I stumbled across an interesting piece in Forbes.com titled “Trying to Create A Well-Rounded M.B.A.” The basic premise of the article is that MBAs who want to be real leaders need skills beyond just the more “technical” skills taught in traditional MBA curriculums. Author Matt Symonds purports that schools outside the US tend to be more innovative and doing a better job with blending philosophy, arts and sciences, and business to create more well-rounded graduates who are better able to focus on the broad big-picture rather than being always caught up in the day-to-day decisions.   Prospective UST MBA students I meet with seem to support this “Renaissance MBA” idea, as many share that they appreciate the chance to take six electives and make their MBA degree their own, whether it be “soft skill” courses or specialized topics in engineering, leadership, or health care.