Jerry F. Husak portrait

Jerry F. Husak

Assistant Professor
Degree
Ph.D., Oklahoma State University
Office
354 Owens
Phone
(651) 962-5223
Toll Free
(800) 328-6819, Ext. 2-5223
Fax
651.962.5201
Mail
OWS 352
University of St. Thomas
2115 Summit Ave.
Saint Paul MN 55105

Professional Interests

My research focuses on understanding how the processes of natural and sexual selection shape physiological and morphological traits. Specifically, I am interested in how hormones link animals to their biotic and abiotic environments through the regulation of performance traits important to fitness. To accomplish this, I integrate theory and techniques from physiology, evolutionary ecology, animal behavior, and functional morphology, and I combine laboratory experiments with correlative studies of natural populations. I primarily work with reptiles as model systems, and I conduct research in the southwestern US and the Caribbean. Some of my current projects include:

  • How steroid hormones mediate performance in lizards
  • How endocrine systems regulate social behavior in Caribbean Anolis lizards
  • Direct and indirect effects of sexually selected traits on animal performance
  • Examining performance consequences of muscle fiber composition in lizards

Lab website:  http://jerryhusak.weebly.com/index.html

 

Representative publications:

(Student researchers are denoted by *.)

  • Husak, J. F., A. R. Keith*, and B. N. Wittry*. 2015. Making Olympic lizards: the effects of specialised exercise training on lizard performance. Journal of Experimental Biology 218:899-906. (*UST undergraduates)
  • Lailvaux, S. P., and J. F. Husak. 2014. The life-history of whole-organism performance. Quarterly Review of Biology 89:285-318.
  • Husak, J. F., and J. G. Swallow. 2011. Compensatory traits and the evolution of male ornaments. Behaviour 148:1-29.
  • Husak, J. F., and I. T. Moore. 2008. Stress hormones and mate choice. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 23:532-534. 
  • Husak, J. F., and S. F. Fox. 2008. Sexual selection on locomotor performance. Evolutionary Ecology Research 10:213-228.

 

Fall 2017 Courses

Fall 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
BIOL 207 - 58 Genetics Ecology Evolution/Lab - - W - - - - 1800 - 2100 OWS 264
CRN: 41063 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Jerry F. Husak A consideration of the mechanisms of heredity, evolution, population genetics, and population ecology emphasizing hypothesis testing, case studies, and quantitative and experimental approaches to population biology. Topics include: Mendelian genetics, genetic mapping, population genetics, selection theory and the process of adaptation, speciation, macroevolution and phylogenetics, and the growth and regulation of populations. Laboratory work emphasizes techniques for data analysis, including computer simulation and modeling. Three laboratory hours per week. This course fulfills the core-area in natural science in the Natural Science and Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning requirements in the core curriculum. Prerequisites: Co-enrollment in or previous credit for CHEM 111 or CHEM 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 349 - 01 Comp Anatomy & Physiology M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OWS 250
CRN: 40011 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jerry F. Husak This course includes an examination of the functional morphology of the vertebrate skeletal, muscular, nervous, and sensory systems. Emphasis will be placed upon the evolution, development and function of these systems as well as the control and integration of all organ systems in vertebrates. This course may be taken as part of a two-semester sequence with BIOL 350 but may also be taken alone. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 207, BIOL 208 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 389 - I2 Research - - - - - - - -
CRN: 43573 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jerry F. Husak Original laboratory, field, library or other analytical investigation under the direction of a member of the biology faculty, culminating in either a written research paper or an oral presentation. Upper class standing not required. Prerequisites: BIOL 207, BIOL 208 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209, permission of the instructor and the department chair.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2018 Courses

J-Term 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
BIOL 211 - A01 Field Research in Costa Rica - - - - - - - -
CRN: 10157 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Gaston E. Small, Jerry F. Husak STUDY ABROAD: Multiple Sites-Costa Rica

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Spring 2018 Courses

Spring 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
BIOL 350 - 01 Comp. Anatomy/Physiology M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OWS 257
CRN: 20012 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jerry F. Husak This course includes an examination of the functional morphology of the vertebrate endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, digestive and reproductive systems, including control and integration of organ systems, as well as adaptation to the environment and evolutionary history. Laboratory work will emphasize functional comparisons of vertebrate organ systems and an experimental approach to physiological problems. Four laboratory hours per week. This course may be taken as a part of a two-semester sequence with BIOL 349 or may be taken alone. Prerequisite: BIOL 207, BIOL 208 and a minimum grad of C- in BIOL 209.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 375 - 01 Endocrinology M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OWS LL54
CRN: 22121 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jerry F. Husak This course is intended to give an overall introduction to the major endocrine systems of vertebrates and their involvement in the control of physiological functions. Major principles involved in signaling by hormones, the integration of hormonal mechanisms to maintain homeostasis, and the evolution of endocrine systems will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on similarities and differences among vertebrate groups, but focus will be primarily mammalian endocrinology. The primary objective is to highlight the complexity of control and integration of physiological functions by chemical signals such as hormones. Prerequisites: BIOL 207, BIOL 208 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 375 - 51 Endocrinology/Lab - - W - - - - 1330 - 1730 OWS 379
CRN: 22122 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Jerry F. Husak This course is intended to give an overall introduction to the major endocrine systems of vertebrates and their involvement in the control of physiological functions. Major principles involved in signaling by hormones, the integration of hormonal mechanisms to maintain homeostasis, and the evolution of endocrine systems will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on similarities and differences among vertebrate groups, but focus will be primarily mammalian endocrinology. The primary objective is to highlight the complexity of control and integration of physiological functions by chemical signals such as hormones. Prerequisites: BIOL 207, BIOL 208 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 375 - 52 Endocrinology/Lab - - - R - - - 1330 - 1730 OWS 379
CRN: 22123 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Jerry F. Husak This course is intended to give an overall introduction to the major endocrine systems of vertebrates and their involvement in the control of physiological functions. Major principles involved in signaling by hormones, the integration of hormonal mechanisms to maintain homeostasis, and the evolution of endocrine systems will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on similarities and differences among vertebrate groups, but focus will be primarily mammalian endocrinology. The primary objective is to highlight the complexity of control and integration of physiological functions by chemical signals such as hormones. Prerequisites: BIOL 207, BIOL 208 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)