Amy C. Finnegan portrait

Amy C. Finnegan

Associate Professor
Office
OEC 470
Phone
(651) 962-5421
Toll Free
(800) 328-6819, Ext. 2-5421
Mail
University of St. Thomas
2115 Summit Avenue Mail # 4059
St. Paul, MN 55105-1096

Dr. Amy Finnegan is a sociologist whose teaching and research interests include social movements and social change, peace and conflict, global health, human rights, medical sociology, globalization and health policy, service learning, and African studies. She is also the co-director of SocMed, a non-profit organization that advocates for and implements global health education in the pursuit of justice and equity through immersion courses in northern Uganda and now, Haiti.

As a program officer, researcher, activist, and teacher, Finnegan has been involved in work related to Uganda for the past 13 years. She has previously taught at the University of Minnesota-Rochester, Tufts University, Boston College, and Gulu University in Gulu, Uganda. She completed her Ph.D. from Boston College in 2011, where her dissertation focused on insider and outsider activist efforts for peace in northern Uganda. She has an MA from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University and a BA in Political Science and Spanish from Washington University in St. Louis.

Finnegan succeeds Dr. Gerald W. Schlabach, Professor of Theology, who became Justice and Peace Studies program director in 2007. Schlabach led a process of strategic planning and curricular revision that transformed Justice and Peace Studies into a department in 2012. He will be on sabbatical in the coming academic year, working on a book on Catholic peace theology.

Fall 2019 Courses

Fall 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HONR 480 - 02 HONORS Social Justice Latin Am - - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 SCB 211

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

SCB 211

Course Registration Number:

41865 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Amy C. Finnegan, Sonia Rey-Montejo

These interdisciplinary seminars are intended to develop integrating insights through an analysis of topics chosen from different disciplines. Often they are taught by two faculty members or by a visiting lecturer who holds one of the endowed chairs at the university.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JPST 250 - L01 Intro to Justice & Peace - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 305

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 305

Course Registration Number:

40151 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Amy C. Finnegan

Major aspects of world and local conflict, theories of social science relating to conflict and violence, and various proposals for solutions. Among the aspects of conflict studied are cultural differences, scarcity of resources, economic and social structures, international trade, the arms race, corruption, oppression and war. Proposed solutions assessed include development, structural changes, world governance, multinational agencies, military power, civilian-based defense, active nonviolence for social change, conflict resolution, disarmament, cultural exchange, religious revival and prayer. These topics are considered in the light of theory, history, and literature. Students apply these concepts by investigating one country or geographic area in depth through a semester long research project. Usually offered every semester. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JPST 280 - W01 Active Nonviolence - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 210

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

40421 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Amy C. Finnegan

Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JPST 375 - D01 Conflict Analysis & Transform - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 305

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 305

Course Registration Number:

42792 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Amy C. Finnegan

An introduction to issues surrounding conflict and the resolution of conflict in today's world focusing primarily on its contextual manifestation at the international, regional and intrastate levels. The course will explore important structural, social and psychological explanations of conflict. Attention will be given to ethnic and nationalist themes surrounding conflicts and their resolution at the intrastate and international levels. The course will examine how different types of intervention affect conflicts (the media, force, other types of third party intervention). Effective methods that foster an environment conducive to resolving or managing disputes will be studied. As part of the final task, the course will critically study how institutions such as power-sharing arrangements, federalism, and the rule of law figure into establishing a lasting basis for peaceful co-existence. For Justice and Peace Studies majors doing a concentration in Conflict Transformation, the course will complement JPST 370 Conflict Mediation, but there are no prerequisites and the course is open to students in other majors.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JPST 473 - 01 Vocational Internship Seminar See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

40352 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Amy C. Finnegan

Students are required to take this seminar during the semester they are doing an internship of 7-10 hrs/wk. The seminar meets three times (at the beginning, middle, and end of the semester), to provide opportunities for those engaged in individual placements to get peer support for their discernment process. At its core is a reflective process designed to lead students to: a deeper understanding of the practical means of working for social change; an evaluation of their internship experience (both in terms of gaining a deeper understanding of their own vocation and a better understanding of the type of institutions they are working with); and applying these insights to future course work and career planning.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1715-190016 Sep '19
1715-190030 Sep '19
1715-190014 Oct '19
1715-190028 Oct '19
1715-190011 Nov '19

J-Term 2020 Courses

J-Term 2020 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
JPST 250 - L01 Intro to Justice & Peace - T W R F - - 0900 - 1200 OEC 313

Days of Week:

- T W R F - -

Time of Day:

0900 - 1200

Location:

OEC 313

Course Registration Number:

10183 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Amy C. Finnegan

Major aspects of world and local conflict, theories of social science relating to conflict and violence, and various proposals for solutions. Among the aspects of conflict studied are cultural differences, scarcity of resources, economic and social structures, international trade, the arms race, corruption, oppression and war. Proposed solutions assessed include development, structural changes, world governance, multinational agencies, military power, civilian-based defense, active nonviolence for social change, conflict resolution, disarmament, cultural exchange, religious revival and prayer. These topics are considered in the light of theory, history, and literature. Students apply these concepts by investigating one country or geographic area in depth through a semester long research project. Usually offered every semester. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Spring 2020 Courses

Spring 2020 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location