Erika Scheurer  
 portrait

Erika Scheurer

Associate Professor of English / Director of Writing Across the Curriculum Program
Degree
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts (Amherst)
M.A., University of Delaware
B.A., College of Notre Dame (Maryland)
At St. Thomas since 1993
Office
JRC 347
Hours
(Fall 2016) By Appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5669
CV

My research interests include writing theory and pedagogy as well as the work of the poet Emily Dickinson. I regularly teach ENGL 110 Intensive Writing, a course in the Academic Development Program, as well as upper-level writing and writing theory/pedagogy courses. On the literary side, I teach a Dickinson seminar at the graduate level and, with Dr. Sherry Jordon (theology), co-teach the theology bridge course, Grappling with God: Theology and Literature. Since 2009 I have directed the Writing Across the Curriculum program, a university-wide initiative to nurture a culture of writing across all academic disciplines.

Fall 2016 Courses

Fall 2016 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 110 - PW2 Intensive Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 301
CRN: 40097 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Erika C. Scheurer The course provides students with intensive practice in writing, enabling them to adapt to the demands of differing rhetorical contexts. Emphasis on understanding writing processes and learning to respond thoughtfully to writing at various stages. Critical reading will be practiced as an integral part of the writing process. Prerequisite: participation in the Academic Development Program

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2017 Courses

J-Term 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2017 Courses

Spring 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 647 - 01 Emily Dickinson in Context - T - - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481
CRN: 21867 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Erika C. Scheurer In this seminar we will focus on the poetry, letters, and life of Emily Dickinson in their cultural context and in the context of contemporary critical theory. Throughout the semester, we will work on close, critical readings of Dickinson's poems and letters. As we do so, we will study topics such as the following: what is currently known of her life, as distinguished from popular myth; 19th-century Amherst and New England history and culture; the publishing history and reception of her work; her female poet contemporaries; different critical approaches to her poems (including feminist, psychological, Marxist, post-structuralist, cultural); and the implications of various poetic, artistic, musical, and dramatic interpretations of her life and work. In addition to preparing a traditional seminar paper for academic audiences, participants will bring Dickinson to the general public by helping to host and prepare displays for the April 2016 marathon reading of all Dickinson’s poems. This course satisfies the pre- 1900 American Literature distribution requirement and counts as a 600-level seminar. Prerequisite: ENGL 513 or permission of the instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)