Shannon Scott portrait

Shannon Scott

Instructor of English
Office
JRC 316
Hours
(Fall 2018) M/W 11:00am-12:00pm; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5622
CV

Werewolves, circuses, film noir detectives, and femme fatales--these are the themes of the English courses I teach. Each class is an exploration of lives lived on the edge of a tightrope or a knife, in the shadows of a sideshow tent or the silhouette of a smoking gun. What I love about teaching these topics is that no two classes are ever the same--new experiences, new texts and films, and, most importantly, new blood.

In 2015, my article "Female Werewolf as Monstrous Other in Honoré Beaugrand's 'The Werewolves'" was published in She-Wolf: A Cultural History of Female Werewolves (U of Manchester Press).

Fall 2018 Courses

Fall 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 121 - W16 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MCH 116

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MCH 116

Course Registration Number:

40950 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Shannon F. Scott

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W06 Ringmaster: Lit of the Circus M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 MCH 106

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

MCH 106

Course Registration Number:

42696 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Shannon F. Scott

This course explores performativity, exhibition, and exploitation in the circus through a series of texts told from multiple perspectives: ringmasters, sideshow acts, animal tamers, and acrobats. Moving back and forth in time, this class examines the origins of the circus in Rome, its transformation in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in France, Britain, and America, and its triumphs and challenges in twentieth century America, particularly during the Great Depression. From non-fiction essays on carnies and famous bearded ladies, by Harry Crews and Joseph Mitchell respectively, to Toulouse-Lautrec’s depictions of the circuses of Molier and Fernando and the Nouveau Cirque, to excerpts from P.T. Barnum’s autobiography, THE ART OF GETTING MONEY, OR HINTS AND HELPS TO MAKE A FORTUNE, to guest speakers in the fields of magic and tattoo artistry, this course respects the extraordinary and redefines definitions of “normal.” Texts for the class include the collection, STEP RIGHT UP: STORIES OF CARNIVALS, SIDESHOWS, AND THE CIRCUS, which features works by Ray Bradbury, Mark Twain, Angela Carter, Flannery O’Connor, and Franz Kafka. Katherine Dunn’s GEEK LOVE and Erin Morgenstern’s THE NIGHT CIRCUS will be read in their entirety. Carol Birch's ORPHANS OF THE CARNIVAL will be examined using Helen Davies theoretical approach to "Neo-Victorian Freakery." The film adaptation of Sara Gruen’s WATER FOR ELEPHANTS will also be screened outside of class. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W08 Ringmaster: Lit of the Circus M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MCH 106

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

MCH 106

Course Registration Number:

42698 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Shannon F. Scott

This course explores performativity, exhibition, and exploitation in the circus through a series of texts told from multiple perspectives: ringmasters, sideshow acts, animal tamers, and acrobats. Moving back and forth in time, this class examines the origins of the circus in Rome, its transformation in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in France, Britain, and America, and its triumphs and challenges in twentieth century America, particularly during the Great Depression. From non-fiction essays on carnies and famous bearded ladies, by Harry Crews and Joseph Mitchell respectively, to Toulouse-Lautrec’s depictions of the circuses of Molier and Fernando and the Nouveau Cirque, to excerpts from P.T. Barnum’s autobiography, THE ART OF GETTING MONEY, OR HINTS AND HELPS TO MAKE A FORTUNE, to guest speakers in the fields of magic and tattoo artistry, this course respects the extraordinary and redefines definitions of “normal.” Texts for the class include the collection, STEP RIGHT UP: STORIES OF CARNIVALS, SIDESHOWS, AND THE CIRCUS, which features works by Ray Bradbury, Mark Twain, Angela Carter, Flannery O’Connor, and Franz Kafka. Katherine Dunn’s GEEK LOVE and Erin Morgenstern’s THE NIGHT CIRCUS will be read in their entirety. Carol Birch's ORPHANS OF THE CARNIVAL will be examined using Helen Davies theoretical approach to "Neo-Victorian Freakery." The film adaptation of Sara Gruen’s WATER FOR ELEPHANTS will also be screened outside of class. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2019 Courses

J-Term 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2019 Courses

Spring 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 203 - W14 Order Up: The Lit of Food - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22458 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Shannon F. Scott

This course explores food as a cultural metaphor, as a means to connect, create, and sustain family and tradition. It is also a venue to examine history through a culinary lens. In this class we question our assumptions about how food is grown, raised and prepared. What is organic? What is “junk”? Gourmet? Who decides? Who has access to food? Where and what are “food deserts”? There is also a community component, involving field trips to local eateries, work with BrightSide, and a drive for local food shelves. Fiction for this course may include: THE MISTRESS OF SPICES by Chitra Divakaruni, MY YEAR OF MEATS by Ruth Ozeki, Laura Esquivel’s LIKE WATER FOR CHOCOLATE, CHOP CHOP by Simon Wroe, or NUMBER ONE CHINESE RESTAURANT by Lillian Li. The texts, along with the issues discussed in class, will range from the personal to the political: from essays by Michael Pollan and Vandana Shiva, to poetic odes from THE HUNGRY EAR, to personal accounts of Julia Childs’ challenges as a female chef, to French chef Auguste Escoffier’s connection to food and war, to contemporary accusations of “food pornography” and “gluttony” leveled at The Food Network. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W16 Order Up: The Lit of Food - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22460 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Shannon F. Scott

This course explores food as a cultural metaphor, as a means to connect, create, and sustain family and tradition. It is also a venue to examine history through a culinary lens. In this class we question our assumptions about how food is grown, raised and prepared. What is organic? What is “junk”? Gourmet? Who decides? Who has access to food? Where and what are “food deserts”? There is also a community component, involving field trips to local eateries, work with BrightSide, and a drive for local food shelves. Fiction for this course may include: THE MISTRESS OF SPICES by Chitra Divakaruni, MY YEAR OF MEATS by Ruth Ozeki, Laura Esquivel’s LIKE WATER FOR CHOCOLATE, CHOP CHOP by Simon Wroe, or NUMBER ONE CHINESE RESTAURANT by Lillian Li. The texts, along with the issues discussed in class, will range from the personal to the political: from essays by Michael Pollan and Vandana Shiva, to poetic odes from THE HUNGRY EAR, to personal accounts of Julia Childs’ challenges as a female chef, to French chef Auguste Escoffier’s connection to food and war, to contemporary accusations of “food pornography” and “gluttony” leveled at The Food Network. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)