Course Offerings

Employing different disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives, SMDS coursework invites and equips students to examine what science, medicine, and healthcare is, can, or should be.

Information about the requirements of the minor is found here.

Fall 2017 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
BIOL 106 - 01 Women, Medicine and Biology M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MHC 201

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

MHC 201

Course Registration Number:

42492 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Dayius L. Turvold Celotta

This course addresses issues of biology from the perspective of women. The focus of the course will be to learn basic principles of biology in areas such as anatomy, physiology, genetics, cell biology, and microbiology in the context of issues relevant to women and women's health. Two laboratory hours per week. Not open to Biology majors or students who have completed BIOL 101 or BIOL 105.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 106 - 51 Women and Biology /Lab - - - R - - - 1535 - 1735 OWS 266

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1535 - 1735

Location:

OWS 266

Course Registration Number:

42493 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Dayius L. Turvold Celotta

This course addresses issues of biology from the perspective of women. The focus of the course will be to learn basic principles of biology in areas such as anatomy, physiology, genetics, cell biology, and microbiology in the context of issues relevant to women and women's health. Two laboratory hours per week. Not open to Biology majors or students who have completed BIOL 101 or BIOL 105.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 106 - 52 Women and Biology / Lab - - - R - - - 1745 - 1945 OWS 266

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1745 - 1945

Location:

OWS 266

Course Registration Number:

42494 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Dayius L. Turvold Celotta

This course addresses issues of biology from the perspective of women. The focus of the course will be to learn basic principles of biology in areas such as anatomy, physiology, genetics, cell biology, and microbiology in the context of issues relevant to women and women's health. Two laboratory hours per week. Not open to Biology majors or students who have completed BIOL 101 or BIOL 105.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W03 Literature Inspired by Science M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 JRC 301

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

42461 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Leslie A. Miller

Writers have long looked to the sciences for fresh metaphors, innovative structures, and conceptual models. In this course we will read fiction, poetry, and drama inspired by the sciences and explore how writers build on scientific models and methods to bring new vision to ideas about space, time, matter, and being. Texts may include THE ECOPOETRY ANTHOLOGY, Andrea Barrett's ARCHANGEL, BEST AMERICAN SCIENCE AND NATURE WRITING, Italo Calvino's COSMICOMICS, Tracy K. Smith's LIFE ON MARS, Mary Shelley's FRANKENSTEIN, and Anne Patchett's STATE OF WONDER. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W05 Medical Narratives M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 212

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

42463 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Emily M. James

As novelist and essayist Virginia Woolf once observed, it is "strange indeed that illness has not taken its place with love and battle and jealousy among the prime themes of literature." As we read and discuss literary narratives about health and illness, we may also explore historical and contemporary conversations about health and illness, with topics including hysteria, syphilis, tuberculosis, neurasthenia, cancer, HIV/AIDS, and vaccine controversies. Along the way, we will consider literature's role in what Susan Sontag once described as the "punitive and sentimental fantasies concocted" about illness. Key writers may include Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Sylvia Plath, Kazuo Ishiguro, Leslie Jamison, Ian McEwan, Atul Gawande, and Paul Kalanithi. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W01 Final Frontier: Mars & Beyond M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 311

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

OEC 311

Course Registration Number:

42544 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher J. Hassel

How do global politics influence our desire to explore space? How does space exploration impact our theological viewpoints of the universe? What roles might nation-states and corporations play in future space endeavors? Focusing on the human yearning to explore space, as well as current efforts to put humans on Mars in the near future, this class will attempt to answer these questions by examining a variety of literary forms including fiction, science fiction, poetry, nonfiction prose, and biography. Likely works to be studied include Tracy K. Smith’s LIFE ON MARS, Mary Doria Russell’s THE SPARROW, and Andy Weir's THE MARTIAN. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W02 Final Frontier: Mars & Beyond M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 311

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OEC 311

Course Registration Number:

42545 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher J. Hassel

How do global politics influence our desire to explore space? How does space exploration impact our theological viewpoints of the universe? What roles might nation-states and corporations play in future space endeavors? Focusing on the human yearning to explore space, as well as current efforts to put humans on Mars in the near future, this class will attempt to answer these questions by examining a variety of literary forms including fiction, science fiction, poetry, nonfiction prose, and biography. Likely works to be studied include Tracy K. Smith’s LIFE ON MARS, Mary Doria Russell’s THE SPARROW, and Andy Weir's THE MARTIAN. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOG 350 - 01 Geography of Global Health - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 426

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 426

Course Registration Number:

42575 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paul A. Lorah

This class introduces students to the concepts, theories and research techniques used by medical geographers. We study the underlying environmental, cultural and demographic processes that shape the distribution and spread of disease in an effort to achieve a deeper understanding of the factors influencing human health. Much of the semester is spent using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to help community partners analyze and address health care challenges in the Twin Cities.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 354 - 01 Biomedical Ethics - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 SCB 104

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

SCB 104

Course Registration Number:

42648 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heidi M. Giebel

An investigation of ethical problems in medicine and biological technology. Possible topics include: genetic engineering, experimentation with human subjects, the right to health care, and the concept of mental illness. Prerequisite: PHIL 214 or 215

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 121 - 01 Social Psychology - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC LL62

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC LL62

Course Registration Number:

40258 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

John M. Tauer

This is an introduction to the field of social psychology, which examines how an individual's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by the social context. The course covers such topics as conformity, persuasion, stereotypes and prejudice, love and relationships, helping behavior and altruism, aggression, the self-concept, and group dynamics. Prerequisite: PSYC 111

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 151 - 01 Cross-Cultural Psychology M - W - - - - 1730 - 1915 MHC 201

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

MHC 201

Course Registration Number:

40620 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ryan H. Bremner

This course is designed to cover the issues and themes current in the field of cross-cultural psychology. Examples of such issues include: cultural variation along the lines of collectivism and individualism; psychological principles that might be universal compared to those that are culturally specific; how content and context affect psychological functioning, and variation within as well as between cultures. A range of substantive areas within psychology will be examined, including social, developmental, organizational, cognitive, health psychology, and psychology of emotion. Examples will be drawn from a range of non-Western cultures (e.g., Japan, India, Liberia) as well as various cultures within the United States (e.g., African-American, Hispanic, American Indian). Emphasis will be placed on how Western and non-Western cultures differ from each other, on how non-Western cultures differ from each other, and on how intra-cultural variation also plays important roles in psychological functioning. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: PSYC 111

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 207 - 01 Drugs & Behavior M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC LL01

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC LL01

Course Registration Number:

40262 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jessica A. Siegel

The course surveys some basic facts and principles of administration, absorption, transport, action, deactivation and elimination of drugs. Various classes of drugs; their effects on mood, behavior, and consciousness; their use and misuse; and phenomena of chemical dependency and its treatment modalities are discussed. Lectures, readings, films, tapes and invited speakers are employed. Prerequisite: PSYC 111

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 301 - 01 Psychopathology - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 JRC LL01

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

JRC LL01

Course Registration Number:

40267 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jean E. Giebenhain

This course sets forth a framework for understanding abnormal or maladaptive behavior. It will investigate specific diagnostic categories (such as depression and schizophrenia), causal factors and treatments of these maladaptive patterns. Prerequisites: PSYC 111 and junior standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 301 - 02 Psychopathology - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC LL01

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC LL01

Course Registration Number:

40266 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jean E. Giebenhain

This course sets forth a framework for understanding abnormal or maladaptive behavior. It will investigate specific diagnostic categories (such as depression and schizophrenia), causal factors and treatments of these maladaptive patterns. Prerequisites: PSYC 111 and junior standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 365 - 01 Health Psychology M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC LL21

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

JRC LL21

Course Registration Number:

42748 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jennifer R. Prichard

This survey course will examine the contributions of psychological research to the understanding, prevention, and treatment of a variety of health concerns. This course will employ a biopsychosocial model, which means that we will study how social, emotional, behavioral, biological, and spiritual factors influence health. The specific topics include injury, stress, pain management, additions, sleep, patient-physician relations, and chronic illnesses such as Alzheimer's, diabetes, and AIDS. Prerequisite: PSYC 111

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOCI 100 - L04 Intro to Sociology - HEALTH - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 310

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 310

Course Registration Number:

41915 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy C. Finnegan

Introduction to the concepts, theories, methods and applications of the scientific study of society and social concerns. Enables students to understand the connections between the individual and larger social and cultural forces. Heightens awareness of the diversity of American and other societies. This course fulfills the Social Analysis and Human Diversity requirements in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 420 - L01 Theology & Biomedical Revol - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 JRC 247

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

JRC 247

Course Registration Number:

41717 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paul J. Wojda

This course examines the contributions of Christian faith to reflecting upon, understanding, and resolving issues and ethical questions raised by revolutionary developments in the life sciences, e.g. innovation birth technologies, genetic manipulation and control, human experimentation, the prolonging of life and allocation of scarce medical resources. Prerequisite: THEO 101 and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course and PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 420 - L02 Theology & Biomedical Revol M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 SCB 104

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

SCB 104

Course Registration Number:

43489 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paul J. Wojda

This course examines the contributions of Christian faith to reflecting upon, understanding, and resolving issues and ethical questions raised by revolutionary developments in the life sciences, e.g. innovation birth technologies, genetic manipulation and control, human experimentation, the prolonging of life and allocation of scarce medical resources. Prerequisite: THEO 101 and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course and PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 434 - 01 Science & Christian Theo - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 201

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MHC 201

Course Registration Number:

43025 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Philip A. Rolnick

This course is an introduction to the interrelationship between Christian theology (the understanding of the Christian faith), and the natural sciences. It explores the relationship between scientific and theological methods and modes of knowledge, and considers some of the central topics of Christian theology - God, creation, providence, resurrections, and afterlife - in the light of modern scientific evidence and theories. Prerequisite: THEO 101 and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course and PHIL 115 and one Science course

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2018 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
BIOL 106 - 1 Women, Medicine and Biology - T W R F - - 1000 - 1200 OWS 275

Days of Week:

- T W R F - -

Time of Day:

1000 - 1200

Location:

OWS 275

Course Registration Number:

10095 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Dayius L. Turvold Celotta

This course addresses issues of biology from the perspective of women. The focus of the course will be to learn basic principles of biology in areas such as anatomy, physiology, genetics, cell biology, and microbiology in the context of issues relevant to women and women's health. Two laboratory hours per week. Not open to Biology majors or students who have completed BIOL 101 or BIOL 105.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 106 - 51 Women/Medicine & Biology/ Lab - T W R F - - 1205 - 1605 OWS 266

Days of Week:

- T W R F - -

Time of Day:

1205 - 1605

Location:

OWS 266

Course Registration Number:

10096 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Dayius L. Turvold Celotta

This course addresses issues of biology from the perspective of women. The focus of the course will be to learn basic principles of biology in areas such as anatomy, physiology, genetics, cell biology, and microbiology in the context of issues relevant to women and women's health. Two laboratory hours per week. Not open to Biology majors or students who have completed BIOL 101 or BIOL 105.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 161 - 01 Medical Geology - T W R F - - 1000 - 1200 OSS 122

Days of Week:

- T W R F - -

Time of Day:

1000 - 1200

Location:

OSS 122

Course Registration Number:

10293 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jennifer T. McGuire

This course explores the effects of geologic materials and processes on human health. Topics include exposure to or deficiency of trace metals and minerals, inhalation of ambient and anthropogenic mineral dusts and volcanic emissions; transportation, modification and concentration of organic compounds; and exposure to radionuclide's, microbes and pathogens in various geologic settings. The knowledge and skills covered in this course will provide an understanding of the geological and biological processes controlling various public health concerns and thus provides a preparation to contribute to important societal questions. Prerequisites:GEOL 111, 112, 114, 115 or CHEM 100, 101, 111, 115 or permission of instructor. NOTE: Students who take GEOL 161 may not receive credit for GEOL 461

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Spring 2018 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
BIOL 106 - 01 Women, Medicine and Biology M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OWS 257

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OWS 257

Course Registration Number:

20991 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Dayius L. Turvold Celotta

This course addresses issues of biology from the perspective of women. The focus of the course will be to learn basic principles of biology in areas such as anatomy, physiology, genetics, cell biology, and microbiology in the context of issues relevant to women and women's health. Two laboratory hours per week. Not open to Biology majors or students who have completed BIOL 101 or BIOL 105.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 106 - 51 Women and Biology/ Lab - - - R - - - 1330 - 1530 OWS 266

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1530

Location:

OWS 266

Course Registration Number:

20992 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Dayius L. Turvold Celotta

This course addresses issues of biology from the perspective of women. The focus of the course will be to learn basic principles of biology in areas such as anatomy, physiology, genetics, cell biology, and microbiology in the context of issues relevant to women and women's health. Two laboratory hours per week. Not open to Biology majors or students who have completed BIOL 101 or BIOL 105.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 106 - 52 Women and Biology/ Lab - - - R - - - 1535 - 1735 OWS 266

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1535 - 1735

Location:

OWS 266

Course Registration Number:

20993 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Dayius L. Turvold Celotta

This course addresses issues of biology from the perspective of women. The focus of the course will be to learn basic principles of biology in areas such as anatomy, physiology, genetics, cell biology, and microbiology in the context of issues relevant to women and women's health. Two laboratory hours per week. Not open to Biology majors or students who have completed BIOL 101 or BIOL 105.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W07 Medical Narratives M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

22268 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Emily M. James

As novelist and essayist Virginia Woolf once observed, it is "strange indeed that illness has not taken its place with love and battle and jealousy among the prime themes of literature." As we read and discuss literary narratives about health and illness, we may also explore historical and contemporary conversations about health and illness, with topics including hysteria, syphilis, tuberculosis, neurasthenia, cancer, HIV/AIDS, and vaccine controversies. Along the way, we will consider literature's role in what Susan Sontag once described as the "punitive and sentimental fantasies concocted" about illness. Key writers may include Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Sylvia Plath, Kazuo Ishiguro, Leslie Jamison, Ian McEwan, Atul Gawande, and Paul Kalanithi. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W01 Final Frontier: Mars & Beyond M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 212

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

22396 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher J. Hassel

How do global politics influence our desire to explore space? How does space exploration impact our theological viewpoints of the universe? What roles might nation-states and corporations play in future space endeavors? Focusing on the human yearning to explore space, as well as current efforts to put humans on Mars in the near future, this class will attempt to answer these questions by examining a variety of literary forms including fiction, science fiction, poetry, nonfiction prose, and biography. Likely works to be studied include Tracy K. Smith’s LIFE ON MARS, Mary Doria Russell’s THE SPARROW, and Andy Weir's THE MARTIAN. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W15 Reading Eating - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 SCB 107

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

SCB 107

Course Registration Number:

22411 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paula F. Cisewski

Why are both hunger and obesity problems? What is healthy food, and how does it make its way to us? With whom do you choose to break bread? In this course, we will explore both personal pleasures and political issues around eating. From Marcel Proust’s famous madeleine to Anthony Bourdain’s PARTS UNKNOWN, from TV ads to literature to Instagram images, we will examine our assumptions and our beliefs around food sources, food access, and food justice. Students will design individual research projects around the topic that may include interviews with food or farm experts or a service learning element. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 324 - L01 Genre: Science Fiction M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 301

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

21699 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Martin L. Warren

Do you want to rule the world? Blow apart a sun? Test a theory about medicine and the spread of disease? It is possible. . . at least in the imagination. Follow the paths of science fiction authors who have explored both our wildest dreams and greatest fears for where technology and new ideas might lead us. In its fascinating evolution, science fiction has always functioned as a lens to think about society, whether it’s Mary Shelley in 1818 looking on as Victor Frankenstein turns to modern experiments with electricity in the laboratory or Ernest Cline in 2011 imagining the energy crisis and global warming in a near-future world. We will approach the genre of SF as a mode of thought-experimentation and world-building that explores themes such as cloning, environmental apocalypse, the alien, utopias and dystopias, race, gender, and sexuality, religion and culture. Possible texts (written and film) may include BLADERUNNER, THE LEFT HAND OF DARKNESS, DISTRICT 9, THE UNIT, BLACK MIRROR, and THE HANDMAID'S TALE. This courses satisfies the Genre Studies requirement for English and English with a Creative Writing Emphasis majors. It also satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 361 - L01 Bodying Forth Shakespeare - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 MHC 209

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

MHC 209

Course Registration Number:

21113 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy M. Muse

Audiences in the age of Shakespeare were well familiar with the visceral impact of literature, the way in which drama, for example, can work on both the nerves and the mind. They took seriously somatic responses to literary texts and saw clear ties between literature, emotions, and bodily health. Some feared that drama had a dangerous invasive power, like a virus, while others praised it for its curative properties. In this course we will read such 17th-century best-sellers as Robert Burton’s ANATOMY OF MELANCHOLY and Thomas Heywood’s APOLOGY FOR ACTORS alongside deep and close examinations of love, melancholy, rage, and forgiveness in plays such as Shakespeare’s HAMLET, MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING, THE MERCHANT OF VENICE, KING LEAR, and THE WINTER'S TALE, Heywood’s A WOMAN KILLED WITH KINDNESS, and John Webster’s THE DUCHESS OF MALFI. We will also research early modern medical practices and theories of the emotions and passions and the body and soul, seeing what they illuminate about the plays as well as what they might say to us about our understandings of literature, emotions, and health today. This course counts both as an early British literature course and as a Contexts and Convergences course for English majors. It also satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 241 - L01 Hist. & Philosophy of Medicine - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 246

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

22245 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Peter M. Distelzweig

This course presents an integrated, interdisciplinary examination of philosophical developments in the history of medical science and health care. Students will develop a critical and creative perspective on medicine and health care through philosophical exploration of their history, foundations, and purposes. Students will study important episodes and developments in the history of the theory and practice of medicine and explore philosophical analyses of and arguments about the nature of medical knowledge, health, disease and health care. Prerequisite: PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
POLS 205 - L01 Cit. Participation & Pub Pol M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 247

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 247

Course Registration Number:

20258 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Timothy R. Lynch

This course focuses on American politics and public policy, with an emphasis on what both citizens and governments do, why they do it, and what difference it makes. It examines aspects of the policy process, such as agenda-setting and issue attention cycles, before covering substantive public policy issues such as education, civil rights, health care, energy and the environment, defense, and immigration. The ways in which citizens influence the public policy process through elections, interest groups, and measures of public opinion will also be considered. Prerequisite: POLS 104 or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 121 - 01 Social Psychology M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC LL62

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

JRC LL62

Course Registration Number:

20264 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jhon T. Wlaschin

This is an introduction to the field of social psychology, which examines how an individual's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by the social context. The course covers such topics as conformity, persuasion, stereotypes and prejudice, love and relationships, helping behavior and altruism, aggression, the self-concept, and group dynamics. Prerequisite: PSYC 111

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 301 - L01 Psychopathology M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 JRC LL62

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

JRC LL62

Course Registration Number:

20269 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jean E. Giebenhain

This course sets forth a framework for understanding abnormal or maladaptive behavior. It will investigate specific diagnostic categories (such as depression and schizophrenia), causal factors and treatments of these maladaptive patterns. Prerequisites: PSYC 111 and junior standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 301 - L02 Psychopathology - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 JRC LL01

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

JRC LL01

Course Registration Number:

20270 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jean E. Giebenhain

This course sets forth a framework for understanding abnormal or maladaptive behavior. It will investigate specific diagnostic categories (such as depression and schizophrenia), causal factors and treatments of these maladaptive patterns. Prerequisites: PSYC 111 and junior standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 301 - L03 Psychopathology - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC LL01

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC LL01

Course Registration Number:

20614 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jean E. Giebenhain

This course sets forth a framework for understanding abnormal or maladaptive behavior. It will investigate specific diagnostic categories (such as depression and schizophrenia), causal factors and treatments of these maladaptive patterns. Prerequisites: PSYC 111 and junior standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 365 - 01 Health Psychology M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC LL01

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC LL01

Course Registration Number:

21693 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jennifer R. Prichard

This survey course will examine the contributions of psychological research to the understanding, prevention, and treatment of a variety of health concerns. This course will employ a biopsychosocial model, which means that we will study how social, emotional, behavioral, biological, and spiritual factors influence health. The specific topics include injury, stress, pain management, additions, sleep, patient-physician relations, and chronic illnesses such as Alzheimer's, diabetes, and AIDS. Prerequisite: PSYC 111

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)