On-Demand CLEs

The Minnesota Board of Continuing Legal Education allows attorneys to claim up to 15 hours of CLE credit per 45-hour reporting period through on-demand CLEs. On-demand CLEs are similar to regular CLEs in terms of content, but they may be viewed at any time rather than only during the live presentation. St. Thomas School of Law provides occasional on-demand CLE videos to view on its website. Most on-demand CLEs are open to the public, unless otherwise noted.  

As various departments at the School of Law host CLEs, the Alumni Relations Office will reach out to the department to find out if a presentation may be recorded for the purpose of seeking on-demand CLE approval. Not all CLEs presented at St. Thomas School of Law will be available for on-demand CLE. The CLEs will be available to view for no more than a 24 month time period. St. Thomas School of Law is required to maintain a list of all course participants and provide it to the CLE Board if requested. Please be sure to sign-in via the “sign-in here" hyperlink listed next to the course you intend to view. You can report your CLE credit for on-demand courses the same way you would for any other CLE course. The event code for each course is posted on the website.

***Please note that on-demand CLE credit is only available for a 24 month time period following the date it is approved for on-demand credit*** 

 

Universal Basic Income: An Idea Whose Time Has Come

Approved for 1.25 standard on-demand CLE credits (event code: 255788)

Program Description: 

This panel will discuss the various ethical issues surrounding the use of artificial intelligence. Specifically, the panel will analyze the use of artificial intelligence now and in the future. How ethics parlays into the use of artificial intelligence from multiple different angles will also be discussed. Program contact is Seanne Harris (murphyinstit@stthomas.edu).

View CLE here. Sign-in for credit here.


Ethical Considerations of Artificial Intelligence

Approved for 2 ethics on-demand CLE credits (event code: 255525)

Program Description: 

This panel will discuss the various ethical issues surrounding the use of artificial intelligence. Specifically, the panel will analyze the use of artificial intelligence now and in the future. How ethics parlays into the use of artificial intelligence from multiple different angles will also be discussed. Program contact is Colleen Dorsey (colleen.dorsey@stthomas.edu).

View CLE here. Sign-in for credit here.


Should Medicaid Be Converted to a Block-Grant Program?

Approved for 1 standard CLE credit (event code: 255513)

Program description:

Join Lucas Swanepoel, Sr. Director Government Affairs Catholic Charities USA, and David Vang, Prof. of Finance, University of St. Thomas Opus College of Business, as they debate whether Medicaid should be converted to a block- grant program. Presented by the Terrence J. Murphy Institute for Catholic Thought, Law, and Public Policy.

View CLE here. Sign-in for credit here.


Campus Speech in Uncertain Times—Hopes and Challenges?

Approved for 3 standard on-demand CLE credits (event code: 255524)

Program Description: 

University of St. Thomas deans Yohuru Williams (College of Arts and Sciences) and Robert Vischer (School of Law) will tackle the complex issues presented in the national debate over the fate of Confederate monuments.

The past year controversies over freedom of speech have erupted on college campuses across the nation. Sometimes – as at Middlebury College – they involve student protests against controversial speakers; other controversies have arisen in response to over-zealous enforcement of Title IX. How should colleges and universities react to these developments? Do the recent events in Charlottesville –which took place on a university campus – pose additional hurdles to balancing the competing challenges of ensuring student safety while protecting free expression? Finally, what about law schools? During tumult of the past two years, law schools been appeared to be place of relative calm. Why is this?

Sponsored by the St. Thomas Law Journal

View CLE Part 1 here. View CLE Part II here. Sign-in for credit here.


Sex Trafficking: Addressing a Global Issue in our Backyard

Approved for 2.5 standard on-demand CLE credits (event code: 255527)

Program description:

This symposium examines the legal issues surrounding sex trafficking with a focus on Minnesota. The symposium looks at the various aspects of sex trafficking and how the issue and victims are treated by our legal system, including prevention, intervention, and rehabilitation. The symposium further examines how the legal system has prevented sex trafficking and where it has failed to do so and what is needed to make it more effective. It also examines the legal and ethical implications of the children involved in these heinous crimes. Lastly, the symposium looks at how all of this—how sex trafficking in Minnesota—relates to and fits with the issue in a global context. Since sex trafficking and the victims of sex trafficking are often brought here from abroad, it is necessary to examine the issue on a global scale. The symposium will look at the presence of international sex trafficking criminal organizations in Minnesota and what is needed to prosecute them. It will also look at the issue of sex tourism and Minnesotans going abroad to commit these crimes.

View CLE here. Sign-in for credit here.


Hot Topics: Cool Talk - What Should We Do About Confederate Monuments?

Approved on 11/8/2017 for 1 standard on-demand CLE credit (event code: 248979)

Program Description: 

University of St. Thomas deans Yohuru Williams (College of Arts and Sciences) and Robert Vischer (School of Law) will tackle the complex issues presented in the national debate over the fate of Confederate monuments.

In the past few decades, many countries have confronted the difficult issue of public commemorations of troubling histories. Germany consciously obliterated any public spaces that might become rallying points for Neo-Nazis, while offering a myriad of innovative (and sometimes controversial) monuments to victims of the Holocaust. The destruction of statues of dictators such as Saddam Hussein in Iraq, and Lenin, Stalin, and other Communist dictators, were triumphant rallying points in the regime changes in Iraq and Eastern Europe. Hungary made the conscious decision not to destroy its Communist-era statutes, but to display them in an open-air museum, Szoborpark.

The United States is now confronting its history of slavery, at a time when discussions of racial justice are particularly charged. How might the guiding principles that unite the University of St. Thomas community inform our response to these challenges? Deans Yohuru Williams (College of Arts and Sciences) and Robert Vischer (School of Law) will tackle the complex issues presented in the national debate over the fate of Confederate monuments in our first Hot Topics: Cool Talk program of the academic year.

View CLE here. Sign-in for credit here.


Christianity and Politics in the U.S. Today: A Conversation with Ross Douthat & Cornel West

Approved on 11/9/2017 for 1 standard CLE credit (event code 248966).

Program Description:

The Terrence J. Murphy Institute for Catholic Thought, Law, and Public Policy hosted New York Times op-ed columnist, Ross Douthat, and Harvard professor and political commentator, Dr. Cornel West, for a discussion of “Christianity and Politics in the U.S. Today” in Woulfe Alumni Hall of Anderson Student Center on the St. Paul campus of the University of St. Thomas, on Friday, April 7, 2017. Moderator for the evening was Elizabeth Schiltz, a St. Thomas School of Law professor, the Thomas. J. Abood Research Scholar and co-director of the Murphy Institute.

View CLE here. Sign-in for credit here.


Finding Common Ground Between Public Safety and Racial Justice

Approved for 2 elimination of bias on-demand CLE credits on October 6, 2016.

Cost: $50 for non-St. Thomas Law (MN) alumni wanting to receive CLE credit; free for St. Thomas Law (MN) alumni. Register and sign-in here. Upon registration you will be sent the webcast link, access code, and sign-in information.

Program Description

On September 14, 2016, the University of St. Thomas School of Law hosted a candid, critical dialogue on public safety and racial justice, seeking to understand other perspectives, foster mutual respect, build bridges across differences and promote community engagement. The speakers included Cedric Alexander, Psy.D., CNN law enforcement analyst, member of the White House Task Force on 21st Century Policing and director of public safety for Dekalb County, Georgia; Michael Freeman, Hennepin County attorney; Michael Goldstein, chief of police and director of public safety, City of Plymouth, Minnesota; Nekima Levy-Pounds, president, Minneapolis NAACP; R.T. Rybak, president and CEO, Minneapolis Foundation; former mayor of the City of Minneapolis; and, Nkechi Taifa, advocacy director for criminal justice, Open Society Foundations.


Supremely Unique: Significant Supreme Court Opinions in 2016 - Part I

Approved for 1 hour of on-demand CLE credit on October 20, 2016 (event code 229047).

View CLE here. Sign-in here

Program Description

The 2015-16 Supreme Court Term was unique mostly because of the unexpected death of Justice Scalia in the middle of the term.  But the Court endured, hearing and deciding contested legal issues surrounding immigration, standing to sue, and class certification, among others.  On September 9, 2016, following St. Thomas Law alumni panelists, each practicing in the areas directly affected by the Court's rulings, discussed the issues presented, the outcome, and the impact of the opinion:


Protecting Virtual You: Individual and Informational Privacy in the Age of Big Data

Approved for 3.25 on-demand CLE credits on October 20, 2016 (event code 229042).

View CLE here. Sign-in here.

Program Description

The Journal of Law and Public Policy hosted its Fall Symposium on September 30, 2016. The speakers and topics included:


Can Sanctuary Keep Communities Secure? Legal, Moral and Historical Considerations

Approved for 3.25 standard on-demand CLE credits (event code 218786) on April 15, 2016. View the program here. Sign-in here.

Program Description

Immigration policies impact the lives of immigrants and of those in the communities in which they live. Immigration raises many questions about the involvement of different levels of government and civil society in assisting or apprehending unauthorized immigrants. This University of St. Thomas Law Journal symposium explored what Sanctuary Cities are, how their policies affect unauthorized immigrants, and how federal statutes, state laws, and local ordinances interact on this issue. Speakers considered historical and theological foundations of providing sanctuary. Can federal immigration authorities compel local law enforcement to detain and hold persons suspected of violating immigration laws? Can local governments limit information-gathering about unauthorized immigrants? Can state legislatures overrule local sanctuary ordinances? This conversation focused on the impact of immigration policies at the federal, state and local levels.


Smartphoned - Legality of Filming the Police in Light of the First Amendment

Approved 3/28/2016 for 3.0 hours of standard on-demand CLE credit (event code 217922).

View part I of the CLE here; part II here; and, part III here. Sign-in here.

Program Description

On March 4, 2016, the Journal of Law and Public Policy hosted its symposium: Smartphoned - Legality of Filming the Police in Light of the First Amendment. The program included:

  • Jocelyn Simonson, presenting “Recording the Police as an Act of Resistance” 
  • Laurent Sacharoff, presenting “Police Body Cameras and Accountability”
  • Jeff Storms, presenting “Recording the Police: The Intersection of Evidence Preservation and First Amendment Rights” 
  • Panel discussion