Mark Spencer

Assistant Professor of Philosophy
Degree
Ph.D., Philosophy, University at Buffalo, 2012
Dissertation: "Thomistic Hylomorphism and the Phenomenology of Self-Sensing"
Director: Jorge J.E. Gracia
M.A., Philosophy, Franciscan University of Steubenville, 2008
B.A., Philosophy and Theology, Franciscan University of Steubenville, 2007
Office
JRC 240
Phone
(651) 962-5344
Toll Free
(800) 328-6819, Ext. 2-5344
Fax
(651) 962-5340
Mail
University of St. Thomas, JRC 241
2115 Summit Avenue
Saint Paul, MN 55105

Academic History
Ph.D., Philosophy, University at Buffalo, 2012
           Dissertation: "Thomistic Hylomorphism and the Phenomenology of Self-Sensing"
           Director: Jorge J.E. Gracia
M.A., Philosophy, Franciscan University of Steubenville, 2008
B.A., Philosophy and Theology, Franciscan University of Steubenville, 2007

Areas of Specialization
Medieval/Scholastic Philosophy
Metaphysics
Phenomenology
Philosophical Theology

Selected Publications

“The Flexibility of Divine Simplicity: Aquinas, Scotus, Palamas”, International Philosophical Quarterly 57:2 (July 2017), forthcoming.

“Divine Causality and Created Freedom: A Thomistic Personalist View”, Nova et Vetera 14:3 (Spring 2016): 375-419.

“Christologically Inspired, Empirically Motivated Hylomorphism.” Co-written with Tim Pawl. Res Philosophica 93:1 (January 2016): 137-160.

“Quantum Randomness, Hylomorphism, and Classical Theism.” Journal of Analytic Theology 4 (2016): 147-170.

"The Category of Habitus: Artifacts, Accidents, and Human Nature", The Thomist 79:1 (January 2015): 113-154.

“Aristotelian Substance and Personalistic Subjectivity.” International Philosophical Quarterly 55:2 (June 2015): 145-164.

“Activity, Identity, and God: A Tension in Aquinas and His Interpreters.” Co-written with W.Matthews Grant, Studia Neoaristotelica 12 (2015): 5-61.

“Habits, Potencies, and Obedience: Experiential Evidence for Thomistic Hylomorphism.” Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 88, Dispositions, Habits, and Virtues (2014): 165-180.

“The Personhood of the Separated Soul.” Nova et Vetera 12:3 (Summer 2014): 863-912.

“Transcendental Order in Suárez.” Studia Neoaristotelica 10:2 (2013): 157-195.

"Ethical Subjectivity in Levinas and Thomas Aquinas: Common Ground?" The Heythrop Journal 53:1 (January 2012): 137-147.

"Abelard on Status and their Relation to Universals: A Husserlian Interpretation." International Philosophical Quarterly 51:1 (June 2011): 223-240.

"An Ethical Neo-Platonism: Levinas and Bonaventure in Dialogue." Quaestiones Disputatae 1:2 (Spring 2011): 226-240.

"A Reexamination of the Hylomorphic Theory of Death." The Review of Metaphysics 63:4 (June 2010) 843-870.

"Liturgy as a Foundation of Ethical Practice: Marion as a Mediator Between Levinas and Radical Orthodoxy." Fides Quaerens Intellectum 4:1 (Fall 2007): 1-20.

"Full Human Flourishing: The Place of the Various Virtues in the Quest for Happiness in Aristotle's Ethics." Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 81, Freedom, Will, and Nature (2007): 193-204.

Fall 2018 Courses

Fall 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

J-Term 2019 Courses

J-Term 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2019 Courses

Spring 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
PHIL 115 - W04 Philosophy of Human Person M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MCH 109

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

MCH 109

Course Registration Number:

20311 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Mark K. Spencer

An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention. This course, with PHIL 214, fulfills the Moral and Philosophical Reasoning requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 115 - W09 Philosophy of Human Person M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MCH 109

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MCH 109

Course Registration Number:

21490 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Mark K. Spencer

An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention. This course, with PHIL 214, fulfills the Moral and Philosophical Reasoning requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 306 - 01 Contemporary Philosophy M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 MCH 109

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

MCH 109

Course Registration Number:

22323 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Mark K. Spencer

An investigation of major philosophical problems from the late nineteenth century to the present, with a focus on prominent philosophers, including thinkers from both the analytic and continental traditions. Prerequisite: PHIL 220

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)