Catherine Craft-Fairchild  portrait

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

Professor of English
Degree
M.A., Ph.D., University of Rochester
B.A., Canisius College
At St. Thomas since 1989
Office
JRC 319
Hours
(Fall 2018) M/W/F 12:30-1:30pm; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5614
CV

I really enjoy learning with and from my students, so I teach an eclectic range of courses that allow me to explore new areas and share my interests with others. Although my primary specialty is 18th-century British literature, I also teach women's studies, literature and film, Jewish literature, and most recently, a transatlantic course that combines British and American literature. My current research centers on the writing of Anglo-Irish novelist and educational reformer Maria Edgeworth, while earlier research focused on 18th- and 19th-century women writers more generally, with particular reference to the image and experience of masquerade.

Fall 2018 Courses

Fall 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 202 - W01 Literature and Medicine M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 212

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

42526 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

Viewing physicians as writers, thinkers, and practitioners, we'll study texts that offer reflections from doctors on their craft. We'll also explore historical, economic, political, and ethical questions related to medical care such as: how are illness and caregiving depicted in literary texts? What kinds of emotional and social costs does illness have? How do writers grapple with the moral dimensions of medicine? These and other questions will be addressed through close textual analysis and discussion; in addition, our course will draw upon the expertise of practitioners within the Minneapolis medical community. Readings may include Jane Austen's MANSFIELD PARK, Sarah Ruhl's IN THE NEXT ROOM, Margaret Edson's WIT, Atul Gawande's COMPLICATIONS, and Mark Doty's HEAVEN'S COAST. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W02 Literature and Medicine M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 212

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

42527 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

Viewing physicians as writers, thinkers, and practitioners, we'll study texts that offer reflections from doctors on their craft. We'll also explore historical, economic, political, and ethical questions related to medical care such as: how are illness and caregiving depicted in literary texts? What kinds of emotional and social costs does illness have? How do writers grapple with the moral dimensions of medicine? These and other questions will be addressed through close textual analysis and discussion; in addition, our course will draw upon the expertise of practitioners within the Minneapolis medical community. Readings may include Jane Austen's MANSFIELD PARK, Sarah Ruhl's IN THE NEXT ROOM, Margaret Edson's WIT, Atul Gawande's COMPLICATIONS, and Mark Doty's HEAVEN'S COAST. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2019 Courses

J-Term 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 297U - AL2 Literary Passports: FR, IT, EP - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10181 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild, Heather M. Bouwman

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Spring 2019 Courses

Spring 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 212 - L01 British Authors II M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21129 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

How has the category of “English literature” expanded as a result of global changes over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries? How have authors responded to fundamental upheavals in the individual, religion, the British Empire, the role of women, and the value of poetry and art? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings in the British literary tradition from approximately 1789 to the present. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as revolution and reform, authorship, war, nationality and race, and the relationships between literature and other arts. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 573 - 01 Between Worlds: Racial Divide - T - - - - - 1800 - 2100

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21949 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

This course will explore the history of women’s writing about miscegenation and its consequences for women’s lives in the United States. Before the Civil War, “tragic mulatta” tales like Lydia Maria Child’s “The Quadroons” and Dion Boucicault’s popular play The Octoroon invoked sympathy for female characters born in mixed-race unions who are raised as affluent white women only to discover, on their father’s death, that they are legally black by the “one drop” rule and will be sold as slaves. Like the parading of near-white slaves at rallies, these narratives were used in the service of enlisting white support for abolition. Yet more sophisticated texts, like Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, and Child’s Romance of the Republic worked changes on the “tragic mulatta” tale that allowed these writers to grapple with complex questions of racial identity raised by the highly charged subject positions of mixed-race persons in antebellum society. Obviously, the racial rift in America did not disappear with the ending of slavery; twentieth century writers continued to interrogate issues of identity formation, civil rights, women’s rights, and relational and familial dynamics using the liminal position of the mixed-race woman to define both problems and triumphs. We’ll explore the no-win situations created by Nella Larsen in Quicksand and Passing and the somewhat more hopeful explorations of race offered by current authors like Gloria Naylor (Mama Day) and Natasha Trethewey (Bellotcq’s Ophelia), along with a selection from the compelling body of historical and literary criticism on miscegenation.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)