and film; representations of gender and sexuality in advertising; as well as a section on American music from jazz, blues, folk and roots music, to rock and roll, punk, and hip-hop.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ARTH 202 - L01 History of Street Art See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

41425 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Heather M. Shirey

Street art—including graffiti, murals, and other installations in public space—provides expressive avenues for marginalized voices, shapes urban space, and promotes competing visions of community development. In contrast to art that is created for museums or the commercial art market, street art is uniquely positioned to engage with social issues from a critical perspective. This class will involve an analysis of street art projects from the United States, situated in comparison with projects from around the world. Topics to explored include the history of street art over time (from its origins in graffiti to contemporary mural festivals); the impetus for street art in communities in the USA and globally; models for creating, preserving, and presenting street art; the institutionalization of street art; street art as it relates to diversity and inclusion; and, ultimately, the potential for street art to play a role in social change.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 4140800-0940- T - - - - -
VSP 1-- - - - - - -
ARTH 202 - L02 History of Street Art See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

42096 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Heather M. Shirey

Street art—including graffiti, murals, and other installations in public space—provides expressive avenues for marginalized voices, shapes urban space, and promotes competing visions of community development. In contrast to art that is created for museums or the commercial art market, street art is uniquely positioned to engage with social issues from a critical perspective. This class will involve an analysis of street art projects from the United States, situated in comparison with projects from around the world. Topics to explored include the history of street art over time (from its origins in graffiti to contemporary mural festivals); the impetus for street art in communities in the USA and globally; models for creating, preserving, and presenting street art; the institutionalization of street art; street art as it relates to diversity and inclusion; and, ultimately, the potential for street art to play a role in social change.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 4140955-1135- T - - - - -
VSP 1-- - - - - - -
BLAW 352 - L01 Gender Issues and the Law M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 MCH 117

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MCH 117

Course Registration Number:

42621 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Dawn R. Swink

This course explores the principle that men and women stand as equals before the law. It examines the ways in which courts and legislatures have interpreted the principle of equal opportunity to resolve gender issues in the workplace, as well as in other aspects of society that affect access to the workplace, including education, marriage, and the family. It also provides an historical overview of the law of equal opportunity and will touch upon modern notions of feminist legal theory. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: Junior standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COMM 326 - W01 Communication in Pop Culture See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

41128 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kristen M. Einertson

This course focuses on the creation and use of rhetoric in public persuasion settings, including social movements and political campaigns. The diversity of rhetorical acts examined may include campaign ads, speeches, films, advertisements, music, memorials, architecture and other nonverbal strategies. Topics of study may include: The rhetoric of domination and resistance, national identity formation, and the rhetoric of public memory.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 305I1335-1440M - W - - - -
VSP 1-- - - - - - -
COMM 328 - D01 Comm of Race, Class & Gender - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 313

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 313

Course Registration Number:

41125 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Debra L. Petersen

This course focuses on theories and research of the historical and contemporary correlation between gender, race, class, and communicative practices, including rhetorical practice and mass communication content. It includes the influence of gender and racial stereotypes on public speech and debate, political campaigns and communication, organizational leadership, news coverage and advertising. Topics include: gendered perceptions of credibility; who is allowed to communicate and who is silenced due to class and racial privilege; and the impact of gender, race and class stereotypes about human nature, expertise, and abilities on individuals and groups that want to participate in public culture and communication. Students analyze and evaluate their own communicative styles in light of course readings and activities.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COMM 340 - W01 Television Criticism - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

41409 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Pamela H. Nettleton

This course will provide students with the opportunity to understand television as a text situation in a cultural context. It will examine television from a critical perspective, review a wide variety of program genres and incorporate several theoretical orientations to the qualitative analysis of TV. Students, along with reading about and discussion of critical perspectives, watch programs such as comedies, dramas, news, advertisements, miniseries, etc., and write several critical analyses of the programs.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COMM 340 - W02 Television Criticism - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42231 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Pamela H. Nettleton

This course will provide students with the opportunity to understand television as a text situation in a cultural context. It will examine television from a critical perspective, review a wide variety of program genres and incorporate several theoretical orientations to the qualitative analysis of TV. Students, along with reading about and discussion of critical perspectives, watch programs such as comedies, dramas, news, advertisements, miniseries, etc., and write several critical analyses of the programs.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
EDUC 329 - 01 Diversity & Cultural Comp M - W - - - - 1400 - 1540 SCB 120

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1400 - 1540

Location:

SCB 120

Course Registration Number:

42300 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Staff

This course is designed to equip students with the knowledge, practices, and dispositions to humanize those who are historically underserved. The course engages students with issues such as race, intersectionality, class, gender, exceptionality, oppression, and discrimination while examining the crucial role of educators in influencing positive, systematic change for social justice.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W04 Behind Bars: Prison Literature M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 JRC 301

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

42237 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucy A. Saliger

The difficult contradictions in our criminal legal system – which purportedly aims to reduce violence, addictions, and crime, to keep us safe, and promote justice – hide in plain sight. Thus we simultaneously recognize and do not recognize these contradictory realities: the violence and injustices that often occur in our jails and prisons, profound disparities in legal representation and sentencing bound up with race, class, and nationality, and a host of tangled methods and aims often in conflict with one another. While "crime" news reports, movies, and series keep certain stories ever present in our societal imagination, they tend to obscure deeper stories. In this class, we'll attempt to enter into and understand those deeper stories using both media and texts; writers may include Michelle Alexander, Jimmy Santiago Baca, Brittany Barnett, Johann Hari, Martin Luther King, and Bryan Stevenson. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement, an Integration in the Humanities requirement, and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W05 Behind Bars: Prison Literature M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 301

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

42238 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucy A. Saliger

The difficult contradictions in our criminal legal system – which purportedly aims to reduce violence, addictions, and crime, to keep us safe, and promote justice – hide in plain sight. Thus we simultaneously recognize and do not recognize these contradictory realities: the violence and injustices that often occur in our jails and prisons, profound disparities in legal representation and sentencing bound up with race, class, and nationality, and a host of tangled methods and aims often in conflict with one another. While "crime" news reports, movies, and series keep certain stories ever present in our societal imagination, they tend to obscure deeper stories. In this class, we'll attempt to enter into and understand those deeper stories using both media and texts; writers may include Michelle Alexander, Jimmy Santiago Baca, Brittany Barnett, Johann Hari, Martin Luther King, and Bryan Stevenson. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement, an Integration in the Humanities requirement, and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 337 - L01 Reading for Abolition - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 301

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

42210 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy C. Finnegan, Kanishka Chowdhury

This course traces the genealogies of abolition from the efforts to end slavery in this country through contemporary calls to abolish the prison industrial complex. Briefly, in its contemporary incarnation, Abolition is a political method and practice that calls into question existing punishment systems and political and economic formations that perpetuate violence. In this course, we will explore the work of those who practice this philosophy, extending their invitation to dream boldly and lead with care and accountability in how we respond to harm and violence. We will engage literature that helps us understand the essence of abolition and why people across generations have found it useful. We will also familiarize ourselves with contemporary abolitionist practices in the world and invite our learning community to interrogate collectively root causes of violence and imagine a world we long for. We will read essays by Gloria Anzaldúa, W.E.B. DuBois, Angela Davis, Nick Estes, Fred Moten, Ruth Wilson Gilmore, Mariame Kaba, and David Walker, and fiction, poetry, and plays by Octavia Butler, Natalie Diaz, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Colson Whitehead, and August Wilson, among others. This course satisfies an Integration in the Humanities requirement; the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement, a WAC Writing to Learn requirement, and major/minor requirements for English and Justice and Peace Studies students. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190. NOTE: This course is cross-listed with JPST 298-L01; there are 12 seats on the ENGL 337-L01 side and 8 seats on the JPST 298-L01 side.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 341 - L01 Women of the 20th Century - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42211 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Emily M. James

This course surveys literature by women across the long twentieth century—from early-century writers like Charlotte Perkins Gilman and Virginia Woolf to contemporary writers such as Tracy K. Smith, Sarah Howe, and Ada Limón. Along the way, we will discuss social, cultural, and historical context, including contemporary issues. We will also read, analyze, and emulate the recent work of essayists such as Leslie Jamison and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie—writers who have forged new conversations about women, feminism, and gender studies. The course requires community involvement (event attendance and excursions), regular reading and writing assignments, and enthusiastic participation in class discussion. This course satisfies both an Integrations in the Humanities and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirements, as well as a WAC Writing to Learn requirement. In addition, this course satisfies a major/minor requirement for Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies students; it also satisfies the Human Diversity and Context and Convergences requirements for English with Literature & Writing majors, a Human Diversity requirement for English with Professional Writing majors, and a literature requirement for English with Creative Writing majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HONR 480 - 07 HONORS Race and Place - - - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 205

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MHC 205

Course Registration Number:

42267 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Aura N. Wharton-Beck, Rita E. Lederle

These interdisciplinary seminars are intended to develop integrating insights through an analysis of topics chosen from different disciplines. Often they are taught by two faculty members or by a visiting lecturer who holds one of the endowed chairs at the university.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JPST 280 - W01 Active Nonviolence - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OSS 313

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OSS 313

Course Registration Number:

40575 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy C. Finnegan

Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JPST 280 - W02 Active Nonviolence - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 222

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

41954 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Amy C. Finnegan

Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JPST 280 - W03 Active Nonviolence M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 308

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 308

Course Registration Number:

41955 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Obasesam Okoi

Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JPST 280 - W04 Active Nonviolence M - W - - - - 1330 - 1510 LIB LL21

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

LIB LL21

Course Registration Number:

42044 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JPST 298 - L01 Topic: Reading for Abolition - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 301

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

42847 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy C. Finnegan, Kanishka Chowdhury

This course traces the genealogies of abolition from the efforts to end slavery in this country through contemporary calls to abolish the prison industrial complex. Briefly, in its contemporary incarnation, Abolition is a political method and practice that calls into question existing punishment systems and political and economic formations that perpetuate violence. In this course, we will explore the work of those who practice this philosophy, extending their invitation to dream boldly and lead with care and accountability in how we respond to harm and violence. We will engage literature that helps us understand the essence of abolition and why people across generations have found it useful. We will also familiarize ourselves with contemporary abolitionist practices in the world and invite our learning community to interrogate collectively root causes of violence and imagine a world we long for. We will read essays by Gloria Anzaldúa, W.E.B. DuBois, Angela Davis, Nick Estes, Fred Moten, Ruth Wilson Gilmore, Mariame Kaba, and David Walker, and fiction, poetry, and plays by Octavia Butler, Natalie Diaz, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Colson Whitehead, and August Wilson, among others. This course satisfies an Integration in the Humanities requirement; the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement, a WAC Writing to Learn requirement, and major/minor requirements for English and Justice and Peace Studies students. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190. NOTE: This course is cross-listed with JENGL 337-L01; there are 8 seats on the JPST 298-L01 side and 12 seats on the ENGL 337-L01 side.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MGMT 384 - L01 Project Management - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 MCH 115

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

MCH 115

Course Registration Number:

42742 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ernest L. Owens

This course presents the concepts, techniques, and behavioral skills needed for managing projects effectively. The course introduces students to a project's life cycle (from project definition and goals to completion of the project) and the behavioral dynamics that need to be managed to achieve success. Project leaders need to fulfill multiple roles on a project including managing the timeline, meeting project specifications, resource budgeting and creating a sustainable project culture. Prerequisites: MGMT 200 or MGMT 305; and OPMT 200 or OPMT 300; and Junior standing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MGMT 385 - 01 Inclusive Leadership - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MCH 108

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MCH 108

Course Registration Number:

42743 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Rama K. Hart

Leaders, both with and without formal management titles, need to appreciate the diverse people internal and external to their organizations and society at large. It is critical that leaders step up to design and deliver effective programs of inclusion in their organizations. Culturally competent leaders think critically about these programs and practice inclusion at individual, interpersonal, team, organization, and community levels. This requires foundational knowledge, skills, and attitudes applied in diverse domestic and global contexts. This course introduces a range of perspectives to explore topics including, but not limited to, human diversity; inclusive cultures; social identity and perception; power and privilege; and models and paradigms for interpersonal and organizational inclusion. Prerequisites: MGMT 200 or MGMT 305 and Junior standing. Note: Students who receive credit for MGMT 385 may not receive credit for MGMT 388

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MGMT 385 - 02 Inclusive Leadership - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MCH 231

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MCH 231

Course Registration Number:

42744 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Rama K. Hart

Leaders, both with and without formal management titles, need to appreciate the diverse people internal and external to their organizations and society at large. It is critical that leaders step up to design and deliver effective programs of inclusion in their organizations. Culturally competent leaders think critically about these programs and practice inclusion at individual, interpersonal, team, organization, and community levels. This requires foundational knowledge, skills, and attitudes applied in diverse domestic and global contexts. This course introduces a range of perspectives to explore topics including, but not limited to, human diversity; inclusive cultures; social identity and perception; power and privilege; and models and paradigms for interpersonal and organizational inclusion. Prerequisites: MGMT 200 or MGMT 305 and Junior standing. Note: Students who receive credit for MGMT 385 may not receive credit for MGMT 388

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MKTG 255 - 01 Multicultural & Inclusive Mktg - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MCH 229

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MCH 229

Course Registration Number:

42790 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Minerva J. Purvis

The purpose of this course will be to help students appreciate the presence and understand the nuisances and similarities of various subcultures within the United States. From targeting and segmenting customers to developing partnerships, the class will discuss how these may impact American marketing practices and trends. Realizing that a subculture is any group that shares a set of attitudes, values and goals, this course will consider not only ethnic subcultures but religious, sexual orientation & gender identity, ability, and generational subcultures. Students will be exposed to concepts such as cultural capital, intercultural penetration, intersectionality, historical context and other concepts of culture and identity as they learn how individuals and organizations can effectively and responsibly engage with multiple diverse stakeholders. Prerequisites: MKTG 200

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MUSC 230 - 01 Music of the United States M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 BEC 110

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

BEC 110

Course Registration Number:

42379 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Sarah C. Schmalenberger

This course focuses on the study of music in the United States within its historical, cultural, and sociological contexts. The course will develop skills in critical listening analysis using appropriate musical terminology, to describe both aural and written traditions of music. Repertoire to be explored include homeland traditions of cultures and population groups brought over through migration/immigration, blends of popular and concert traditions, and new and emerging styles unique to the United States. Historical, cultural, and social contexts will facilitate and understanding of how music reflects particular identities, ideas, values, and issues among population groups in the United States.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 230 - 01 Disability and Human Dignity - - - - - - - - VSP

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

VSP

Course Registration Number:

41892 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gloria R. Frost

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability. Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability. This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course. Some of the central questions examined in the course include: What is disability? Is disability merely a medical condition? In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources? Does disability itself make a person worse off or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse? How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US? What is the basis for human dignity? What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities? Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 230 - 02 Disability and Human Dignity - - - - - - - - VSP

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

VSP

Course Registration Number:

42431 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gloria R. Frost

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability. Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability. This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course. Some of the central questions examined in the course include: What is disability? Is disability merely a medical condition? In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources? Does disability itself make a person worse off or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse? How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US? What is the basis for human dignity? What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities? Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 231 - W01 Philosophies of Social Justice M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 222

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

42432 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Thomas D. Feeney

Action to achieve social justice depends, ultimately, on an understanding of what social justice is. What makes a society just? How is a just society ordered? What does social justice look like up close? If our society is not currently just, how may we justly make it so? This course considers competing (though sometimes overlapping) accounts of social justice that are of continuing relevance today, such as those found in the traditions of classical liberalism, socialism, Catholicism, and critical theory. One goal is to understand where such accounts agree, where they disagree, and why. Another goal is to appreciate how such traditions have animated and continue to animate the pursuit of justice, especially for marginalized persons in the United States. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 301 - 01 Sig.Wk:Disability&HumanDignity - - - - - - - - VSP

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

VSP

Course Registration Number:

41802 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gloria R. Frost

This Signature Work section of Disability and Human Dignity is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability. Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability. This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course. Some of the central questions examined in the course include: What is disability? Is disability merely a medical condition? In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources? Does disability itself make a person worse off or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse? How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US? What is the basis for human dignity? What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities? Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115; and at least 80 credits completed.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 301 - W03 Sig.Wk: Phil.of Social Justice M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 222

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

42485 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Thomas D. Feeney

Action to achieve social justice depends, ultimately, on an understanding of what social justice is. What makes a society just? How is a just society ordered? What does social justice look like up close? If our society is not currently just, how may we justly make it so? This course considers competing (though sometimes overlapping) accounts of social justice that are of continuing relevance today, such as those found in the traditions of classical liberalism, socialism, Catholicism, and critical theory. One goal is to understand where such accounts agree, where they disagree, and why. Another goal is to appreciate how such traditions have animated and continue to animate the pursuit of justice, especially for marginalized persons in the United States. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115; and at least 80 credits completed.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 205 - L01 Psychology of Women - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

41032 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Britain A. Scott

An examination of physiological, experiential, and social factors affecting the psychological development of women and their status as adults. Addresses diversity among women and how factors such as class and race intersect with historical and contemporary gender inequalities in women's lives. Topics include: biological and social influences on the development of gender, research on sex-related differences in psychological traits and cognitive abilities, media image and stereotypes of women, close relationships and sexuality, mothering, employment, aging, violence against women, and psychological health. Prerequisite: PSYC 111

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 207 - 01 Drugs and Behavior - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC LL01

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC LL01

Course Registration Number:

40247 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mari S. Gades

The course surveys some basic facts and principles of administration, absorption, transport, action, deactivation and elimination of drugs. Various classes of drugs; their effects on mood, behavior, and consciousness; their use and misuse; and phenomena of chemical dependency and its treatment modalities are discussed. Lectures, readings, films, tapes and invited speakers are employed. Prerequisite: PSYC 111

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOCI 251 - W01 Race and Ethnicity See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

40489 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Patricia L. Maddox

Race and ethnicity as significant components of U.S. social structure; the cognitive and normative aspects of culture which maintain and effect varying manifestations of social distance, tension, prejudice and discrimination between majority and minorities at both micro and macro levels, nationally and internationally. This course meets a requirement in American Cultural Studies and Justice and Peace Studies. Prerequisite: sophomore standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MCH 1061055-1200M - W - - - -
VSP 1-- - - - F - -
SOCI 354 - W01 Sex in Society M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 JRC 222

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

41124 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Patricia L. Maddox

Sexuality as a social construction is explored with a specific focus on cultural and institutional influences including the family, economy, religion, government, and the media. Current research findings are discussed within the context of historical change in American sexual behavior, attitudes and research methodologies. This course meets a requirement in Family Studies. Prerequisite: SOCI 100 or 110

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOWK 391 - 01 Social Policy for Change - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

40600 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Renee A. Hepperlen

This course equips students to understand and critically analyze current and past social policies. Policy alternatives are explored with a focus on the values and attitudes as well as the societal, economic and political dynamics from which they originate. Roles and responsibilities of citizens and professionals in formulating and implementing policies responsive to actual social needs are addressed. Prerequisite: SOWK 181 (or 281 under the old course number) or consent of the Program Director.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SPAN 301 - W01 Adv Written Spanish & Culture - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 318

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 318

Course Registration Number:

41083 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paola B. Ehrmantraut

Intensive practice in written Spanish using selected materials to acquire a high level of competence in writing Spanish. This writing course aims to improve technique, expand syntactic depth, increase vocabulary and learn good writing through a process approach involving stages of idea development, thesis construction, structural development, bibliographic notation, evaluation of ideas and rewriting of the text. Lectures and class discussions are based on major topics that relate to the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Written skills will be assessed. Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 300 or its equivalent with a C- or better.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 226 - L08 Spirituality: Christ Marriage M - - - - - - 1730 - 2115 JRC 201

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2115

Location:

JRC 201

Course Registration Number:

41188 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Marguerite L. Spencer

This section is designed to acquaint students with the theology of Christian marriage, understood as covenant relationship and as sacrament, that is, an effective sign of God's love in our world. Primary though not exclusive emphasis will be on the Roman Catholic tradition. Students will also examine contemporary cultural attitudes toward sexuality, marriage, and the family in the light of Christian theology.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 227 - L20 Contexts: Beloved Community M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MHC 305H

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

MHC 305H

Course Registration Number:

42025 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Benjamin Heidgerken

This course introduces students to central aspects of Christian history, thought, and action concerning ethnicity and race and provides resources to build up what Martin Luther King, Jr., called the “Beloved Community.” The course helps students develop ethical reasoning skills through consideration of various historical and contemporary Christian encounters across lines of racial difference, including examples from monastic communities, papal documents, missionary endeavors, North American churches, and saints from the Catholic tradition.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 228 - L10 Comparative: InterRel Encounte - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42936 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Hans S. Gustafson

In the last half century religious diversity in the West has rapidly increased, bringing people from different religious traditions into daily contact. This has resulted in new conflicts, sometimes in violence, but also in new collaborations and friendships. Drawing on several approaches to interreligious conflict and relations, this course will examine the dynamic encounters that take place between and among people of different religious identities and ask students to reflect on their own role in religiously complex situations. Students will consider this interreligious reality and their role in it against the backdrop of their own individual relationship to spirituality, faith, and theology. To foster interreligious understanding beyond the classroom, students in this course will spend significant time outside the classroom directly engaging religious diversity. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 228 - L11 Comparative: InterRel Encounte - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42937 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Hans S. Gustafson

In the last half century religious diversity in the West has rapidly increased, bringing people from different religious traditions into daily contact. This has resulted in new conflicts, sometimes in violence, but also in new collaborations and friendships. Drawing on several approaches to interreligious conflict and relations, this course will examine the dynamic encounters that take place between and among people of different religious identities and ask students to reflect on their own role in religiously complex situations. Students will consider this interreligious reality and their role in it against the backdrop of their own individual relationship to spirituality, faith, and theology. To foster interreligious understanding beyond the classroom, students in this course will spend significant time outside the classroom directly engaging religious diversity. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
WGSS 205 - L01 Found in Women/Gen/Sexuality M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42041 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

This multi-disciplinary course is designed to raise awareness of women's status and women's diversity, to explore gender identities and interrogate the way that these categories are constructed, and to critically examine disciplines and social practices through the lens of feminist theory. Course readings and discussion will examine ideas about race, class, sexuality, and other aspects of identity as they intersect with sex and gender. Available once a year, usually offered in the Fall semester.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)