Upcoming Terms

The following honors sections will be offered in future terms:

J-Term 2018 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2018 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HIST 114 - W41 Honors Mod Us/Global Perspect M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MCH 232

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MCH 232

Course Registration Number:

20134 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David C. Williard

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MATH 114 - 41 HONORS Calculus II M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OSS 230

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OSS 230

Course Registration Number:

20695 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Douglas P. Dokken

Techniques of integration; applications of integration; infinite series; parametric/polar equations. Offered Fall, Spring and Summer. Prerequisite: a grade of C- or above in MATH 112 or in MATH 113 or MATH 109

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 214 - 40 HONORS: Introductory Ethics M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 MCH 115

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

MCH 115

Course Registration Number:

20243 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher H. Toner

An inquiry into the rational foundations and methods of ethics, with attention to the application of ethical principles to areas of personal conduct, institutional behavior and public policy, and diversity within and across cultures. This course, with PHIL 115, fulfills the Moral and Philosophical Reasoning requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: PHIL 115 NOTE: Students who receive credit for PHIL 214 may not receive credit for PHIL 215.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 325 - L41 HONORS Catholic Social Trad M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 201

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

JRC 201

Course Registration Number:

21659 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Bernard V. Brady

This course examines Catholic reflection on social structures and patterns of moral behavior as they are expressed in economic, social and political contexts. Focus topics might include: social virtues, the role of religion in the public realm, understanding of the person in relation to society and the state, the defense of the dignity of the person, the promotion of the common good, the use of force and the meaning of justice within and between communities. Possible sources for this course might include selections from classic biblical, patristic and medieval texts; papal, conciliar and episcopal documents; writings of modern and contemporary Catholic social theorists; and social movements inspired by the tradition. Prerequisite: THEO 101

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 462 - W41 HONOR Theo & Lit - C.S. Lewis - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MHC 211

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

21684 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Philip A. Rolnick

This is a Bridge Course whose readings will focus primarily on C.S. Lewis's literary works, especially, but not exclusively, on his fiction. The course will also include some critical works, both Lewis's as well as others' work about Lewis. In addition, numerous biblical passages will be examined, including the parables of Jesus, which, as a parallel to Lewis's work, can demonstrate the theological possibility of narrative. Class lectures and readings in and about Lewis will explore Christian theology and its interdisciplinary relations to literature, especially myth. Through the lens of Lewis's literature, historical, philosophical, moral, educational, and global issues will be considered. Prerequisite: THEO 101 and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course and PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)