Mark DelCogliano portrait

Mark DelCogliano

Assistant Professor
Degree
Ph.D. Emory University

Office
JRC 118
Phone
(651) 962-5455
Toll Free
(800) 328-6819, Ext. 2-5455
Fax
651-962-5310

Education

Ph.D., Emory University, 2009

M.T.S., Vanderbilt University Divinity School, 2004

B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1991

 Interests

Early Christianity/Patristics; historical theology, particularly doctrinal debates and developments (Trinitarian doctrine, Christology, soteriology, anthropology); the interpretation of scripture in early Christianity; landmark figures such as Origen, Eusebius, Athanasius, Didymus, Basil of Caesarea, Augustine, and Gregory the Great.

 Current Work

 

Asterius of Cappadocia: Fragments and Testimonies. A new edition of the extant literary remains of an important Trinitarian theologian active ca. 320-340, together with an English translation and commentary.

 

From Asterius to Eunomius: The Development of the Doctrine of the Trinity, 318-362. A study of the development of the “non-Nicene” doctrine of the Trinity and an assessment of its contributions to later “pro-Nicene” orthodoxy.

 

Basil the Theologian. A comprehensive study of Basil of Caesarea’s Trinitarian theology and Christology.

 

Select Publications

 Books:

Basil of Caesarea’s Anti-Eunomian Theory of Names: Christian Theology and Late-Antique Philosophy in the Fourth-Century Trinitarian Controversy. Vigiliae Christianae, Supplements 103. Leiden: Brill, 2010.

St. Basil the Great: On Fasting and Feasts. Popular Patristics Series 50. Yonkers: St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press, 2013. Translated by Susan R. Holman and Mark DelCogliano. Introduction by Susan R. Holman. Of the nine homilies presented in this volume, I contribute annotated translations of four of them: two on fasting, one against drunkenness, and one on the incarnation.

St Basil the Great: On Christian Doctrine and Practice. Popular Patristics Series 47. Yonkers: St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press, 2012. An annotated translation of eleven homilies on Trinitarian theology and various aspects of Christian practice.

Gregory the Great on the Song of SongsCistercian Studies Series. Kalamazoo: Cistercian Publications 2012.

Works on the Spirit: Athanasius and Didymus. Popular Patristics Series. Crestwood: St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press, 2011. With Andrew Radde-Gallwitz and Lewis Ayres.

St. Basil of Caesarea: Against Eunomius. The Fathers of the Church 122. Washington, D.C.: The Catholic University of America Press, 2011. With Andrew Radde-Gallwitz.

Basil of Caesarea’s Anti-Eunomian Theory of Names: Christian Theology and Late-Antique Philosophy in the Fourth-Century Trinitarian Controversy. Vigiliae Christianae, Supplements 103. Leiden: Brill, 2010.

Recent articles:

"Basil of Caesarea, Didymus the Blind, and the Anti-Pneumatomachian Exegesis of Amos 4:13 and John 1:3,” Journal of Theological Studies n.s. 61 (2010): 644–58.

The Death of George of Laodicea,Journal of Theological Studies n.s. 60 (2009): 181–190.

“The Eusebian Alliance: the Case of Theodotus of Laodicea,Zeitschrift für Antikes Christentum / Journal of Ancient Christianity 12 (2008): 250–66.

“Aphrahat on the Modes of Christ’s Indwelling,” Orientalia Christiana Periodica 74 (2008): 181–193.

“Basil of Caesarea on Proverbs 8:22 and the Sources of Pro-Nicene Theology,Journal of Theological Studies n.s. 59 (2008): 183–190.

“Eusebian Theologies of the Son as Image of God before 341,Journal of Early Christian Studies 14.4 (2006): 459–484.

 

 

 



Fall 2017 Courses

Fall 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
THEO 101 - L02 Christian Theo Tradition M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 JRC 247
CRN: 40428 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Mark E. DelCogliano This course is designed to acquaint students with the contents of the Bible and with Christian history, especially in the context of the Catholic tradition. Through careful reading of a core of common texts and a variety of written assignments, students are expected to attain a basic understanding of human experience in the light of major areas of theology, including revelation, God, creation, Jesus and the Church.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 101 - L03 Christian Theo Tradition M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 247
CRN: 42196 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Mark E. DelCogliano This course is designed to acquaint students with the contents of the Bible and with Christian history, especially in the context of the Catholic tradition. Through careful reading of a core of common texts and a variety of written assignments, students are expected to attain a basic understanding of human experience in the light of major areas of theology, including revelation, God, creation, Jesus and the Church.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2018 Courses

J-Term 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2018 Courses

Spring 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
THEO 101 - W02 Christian Theo Tradition M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 212
CRN: 22555 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Mark E. DelCogliano This course is designed to acquaint students with the contents of the Bible and with Christian history, especially in the context of the Catholic tradition. Through careful reading of a core of common texts and a variety of written assignments, students are expected to attain a basic understanding of human experience in the light of major areas of theology, including revelation, God, creation, Jesus and the Church.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 394 - W01 Death and the Afterlife M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 210
CRN: 20613 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Mark E. DelCogliano This course explores Christian and non-Christian conceptions of death and afterlife. It focuses on Christian theological views, but also considers Jewish, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist conceptions. Specific topics addressed will be ideas of judgment, heaven, purgatory, hell, reincarnation, and accounts of near-death experiences. Prerequisite: THEO 101

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 394 - W02 Death and the Afterlife M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 212
CRN: 21341 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Mark E. DelCogliano This course explores Christian and non-Christian conceptions of death and afterlife. It focuses on Christian theological views, but also considers Jewish, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist conceptions. Specific topics addressed will be ideas of judgment, heaven, purgatory, hell, reincarnation, and accounts of near-death experiences. Prerequisite: THEO 101

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)