Amy Muse  portrait

Amy Muse

Associate Professor of English
Degree
Ph.D., Auburn University
M.A., Washington University (St. Louis)
B.A., University of Akron
At St. Thomas since 2001
Office
JRC 334
Phone
(651) 962-5643
CV

 

I am a drama specialist; in both teaching and research I’m interested in dramatic literature, performance theory, and theatre history. My current project is a book about the playwright Sarah Ruhl (The Drama and Theatre of Sarah Ruhl for Bloomsbury/Methuen Drama) and theatre as a space for experiencing intimacy. I’ve also published essays on female Hamlets, theatre of the invisible-made-visible, plays about the 1820s revolution in Greece, and experiencing grief vicariously in the theatre, and I encourage personally-engaged, historically-rooted, idiosyncratic essay writing in my courses. On campus you can usually find me teaching Shakespeare and other courses on drama, performance & social change, British Romanticism, the classical tradition, literary criticism, and essay writing, and I also teach study abroad courses in Greece.

 

Summer 2018 Courses

Summer 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 698 - 02 Independent Reading - - - - - - - -

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Time of Day:

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Location:

Course Registration Number:

30686 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Amy M. Muse

Students will work closely with a faculty mentor on independent research. This research will involve substantial individualized reading, writing, and research.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Fall 2018 Courses

Fall 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 337 - A01 Thirteen Ways Looking at Rome - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

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Time of Day:

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Location:

Course Registration Number:

43275 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Amy M. Muse

This course provides an in-depth exploration of literatures that focus intensively on topics related to race, ethnicity, nation, class, gender, and/or sexual orientation. It examines questions related to how these literatures fit in “the canon” and how they speak to or inform each other, which critical approaches are relevant for studying these literatures, how issues of power and privilege are connected to our understanding of these literatures, and what provocations and concerns emerge from the study of these literatures. Specific topics vary; accordingly, credit may be earned more than once for this course number. This course fulfills the Contexts and Convergences requirement in the English major, and the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2019 Courses

J-Term 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location