Why Wyoming Still Matters: The Senate, the Electoral College, and Government by National Consensus

Explore how the structural architecture of the Constitution delicately balances the power of a central government against the continued sovereignty of the states and the liberty of the people.

Date & Time:

Thursday, September 19, 2019
12:30 PM - 1:25 PM

Location:

MSL 235

Join the St. Thomas Federalist Society and Prof. Richard Duncan of Univ. of Nebraska Law School to explore how the structural architecture of the Constitution delicately balances the incredible power of a central government wielding the sword of the Supremacy Clause against the continued sovereignty of the states and the liberty of we the people of the several states. In particular, the presentation will focus on the Constitution's provisions regarding the electoral college as the mechanism by which the President of the United States is chosen and regarding the structure of the United States Senate. The genius of the Constitution is that it created a national government which, although supreme within its enumerated powers, is checked by the interests and liberties of we the people in the states by the requirement of a strong consensus among the states.

St. Thomas Law Professor Mitchell Gordon will provide commentary/response to the lecture.

This event is part of a university-wide celebration of national Constitution Day on Sept. 17.

To make an accessibility request, call Disability Resources at (651) 962-6315.

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