Fall 2019 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HIST 111 - L01 Origins: Mod World to 1550 See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

40423 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jenna M. Schultz

The first half of this class will take place in the classroom; the second half online.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 2090815-0920M - W - F - -
-- - - - - - -
HIST 112 - 05 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 MHC 201

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

MHC 201

Course Registration Number:

42023 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jaymin Kim

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - 06 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MHC 201

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MHC 201

Course Registration Number:

42024 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jaymin Kim

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - L01 Hist Mod World Since 1550 M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

40694 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - L02 Hist Mod World Since 1550 M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

41306 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W03 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 JRC 222

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

41173 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W04 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 222

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

41668 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L01 Early Am/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

43497 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne L. Osler

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L02 Early Am/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 208

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MHC 208

Course Registration Number:

42265 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne L. Osler

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L04 Early Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 207

Course Registration Number:

42624 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Max Forrester

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L05 Early Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

42625 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Max Forrester

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L06 Early Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 401

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 401

Course Registration Number:

43716 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Max Forrester

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 03 Mod Us/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 JRC 401

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

JRC 401

Course Registration Number:

42021 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephen R. Hausmann

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 06 Mod Us/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

42637 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jacob C. Jurss

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 07 Mod Us/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MHC 207

Course Registration Number:

43220 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephen R. Hausmann

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - L01 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 JRC 201

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

JRC 201

Course Registration Number:

41307 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Meliha Ceric

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - L02 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 247

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

JRC 247

Course Registration Number:

41819 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Meliha Ceric

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - W04 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

41474 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David C. Williard

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - W05 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MCH 106

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

MCH 106

Course Registration Number:

40378 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David C. Williard

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L01 The World Since 1900 M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 247

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 247

Course Registration Number:

40980 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelly L. Donahue

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the origin, development, reception, alteration, and rejection of various ideologies—including, but not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, communism, liberalism, fascism and Nazism—and the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that they produced. Through a close examination of the twentieth century, students gain appreciation for the intricate nature of power and dependency that characterizes the modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L02 The World Since 1900 M - W - - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

41174 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelly L. Donahue

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the origin, development, reception, alteration, and rejection of various ideologies—including, but not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, communism, liberalism, fascism and Nazism—and the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that they produced. Through a close examination of the twentieth century, students gain appreciation for the intricate nature of power and dependency that characterizes the modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - W01 Middle East and North Africa - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 222

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

41308 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shaherzad R. Ahmadi

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze historical evidence in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course introduces students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa, focusing on the region's interaction with global powers. With special attention placed on global developments and local responses, the course will highlight the origins and expansion of Islamic empires, modern interactions with the West through imperialism and oil concessions, responses to this interaction from nationalist, secularist, and Islamist movements, and the issues these responses generate in the present day, including questions of ethnic conflict and religious pluralism. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - W02 Middle East and North Africa - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 222

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

42626 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shaherzad R. Ahmadi

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze historical evidence in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course introduces students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa, focusing on the region's interaction with global powers. With special attention placed on global developments and local responses, the course will highlight the origins and expansion of Islamic empires, modern interactions with the West through imperialism and oil concessions, responses to this interaction from nationalist, secularist, and Islamist movements, and the issues these responses generate in the present day, including questions of ethnic conflict and religious pluralism. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - W03 Middle East and North Africa M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

42242 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Wesley W. Lummus

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze historical evidence in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course introduces students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa, focusing on the region's interaction with global powers. With special attention placed on global developments and local responses, the course will highlight the origins and expansion of Islamic empires, modern interactions with the West through imperialism and oil concessions, responses to this interaction from nationalist, secularist, and Islamist movements, and the issues these responses generate in the present day, including questions of ethnic conflict and religious pluralism. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - W04 Middle East and North Africa M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

42243 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Wesley W. Lummus

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze historical evidence in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course introduces students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa, focusing on the region's interaction with global powers. With special attention placed on global developments and local responses, the course will highlight the origins and expansion of Islamic empires, modern interactions with the West through imperialism and oil concessions, responses to this interaction from nationalist, secularist, and Islamist movements, and the issues these responses generate in the present day, including questions of ethnic conflict and religious pluralism. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 203 - L01 Ancient Egypt and Near East M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 246

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

43227 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ivancica D. Schrunk

A historical, comparative survey of the origins and diversity of human societies in northeastern Africa (Egypt, Nubia) and western Asia (Anatolia, Levant, Mesopotamia, Arabia, Persia), from the earliest organized political and religious communities to the Arab conquest (8000 B.C. to A.D. 750). Historical processes of special emphasis will include: transition to agriculture; urbanization; state and empire building; emergence of major religious traditions; migrations and cultural crosscurrents. Topics will be explored taking into account the latest textual and archaeological evidence. The course should provide historical understanding of the current ethnic, linguistic, and religious diversity in the region.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 241 - 01 History of Modern China - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 SCB 326

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

SCB 326

Course Registration Number:

42636 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jaymin Kim

This course studies the impact of Imperialism on Chinese state and society and China's subsequent transformation from about 1800 to the 1980s. Topics include: early Chinese and Western contacts; the Canton System; the Opium War and unequal treaties; China's reforms and domestic tensions - the Taiping Rebellion, the Boxer Uprising and the 1911 Revolution; the May Fourth cultural iconoclasm; Chiang Kai-shek and the Nationalist government; the Sino-Japanese War; the nature of Mao Zedong's Communism; the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution; Deng Xiaoping, revisionism and the democratic crackdown. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 263 - 01 United States Military History M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

42632 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David C. Williard

This course provides and overview of the military history of the United States from its revolutionary origins to its contemporary challenges. It examines the composition and employment of the United States military as a product of the larger political and cultural aims of American society while also paying attention to the reciprocal effect that wars have on the societies that engage in them. Special attention will be devoted to the human experience of warfare as an ethical, social, and intellectual problem.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 394 - 01 17th Century European Crisis See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

42671 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jenna M. Schultz

Hist 394: Topics: The Seventeenth-Century European Crisis In the 1950s, several historians claimed that there had been a crisis in seventeenth-century Europe. Scholars varied on the causes for the crisis, with theories supporting economic, social, religious, and/or political developments. The theory of a crisis was so groundbreaking, that it has become a debate that has lasted for decades. In this class, we will unpack the various moments of chaos during the century, including rise of the constitutional monarchy in Britain and absolutism in France, the Thirty Years’ War in the Holy Roman Empire, and upheaval in Spanish-controlled territories. This will be examined within the wider context of climate change, colonization, global trade, and advancements in science and technology. The history of this century will prepare students to engage with the historiographical debates regarding the supposed crisis. This includes a study of the theoretical and methodological approaches used by historians to support their arguments, the ways in which the debate has shifted over time, and how students can contribute their own arguments to the debate. Please note: The first half of this course will be in the classroom; the second half online.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MHC 2090935-1040M - W - F - -
-- - - - - - -
HIST 395 - D01 Empires & Nations: Studying ME - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 246

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

42631 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shaherzad R. Ahmadi

Since Napoleon’s invasion of Egypt in 1798, Europeans and Middle Easterners have been writing modern histories of the Islamic world. The colonizer and the colonized, however, asked fundamentally different historical questions. In this course students will learn about the methods of studying Middle Eastern history, or the techniques of analyzing primary sources to piece together an argument about the past, as well as the ways in which the privilege and historical context of researchers inflect their scholarship. By focusing on the methodologies that scholars engage in order to study the Middle East, like Marxist analysis, gender theory, microhistory, or postcolonialism, students learn about trends within the discipline of History, as well. While early western historians of the region were sometimes directly or indirectly involved in the colonial project, Middle Eastern scholars were largely concerned with justifying their independence through nationalist histories. Soon, however, there were critiques of these entrenched positions. Rather than offer nationalist narratives of the past or judge the relative advancement of a given society, historians of the Islamic world began to ask deeper questions. They examined the role of the state in the national community, the experiences of the underclasses, the ways institutions of power pathologized sexuality, the heteronormativity of public culture, and strains of intellectual thought. This course delves into the methodologies in the field of history as well as the ways in which an author’s power and privilege informed their scholarship.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 466 - D01 Capstone: Natural Disasters M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 481

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

42635 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

Natural Disasters like storms, floods, earthquakes, and volcanoes are dramatic events. Often spectacular, terrifying, and deadly, they raise urgent questions for those who survive them and seek to respond. Why did this happen? Is it a divine judgement, the normal course of nature, or some failure of human foresight and planning? And what should be done in response: rescue, rebuilding, moral and religious reformation, or abandonment? Studying such events in the past allows historians unique windows into the societies and cultures faced by these emergencies, but it also raises basic conceptual problems. Just what separates "natural" from social or political disasters? Should plagues, famines, fires - even war - be included in this category? And what, as historians, can we know and should we say about these events? In this course students explore these questions, first through common readings that offer some possible answers and then by putting these insights into practice by conducting an in-depth research project.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2020 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HIST 111 - L01 Origins: Mod World to 1550 - T W R F - - 0900 - 1200 MHC 206

Days of Week:

- T W R F - -

Time of Day:

0900 - 1200

Location:

MHC 206

Course Registration Number:

10282 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jenna M. Schultz

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the development of and interconnections between religious, legal, economic, social, and political institutions around the world. It considers the rise and fall of various civilizations, the peaceful and destructive interactions between and within different societies, and the lasting impacts of the pre-modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L01 Early Am/Global Perspective - T W R F - - 0900 - 1200 MHC 202

Days of Week:

- T W R F - -

Time of Day:

0900 - 1200

Location:

MHC 202

Course Registration Number:

10115 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne L. Osler

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - L01 Mod Us/Global Perspective - T W R F - - 0900 - 1200 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T W R F - -

Time of Day:

0900 - 1200

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

10074 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Meliha Ceric

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L01 The World Since 1900 - T W R F - - 1300 - 1600 JRC 201

Days of Week:

- T W R F - -

Time of Day:

1300 - 1600

Location:

JRC 201

Course Registration Number:

10281 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the origin, development, reception, alteration, and rejection of various ideologies—including, but not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, communism, liberalism, fascism and Nazism—and the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that they produced. Through a close examination of the twentieth century, students gain appreciation for the intricate nature of power and dependency that characterizes the modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - L01 Middle East and North Africa - T W R F - - 1300 - 1600 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T W R F - -

Time of Day:

1300 - 1600

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

10171 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Wesley W. Lummus

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze historical evidence in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course introduces students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa, focusing on the region's interaction with global powers. With special attention placed on global developments and local responses, the course will highlight the origins and expansion of Islamic empires, modern interactions with the West through imperialism and oil concessions, responses to this interaction from nationalist, secularist, and Islamist movements, and the issues these responses generate in the present day, including questions of ethnic conflict and religious pluralism. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Spring 2020 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HIST 111 - W01 Origins: Mod World to 1550 M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 JRC LL62

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

JRC LL62

Course Registration Number:

20899 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jenna M. Schultz

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the development of and interconnections between religious, legal, economic, social, and political institutions around the world. It considers the rise and fall of various civilizations, the peaceful and destructive interactions between and within different societies, and the lasting impacts of the pre-modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 111 - W02 Origins: Mod World to 1550 M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

20900 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jenna M. Schultz

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the development of and interconnections between religious, legal, economic, social, and political institutions around the world. It considers the rise and fall of various civilizations, the peaceful and destructive interactions between and within different societies, and the lasting impacts of the pre-modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - L01 Hist Mod World Since 1550 M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MHC 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

MHC 207

Course Registration Number:

20293 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - L02 Hist Mod World Since 1550 M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MHC 202

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MHC 202

Course Registration Number:

20294 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W03 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 JRC 246

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

20901 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W04 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 246

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

21598 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W05 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 211

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

21118 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shaherzad R. Ahmadi

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W06 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 211

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

21180 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shaherzad R. Ahmadi

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L01 Early Am/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MHC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

MHC 210

Course Registration Number:

20361 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne L. Osler

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L02 Early Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 202

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 202

Course Registration Number:

20295 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Max Forrester

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L03 Early Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

21043 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Max Forrester

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L04 Early Am/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MHC 210

Course Registration Number:

21901 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne L. Osler

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 03 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MHC 209

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

MHC 209

Course Registration Number:

20296 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephen R. Hausmann

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 04 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

21181 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephen R. Hausmann

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - L02 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MHC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

MHC 210

Course Registration Number:

21050 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Meliha Ceric

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - L05 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 MHC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

MHC 210

Course Registration Number:

21182 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Meliha Ceric

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - L06 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

22694 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jacob C. Jurss

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L02 The World Since 1900 M - W - - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

20777 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelly L. Donahue

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the origin, development, reception, alteration, and rejection of various ideologies—including, but not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, communism, liberalism, fascism and Nazism—and the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that they produced. Through a close examination of the twentieth century, students gain appreciation for the intricate nature of power and dependency that characterizes the modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L03 The World Since 1900 - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MHC 208

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MHC 208

Course Registration Number:

21115 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the origin, development, reception, alteration, and rejection of various ideologies—including, but not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, communism, liberalism, fascism and Nazism—and the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that they produced. Through a close examination of the twentieth century, students gain appreciation for the intricate nature of power and dependency that characterizes the modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L41 The World Since 1900 - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

21116 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the origin, development, reception, alteration, and rejection of various ideologies—including, but not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, communism, liberalism, fascism and Nazism—and the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that they produced. Through a close examination of the twentieth century, students gain appreciation for the intricate nature of power and dependency that characterizes the modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - W01 Middle East and North Africa M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 JRC 222

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

21042 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Wesley W. Lummus

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze historical evidence in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course introduces students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa, focusing on the region's interaction with global powers. With special attention placed on global developments and local responses, the course will highlight the origins and expansion of Islamic empires, modern interactions with the West through imperialism and oil concessions, responses to this interaction from nationalist, secularist, and Islamist movements, and the issues these responses generate in the present day, including questions of ethnic conflict and religious pluralism. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - W02 Middle East and North Africa M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 208

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MHC 208

Course Registration Number:

21590 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Wesley W. Lummus

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze historical evidence in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course introduces students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa, focusing on the region's interaction with global powers. With special attention placed on global developments and local responses, the course will highlight the origins and expansion of Islamic empires, modern interactions with the West through imperialism and oil concessions, responses to this interaction from nationalist, secularist, and Islamist movements, and the issues these responses generate in the present day, including questions of ethnic conflict and religious pluralism. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 205 - L01 The Ancient Greek World M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 481

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

22689 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ivancica D. Schrunk

This course is a study of ancient Greek social structures, political processes, culture, beliefs, and moral values, from the Mycenaean society in the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic world of Alexander's legacy. The objective is to learn about major social, political, economic, and cultural change over time in the Greek world, with regard to the wider context of the surrounding cultures. We examine textual and material evidence in order to learn about the nature, value, and explication of primary sources and about historical, archaeological and anthropological methods of inquiry and analysis. Overall, we seek to understand the historic roots of modern issues and the relevance of past experiences, while keeping abreast of recent research and current scholarly debate.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 223 - 01 Irish Hist Survey: Celtic-1972 M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 481

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

22683 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelly L. Donahue

As a survey of Irish History, the course covers early Irish history and society, the Viking and Norman invasions, and special attention is given to the early modern period and the origins of Ulster during the Tudor-Stuart Period in English History. In the 18th century the origins of Irish nationalism and the Rising of 1798 is highlighted. In the 19th century the course covers Catholic Emancipation, the Great Famine and emigration and the movement for Home Rule. Twentieth century Ireland includes the creation of the Irish Free State and the history of contemporary Ireland to the present.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 292 - 01 Topics: Cont Native Amer M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

22688 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephen R. Hausmann

In popular culture and even academic histories, the story of Native North America is too often assumed to have ended with the 1890 Massacre at Wounded Knee. Rather than an ending, this course begins at that pivotal and tragic moment. This course surveys the history of Indigenous people in North America from the end of the nineteenth century to the present and emphasizes methods by which Native communities survived, resisted, and thrived, within the bounds of American colonialism in the modern era. We will address issues and questions such as Native sovereignty, the changing relationship between Native people and the US state, and Native activism in the realms of politics and environmental justice, including the rise of AIM in the mid-twentieth century and the #NODAPL movement in the twenty first.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 322 - 01 Tudor and Stuart Britain M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 SCB 211

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

SCB 211

Course Registration Number:

22690 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

England from the accession of the Tudor dynasty down to the Glorious Revolution. Modernization of English society and government. The English Reformation. Anglicanism. The Elizabethan period. Puritanism. Crown and Parliament in Tudor and Early Stuart times. Civil War, Revolution and Restoration. The Revolution of 1688. Prerequisite: One 100-level history course

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 336 - 01 History of the Soviet Union - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

22691 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

This course examines the history of the Soviet Union from its outset to its collapse. During the semester students engage with topics related to the “Soviet experiment” that transformed the world’s largest country in every aspect. Topics include, but certainly not limited to: origins of the Soviet ideology; the Bolshevik Revolution and the subsequent Civil War; Leninism; the Stalinist Revolution and the Great Purge; the Great Patriotic War; de-Stalinization, the Soviet Union and the Cold War in its global perspective; everyday history of the Soviet Union; collapse of the system; and the emergence of post-Soviet Russia. Prerequisite: One 100-level history course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 395 - D01 Top:Heresies in Imperial China - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

21678 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jaymin Kim

This course will investigate imperial orthodoxy and heresies in a historical context. We will start with the establishment of Confucianism as the orthodox school of thought in China by the second century BCE, focusing on Confucius and his followers as well as their opponents. In the second part of the class, we will encounter Confucianism as an institutionalized imperial orthodoxy by looking at the imperial legal codes as well as the civil service examination system, two key institutions that perpetuated its orthodoxy in late imperial China (1368-1912). Last, we will look at various “heresies” that went against this imperial orthodoxy, ranging from disobedience to one’s parents to the practice of Christianity. By analyzing legal records from the Qing dynasty (1636-1912), we will look at how orthodoxy worked in practice as well as how heresies operated and sometimes were persecuted by the imperial state. The overarching goals of this course are to highlight the historical relevance of Confucianism as a sociocultural structure, to become aware of the diversity of ways of life in imperial China, and to introduce basic components of source analysis and analytical writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 466 - D01 Cap: Sectarianism in Modern ME - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MHC 203

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MHC 203

Course Registration Number:

22695 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shaherzad R. Ahmadi

The Islamic world has been characterized, from its inception, by political dissent, religious syncretism, and ethnoreligious diversity. This course will explore the various sects within Islam as well as the contribution of Christianity, Judaism, Zoroastrianism, and Hinduism to Islamic civilization. Students will learn about systems of power and privilege in the Middle East and North Africa, the ways nationalism complicated those entrenched hierarchies, and the historiographic debate surrounding sectarianism among scholars of the region.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)