Philosophy Students Studying

Current Course Offerings

Click the link for elective course information in the Fall 2020 Electives Brochure.

For additional course information please consult the University of St. Thomas Undergraduate Catalog.

Summer 2020 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
PHIL 110 - 02 The Person and the Good - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30479 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gloria R. Frost

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 115 - 05 Philosophy of Human Person - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30475 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephen J. Laumakis

An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 214 - 01 Introductory Ethics - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30003 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mathew Lu

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 214 - 02 Introductory Ethics - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30004 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gloria R. Frost

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 214 - 03 Introductory Ethics - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30160 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael J. Winter

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 214 - 05 Introductory Ethics - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30593 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher H. Toner

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 214 - 08 Introductory Ethics - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30597 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heidi M. Giebel

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 214 - 7 Introductory Ethics - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30474 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heidi M. Giebel

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Fall 2020 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
PHIL 110 - 04 The Person and the Good - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OWS 150

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OWS 150

Course Registration Number:

46684 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew A. Kent

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 110 - 05 The Person and the Good M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46685 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephen J. Heaney

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 110 - 06 The Person and the Good - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46686 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephen J. Heaney

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 110 - 07 The Person and the Good M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MHC 203

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

MHC 203

Course Registration Number:

46687 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Thomas D. Feeney

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 110 - 09 The Person and the Good - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46699 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephen J. Heaney

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 110 - 10 The Person and the Good - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 201

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 201

Course Registration Number:

46700 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mark K. Spencer

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 110 - 11 The Person and the Good - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MCH 231

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MCH 231

Course Registration Number:

46701 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mark K. Spencer

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 110 - 12 The Person and the Good M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MCH 108

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MCH 108

Course Registration Number:

46702 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher H. Toner

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 110 - 13 The Person and the Good M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MCH 108

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

MCH 108

Course Registration Number:

46703 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher H. Toner

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 110 - 15 The Person and the Good M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MCH 233

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MCH 233

Course Registration Number:

46751 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew A. Kent

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 110 - 16 The Person and the Good M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MHC 206

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

MHC 206

Course Registration Number:

46705 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephen J. Laumakis

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 110 - 21 The Person and the Good See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

47642 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Faith G. Pawl

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MCH 1111055-1200M - W - - - -
1055-1200- - - - F - -
PHIL 110 - W14 The Person and the Good See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

46704 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Faith G. Pawl

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MCH 2311215-1320M - W - - - -
1215-1320- - - - F - -
PHIL 115 - 01 Philosophy of Human Person M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MCH 109

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MCH 109

Course Registration Number:

46730 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David L. Clemenson

An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 115 - 02 Philosophy of Human Person - T - R - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 201

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

JRC 201

Course Registration Number:

45919 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

John D. Kronen

An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 115 - 04 Philosophy of Human Person See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

46736 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jonathan E. Stoltz

An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 2050935-1040M - W - - - -
-- - - - - - -
PHIL 115 - 05 Philosophy of Human Person - - - - - - - - MCH 233

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

MCH 233

Course Registration Number:

46737 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Peter M. Distelzweig

An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 115 - 06 Philosophy of Human Person M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MCH 111

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MCH 111

Course Registration Number:

46738 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Erik M. Pedersen

An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 115 - 09 Philosophy of Human Person - - - - - - - - JRC 247

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

JRC 247

Course Registration Number:

46740 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Peter M. Distelzweig

An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 115 - 10 Philosophy of Human Person - - - - - - - - MHC 208

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

MHC 208

Course Registration Number:

46741 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Peter M. Distelzweig

An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 115 - W08 Philosophy of Human Person - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MHC 206

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MHC 206

Course Registration Number:

45372 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Thomas D. Feeney

An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 200 - 01 Ancient Philosophy - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 BEC LL17

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

BEC LL17

Course Registration Number:

44041 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Catherine A. Deavel

Alfred North Whitehead famously claimed that “[t]he safest general characterization of the European philosophical tradition is that it consists of a series of footnotes to Plato.” Plato and Aristotle set the stage for nearly all of the philosophical systems—and battles—that come after them. We will work through texts of the Pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristotle with a careful eye to their points of agreement and disagreement. These philosophers are searching for a comprehensive and rigorous understanding of reality, including the nature of human beings. Accordingly, the ancient Greeks turn their attention to a wide array of topics, such as metaphysics, physics, biology, politics, ethics, astronomy, and theology. We will give special attention to the development of substance metaphysics. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, 115 or 197.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 200 - 02 Ancient Philosophy - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 401

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 401

Course Registration Number:

44445 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mathew Lu

In this course we will consider some of the central figures and questions of ancient (Western) philosophy. We will begin with some of the most important pre-Socratic philosophers, but the majority of the course will concentrate on Plato and Aristotle. Our main goal will be to gain a basic familiarity with the overall philosophical outlook of each of these two pillars of Western thought. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, 115 or 197.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 214 - 01 Introductory Ethics - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44042 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael J. Degnan

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 214 - 02 Introductory Ethics See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44974 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew A. Kent

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JRC 2011335-1440M - - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
PHIL 214 - 03 Introductory Ethics - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 201

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 201

Course Registration Number:

46744 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

John D. Kronen

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 214 - 04 Introductory Ethics See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

47501 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew A. Kent

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JRC 2010935-1040M - - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
PHIL 214 - 08 Introductory Ethics M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 JRC 201

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

JRC 201

Course Registration Number:

45130 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael J. Winter

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 214 - 09 Introductory Ethics M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MCH 116

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MCH 116

Course Registration Number:

45556 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael J. Winter

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 214 - 10 Introductory Ethics M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 201

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 201

Course Registration Number:

45942 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Joshua M. Stuchlik

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 214 - 11 Introductory Ethics M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 201

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

JRC 201

Course Registration Number:

46745 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Joshua M. Stuchlik

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 214 - 12 Introductory Ethics - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MHC 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MHC 207

Course Registration Number:

46746 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Erik M. Pedersen

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 214 - 14 Introductory Ethics See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

45943 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gloria R. Frost

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 2080955-1135- T - - - - -
0955-1135- T - - - - -
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PHIL 214 - 15 Introductory Ethics See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44674 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gloria R. Frost

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
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PHIL 214 - 18 Introductory Ethics See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

45557 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mathew Lu

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JRC 401-- - - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
PHIL 214 - 19 Introductory Ethics See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

45944 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mathew Lu

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
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PHIL 214 - 40 HONORS: Introductory Ethics - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 JRC 247

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

JRC 247

Course Registration Number:

45132 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael J. Winter

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 214 - W04 Introductory Ethics M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45129 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Rose Mary H. Lemmons

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 214 - W05 Introductory Ethics M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44043 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Rose Mary H. Lemmons

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 214 - W06 Introductory Ethics M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44824 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Rose Mary H. Lemmons

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 214 - W07 Introductory Ethics M - W - - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 201

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

JRC 201

Course Registration Number:

45941 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

John D. Kronen

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 220 - 01 Logic - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 MHC 209

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

MHC 209

Course Registration Number:

44044 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heidi M. Giebel

This course provides students with skills for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating the sorts of reasoning encountered in natural language. Emphasis will be placed on attaining facility with different formal systems for representing and evaluating arguments - including propositional logic, Aristotelian syllogistic, first-order predicate calculus, - as well as on acquiring the ability to apply these systems in the analysis and evaluation of arguments in ordinary and philosophical discourse. This course satisfies one of the core curriculum requirements in “Integrations in the Humanities.” Prerequisite: PHIL 110, 115 or 197.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 240 - 01 Faith and Doubt - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MHC 207

Course Registration Number:

46755 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael W. Rota

This course will be a semester-long introduction to a number of issues relating to faith, doubt, and religious belief. We will focus on the following four questions: Are there good arguments for the existence of God? Are there good arguments against the existence of God? What is faith, and is it rational? And, is there good reason to believe that the faith of the Catholic Church is divinely revealed? In the course of thinking about these questions, we will discuss most or all of the following topics: (a) evidentialist approaches to religious belief, (b) Reformed Epistemology and Alvin Plantinga’s account of the rationality of religious belief, (c) the cosmological argument, (d) the fine-tuning argument, (e) Pascal’s Wager, (f) the argument from evil, (g) the problem of divine hiddenness, (h) the doctrine of Hell, and (i) arguments for the veracity of Catholicism. Heavy emphasis will be placed on the analysis and assessment of arguments. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, 115, or 197.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 254 - 01 Biomedical Ethics - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MHC 209

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MHC 209

Course Registration Number:

47304 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heidi M. Giebel

This course will focus on fascinating and difficult questions in three main areas of medical ethics: doctor-patient relationships, life issues, and social dimensions of medicine. In the doctor-patient section, we will look at issues such as confidentiality of medical records and whether a doctor can withhold information from a patient for his/her own good. In the life issues section, we will touch on the controversies surrounding stem-cell research and human cloning, as well as the more “traditional” issues of abortion and euthanasia. In the social dimensions section of the course, we will evaluate the current state of health care in the U.S. and consider whether or not other nations’ systems are an improvement over ours. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, 115, 197, 214 or 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 297 - 01 Topics: Buddhist Philosophy M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MHC 206

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MHC 206

Course Registration Number:

46756 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephen J. Laumakis

Want to achieve Nirvana? Satori? Want to be released from Samsara? Want to know what Dukkha is, where it comes from, and how to make it stop? Want to know what these questions are about? Then consider PHIL 297 Buddhist Philosophy. This course in the history and development of Buddhism will be divided into three parts. After an introductory overview we will begin with Buddhism in India by looking at the earliest teachings and doctrines of the Buddha and their relationship to the basic beliefs and practices of Hinduism. Second, we will trace the subsequent development of the different schools of Buddhist thought in China. Particular attention will be given to the teachings of Bodhidharma and Huineng and their connection to traditional Buddhism. Finally, we will focus on two types of Japanese Buddhism: Zen and Pure Land Buddhism. Throughout the course we will be concerned with both the cultural and historical transformations of Buddhism as well as its relevance as a source of meaning and insight about the nature of reality. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, 115, 197 or 214.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 304 - 01 Modern Philosophy - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MCH 230

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MCH 230

Course Registration Number:

44975 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David L. Clemenson

By the end of the early modern period (1600-1800), academic philosophers had largely rejected the Christian Aristotelianism of the medieval Scholastics in favor of the "Enlightenment" tradition of Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz (the Continental Rationalists), Locke, Berkeley, and Hume (the British Empiricists), and Kant (whose "transcendental idealism" was an attempt to overcome certain basic shortcomings of Rationalist and Empiricist systems). Enlightenment philosophy's critique of a range of traditional beliefs concerning the human person and human knowledge has profoundly shaped contemporary society. Acquaintance with its main points is indispensable to a thorough understanding of modernity's achievements and defects. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, 115 or 197, and one other PHIL course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 350 - 01 Advanced Ethical Theory M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MCH 108

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MCH 108

Course Registration Number:

46757 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher H. Toner

An advanced treatment of central aspects of ethical theory, this course will provide a brief historical introduction that contextualizes current debates, and proceed to an examination of the “big three” theories: Consequentialism (building on the legacy of Bentham and Mill), Deontology (drawing on Kant), and Virtue Ethics (developing Aristotle). Following this, the course will undertake a more detailed examination of Virtue Ethics, so as to allow an in-depth critical look at one of the main approaches to ethical theory. The course will also engage a number of “hot issues” in ethical theory today, such as naturalism, challenges to Virtue Ethics drawn from psychology, right action, moral motivation, and the challenge of egoism. Prerequisite: PHIL 214, or PHIL 110, 115, or 197 and one other PHIL course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 365 - W01 Natural Phil & Metaphysics - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 SCB 326

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

SCB 326

Course Registration Number:

44208 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Timothy J. Pawl

This course will focus on some major questions in metaphysics and natural philosophy. We will approach these topics from two different perspectives: the Aristotelian-Thomistic perspective and the contemporary analytic perspective. Some issues we will discuss include: metaphysical composition of material objects and their persistence conditions; the analysis of compositional, qualitative, and substantial change; possibility and necessity; causation; the nature of time; and the problem of universals. Prerequisite: PHIL 220.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 365 - W02 Natural Phil & Metaphysics M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 MCH 229

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

MCH 229

Course Registration Number:

44254 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Timothy J. Pawl

This course will focus on some major questions in metaphysics and natural philosophy. We will approach these topics from two different perspectives: the Aristotelian-Thomistic perspective and the contemporary analytic perspective. Some issues we will discuss include: metaphysical composition of material objects and their persistence conditions; the analysis of compositional, qualitative, and substantial change; possibility and necessity; causation; the nature of time; and the problem of universals. Prerequisite: PHIL 220.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 380 - 01 Epistemology M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MCH 229

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

MCH 229

Course Registration Number:

44980 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jonathan E. Stoltz

Epistemology is the philosophical study of the nature, origin, and limits of human knowledge. While we use terms like “knowledge,” “justification,” and “proof” frequently in everyday life, understanding the exact meanings of these terms is rather difficult. In this class we will examine competing philosophical accounts of knowledge and justification, and will discuss a variety of puzzles associated with these accounts. Prerequisite: PHIL 220

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2021 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
PHIL 115 - 01 Philosophy of Human Person - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10515 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 214 - 01 Introductory Ethics - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10517 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 214 - 02 Introductory Ethics - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10518 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 214 - 03 Introductory Ethics - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10519 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or 115. NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 297 - L01 Topics: Dying in America - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10608 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

The subject matter of these courses will vary from year to year, but will not duplicate existing courses. Descriptions of these courses are available in the Searchable Class Schedule on Murphy Online, View Searchable Class Schedule

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Degree Planning Guide

Degree Planning Guide