Emily James  portrait

Emily James

Assistant Professor of English
Degree
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Washington
At St. Thomas since 2012
Office
JRC 322
Hours
(Fall 2014) T 5:00-7:00pm; after class; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5608

I focus on modernism and especially the work of English and Irish writers in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In both my teaching and research, I consider literature’s intersections with historical and cultural currents. My interest in modernism also extends across the arts, from poetry and visual art to dance and music. The complexities and challenges of writing have always fascinated me, so my current research project concerns composition and modernism, especially in the work of George Bernard Shaw, Virginia Woolf, and Aldous Huxley. These writers imagined material and physical histories of words—through speech, handwriting, and typewriting—in order to uncover the labor behind the composition process and highlight writing’s strain on the body.

Fall 2014 Courses

Fall 2014 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 202 - 02 Visual Literacy - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 211
CRN: 42359 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Emily M. James In this course, we will explore the rich intersections between image and text across the twentieth century. Working from a critical framework of readings about the visual, we will apply certain key terms and concepts--from ekphrasis to punctum--to graphic novels, photo-essays, and stories and novels about visual artists. As a class, we will practice close-reading both images and literary texts, collaboratively developing a set of analytical strategies and practices along the way. This course will also involve visits to local museums, galleries, and exhibits. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - 03 Visual Literacy - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 211
CRN: 42389 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Emily M. James In this course, we will explore the rich intersections between image and text across the twentieth century. Working from a critical framework of readings about the visual, we will apply certain key terms and concepts-- from ekphrasis to punctum--to graphic novels, photo-essays, and stories and novels about visual artists. As a class, we will practice close-reading both images and literary texts, collaboratively developing a set of analytical strategies and practices along the way. The course will also involve visits to local museums, galleries, and exhibits. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 450 - 01 James Joyce and Company - - - R - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481
CRN: 43216 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Emily M. James This advanced course will focus on a closely defined group of literary and critical texts. Students will be asked to synthesize as they read and write, using extensive critical analysis to integrate their experience of literary texts with relevant critical insights and ongoing scholarship. Students will also be expected to take part in and lead discussion, and to write a substantial critical essay. Prerequisites: 5 courses beyond the ENGL 100 level including ENGL 380. Open to limited graduate student enrollment by permission of instructor and the graduate program director.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 637 - 01 James Joyce and Company - - - R - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481
CRN: 42368 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Emily M. James The writings of Irish writer James Joyce have enchanted, bewildered, and offended readers for over a century. We will begin with the 1914 short story collection DUBLINERS (pausing to celebrate its centennial!) and proceed to the 1922 novel ULYSSES--"a book to which we are all indebted," in the words of fellow modernist T. S. Eliot, "and from which none of us can escape." We will take our time here, exploring the novel's thorny publication history and coupling its episodes with current critical perspectives. Next, we turn to selections of FINNEGANS WAKE (1939) for equal parts amusement and challenge. As the course title promises, our readings will include selections of poetry, fiction, music, and art that either inspired or echoed Joyce's work. Along the way, we will survey Joycean criticism in preparation for the seminar's final essay assignment. The course will likely include a guest speaker and a visit to UST's Celtic Collection. This course counts as a 600-level elective. Prerequisite: GENG 513.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 699 - 01 Master's Essay - - - - - - - -
CRN: 41259 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Emily M. James

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2015 Courses

J-Term 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2015 Courses

Spring 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 202 - 05 Medical Narratives M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 202
CRN: 21846 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Emily M. James In this course, we will examine literary narratives about health and illness, considering the body's role in what Susan Sontag describes as the "punitive and sentimental fantasies concocted" about illness. Alongside selected critical accounts of medicine and illness, we will focus our time on writing by George Eliot, Virginia Woolf, Kazuo Ishiguro, Ian McEwan, and others. Alongside these literary texts, we may also examine selected historical case studies: hysteria, tuberculosis, neurasthenia, HIV/AIDS, and others. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - 06 Medical Narratives M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MHC 202
CRN: 21822 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Emily M. James In this course, we will examine literary narratives about health and illness, considering the body's role in what Susan Sontag describes as the "punitive and sentimental fantasies concocted" about illness. Alongside selected critical accounts of medicine and illness, we will focus our time on writing by George Eliot, Virginia Woolf, Kazuo Ishiguro, Ian McEwan, and others. Alongside these literary texts, we may also examine selected historical case studies: hysteria, tuberculosis, neurasthenia, HIV/AIDS, and others. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 481 - 01 Sem: Rewriting Virginia Woolf M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 222
CRN: 20106 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Emily M. James In this course, we will read key works by English novelist and essayist Virginia Woolf alongside contemporary reactions to her work by writers Alice Walker, Ian McEwan, and Michael Cunningham; film-makers Sally Potter and Stephen Daldry; as well as contemporary visual artists and composers. Prerequisite: Completion of five English courses at or beyond ENGL 211, including ENGL 380; or, for non-majors, permission of the instructor and the department chair.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)