On-Demand CLEs

The Minnesota Board of Continuing Legal Education allows attorneys to claim up to 15 hours of CLE credit per 45-hour reporting period through on-demand CLEs. On-demand CLEs are similar to regular CLEs in terms of content, but they may be viewed at any time rather than only during the live presentation. St. Thomas School of Law provides occasional on-demand CLE videos to view on its website. Most on-demand CLEs are open to the public, unless otherwise noted.  

As various departments at the School of Law host CLEs, the Alumni Relations Office will reach out to the department to find out if a presentation may be recorded for the purpose of seeking on-demand CLE approval. Not all CLEs presented at St. Thomas School of Law will be available for on-demand CLE. The CLEs will be available to view for no more than a 24 month time period. St. Thomas School of Law is required to maintain a list of all course participants and provide it to the CLE Board if requested. Please be sure to sign-in via the “sign-in here" hyperlink listed next to the course you intend to view. You can report your CLE credit for on-demand courses the same way you would for any other CLE course. The event code for each course is posted on the website.

***Please note that on-demand CLE credit is only available for a 24 month time period following the date it is approved for on-demand credit*** 

 


Hot Topics: Cool Talk - What Should We Do About Confederate Monuments?

Pending approval for 1 standard CLE credit (event code: 248979)

Program Description: 

University of St. Thomas deans Yohuru Williams (College of Arts and Sciences) and Robert Vischer (School of Law) will tackle the complex issues presented in the national debate over the fate of Confederate monuments.

In the past few decades, many countries have confronted the difficult issue of public commemorations of troubling histories. Germany consciously obliterated any public spaces that might become rallying points for Neo-Nazis, while offering a myriad of innovative (and sometimes controversial) monuments to victims of the Holocaust. The destruction of statues of dictators such as Saddam Hussein in Iraq, and Lenin, Stalin, and other Communist dictators, were triumphant rallying points in the regime changes in Iraq and Eastern Europe. Hungary made the conscious decision not to destroy its Communist-era statutes, but to display them in an open-air museum, Szoborpark.

The United States is now confronting its history of slavery, at a time when discussions of racial justice are particularly charged. How might the guiding principles that unite the University of St. Thomas community inform our response to these challenges? Deans Yohuru Williams (College of Arts and Sciences) and Robert Vischer (School of Law) will tackle the complex issues presented in the national debate over the fate of Confederate monuments in our first Hot Topics: Cool Talk program of the academic year.

View CLE here. Sign-in for credit here.


Christianity and Politics in the U.S. Today: A Conversation with Ross Douthat & Cornel West

Pending approval for 1 standard CLE credit (event code 248966).

Program Description:

The Terrence J. Murphy Institute for Catholic Thought, Law, and Public Policy hosted New York Times op-ed columnist, Ross Douthat, and Harvard professor and political commentator, Dr. Cornel West, for a discussion of “Christianity and Politics in the U.S. Today” in Woulfe Alumni Hall of Anderson Student Center on the St. Paul campus of the University of St. Thomas, on Friday, April 7, 2017. Moderator for the evening was Elizabeth Schiltz, a St. Thomas School of Law professor, the Thomas. J. Abood Research Scholar and co-director of the Murphy Institute.

View CLE here. Sign-in for credit here.


Finding Common Ground Between Public Safety and Racial Justice

Approved for 2 elimination of bias on-demand CLE credits on October 6, 2016.

Cost: $50 for non-St. Thomas Law (MN) alumni wanting to receive CLE credit; free for St. Thomas Law (MN) alumni. Register and sign-in here. Upon registration you will be sent the webcast link, access code, and sign-in information.

Program Description

On September 14, 2016, the University of St. Thomas School of Law hosted a candid, critical dialogue on public safety and racial justice, seeking to understand other perspectives, foster mutual respect, build bridges across differences and promote community engagement. The speakers included Cedric Alexander, Psy.D., CNN law enforcement analyst, member of the White House Task Force on 21st Century Policing and director of public safety for Dekalb County, Georgia; Michael Freeman, Hennepin County attorney; Michael Goldstein, chief of police and director of public safety, City of Plymouth, Minnesota; Nekima Levy-Pounds, president, Minneapolis NAACP; R.T. Rybak, president and CEO, Minneapolis Foundation; former mayor of the City of Minneapolis; and, Nkechi Taifa, advocacy director for criminal justice, Open Society Foundations.


Supremely Unique: Significant Supreme Court Opinions in 2016 - Part I

Approved for 1 hour of on-demand CLE credit on October 20, 2016 (event code 229047).

View CLE here. Sign-in here

Program Description

The 2015-16 Supreme Court Term was unique mostly because of the unexpected death of Justice Scalia in the middle of the term.  But the Court endured, hearing and deciding contested legal issues surrounding immigration, standing to sue, and class certification, among others.  On September 9, 2016, following St. Thomas Law alumni panelists, each practicing in the areas directly affected by the Court's rulings, discussed the issues presented, the outcome, and the impact of the opinion:


Protecting Virtual You: Individual and Informational Privacy in the Age of Big Data

Approved for 3.25 on-demand CLE credits on October 20, 2016 (event code 229042).

View CLE here. Sign-in here.

Program Description

The Journal of Law and Public Policy hosted its Fall Symposium on September 30, 2016. The speakers and topics included:


Can Sanctuary Keep Communities Secure? Legal, Moral and Historical Considerations

Approved for 3.25 standard on-demand CLE credits (event code 218786) on April 15, 2016. View the program here. Sign-in here.

Program Description

Immigration policies impact the lives of immigrants and of those in the communities in which they live. Immigration raises many questions about the involvement of different levels of government and civil society in assisting or apprehending unauthorized immigrants. This University of St. Thomas Law Journal symposium explored what Sanctuary Cities are, how their policies affect unauthorized immigrants, and how federal statutes, state laws, and local ordinances interact on this issue. Speakers considered historical and theological foundations of providing sanctuary. Can federal immigration authorities compel local law enforcement to detain and hold persons suspected of violating immigration laws? Can local governments limit information-gathering about unauthorized immigrants? Can state legislatures overrule local sanctuary ordinances? This conversation focused on the impact of immigration policies at the federal, state and local levels.


Smartphoned - Legality of Filming the Police in Light of the First Amendment

Approved 3/28/2016 for 3.0 hours of standard on-demand CLE credit (event code 217922).

View part I of the CLE here; part II here; and, part III here. Sign-in here.

Program Description

On March 4, 2016, the Journal of Law and Public Policy hosted its symposium: Smartphoned - Legality of Filming the Police in Light of the First Amendment. The program included:

  • Jocelyn Simonson, presenting “Recording the Police as an Act of Resistance” 
  • Laurent Sacharoff, presenting “Police Body Cameras and Accountability”
  • Jeff Storms, presenting “Recording the Police: The Intersection of Evidence Preservation and First Amendment Rights” 
  • Panel discussion

Thinking Humanly, Acting Wisely

Approved 3/23/2016 for 1.5 hours of standard on-demand CLE credit (event code 217640).

View the CLE here. Sign-in here.

Program Description

On Thursday, February 11, 2016, the Terrance J. Murphy Institute for Catholic Thought, Law, and Public Policy held a symposium on Minding the Modern: Human Agency, Intellectual Traditions, and Responsible Knowledge with Pfau and St. Thomas professors: An and MacKenzie (English), Kidd (Catholic Studies), and McInroy (Theology) In recent years, the humanities have been attacked on several fronts. Humanistic study, it is claimed, is not marketable; its truths do not reduce to method; its skills cannot be measured. Yet, as Thomas Pfau suggests in Minding the Modern, perhaps the humanities can neither be sold, nor automated, nor quantified, because neither can the human being herself.  What is at stake in the humanities is our commitment to specifically human ways of thinking and acting as such. How might Pfau's argument help us think about the contemporary role of the humanities in Catholic universities like our own, in other institutions of higher learning, and in our broader political and economic order?


Hot Topics: Cool Talk -70x7 Times? On Hate Speech and Forgiveness

Approved 3/23/2016 for 1 hour of standard on-demand CLE credit (event code 217639).

View the CLE here. Sign-in here.

Program Description

Robert Kahn and Kimberly Vrudny explore legal and theological approaches to hate speech. Dr. Robert Kahn's talk centered around the work of Peter Molnar, a Hungarian activist and scholar who seeks to respond to hate speech with art, education and the punishment of speech that directly incites to violence.  Dr. Vrudny examined Jesus' directive to forgive a wrongdoer 70x7 times in the context of hate speech, drawing on insights from the theology of Desmond Tutu and South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation process.

Kimberly Vrudny is an associate professor of systematic theology at the University of St. Thomas and teaches in the areas of theology and public health, theology and the arts, and theological aesthetics.

Robert Kahn is a professor of law at the University of St. Thomas School of Law.  He holds a J.D. and a Ph.D. in Political Science.  Kahn is currently working on a book length manuscript on how history, culture and geography make a society more or less likely to punish hate speech.


Change of Heart: Making Peace with my Sister's Killer

Approved 3/23/2016 for 1 hour of standard on-demand CLE credit (event code 217638).

View the CLE here. Sign-in here.

Program Description

Jeanne Bishop has traveled an extraordinary 25-year journey that ultimately led to her corresponding and then meeting multiple times with her sister's killer. In 1990, Nancy and Richard Langert were taken captive in their home and murdered by a 16-year-old male in suburban Chicago. The juvenile was convicted and sentenced to life imprisonment without parole. In the 25 years that have followed, Nancy’s older sister, Jeanne Bishop, has traveled an extraordinary journey that ultimately led to her corresponding and then meeting multiple times with her sister's killer. She shared the story of that journey at the University of St. Thomas School of Law on Wednesday, Feb. 24.

All questions relating to the CLE content can be directed to law professor Mark Osler.


Making a Murderer - Brendan Dassey: True Story of a False Confession

On February 22, 2016, Laura Nirider, attorney for Brendan Dassey and project director at the Center on Wrongful Convictions of Youth at Northwestern University School of Law in Chicago, spoke at the University of St. Thomas School of Law. Nirider discussed Brendan Dassey's case, specifically his interrogation, and talked about juvenile false confessions.

Nirider's keynote was followed by a panel discussion on the topics of juvenile confessions, police interrogations, and juvenile justice, with the following participants:

  • Moderator, Judge Michael Browne, Hennepin County District Court
  • Laura Nirider, attorney for Brendan Dassey and project director at the Center on Wrongful Convictions of Youth at Northwestern University School of Law in Chicago
  • Julie Jonas, legal director, Minnesota Innocence Project
  • Perry Moriearty, Vaughan G. Papke clinical professor in law, University of Minnesota 
  • Pete Orput, Washington County Attorney

The Minnesota Board of Continuing Legal Education has approved this for 2.5 On-Demand Standard CLE credits (event code 215966). This on-demand CLE is available until February 9, 2018.   

Cost: $15 to watch this previously recorded CLE via webcast; $5 for St. Thomas Alumni (not law); free for St. Thomas Law alumni, students, faculty, adjuncts, mentors, and staff. Upon registration you will be sent the webcast link, access code, and sign-in information. Register here.


The Basic Mechanics of a Section 1983 8th Amendment Action

On-demand CLE event code 212625 approved for 1 hour standard CLE credit on 11/19/2015.

View the CLE here. Sign-in here. All questions relating to the CLE content can be directed to Jeff Storms, Attorney, Newmark Storms Law Office.

This CLE, presented by Jeff Storms '06, will provide a brief overview of the history of Section 1983 and the civil rights issues related to cruel and unusual punishment (i.e., prisoner abuse actions).  The course will focus on the practical mechanics of pursuing a Section 1983 action under the 8thAmendment, including: (1) identifying the party or parties to sue; (2) considerations in drafting the complaint; (3) discovery considerations; and (4) the fee petition. This event was presented live on November 11, 2015, at the law school.


Hot Topics: Cook Talk - Federal Narcotics Sentences: Too High?

On-demand CLE event code 212780 approved for 1 hour standard CLE credit on 11/24/2015.

View the CLE here.  Sign-in here.  All questions relating to the CLE content can be directed to Seanne Harris


 

Hot Topics: Cool Talk - What Should We Do About Confederate Monuments?