Yohuru Williams portrait

Yohuru Williams

Distinguished University Chair, Professor and Founding Director of the Racial Justice Initiative
Degree
Ph.D., Howard University
M.A., University of Scranton
B.S., University of Scranton
Phone
651-962-6001

Dr. Yohuru Williams is a Distinguished University Chair, Professor and the Founding Director of the Racial Justice Initiative at the University of St. Thomas. A noted scholar of the civil rights and black power movements, an education activist and frequent national commentator, he is an important voice on the topics of race and social justice.

Dr. Williams holds a joint appointment in the Department of History and the School of Law. As a Distinguished University Chair, he helps the university address equity and justice topics that are outside any one school or college and separate from the internal-facing portfolio of the Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. Dr. Williams collaborates with people across the university already engaged in community work in order to leverage the full intellectual capacity of St. Thomas to be of even greater service to the community.

Fall 2021 Courses

Fall 2021 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

J-Term 2022 Courses

J-Term 2022 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2022 Courses

Spring 2022 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HIST 216 - 01 African-American History M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 MHC 201

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

MHC 201

Course Registration Number:

29449 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

David C. Williard, Yohuru Williams

An introductory social history survey of African-American experience in global perspective. This course will cover developments from the beginnings of the trans-Atlantic slave trade through the present. Topics include: West African cultures; origins of the international slave trade; African American life in the colonies and during the Revolution; development of slavery in global comparative perspective; resistance to slavery; and the role of African Americans in the Civil War and Reconstruction eras; Jim Crow culture and its challengers; migration; changes during the depression and WWII; black nationalism and independent Africa; the freedom movements of the North and South; and the post civil rights era.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)