Spring 2020 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HIST 111 - W01 Origins: Mod World to 1550 M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 JRC LL62

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

JRC LL62

Course Registration Number:

20899 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jenna M. Schultz

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the development of and interconnections between religious, legal, economic, social, and political institutions around the world. It considers the rise and fall of various civilizations, the peaceful and destructive interactions between and within different societies, and the lasting impacts of the pre-modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 111 - W02 Origins: Mod World to 1550 M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

20900 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jenna M. Schultz

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the development of and interconnections between religious, legal, economic, social, and political institutions around the world. It considers the rise and fall of various civilizations, the peaceful and destructive interactions between and within different societies, and the lasting impacts of the pre-modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - L01 Hist Mod World Since 1550 M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MHC 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

MHC 207

Course Registration Number:

20293 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - L02 Hist Mod World Since 1550 M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MHC 202

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MHC 202

Course Registration Number:

20294 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W03 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 JRC 246

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

20901 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W04 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 246

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

21598 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W05 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 211

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

21118 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shaherzad R. Ahmadi

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W06 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 211

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

21180 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shaherzad R. Ahmadi

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L01 Early Am/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MHC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

MHC 210

Course Registration Number:

20361 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne L. Osler

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L02 Early Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 202

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 202

Course Registration Number:

20295 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Max Forrester

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L03 Early Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

21043 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Max Forrester

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L04 Early Am/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MHC 210

Course Registration Number:

21901 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne L. Osler

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 03 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MHC 209

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

MHC 209

Course Registration Number:

20296 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephen R. Hausmann

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 04 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

21181 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephen R. Hausmann

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - L02 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MHC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

MHC 210

Course Registration Number:

21050 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Meliha Ceric

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - L05 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 MHC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

MHC 210

Course Registration Number:

21182 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Meliha Ceric

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - L06 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

22694 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jacob C. Jurss

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L02 The World Since 1900 M - W - - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

20777 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelly L. Donahue

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the origin, development, reception, alteration, and rejection of various ideologies—including, but not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, communism, liberalism, fascism and Nazism—and the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that they produced. Through a close examination of the twentieth century, students gain appreciation for the intricate nature of power and dependency that characterizes the modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L03 The World Since 1900 - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MHC 208

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MHC 208

Course Registration Number:

21115 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the origin, development, reception, alteration, and rejection of various ideologies—including, but not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, communism, liberalism, fascism and Nazism—and the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that they produced. Through a close examination of the twentieth century, students gain appreciation for the intricate nature of power and dependency that characterizes the modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L41 Honr: The World Since 1900 - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

21116 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the origin, development, reception, alteration, and rejection of various ideologies—including, but not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, communism, liberalism, fascism and Nazism—and the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that they produced. Through a close examination of the twentieth century, students gain appreciation for the intricate nature of power and dependency that characterizes the modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - W01 Middle East and North Africa M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 JRC 222

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

21042 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Wesley W. Lummus

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze historical evidence in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course introduces students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa, focusing on the region's interaction with global powers. With special attention placed on global developments and local responses, the course will highlight the origins and expansion of Islamic empires, modern interactions with the West through imperialism and oil concessions, responses to this interaction from nationalist, secularist, and Islamist movements, and the issues these responses generate in the present day, including questions of ethnic conflict and religious pluralism. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - W02 Middle East and North Africa M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 208

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MHC 208

Course Registration Number:

21590 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Wesley W. Lummus

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze historical evidence in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course introduces students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa, focusing on the region's interaction with global powers. With special attention placed on global developments and local responses, the course will highlight the origins and expansion of Islamic empires, modern interactions with the West through imperialism and oil concessions, responses to this interaction from nationalist, secularist, and Islamist movements, and the issues these responses generate in the present day, including questions of ethnic conflict and religious pluralism. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 205 - L01 The Ancient Greek World M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 481

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

22689 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ivancica D. Schrunk

This course is a study of ancient Greek social structures, political processes, culture, beliefs, and moral values, from the Mycenaean society in the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic world of Alexander's legacy. The objective is to learn about major social, political, economic, and cultural change over time in the Greek world, with regard to the wider context of the surrounding cultures. We examine textual and material evidence in order to learn about the nature, value, and explication of primary sources and about historical, archaeological and anthropological methods of inquiry and analysis. Overall, we seek to understand the historic roots of modern issues and the relevance of past experiences, while keeping abreast of recent research and current scholarly debate.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 223 - 01 Irish Hist Survey: Celtic-1972 M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 481

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

22683 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelly L. Donahue

As a survey of Irish History, the course covers early Irish history and society, the Viking and Norman invasions, and special attention is given to the early modern period and the origins of Ulster during the Tudor-Stuart Period in English History. In the 18th century the origins of Irish nationalism and the Rising of 1798 is highlighted. In the 19th century the course covers Catholic Emancipation, the Great Famine and emigration and the movement for Home Rule. Twentieth century Ireland includes the creation of the Irish Free State and the history of contemporary Ireland to the present.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 292 - 01 Topics: Cont Native Amer M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

22688 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephen R. Hausmann

In popular culture and even academic histories, the story of Native North America is too often assumed to have ended with the 1890 Massacre at Wounded Knee. Rather than an ending, this course begins at that pivotal and tragic moment. This course surveys the history of Indigenous people in North America from the end of the nineteenth century to the present and emphasizes methods by which Native communities survived, resisted, and thrived, within the bounds of American colonialism in the modern era. We will address issues and questions such as Native sovereignty, the changing relationship between Native people and the US state, and Native activism in the realms of politics and environmental justice, including the rise of AIM in the mid-twentieth century and the #NODAPL movement in the twenty first.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 322 - 01 Tudor and Stuart Britain M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 SCB 211

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

SCB 211

Course Registration Number:

22690 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

England from the accession of the Tudor dynasty down to the Glorious Revolution. Modernization of English society and government. The English Reformation. Anglicanism. The Elizabethan period. Puritanism. Crown and Parliament in Tudor and Early Stuart times. Civil War, Revolution and Restoration. The Revolution of 1688. Prerequisite: One 100-level history course

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 336 - 01 History of the Soviet Union - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

22691 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

This course examines the history of the Soviet Union from its outset to its collapse. During the semester students engage with topics related to the “Soviet experiment” that transformed the world’s largest country in every aspect. Topics include, but certainly not limited to: origins of the Soviet ideology; the Bolshevik Revolution and the subsequent Civil War; Leninism; the Stalinist Revolution and the Great Purge; the Great Patriotic War; de-Stalinization, the Soviet Union and the Cold War in its global perspective; everyday history of the Soviet Union; collapse of the system; and the emergence of post-Soviet Russia. Prerequisite: One 100-level history course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 395 - D01 Top:Heresies in Imperial China - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

21678 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jaymin Kim

This course will investigate imperial orthodoxy and heresies in a historical context. We will start with the establishment of Confucianism as the orthodox school of thought in China by the second century BCE, focusing on Confucius and his followers as well as their opponents. In the second part of the class, we will encounter Confucianism as an institutionalized imperial orthodoxy by looking at the imperial legal codes as well as the civil service examination system, two key institutions that perpetuated its orthodoxy in late imperial China (1368-1912). Last, we will look at various “heresies” that went against this imperial orthodoxy, ranging from disobedience to one’s parents to the practice of Christianity. By analyzing legal records from the Qing dynasty (1636-1912), we will look at how orthodoxy worked in practice as well as how heresies operated and sometimes were persecuted by the imperial state. The overarching goals of this course are to highlight the historical relevance of Confucianism as a sociocultural structure, to become aware of the diversity of ways of life in imperial China, and to introduce basic components of source analysis and analytical writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 466 - D01 Cap: Sectarianism in Modern ME - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MHC 203

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MHC 203

Course Registration Number:

22695 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shaherzad R. Ahmadi

The Islamic world has been characterized, from its inception, by political dissent, religious syncretism, and ethnoreligious diversity. This course will explore the various sects within Islam as well as the contribution of Christianity, Judaism, Zoroastrianism, and Hinduism to Islamic civilization. Students will learn about systems of power and privilege in the Middle East and North Africa, the ways nationalism complicated those entrenched hierarchies, and the historiographic debate surrounding sectarianism among scholars of the region.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2020 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HIST 115 - L01 The World Since 1900 M - W - - - - 1730 - 2130 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2130

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

30137 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelly L. Donahue

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the origin, development, reception, alteration, and rejection of various ideologies—including, but not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, communism, liberalism, fascism and Nazism—and the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that they produced. Through a close examination of the twentieth century, students gain appreciation for the intricate nature of power and dependency that characterizes the modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L02 The World Since 1900 - T - R - - - 0900 - 1300 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0900 - 1300

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

30179 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the origin, development, reception, alteration, and rejection of various ideologies—including, but not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, communism, liberalism, fascism and Nazism—and the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that they produced. Through a close examination of the twentieth century, students gain appreciation for the intricate nature of power and dependency that characterizes the modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Fall 2020 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HIST 111 - L01 Origins: Mod World to 1550 M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44221 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jenna M. Schultz

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the development of and interconnections between religious, legal, economic, social, and political institutions around the world. It considers the rise and fall of various civilizations, the peaceful and destructive interactions between and within different societies, and the lasting impacts of the pre-modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 111 - L02 Origins: Mod World to 1550 M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46473 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jenna M. Schultz

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the development of and interconnections between religious, legal, economic, social, and political institutions around the world. It considers the rise and fall of various civilizations, the peaceful and destructive interactions between and within different societies, and the lasting impacts of the pre-modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - L01 Hist Mod World Since 1550 M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44444 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - L02 Hist Mod World Since 1550 M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44959 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - L05 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45515 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kari E. Zimmerman

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W03 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44846 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W04 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45248 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L01 Early Am/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46095 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne L. Osler

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L02 Early Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1730 - 1915

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45621 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Max Forrester

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L03 Early Am/Global Perspective M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46510 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jacob C. Jurss

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 01 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44960 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Meliha Ceric

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 02 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45363 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Meliha Ceric

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 03 Mod Us/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45514 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephen R. Hausmann

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 04 Mod Us/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45835 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephen R. Hausmann

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - W05 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44187 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David C. Williard

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - W06 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46472 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David C. Williard

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L01 The World Since 1900 - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44691 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the origin, development, reception, alteration, and rejection of various ideologies—including, but not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, communism, liberalism, fascism and Nazism—and the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that they produced. Through a close examination of the twentieth century, students gain appreciation for the intricate nature of power and dependency that characterizes the modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L02 The World Since 1900 - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44847 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the origin, development, reception, alteration, and rejection of various ideologies—including, but not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, communism, liberalism, fascism and Nazism—and the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that they produced. Through a close examination of the twentieth century, students gain appreciation for the intricate nature of power and dependency that characterizes the modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L03 The World Since 1900 M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46474 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelly L. Donahue

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the origin, development, reception, alteration, and rejection of various ideologies—including, but not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, communism, liberalism, fascism and Nazism—and the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that they produced. Through a close examination of the twentieth century, students gain appreciation for the intricate nature of power and dependency that characterizes the modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L04 The World Since 1900 M - W - - - - 1730 - 1915

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46475 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelly L. Donahue

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the origin, development, reception, alteration, and rejection of various ideologies—including, but not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, communism, liberalism, fascism and Nazism—and the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that they produced. Through a close examination of the twentieth century, students gain appreciation for the intricate nature of power and dependency that characterizes the modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - W01 Middle East and North Africa M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44961 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shaherzad R. Ahmadi

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze historical evidence in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course introduces students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa, focusing on the region's interaction with global powers. With special attention placed on global developments and local responses, the course will highlight the origins and expansion of Islamic empires, modern interactions with the West through imperialism and oil concessions, responses to this interaction from nationalist, secularist, and Islamist movements, and the issues these responses generate in the present day, including questions of ethnic conflict and religious pluralism. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - W02 Middle East and North Africa M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45827 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shaherzad R. Ahmadi

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze historical evidence in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course introduces students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa, focusing on the region's interaction with global powers. With special attention placed on global developments and local responses, the course will highlight the origins and expansion of Islamic empires, modern interactions with the West through imperialism and oil concessions, responses to this interaction from nationalist, secularist, and Islamist movements, and the issues these responses generate in the present day, including questions of ethnic conflict and religious pluralism. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - W04 Middle East and North Africa M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45610 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Wesley W. Lummus

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze historical evidence in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course introduces students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa, focusing on the region's interaction with global powers. With special attention placed on global developments and local responses, the course will highlight the origins and expansion of Islamic empires, modern interactions with the West through imperialism and oil concessions, responses to this interaction from nationalist, secularist, and Islamist movements, and the issues these responses generate in the present day, including questions of ethnic conflict and religious pluralism. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 119 - L02 East Asian Civilizations - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46477 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jaymin Kim

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course uses a culture of East Asia (e.g., China or Japan) as a focal point for investigating the history of the region. Students will gain a broad-based historical and cultural understanding of East Asia in its global context, beginning with the origins of this culture, and including its inter-regional connections and its encounters with the West. Topics may include Eastern philosophies of politics and religion, political dynasties and nation state formation, expansion and empire, multiculturalism, commodities and trade, rebellion and revolution. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 119 - W01 East Asian Civilizations - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46476 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jaymin Kim

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course uses a culture of East Asia (e.g., China or Japan) as a focal point for investigating the history of the region. Students will gain a broad-based historical and cultural understanding of East Asia in its global context, beginning with the origins of this culture, and including its inter-regional connections and its encounters with the West. Topics may include Eastern philosophies of politics and religion, political dynasties and nation state formation, expansion and empire, multiculturalism, commodities and trade, rebellion and revolution. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 207 - 01 Slavery in the Americas - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46480 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kari E. Zimmerman

By examining slave societies in Brazil, Cuba, and the United States, this course considers the commonalities and differences in African slavery across the Americas during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. We trace the history of slavery and society through such topics as the Atlantic Trade, plantation v. urban labor, family life, religion and culture, gender, resistance and rebellion, and post-emancipation race relations. Throughout the course, we consider how geographic location and social norms created parallel but distinct systems of slavery. Moreover, we will focus on the sources and methods employed for analyzing those groups that typically lack a historical voice. Focusing on the historiography of slavery, students will gain experience in effectively using evidence to develop an argument, thinking comparatively as a way to analyze information, and learning how to assess or evaluate arguments made by scholars. By the end of the course, students will recognize both the historical conditions of slavery in the Americas and the scholarly treatment of the subject.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 222 - 01 Early Modern Europe: 1450-1750 M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46481 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

Political, religious, and cultural development of the early modern Europe: Late Renaissance; Religious Reformations; Age of Discovery and the rise of the Atlantic Economy; State building in Early Modern Europe; the New Science.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 240 - D01 Found. of Chinese Civilization - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46479 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jaymin Kim

This course introduces students to the formation and evolution of fundamental elements of Chinese civilization to about 1800. Topics include: major Chinese thought, Confucianism, Taoism and Legalism with special emphasis on how Confucianism became a prevailing influence on Chinese government, family and society; the development of the Chinese imperial government including the Civil Service Examination; the flourishing of Buddhism in a Confucian China; Chinese written characters, calligraphy and poetry; the cosmopolitan T'ang dynasty; the T'ang-Sung commercial transformation; the Mongol rule in China; and the state and society before encountering Western expansion. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 292 - W01 Topics: U.S. History M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46478 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David C. Williard, David T. Lawrence

The subject matter of this course will vary from year to year and will focus on a specific historical period or event and/or particular methodological approach(es) to doing history. It will not duplicate existing courses in U.S. history. Students will be asked not only to employ evidence in support of historical interpretations but also to think critically about the relationship between varying types of evidence, to engage in prevalent debates within fields of historical scholarship, and to evaluate historical questions themselves for their utility and manageability.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 337 - 01 History of the First World War - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46483 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

This course examines one of the most monumental and influential events of the twentieth century: The First World War (1914-1918). Itseeks to move beyond the trenches to investigate various issues that relate tothe war that was supposed to end all wars,includingthe complex origins of the war,the experiences of front-soldiers and those of the home front,the difficulty of the peace treaties that followed,the impacts of the conflict on the (geo-) political, social and intellectual landscapeandits legacy and its commemoration. Prerequisites: One 100-level history course

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 358 - 01 20th Century U.S. - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46484 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephen R. Hausmann

An intensive study of 20th-century United States domestic history, with emphasis on social change and social thought. Topics include: reform movements, industrialization, urbanization, the economy, the homefront, consumer culture, suburbanization, liberation movements, and deindustrialization. Prerequisite: one 100-level history course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 375 - 01 Non-State Actors Islamic World M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46482 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shaherzad R. Ahmadi

As the Ottoman and Qajar empires showed signs of collapse in the late nineteenth century, Middle Eastern and North African intellectuals eagerly adopted western systems of finance, education, and governance. In fact, some burgeoning nation-states even copied, word-for-word, European constitutions. By the mid-twentieth century, however, despots ruled the Middle East and North Africa. The two questions that animate this course are: (1) Why do we see autocracies, and destructive non-state actors, dominating the Islamic world? (2) What role do non-state actors play in producing volatility or maintaining stability? Students address these complex questions for an understanding of the region’s conflicts and the role of the international community in resolving (or exacerbating) humanitarian crises. Prerequisites: One 100-level history course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)