Into the world of hospital ethics - Dr. Paul Wojda

February 23, 2018
The course invites students to engage these issues and questions by immersing themselves (virtually) in the world and work of actual hospital ethics committees.

A native of Buffalo, NY, Dr. Wojda received his B.A. in Government/Political Theory from the University of Notre Dame in 1984. He then studied Religious Ethics at Yale University Divinity School, graduating with an M.A.R. degree, cum laude, in 1987. He returned to Notre Dame, where he studied under the late Richard A. McCormick, S.J., receiving his Ph.D. in moral theology in 1993. Since 1992 Dr. Wojda has taught in the Theology Department at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, MN. Dr. Wojda’s area of academic interest and specialization is Catholic health care ethics. He has served as chair of the St. Paul/Minneapolis Archdiocesan Biomedical Ethics Committee; member of the Perinatal Biomedical Ethics Committee at Hennepin County Medical Center; and consultant for Catholic Health Initiatives, one of the largest Catholic health care services in the United States. He currently assists the Veritas Institute (UST Opus College of Business) in its work helping Catholic health care systems assess their mission as Catholic institutions.  Dr. Wojda’s publications have appeared in a wide variety of professional and popular books and journals. He is currently working on an introductory text on the development of Catholic health care ethics in the United States. Dr. Wojda lives in St. Paul, MN with his wife, Keely Bishop Wojda, who teaches theology at DeLasalle High School in Minneapolis. They have five children.

 

THEO420 Theology & the Biomedical Revolution examines the origins and development of the “bioethics movement” from its beginnings in the immediate post-World War II era to the present. It is generally forgotten today that Christian theological voices were instrumental in bringing “bioethics” to birth in the 1950s and 60s. The course looks at a range of issues in contemporary bioethics, from the beginning-of-life to the end-of-life, asking what difference a Christian theological perspective makes to how such bioethical issues are framed, as well as how the Christian theological tradition might provide resources for our necessarily common search for bioethical wisdom. The course invites students to engage these issues and questions by immersing themselves (virtually) in the world and work of actual hospital ethics committees.