Cultural Adaptation: Finding Common Ground Between Western Mental Health Interventions and Cultural Contexts

2020 AEIR Event March 17. Cultural Adaptation: Finding Common Ground Between Western Mental Health Interventions and Cultural Contexts

Learn from bi-cultural providers about how they adapt mental health interventions across language and culture to be effective with non-Western clients. Hosted by the AEIR Scholars.

Date & Time:

Tuesday, March 17, 2020
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Registration:

Admission:

Free We have reopened the registration form. If you registered for the waitlist, you will be added to the registration list. There is no need to re-register.

Location:

University of St. Thomas, McNeely Hall, MCH 100. 2060 Summit Ave., St. Paul, MN 55105

Parking & Check-in

Parking is available in the Anderson Parking Facility (#71 on the map) for $2/hour. NOTE: Most street parking around campus has a two-hour limit. Please do not park in the permitted lots behind McNeely Hall or Summit Classroom Building - you may be ticketed.

Check-in will begin at 1:45 pm and refreshments will be available.

The MSW Area of Emphasis in Practice with Immigrants and Refugees (AEIR) scholars are honored to host this event, which will feature 3 speakers from different cultural communities, including Hmong, Somali and Karen perspectives. Our goal is to learn from bi-cultural providers about how they adapt mental health interventions across language and culture to be effective with non-Western clients.

Presentations will be followed by a facilitated panel discussion and opportunities for Q&A from the audience.

Certificates of attendance for 2 continuing education contact hours will be provided.

Presenters:

Photo of AEIR Panelist Pahoua Yang

Pahoua Yang, MSSW, PhD, LICSW, LP, Vice President, Community Mental Health and Wellness at Wilder Foundation

Pahoua Yang is the Vice President of Community Mental Health & Wellness at the Amherst H. Wilder Foundation in St. Paul. As a clinician, she has immense experience with diverse client populations in multiple settings. Pahoua has served on a number of national and statewide committees and task forces aimed at advancing health equity. She is a past recipient of the University of Minnesota’s Polaris Award for Health and Human Services, was the 2014 National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) of Minnesota Professional of the Year, and serves on the board of the Minnesota Association of Community Mental Health Programs. Pahoua holds a Master of Science in Social Work from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a doctorate in Educational Psychology (counseling) from the University of Minnesota. In her spare time, she enjoys being with her family and her Kindle. 

AEIR Panelist Ahmed Hassan

Ahmed Hassan, MA, Psychotherapist/Program Director at Summit Guidance Center

Ahmed Hassan, M.A., LPCC, is a bilingual bicultural therapist and program director at Summit Guidance. He received his master’s degree from St Mary’s University of Minnesota. Summit Guidance, started by Ahmed in 2010, offers a variety of services, including psychotherapy, assessment, CTSS, ARMHS (adult rehabilitation mental health services), and school-based mental health services. Ahmed has worked with immigrants and refugees' clients at Community University Healthcare Center as mental health practitioner. He currently provides consultation to mental health providers and agencies that are working with East African clients. Ahmed has been a co-facilitator of the Imam training project run by Fairview foundations for the past two years. 

AEIR Panelist, Nova Josiah Isaac

Novia Josiah-Isaac, '18 MSW and AEIR scholar, CVT (The Center for Victims of Torture)

Novia Josiah-Isaac is a social worker /mental health case manager at The Center for Victims of Torture. She provides targeted case management services to refugees in primary care clinics through the Healing Hearts program. She has a variety of professional experiences working with diverse populations, ranging from community level interventions, facilitating groups and providing individual psychotherapy. She has developed specialized skills from working with individuals and families affected by domestic violence. She provides trainings to providers on best practices in working with refugees and immigrants. She has a Master of Social Work from St. Catherine University/University of St. Thomas and a Bachelor’s degree in Social Work with Family Studies concentration from St. Olaf College. She is a bicultural Licensed Graduate Social worker (LGSW) offering culturally responsive therapy in Karen and English to refugee adults. She is also fluent in Thai and conversational in Burmese. 

To make an accessibility request, call Disability Resources at (651) 962-6315.

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