Spring 2018 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ACCT 215 - 01 Managerial Accounting M - W - - - - 1315 - 1455 SCH 316

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1315 - 1455

Location:

SCH 316

Course Registration Number:

21740 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephanie D. Grimm

This course is designed to give students an understanding of how accounting and business information is used in planning, budgeting, decision-making, and performance evaluation. Prerequisite: ACCT 210

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ACCT 215 - 02 Managerial Accounting M - W - - - - 1115 - 1255 SCH 316

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1115 - 1255

Location:

SCH 316

Course Registration Number:

21742 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephanie D. Grimm

This course is designed to give students an understanding of how accounting and business information is used in planning, budgeting, decision-making, and performance evaluation. Prerequisite: ACCT 210

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 198 - 01 BIOL of Urban Agriculture - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OSS 127

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OSS 127

Course Registration Number:

22126 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Adam D. Kay

The subject matter of these courses will vary from year to year, but will not duplicate existing courses. Descriptions of these courses are available in the Searchable Class Schedule on Murphy Online, View Searchable Class Schedule

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 207 - 01 Genetics Ecology Evolution - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OWS 251

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OWS 251

Course Registration Number:

20973 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Leah M. Domine

A consideration of the mechanisms of heredity, evolution, population genetics, and population ecology emphasizing hypothesis testing, case studies, and quantitative and experimental approaches to population biology. Topics include: Mendelian genetics, genetic mapping, population genetics, selection theory and the process of adaptation, speciation, macroevolution and phylogenetics, and the growth and regulation of populations. Laboratory work emphasizes techniques for data analysis, including computer simulation and modeling. Three laboratory hours per week. This course fulfills the core-area in natural science in the Natural Science and Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning requirements in the core curriculum. Prerequisites: Co-enrollment in or previous credit for CHEM 111 or CHEM 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 328 - 01 Environ.Toxicology & Health - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OWS 250

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OWS 250

Course Registration Number:

21386 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Dalma Martinovic

There is increasing public interest and concern over the connections between environmental quality and human health. This course will explore these connections by providing an introduction to the multidisciplinary field of environmental toxicology- the study of the adverse effects of chemical, biological, and physical agents in the environment on living organisms, including humans. Topics will cover global and local problems including issues of environmental justice and future approaches to sustainably mitigate the major environmental health problems in industrialized and developing countries. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 207, BIOL 208 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 333 - 01 Ecology M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OWS LL54

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OWS LL54

Course Registration Number:

21432 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kyle D. Zimmer

This course is an exploration of the major concepts in modern ecology, including eco-physiology and adaptation, population growth and regulation, community and ecosystem ecology, and biodiversity and conservation biology. Laboratory and fieldwork will complement these topics and will emphasize careful experimental design and statistical analysis of data. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 207 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209. STAT 220 or MATH 303 recommended.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 333 - 51 Ecology/Lab M - - - - - - 1330 - 1730 OWS 268

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1730

Location:

OWS 268

Course Registration Number:

21433 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Kyle D. Zimmer

This course is an exploration of the major concepts in modern ecology, including eco-physiology and adaptation, population growth and regulation, community and ecosystem ecology, and biodiversity and conservation biology. Laboratory and fieldwork will complement these topics and will emphasize careful experimental design and statistical analysis of data. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 207 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209. STAT 220 or MATH 303 recommended.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 333 - 52 Ecology/Lab - - W - - - - 1215 - 1615 OWS 268

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1615

Location:

OWS 268

Course Registration Number:

21434 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Leah M. Domine

This course is an exploration of the major concepts in modern ecology, including eco-physiology and adaptation, population growth and regulation, community and ecosystem ecology, and biodiversity and conservation biology. Laboratory and fieldwork will complement these topics and will emphasize careful experimental design and statistical analysis of data. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 207 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209. STAT 220 or MATH 303 recommended.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 333 - 53 Ecology / Lab - - - R - - - 1215 - 1615 OWS 268

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1615

Location:

OWS 268

Course Registration Number:

21648 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Leah M. Domine

This course is an exploration of the major concepts in modern ecology, including eco-physiology and adaptation, population growth and regulation, community and ecosystem ecology, and biodiversity and conservation biology. Laboratory and fieldwork will complement these topics and will emphasize careful experimental design and statistical analysis of data. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 207 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209. STAT 220 or MATH 303 recommended.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 375 - 01 Endocrinology M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OWS LL54

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OWS LL54

Course Registration Number:

22121 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jerry F. Husak

This course is intended to give an overall introduction to the major endocrine systems of vertebrates and their involvement in the control of physiological functions. Major principles involved in signaling by hormones, the integration of hormonal mechanisms to maintain homeostasis, and the evolution of endocrine systems will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on similarities and differences among vertebrate groups, but focus will be primarily mammalian endocrinology. The primary objective is to highlight the complexity of control and integration of physiological functions by chemical signals such as hormones. Prerequisites: BIOL 207, BIOL 208 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 375 - 51 Endocrinology/Lab - - W - - - - 1330 - 1730 OWS 379

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1730

Location:

OWS 379

Course Registration Number:

22122 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Jerry F. Husak

This course is intended to give an overall introduction to the major endocrine systems of vertebrates and their involvement in the control of physiological functions. Major principles involved in signaling by hormones, the integration of hormonal mechanisms to maintain homeostasis, and the evolution of endocrine systems will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on similarities and differences among vertebrate groups, but focus will be primarily mammalian endocrinology. The primary objective is to highlight the complexity of control and integration of physiological functions by chemical signals such as hormones. Prerequisites: BIOL 207, BIOL 208 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 375 - 52 Endocrinology/Lab - - - R - - - 1330 - 1730 OWS 379

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1730

Location:

OWS 379

Course Registration Number:

22123 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Jerry F. Husak

This course is intended to give an overall introduction to the major endocrine systems of vertebrates and their involvement in the control of physiological functions. Major principles involved in signaling by hormones, the integration of hormonal mechanisms to maintain homeostasis, and the evolution of endocrine systems will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on similarities and differences among vertebrate groups, but focus will be primarily mammalian endocrinology. The primary objective is to highlight the complexity of control and integration of physiological functions by chemical signals such as hormones. Prerequisites: BIOL 207, BIOL 208 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CHEM 101 - 01 Environmental Chemistry - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OSS 127

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OSS 127

Course Registration Number:

20018 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel A. Tobin

An introduction to chemistry with particular emphasis on environmental science. Basic chemistry topics covered include the structure of matter, elements, compounds, reactions, energy and energy changes. These fundamentals lead to the study of currently relevant environmental problems and their proposed solutions, for example the depletion of ozone in the stratosphere, global warming, acid rain, smog, waste disposal, water pollution and the study of energy resources. Lectures and laboratory. This course satisfies the lab science requirement in the core curriculum for non-majors. Offered spring semester. NOTE: Students who receive credit for CHEM 101 may not receive credit for CHEM 100.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CHEM 101 - 51 Environmental Chemistry/Lab - - W - - - - 0830 - 1130 OWS 479

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

0830 - 1130

Location:

OWS 479

Course Registration Number:

20019 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Daniel A. Tobin

An introduction to chemistry with particular emphasis on environmental science. Basic chemistry topics covered include the structure of matter, elements, compounds, reactions, energy and energy changes. These fundamentals lead to the study of currently relevant environmental problems and their proposed solutions, for example the depletion of ozone in the stratosphere, global warming, acid rain, smog, waste disposal, water pollution and the study of energy resources. Lectures and laboratory. This course satisfies the lab science requirement in the core curriculum for non-majors. Offered spring semester. NOTE: Students who receive credit for CHEM 101 may not receive credit for CHEM 100.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CISC 321 - 01 Systems Analysis and Design II - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OSS 428

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OSS 428

Course Registration Number:

22270 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Timothy G. Meyer

(Formerly QMCS 421) Continuation of CISC 320. Concentration on user-centered design (UCD), physical design, low- and high- fidelity prototyping, and agile methods. Emphasis on managerial problems in systems development. Continued use of CASE and project-management tools. A "real world" design and prototyping project is an integral part of this course. Prerequisite: CISC 320

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 100 - 01 Public Speaking - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 BEC 114

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

BEC 114

Course Registration Number:

20522 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Debra L. Petersen

Preparation, presentation, and evaluation of original speeches by each student throughout the semester; special emphasis given to selecting and researching topics, organizing evidence, analyzing audiences, sharpening style and tone, communicating ethically and listening critically. This course is designed for students who are not pursuing a Communication and Journalism major. COJO majors may only take this course with permission from the department chair.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 100 - 02 Public Speaking - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 BEC 113

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

BEC 113

Course Registration Number:

20523 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Debra L. Petersen

Preparation, presentation, and evaluation of original speeches by each student throughout the semester; special emphasis given to selecting and researching topics, organizing evidence, analyzing audiences, sharpening style and tone, communicating ethically and listening critically. This course is designed for students who are not pursuing a Communication and Journalism major. COJO majors may only take this course with permission from the department chair.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 258 - 01 Writing/Designing for the Web M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 312

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

OEC 312

Course Registration Number:

20539 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

John C. Keston

This course teaches students HTML and Web-page production. The goal is to help students develop strategies for writing, editing, designing and publishing a Website that meets professional standards.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 344 - 01 Writing for Strategic Comm M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

21619 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Craig E. Bryan

Writing for Strategic Communication provides practical experience in public relations and advertising writing including: strategic communication plans, news releases, position statements, brochures, query letters, feature stories, social media posts and ad copy. The course emphasizes weekly drafting and editing in class with the aim of giving students the fundamental skills that constitute excellent writing. Students leave the course with a portfolio of written work that can be utilized in multiple communication environments (agencies, corporations, non-profits, political, education, healthcare organizations, etc.). Prerequisite: COJO 234

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 470 - 01 Strategic Comm Campaigns - - - R - - - 1800 - 2130 OEC 452

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2130

Location:

OEC 452

Course Registration Number:

20545 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paul G. Omodt

Students work as strategic communicators in advertising and public relations to develop an integrated communication campaign plan that will successfully influence key audiences' attitudes and behaviors for the ultimate goal of building and maintaining good relationships with audiences' key audiences. Prerequisites: COJO 344

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W07 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

20821 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Alison L. Underthun-Meilahn

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement. Please note that this course is half in-class (meets weekly on Thursdays from 3:25-5:00pm) and half online.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 2101525-1700- - - R - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENTR 490 - 01 Environmental Sust Innovation M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 MCH 110

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

MCH 110

Course Registration Number:

21816 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Annmarie P. Thomas

An elective course designed to introduce students to the role of environmental sustainability in product development. This course will look at ways that a wide variety of companies have adopted environmentally sustainable practices, and we will practice using methods such as life cycle analysis and whole system thinking. Students will learn and use an array of design thinking techniques. All students will be expected to complete a final project in which they work in a team to write a proposal for a business based on sustainable principles. Prerequisite: ENTR 200 or ENGR 150 or Instructor Permission.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENVR 151 - L01 Environmental Challenges M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 401

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

JRC 401

Course Registration Number:

20098 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paul A. Lorah

A study of the interaction of humans and the environment over time and space; a broad introduction that integrates a variety of social-science perspectives into an understanding of the environment and the relations between humans and nature. Specific topics include ecology, population, economic development, resources and sustainable development.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENVR 151 - L02 Environmental Challenges M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 401

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 401

Course Registration Number:

22530 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paul A. Lorah

A study of the interaction of humans and the environment over time and space; a broad introduction that integrates a variety of social-science perspectives into an understanding of the environment and the relations between humans and nature. Specific topics include ecology, population, economic development, resources and sustainable development.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENVR 401 - D01 Field Seminar M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 426

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 426

Course Registration Number:

20397 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

A capstone course that combines field experience with classroom seminar. Student teams will conduct collaborative broadly interdisciplinary analyses of selected environmental problems. Field-based projects are chosen by the students in consultation with course instructor. Classroom seminars are used for exchange of information between teams and for discussion of readings pertinent to individual research projects or, more broadly, to the interdisciplinary character of environmental problem-solving. Each team produces a major paper that examines the selected problems through humanities, natural-science and social-science lenses. This class is cross-listed with, and is equivalent to, GEOG 402. Prerequisite: 301 and 351 or permission of the instructor

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ESCI 310 - 01 Environmental Problem Solving M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OSS 127

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OSS 127

Course Registration Number:

20748 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gaston E. Small

This course explores methods of solving environmental problems. These problems are by nature, interdisciplinary and are rarely addressed in a substantive fashion in traditional science textbooks. In this course, students and faculty work together to develop a working model of a critical earth system or biogeochemical cycle (i.e. the carbon or nitrogen cycle), and learn how to make calculations of human-induced changes to that system. Students from all concentrations of the environmental science major will work together on this interdisciplinary research project using modeling and systems analysis software to more fully understand specific environments and the quantitative methods of assessing challenges to those environments. This course should be taken by all ESCI students during their junior year. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 209 or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ESCI 310 - 51 Envi. Problem Solving Lab - - - R - - - 1330 - 1730 OWS 264

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1730

Location:

OWS 264

Course Registration Number:

20964 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Gaston E. Small

This course explores methods of solving environmental problems. These problems are by nature, interdisciplinary and are rarely addressed in a substantive fashion in traditional science textbooks. In this course, students and faculty work together to develop a working model of a critical earth system or biogeochemical cycle (i.e. the carbon or nitrogen cycle), and learn how to make calculations of human-induced changes to that system. Students from all concentrations of the environmental science major will work together on this interdisciplinary research project using modeling and systems analysis software to more fully understand specific environments and the quantitative methods of assessing challenges to those environments. This course should be taken by all ESCI students during their junior year. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 209 or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ESCI 430 - 01 Senior Research Seminar - - W - - - - 1330 - 1730 OSS 120

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1730

Location:

OSS 120

Course Registration Number:

21085 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Thomas A. Hickson

This course is designed to fulfill the senior capstone experience in Environmental Science. It brings together students from all the environmental science concentrations (biology, chemistry, and geology) to complete interdisciplinary research projects where students can integrate the knowledge gained in their distinct, yet complementary disciplinary tracks. The course will be a mix of research and seminar format designed to give students significant opportunities to practice the methods of scholarship and modes of communication used by environmental scientists. This course should be completed in the final Spring semester prior to graduation. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: ESCI 310 or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ESCI 430 - 51 Senior Research Seminar/Lab - - - - F - - 1330 - 1545 OSS 120

Days of Week:

- - - - F - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1545

Location:

OSS 120

Course Registration Number:

21687 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Beth Fisher

This course is designed to fulfill the senior capstone experience in Environmental Science. It brings together students from all the environmental science concentrations (biology, chemistry, and geology) to complete interdisciplinary research projects where students can integrate the knowledge gained in their distinct, yet complementary disciplinary tracks. The course will be a mix of research and seminar format designed to give students significant opportunities to practice the methods of scholarship and modes of communication used by environmental scientists. This course should be completed in the final Spring semester prior to graduation. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: ESCI 310 or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
FAST 400 - 01 Family Studies Capstone Sem. M - - - - - - 1800 - 2115 JRC LL62

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2115

Location:

JRC LL62

Course Registration Number:

20099 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Allison C. Jessee

This advanced capstone course for the Family Studies major is a multidisciplinary seminar taken after a student has completed at least four courses in the Family Studies major. The course incorporates a variety of methods, theories, and pedagogies drawn from the family studies paradigm. A substantial portion of the course will be devoted to student experience in the community and professions, including reflections and analyses that incorporate family studies scholarship. Prerequisite: FAST 200, plus two of COJO 374 (formerly COJO 472), PSYC 288, SOCI 321, plus six other courses from the list of approved courses for the Major.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOG 111 - L01 Human Geography M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 309

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 309

Course Registration Number:

20954 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David W. Kelley

This course explores the effects of social, economic, environmental, political, and demographic change from a geographic perspective. It introduces students to a broad range of topics, including the effects of population growth, human impact on the environment, economic development, and globalization. Offered every semester. This course fulfills the Social Analysis and Human Diversity requirements in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOG 331 - L01 Conservation Geography - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 426

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 426

Course Registration Number:

21088 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paul A. Lorah

This course uses basic Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to study a wide range of conservation issues. GIS is ideal platform for exploring the relationships between the economic, political and environmental processes shaping our landscapes. Typical class projects include locating the best lands in Minnesota for carbon sequestration projects and helping the Minnesota Nature Conservancy target valuable forest habitat for conservation purchases.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOG 421 - 01 Applied Geographic Info Sys M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 426

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 426

Course Registration Number:

21612 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David W. Kelley

A sequel to GEOG 321, this project-based course is designed around individual student interests to utilize advanced ArcGIS functions and analysis. Principles of geographic information systems will be implemented in a wide variety of applications. Prerequisite: GEOG 321 or consent of the instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 111 - 01 Intro Physical Geology M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OWS 150

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OWS 150

Course Registration Number:

20958 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Rebecca Clotts

A study of the Earth's properties; the formation and classification of minerals, rocks, ore deposits, and fuels; and the nature and origin of the Earth's surface and interior. Emphasis will be placed upon a changing Earth, and the geologic processes operating at the surface and in the interior. Lecture and two laboratory hours per week. LEC 111-01 must be registered with LAB section 51, 52, 53, or 54. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 111 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 114, or 115.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 111 - 02 Intro Physical Geology M - W - - - - 1730 - 1915 OSS 127

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

OSS 127

Course Registration Number:

20961 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Rebecca Clotts

A study of the Earth's properties; the formation and classification of minerals, rocks, ore deposits, and fuels; and the nature and origin of the Earth's surface and interior. Emphasis will be placed upon a changing Earth, and the geologic processes operating at the surface and in the interior. Lecture and two laboratory hours per week. LEC 111-02 must be registered with LAB sections 57 or 58. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 111 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 114, or 115.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 111 - 51 Intro Physical Geology Lab M - - - - - - 1500 - 1700 OSS 124

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1500 - 1700

Location:

OSS 124

Course Registration Number:

20962 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Eric W. Stevens

A study of the Earth's properties; the formation and classification of minerals, rocks, ore deposits, and fuels; and the nature and origin of the Earth's surface and interior. Emphasis will be placed upon a changing Earth, and the geologic processes operating at the surface and in the interior. Lecture and two laboratory hours per week. GEOL 111-51 LAB can only be registered with GEOL 111-01. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 111 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 114, or 115.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 111 - 52 Intro Physical Geology Lab - T - - - - - 1000 - 1200 OSS 124

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

1000 - 1200

Location:

OSS 124

Course Registration Number:

20972 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Carolyn A. Dykoski

A study of the Earth's properties; the formation and classification of minerals, rocks, ore deposits, and fuels; and the nature and origin of the Earth's surface and interior. Emphasis will be placed upon a changing Earth, and the geologic processes operating at the surface and in the interior. Lecture and two laboratory hours per week. GEOL 111-52 LAB can only be registered with GEOL 111-01. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 111 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 114, or 115.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 111 - 53 Intro Physical Geology LAB - T - - - - - 1330 - 1530 OSS 124

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1530

Location:

OSS 124

Course Registration Number:

21081 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Eric W. Stevens

A study of the Earth's properties; the formation and classification of minerals, rocks, ore deposits, and fuels; and the nature and origin of the Earth's surface and interior. Emphasis will be placed upon a changing Earth, and the geologic processes operating at the surface and in the interior. Lecture and two laboratory hours per week. GEOL 111-53 LAB can only be registered with GEOL 111-01. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 111 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 114, or 115.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 111 - 54 Intro Physical Geology LAB - T - - - - - 1600 - 1800 OSS 124

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

1600 - 1800

Location:

OSS 124

Course Registration Number:

21089 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Melissa A. Lamb

A study of the Earth's properties; the formation and classification of minerals, rocks, ore deposits, and fuels; and the nature and origin of the Earth's surface and interior. Emphasis will be placed upon a changing Earth, and the geologic processes operating at the surface and in the interior. Lecture and two laboratory hours per week. GEOL 111-54 LAB can only be registered with GEOL 111-01. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 111 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 114, or 115.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 111 - 57 Intro Physical Geology LAB M - - - - - - 1916 - 2115 OSS 124

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1916 - 2115

Location:

OSS 124

Course Registration Number:

20959 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Rebecca Clotts

A study of the Earth's properties; the formation and classification of minerals, rocks, ore deposits, and fuels; and the nature and origin of the Earth's surface and interior. Emphasis will be placed upon a changing Earth, and the geologic processes operating at the surface and in the interior. Lecture and two laboratory hours per week. GEOL 111-57 LAB can only be registered with GEOL 111-02. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 111 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 114, or 115.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 111 - 58 Intro Physical Geology LAB - - W - - - - 1916 - 2115 OSS 124

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1916 - 2115

Location:

OSS 124

Course Registration Number:

20960 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Rebecca Clotts

A study of the Earth's properties; the formation and classification of minerals, rocks, ore deposits, and fuels; and the nature and origin of the Earth's surface and interior. Emphasis will be placed upon a changing Earth, and the geologic processes operating at the surface and in the interior. Lecture and two laboratory hours per week. GEOL 111-58 LAB can only be registered with GEOL 111-02. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 111 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 114, or 115.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 115 - 01 Environmental Geology M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OWS 250

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OWS 250

Course Registration Number:

22090 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Melissa A. Lamb

This course emphasizes the interactions between humans and their environment, focusing on those processes and issues that are fundamentally geological in nature. Early in the course, students will be introduced to basic geoscience concepts and principals, the scientific method, plate tectonics, and earth materials (rocks and minerals). The remainder of the course will focus on specific topics at the interface between humans and their environment, including volcanic and earthquake hazards, human impacts on the hydrological cycle, surface and groundwater contamination, climate and the carbon cycle, nuclear waste storage, soil erosion, non-renewable resources, and slope stability. LEC 115-01 must be registered with LAB Section 51, 52, or 53. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 115 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 111, or 114.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 115 - 51 Environmental Geology LAB - - - R - - - 1330 - 1530 OSS 124

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1530

Location:

OSS 124

Course Registration Number:

22091 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Melissa A. Lamb

This course emphasizes the interactions between humans and their environment, focusing on those processes and issues that are fundamentally geological in nature. Early in the course, students will be introduced to basic geoscience concepts and principals, the scientific method, plate tectonics, and earth materials (rocks and minerals). The remainder of the course will focus on specific topics at the interface between humans and their environment, including volcanic and earthquake hazards, human impacts on the hydrological cycle, surface and groundwater contamination, climate and the carbon cycle, nuclear waste storage, soil erosion, non-renewable resources, and slope stability. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 115 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 111, or 114.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 115 - 53 Environmental Geology LAB - - - R - - - 1000 - 1200 OSS 124

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1000 - 1200

Location:

OSS 124

Course Registration Number:

22094 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Melissa A. Lamb

This course emphasizes the interactions between humans and their environment, focusing on those processes and issues that are fundamentally geological in nature. Early in the course, students will be introduced to basic geoscience concepts and principals, the scientific method, plate tectonics, and earth materials (rocks and minerals). The remainder of the course will focus on specific topics at the interface between humans and their environment, including volcanic and earthquake hazards, human impacts on the hydrological cycle, surface and groundwater contamination, climate and the carbon cycle, nuclear waste storage, soil erosion, non-renewable resources, and slope stability. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 115 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 111, or 114.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 220 - 01 Oceanography M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OSS 120

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OSS 120

Course Registration Number:

22096 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kevin M. Theissen

The Earth's surface is dominated by vast oceans known for the beauty of their wildlife and waters. The oceans are also increasingly recognized for their critical importance to the functioning of the Earth's climate system and for their endangered natural resources. For example, the ocean- atmospheric climate phenomenon known as El Nino Southern Oscillation has gained household name recognition for its global impact on the weather, economy, and public health. In this course we will explore the physical, chemical, and biological processes that characterize the oceans. Students will develop research and analytical skills by making observations and interpretations of oceanographic processes using data, demonstrations, and field experiences. Prerequisites: One of GEOL 110, 111, 113, 114, 115, 130, 161 or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 220 - 51 Oceanography LAB M - - - - - - 1335 - 1635 OSS 120

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1635

Location:

OSS 120

Course Registration Number:

22097 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Kevin M. Theissen

The Earth's surface is dominated by vast oceans known for the beauty of their wildlife and waters. The oceans are also increasingly recognized for their critical importance to the functioning of the Earth's climate system and for their endangered natural resources. For example, the ocean- atmospheric climate phenomenon known as El Nino Southern Oscillation has gained household name recognition for its global impact on the weather, economy, and public health. In this course we will explore the physical, chemical, and biological processes that characterize the oceans. Students will develop research and analytical skills by making observations and interpretations of oceanographic processes using data, demonstrations, and field experiences. Prerequisites: One of GEOL 110, 111, 113, 114, 115, 130, 161 or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W05 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 MCH 114

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

MCH 114

Course Registration Number:

21467 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W06 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MCH 108

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MCH 108

Course Registration Number:

22001 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 298 - 01 Topics: Hist of Envir Thought M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 SCB 205

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

SCB 205

Course Registration Number:

21253 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

We live in an era of unprecedented concern for environmental dangers and disasters, but ideas and beliefs about human relationships with nature are nothing new. This course begins with ancient texts and concludes in the present, asking along the way how people - from philosophers to the illiterate, scientists to laypeople - have understood their environments. Key themes include the legacies of ancient medical and religious traditions, responses to urbanization and resource scarcity in Renaissance Europe, native American interpretations of nature, and the challenges of modern industrial society. We will consider influential environmentalists such as John Muir and Rachel Carson as well as others who fit less comfortably into that tradition including government planners and legislators, business leaders and economists, consumers and novelists. The course will conclude with an examination of environmentalism in action in students' own communities.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JPST 250 - L02 Intro to Justice & Peace - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 305

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 305

Course Registration Number:

21087 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael C. Klein

Major aspects of world and local conflict, theories of social science relating to conflict and violence, and various proposals for solutions. Among the aspects of conflict studied are cultural differences, scarcity of resources, economic and social structures, international trade, the arms race, corruption, oppression and war. Proposed solutions assessed include development, structural changes, world governance, multinational agencies, military power, civilian-based defense, active nonviolence for social change, conflict resolution, disarmament, cultural exchange, religious revival and prayer. These topics are considered in the light of theory, history, and literature. Students apply these concepts by investigating one country or geographic area in depth through a semester long research project. Usually offered every semester. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MGMT 430 - D01 International Management - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MCH 229

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MCH 229

Course Registration Number:

21877 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mary M. Maloney

Managers operating in a global environment need to manage the differences in doing business with people from other cultures. This goes beyond knowing that people have different customs, goals, and thought patterns. Today's managers need to be able to understand the cross-cultural subtleties imbedded in any interpersonal working relationships, regardless of whether operating in a foreign location, interacting with foreign nationals from a distance, or working with a culturally diverse American workforce. A manager's ability to understand, accept, and embrace these differences is critical to his or her success. This course is designed to address the complexities of intercultural management and facilitate the student's ability to manage successfully in a cross-cultural environment. Topics include intercultural ethics, intercultural negotiations, and work values. Prerequisites: FINC 321, OPMT 310, MKTG 300 or concurrent registration and prerequisite waived by instructor, MGMT 305, BETH 301.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MKTG 340 - 01 Marketing Research - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MCH 118

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MCH 118

Course Registration Number:

21920 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David M. Harman

In this course, students learn to develop surveys, observation, experiments, and other tools for learning about customer characteristics and requirements. They learn about analytical techniques, data sources, re search planning and costs. Students would greatly benefit from completing this course before they take MKTG 430. Prerequisites: MKTG 300, MATH 101 or 109 or 111 or 113, STAT 220 (QMCS 220 or IDTH 220)

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MKTG 340 - 02 Marketing Research - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MCH 118

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MCH 118

Course Registration Number:

21921 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David M. Harman

In this course, students learn to develop surveys, observation, experiments, and other tools for learning about customer characteristics and requirements. They learn about analytical techniques, data sources, re search planning and costs. Students would greatly benefit from completing this course before they take MKTG 430. Prerequisites: MKTG 300, MATH 101 or 109 or 111 or 113, STAT 220 (QMCS 220 or IDTH 220)

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MKTG 375 - 01 Product Innovation and Mktg - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MCH 110

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MCH 110

Course Registration Number:

21925 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David L. Alexander

This course takes a strategic perspective on managing the product element of the firm's marketing mix - the most integral element. Students will delve into segmenting markets based on needs and assessing innovation strategy, viability, new product design, product differentiation, product portfolio and lifecycle management, line and brand extension strategy amongst other product and service tactics. Prerequisites: MKTG 300

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OPMT 360 - D01 Service Operations Management M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 MCH 115

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

MCH 115

Course Registration Number:

21957 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Sheneeta W. White

The service sector is the fastest-growing sector of the economy. This course is designed to explore the dimensions of service operations management and the process of ongoing improvement. Outstanding service organizations are managed differently than their manufacturing counterparts. The results show not only in terms of conventional operational measures of performance, but also in the enthusiasm of the employees and degree of customer satisfaction, where efficient and effective service is taken as a positive experience. This course aims at applying tools learned in Operations Management as well as integrating student learning from other areas such as strategy, marketing, technology and organizational issues in the service industry. Service sectors covered in this course include airlines, health care, hotels, restaurants, entertainment & recreation, and service consulting. Offered Spring semester. Prerequisite: OPMT 310

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 115 - 41 HONORS: Phil. of Human Person M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 JRC 201

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

JRC 201

Course Registration Number:

22206 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Thomas D. Feeney

An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention. This course, with PHIL 214, fulfills the Moral and Philosophical Reasoning requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 334 - 01 Psychology for Sustainability - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC LL01

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC LL01

Course Registration Number:

22479 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Britain A. Scott

Drawing from work in environmental psychology, ecopsychology, and conservation psychology we will address how psychological theory and research can be applied to promote a sustainable future and explore psychological aspects of the reciprocal relationship between humans and the rest of the natural world. This course will provide an overview of the basic knowledge, theories, and research methods that characterize the psychology of sustainable behavior. After completing this course, students will understand the causes and consequences of environmental degradation, understanding of the psychological underpinnings of the approaches being used to promote sustainable behavior and be able to describe important social, cultural, and policy factors that influence sustainable behavior. Prerequisite: One of the following PSYC 111, ENVR 151, ENGR 123, BIOL BIOL 102, BIOL 209, GEOL 115 OR CHEM 101, or permission of the instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SPAN 211 - L05 Intermediate Spanish I - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 308

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 308

Course Registration Number:

20297 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Susana Perez Castillejo

Designed to increase listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish. Intensive review of grammatical structures of Elementary Spanish I and II. Continued exposure to Hispanic culture. Prerequisite: SPAN 112 or its equivalent with a grade of C- or better

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SPAN 211 - L07 Intermediate Spanish I M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 311

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 311

Course Registration Number:

20298 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jane D. Tar

Designed to increase listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish. Intensive review of grammatical structures of Elementary Spanish I and II. Continued exposure to Hispanic culture. Prerequisite: SPAN 112 or its equivalent with a grade of C- or better

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SPAN 211 - L12 Intermediate Spanish I - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 302

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 302

Course Registration Number:

20893 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Susana Perez Castillejo

Designed to increase listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish. Intensive review of grammatical structures of Elementary Spanish I and II. Continued exposure to Hispanic culture. Prerequisite: SPAN 112 or its equivalent with a grade of C- or better

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SPAN 320 - D01 Business Spanish M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 MHC 208

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

MHC 208

Course Registration Number:

22291 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Susana Perez Castillejo

Practice in the language skills and vocabulary needed to conduct business in the Hispanic world; an overview of political, economic, social and cultural factors which affect business in the Hispanic countries. Offered in fall semester. Prerequisites: Successful completion of SPAN 301 and 305 or their equivalents with a C- or better in each course (may be taken simultaneously with SPAN 305).

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 459 - L01 Theology & Environment - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 JRC 246

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

21671 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy M. Levad

This course examines Christian theological and moral reflection on the relation between human activity and the natural environment. It will address environmental issues that are of mutual concern to theologians and the natural or social sciences; thus it will study scientific analysis along with theological perspectives. The course will also review contemporary practices and/or policies that address environmental problems. Prerequisite: THEO 101 and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course, and PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term Study Abroad in Germany and Denmark

Psychology of Sustainability in Germany and Denmark (PSYC 334) | Instructor: Elise Amel

Course description:  The psychology of sustainability is the scientific study of the interplay between human behavior and the natural environment. Though the field is gaining momentum in the United States, it is much better established in Germany (Umweltpsychologie) and other European countries. We begin the course by examining the scientific evidence regarding environmental issues including global climate change, industrial food systems, and depletion of natural resources like fresh water, oil, and metal deposits. Then we examine psychological factors associated with decision making and conservation-related behavior. We will cover such topics as norms, values, and incentives and why they may strengthen or weaken the link between our attitudes and behaviors. We close by examining interventions designed to change human behavior. Locating the course in German cities such as Hamburg and Berlin as well as the Danish capital of Copenhagen will provide ample opportunity to examine important concepts by directly observing how these strategies have been applied.  See here for more details. 

Term offered: J-term 2018 as a Study Abroad program in Germany and Denmark

CRN: not available, see the Study Abroad website for course details

J-Term Study Abroad in Hawaii

Multi-Cultural Communication in Diverse Organizations (COJO 370) | Instructor: Debra Petersen

Course description: We will examine the concepts, theories, and realities of the way individuals and groups work and communicate in organizations where culture and multiculturalism play a primary or prominent role. Each year we partner with the Ke Kula Ni’ihau O' Kekaha Learning Center (KKNOK) to create a reciprocal service-learning experience on an environmental theme that meets the curricular needs of their forty students (pre-school - high school) and the learning objectives of our course. Previous activities with KKNOK include learning about an endangered Hawaiian duck—the kaloa maoli--in 2010.  We contributed to the production of a dvd that features the art, music and literature projects on which our students and their students collaborated.  They continue to use this dvd to educate Hawaiians about endangered species and to showcase their unique school at Hawai’i state education meetings. In 2014 our students and the KKNOK students learned about various aspects of the Waimea River, including ecological challenges to the river and surrounding watershed. Highlights included a presentation by an elder at the Waimea Technology Center and a day on and around the river in which the Kekaha students and our students taught others about the history and environmental challenges of this area. 

The course is highlighted in this PBS video about the KKNOK Learning Center, at 14:40.

Term offered: J-term 2018 as a Study Abroad program in Hawaii

CRN: not available, see the Study Abroad website for course details