Matthew Harrison portrait

Matthew Harrison

Instructor of English
Office
JRC 351
Phone
(651) 962-5656

Ph.D. University of California-Irvine

M.F.A. University of Massachusetts-Amherst

J-Term 2019 Courses

J-Term 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2019 Courses

Spring 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 203 - W15 Museums of Stories - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OSS 127

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OSS 127

Course Registration Number:

22459 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Matthew B. Harrison

Museums are packed full with stories, and so writers have long told stories about museums, framing scenes based on the histories preserved in artifacts. In museum corridors and galleries that so often feel sacred and mysterious, writers have found inspiration for exploring how people learn to tell facts from fantasies, tricks from truths, histories from “mere” stories. The texts in this course survey the common and strange things that we collect as evidence of our values, our personalities, and our dreams. Readings will include Lawrence Weschler’s MR. WILSON’S CABINET OF WONDER; Mark Doty’s STILL LIFE WITH LEMON; Margaret Atwood’s LIFE BEFORE MAN; Thomas Bernhard’s OLD MASTERS; and selected poems by Donika Kelly, Allison Benis White, Adrienne Rich, Frank O’Hara, William Carlos Williams, Victoria Chang, and others. We’ll view at least one movie: MUSEUM HOURS (2012). The writing load for this course—a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised work—will involve both descriptive and interpretive papers about museum spaces and artifacts. Over the course of the semester, students will also construct a catalogue of images and writing that displays a story about themselves. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2019 Courses

Summer 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 203 - W05 American Haunts - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30429 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Matthew B. Harrison

Although Gothic literature began in Britain, the genre found quick purchase in the U.S., where internal battles often exposed the young republic as an ill-stitched federation of parts, a Frankenstein body politic threatening to come undone. America as an ideal has been resuscitated again and again, but the revived dream still reels with recurrent nightmares. This class will examine how the Gothic has shape-shifted over time to represent the most chronic social conflicts in the U.S.: beginning with a slave narrative, we’ll proceed through texts that portray the legacies of racism and other uneven distributions of opportunity and power. Our discussions will remain sensitive to the dividing and unifying movements that continue to influence visions of America. Readings will include Harriet Jacobs, INCIDENTS IN THE LIFE OF A SLAVE GIRL; Octavia Butler, FLEDGLING; Shirley Jackson, WE HAVE ALWAYS LIVED IN THE CASTLE; and Richard Brautigan, THE HAWKLINE MONSTER; as well as short stories by Poe, Chesnutt, Bierce, Hawthorne, Faulkner, Welty, O’Connor, Bowles, and Carol Oates. Selected essays from AFRICAN AMERICAN GOTHIC: SCREAMS FROM SHADOWED PLACES, by Maisha L. Wester and AMERICAN GOTHIC FICTION, by Allan Lloyd-Smith, will supplement our primary texts. Films may include THE ELECTRIC HOUSE (Keaton, 1922); INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS (Siegel, 1956); and GET OUT (Peele, 2017). The writing load for this fully online course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)