W. Matthews Grant

Philosophy Department Chair, Professor of Philosophy
Degree
Ph.D., Philosophy, Fordham University, Bronx, New York
M.A., Philosophy, Fordham University, Bronx, New York
B.A., Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
Office
JRC 244
Phone
(651) 962-5345
Toll Free
(800) 328-6819, Ext. 2-5345
Fax
(651) 962-5340
Mail
University of St. Thomas, JRC 241
2115 Summit Avenue
Saint Paul, MN 55105

Associate Editor (Book Reviews), American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly (ACPQ)

Expertise
Philosophy of Religion
Medieval Philosophy (especially Aquinas)

Articles
"Aseity," Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy (online), forthcoming.

"Divine Simplicity, Contingent Truths, and Extrinsic Models of Divine Knowing" Faith and Philosophy 29 (2012): forthcoming.

"Our Merits, God's Gifts," accepted in Steven A. Long and Christopher J. Thompson (eds.) Reason and the Rule of Faith: Conversations in the Tradition with John Paul II (University Press of America, forthcoming).

"Can a libertarian hold that our free acts are caused by God?" Faith and Philosophy 27 (2010): 22-44.

"Aquinas on how God causes the act of sin without causing the sin itself," The Thomist 73 (2009): 455-96.

"Anselm, God, and the Act of Sin: Interpretive Difficulties," The Saint Anselm Journal 5.2 (2008).

"Must a Cause be Really Related to its Effects?: The Analogy between Divine and Libertarian Agent Causality," Religious Studies 43 (2007): 1-23.

"Aquinas, Divine Simplicity, and Divine Freedom," Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 77 (2004): 129-144.

"The Naturalistic Fallacy and Natural Law Methodology," in Truth Matters, ed. John Trapani (Washington, DC: American Maritain Association, distributed by Catholic University of America Press, 2004): 168-181.

"Aquinas among Libertarians and Compatibilists: Breaking the Logic of Theological Determinism,"Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 75 (2002): 221-235.

"MacIntyre's Interpretation of adaequatio intellectus et rei," in Jacques Maritain and the Many Ways of Knowing, ed. Douglas A. Ollivant (Washington, DC: American Maritain Association, distributed by Catholic University of America Press, 2002): 102-119.

"Counterfactuals of Freedom, Future Contingents, and the Grounding Objection to Middle Knowledge," Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 74 (2001): 307-323.

Summer 2018 Courses

Summer 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2018 Courses

Fall 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
PHIL 115 - W35 Philosophy of Human Person M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 MHC 204

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

MHC 204

Course Registration Number:

41512 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Walter M. Grant

An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention. This course, with PHIL 214, fulfills the Moral and Philosophical Reasoning requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 115 - W36 Philosophy of Human Person M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MHC 204

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MHC 204

Course Registration Number:

42021 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Walter M. Grant

An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention. This course, with PHIL 214, fulfills the Moral and Philosophical Reasoning requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2019 Courses

J-Term 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location