Laura Zebuhr portrait

Laura Zebuhr

Assistant Professor of English
Degree
Ph.D., University of Minnesota
B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University
At St. Thomas since 2015
Office
JRC 313
Hours
(Fall 2018) W 12:00-2:00pm; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5607
CV

I mostly teach and write about 19th-century American literature and am working on a project about Henry David Thoreau and the concept of enchantment. In my classes and research, I like to look at how literary, philosophical, and cultural texts from different times and places can be put in to conversation with each other.

Publications

2017.  "Sound Enchantment: The Case of Henry David Thoreau." New Literary History, vol. 48 no. 3, pp. 581-603.

2015. “The Work of Friendship in Nineteenth-Century American Friendship Album Verses.” American Literature. 87(3): 433-454.

2015. “The Voice of Ambiguity: Simone de Beauvoir’s Phenomenological and Literary
Echoes.” With Alexandra Morrison. Hypatia: a Journal of Feminist Philosophy.  30.2. 418-433.  

2015. Review of David Greven. Gender Protest and Same-Sex Desire in Antebellum American Literature. (Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2014). Review 19. www.nbol-19.org.

2012. Review of Robert Azarallo. Queer Environmentality: Ecology, Evolution, and Sexuality in American Literature. (Burlington, VT: Ashgate,  2012.) Review 19. www.nbol-19.org

2012. Review of Branka Arsićand Cary Wolfe, eds. The Other Emerson. (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2010.) Cultural Critique. 82. 189-194.

2010. “Sounding Walden.” Mosaic: a Journal for the Interdisciplinary Study of Literature. 43:3. 35-50.

Fall 2018 Courses

Fall 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 121 - W29 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 SCB 329

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

SCB 329

Course Registration Number:

41715 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Laura R. Zebuhr

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 642 - 01 Colonial American Literature M - - - - - - 1800 - 2100 OEC 210

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

42463 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Laura R. Zebuhr

In this course we'll survey various kinds of writing in the American colonies and United States from 1492 to the turn of the 19th century. Genres of writing include letters, captivity narratives, autobiography, political writing, slave narratives, fiction, and poetry. Our focus will be three-fold: the texts themselves; practices of literacy; and the historical contexts in which these texts and practices emerged. This course satisfies the pre-1900 American Literature distribution requirement and counts as one 600-level course. This course also satisfies the early British/American requirement for the new curriculum. Prerequisite: GENG 513 or permission of the instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HONR 480 - 02 HONORS The Lemonade Library - - - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 210

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MHC 210

Course Registration Number:

42319 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Laura R. Zebuhr

These interdisciplinary seminars are intended to develop integrating insights through an analysis of topics chosen from different disciplines. Often they are taught by two faculty members or by a visiting lecturer who holds one of the endowed chairs at the university.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2019 Courses

J-Term 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2019 Courses

Spring 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 280 - L01 Intro to English Studies M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 454

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

OEC 454

Course Registration Number:

21130 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Laura R. Zebuhr

This gateway course into the English major and the minor is an introduction to (a) literary tools, techniques, and terminology for reading and writing in English studies; (b) the history of English Studies as a discipline and the intellectual concepts and critical debates that have shaped the field; and (c) the practices of English Studies, from close reading and analysis of literary and critical texts to interpretation and scholarly research.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 370 - L01 Early Amr Lit:Politics/Emotion See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

21947 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Laura R. Zebuhr

Discussions of the current political climate in the United States often paint a picture of passionate, emotional, irrational, and partisan leaders of all political persuasions stoking fear and exploiting citizens' pain. The same can be said for the nation's colonial and founding periods. Taking a transnational approach, this course examines the role of feeling in the earliest literature written in and about the "new world." Our basic premise will be that the so-called intimate sphere of "feeling" is not distinct from power relations; rather, power and feeling are inextricable. Our readings--ranging from captivity narratives to novels to political documents--will show that writers and speakers in the 15th-18th centuries claimed that strong feeling was both essential to democracy and dangerous to it. We will consider who was thought to have the ability to access and express strong feelings, what kinds of emotions were considered appropriate to express, as well as how people represented their strongest feelings. We will also consider how these feelings related to sexual practices and the production of differently desiring and racialized subjectivities. As a hybrid course, this class will meet on Mondays and Wednesdays in person. Fridays' credit hours are conducted remotely and dedicated to research that will build toward a multimedia storytelling final project. This course fulfills both the Contexts and Convergences and the Early American Literature requirements in the English major. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 4541215-1320M - W - - - -
-- - - - - - -
GENG 699 - 01 Master's Project - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21833 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Laura R. Zebuhr

The capstone for graduate programs in English is the Master's Project course. For the MA in English, students complete an essay that provides an opportunity for lengthy reflection about selected works or authors. The purpose is to give students a final opportunity to develop an area of expertise while they refine their writing, revising, and editing skills. For the MA in Creative Writing and Publishing, students complete a chapbook-length portfolio of 40-50 pages such as a collection of poetry, literary fiction, young adult fiction or creative nonfiction. In either program, students will present their project to a review committee of a faculty advisor and two additional faculty readers and should demonstrate a high level of cogency and stylistic grace. The Master's Project (GENG 699) is its own course with its own unique registration and counts for 3 credits towards the Master of Arts in English of Master of Arts in Creative Writing and Publishing degree.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)