Sarah Baxter portrait

Sarah Baxter

Professor
Degree
Ph.D. University of Virginia
Office
OSS 324
Hours
By appointment
Phone
651-962-5507
Mail
School of Engineering
Mail Stop OSS 100
2115 Summit Ave.
St. Paul MN 55105
CV

Education

Ph.D. University of Virginia, Applied Mathematics
M.S. University of Minnesota, Duluth, Applied and Computation Mathematics

Professional Experience 

Professor, University of South Carolina, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2013-2014.
Associate Professor, USC, Department of Mechanical Engineering, USC, 2003-2013.
Assistant Professor, USC, Department of Mechanical Engineering, USC, 1997-2003.
Postdoctoral Research, University of Virginia, Applied Mechanics, 1995-1997.
Scientist, National Institute of Standards and Technology, MD, 1993.
Member of the Technical Staff, The Aerospace Corporation, CA, 1991.

Honors and Awards

NSF Career Proposal -- National Science Foundation, 1999.
Mungo Undergraduate Teaching Award -- University of South Carolina, 2014.

Research Interests

Dr. Baxter’s  research has focused on developing novel applications of mathematical and mechanics models. The majority of these models have focused on understanding the mechanics of heterogeneous materials through probabilistic/stochastic approaches. These include (1) an approach for predicting the properties of heterogeneous materials that merges homogenization schemes, which provide effective properties of a material with a random microstructure medium, and probabilistic methods, which describe variations in properties as a result of this randomness, and most recently, (2) an approach to modeling the effective properties of nanoscale composites that includes capturing the effects of scale including nondeterministic effects such as percolation and clustering.  New work is in exploring probabilistic models of dynamic control systems for structural control.

She has also developed several significant interdisciplinary collaborations, most notably modeling binding site affinity distributions in molecularly imprinted polymers and developing a novel approach to tracking mechanical activity of cells in soft tissue using light scattered from gold nano-rods as a tracking pattern.

Spring 2017 Courses

Spring 2017 Courses
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Summer 2017 Courses

Summer 2017 Courses
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Fall 2017 Courses

Fall 2017 Courses
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