Spring 2018 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HIST 111 - W01 Origins: Mod World to 1550 M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 MHC 203

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

MHC 203

Course Registration Number:

21062 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jenna M. Schultz

This course examines significant political, social, economic, religious and cultural developments of ancient Near East, ancient India, Greco-Roman civilizations, ancient and medieval China, ancient Japan, Islamic civilization, ancient African and American societies, and Medieval and Renaissance Europe. As beliefs and social- political concepts and practices of various civilizations formulated and developed during this period still heavily influence our modern world, this course provides a foundation to our understanding of the highly interdependent and interrelated contemporary world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 111 - W02 Origins: Mod World to 1550 M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MHC 203

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

MHC 203

Course Registration Number:

21063 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jenna M. Schultz

This course examines significant political, social, economic, religious and cultural developments of ancient Near East, ancient India, Greco-Roman civilizations, ancient and medieval China, ancient Japan, Islamic civilization, ancient African and American societies, and Medieval and Renaissance Europe. As beliefs and social- political concepts and practices of various civilizations formulated and developed during this period still heavily influence our modern world, this course provides a foundation to our understanding of the highly interdependent and interrelated contemporary world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - L01 Hist Mod World Since 1550 M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MHC 209

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

MHC 209

Course Registration Number:

20344 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - L02 Hist Mod World Since 1550 M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MHC 209

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MHC 209

Course Registration Number:

20345 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W03 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 203

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MHC 203

Course Registration Number:

21064 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kari E. Zimmerman

The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W05 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 MCH 114

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

MCH 114

Course Registration Number:

21467 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W06 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MCH 106

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MCH 106

Course Registration Number:

22001 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W07 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

22921 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L01 Early Am/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MCH 109

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MCH 109

Course Registration Number:

20421 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne L. Osler

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of North America from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. Special emphasis is given to the relation of minority groups (American Indians, African Americans, Hispanic peoples, European immigrants, etc.) to the dominant culture. Major themes include: colonization, slavery, revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, industrialization, reform movements, nativism, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L02 Early Am/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MCH 109

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MCH 109

Course Registration Number:

20346 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne L. Osler

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of North America from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. Special emphasis is given to the relation of minority groups (American Indians, African Americans, Hispanic peoples, European immigrants, etc.) to the dominant culture. Major themes include: colonization, slavery, revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, industrialization, reform movements, nativism, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - W03 Early Am/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MHC 202

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

MHC 202

Course Registration Number:

21255 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael A. Blaakman

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of North America from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. Special emphasis is given to the relation of minority groups (American Indians, African Americans, Hispanic peoples, European immigrants, etc.) to the dominant culture. Major themes include: colonization, slavery, revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, industrialization, reform movements, nativism, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - W04 Early Am/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 209

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MHC 209

Course Registration Number:

21256 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael A. Blaakman

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of North America from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. Special emphasis is given to the relation of minority groups (American Indians, African Americans, Hispanic peoples, European immigrants, etc.) to the dominant culture. Major themes include: colonization, slavery, revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, industrialization, reform movements, nativism, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 02 Mod Us/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 204

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OEC 204

Course Registration Number:

21269 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

George M. Woytanowitz

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 04 Mod Us/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1730 - 1915 MHC 202

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

MHC 202

Course Registration Number:

22006 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Max Forrester

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 05 Mod Us/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 311

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 311

Course Registration Number:

22007 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Max Forrester

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - L03 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 JRC 222

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

20348 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Meliha Ceric

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - W41 Honors Mod Us/Global Perspect M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MCH 232

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MCH 232

Course Registration Number:

20134 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David C. Williard

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L01 The World Since 1900 - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 207

Course Registration Number:

20422 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

This course is an introduction to the history of the world since 1900. Students will learn about the historical processes that led to the emergence of an interdependent world in the 21st century. Topics will include: the establishment of Europe's world hegemony in the years leading up to World War I, the internal conflicts which beset European civilization in the years between the wars, in particular, the rise of Communism and Fascism and the world economic crisis of the 1930's which pushed Europe and Asia toward World War II. Students will also examine the character of the world order that emerged after 1945, the origins of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and the problems of some of the nations newly emerging from colonial domination. Finally, we discuss the role of religion and international politics in one major world religion: the Middle East. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. -- -- --

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L02 The World Since 1900 - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 208

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MHC 208

Course Registration Number:

20927 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

This course is an introduction to the history of the world since 1900. Students will learn about the historical processes that led to the emergence of an interdependent world in the 21st century. Topics will include: the establishment of Europe's world hegemony in the years leading up to World War I, the internal conflicts which beset European civilization in the years between the wars, in particular, the rise of Communism and Fascism and the world economic crisis of the 1930's which pushed Europe and Asia toward World War II. Students will also examine the character of the world order that emerged after 1945, the origins of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and the problems of some of the nations newly emerging from colonial domination. Finally, we discuss the role of religion and international politics in one major world religion: the Middle East. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. -- -- --

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L03 The World Since 1900 M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 401

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 401

Course Registration Number:

21455 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelly L. Donahue

This course is an introduction to the history of the world since 1900. Students will learn about the historical processes that led to the emergence of an interdependent world in the 21st century. Topics will include: the establishment of Europe's world hegemony in the years leading up to World War I, the internal conflicts which beset European civilization in the years between the wars, in particular, the rise of Communism and Fascism and the world economic crisis of the 1930's which pushed Europe and Asia toward World War II. Students will also examine the character of the world order that emerged after 1945, the origins of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and the problems of some of the nations newly emerging from colonial domination. Finally, we discuss the role of religion and international politics in one major world religion: the Middle East. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. -- -- --

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L04 The World Since 1900 M - W - - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

21457 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelly L. Donahue

This course is an introduction to the history of the world since 1900. Students will learn about the historical processes that led to the emergence of an interdependent world in the 21st century. Topics will include: the establishment of Europe's world hegemony in the years leading up to World War I, the internal conflicts which beset European civilization in the years between the wars, in particular, the rise of Communism and Fascism and the world economic crisis of the 1930's which pushed Europe and Asia toward World War II. Students will also examine the character of the world order that emerged after 1945, the origins of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and the problems of some of the nations newly emerging from colonial domination. Finally, we discuss the role of religion and international politics in one major world religion: the Middle East. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. -- -- --

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - W01 Middle East and North Africa - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 SCB 325

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

SCB 325

Course Registration Number:

21254 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Wesley W. Lummus

This course will introduce students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa with special attention to the impact of successive Islamic movements that shaped the modern-day political system of Islam and that continues to inform their interactions with Europe and the West today. The organizing theme of the course is "Contact and Change," which will afford an opportunity to examine two of the principal challenges facing historians: accounting for change and understanding people and societies separated from us by space and time. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 119 - L01 East Asian Civilizations - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 307

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 307

Course Registration Number:

22357 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shibani Bose

This course uses a culture of East Asia (China or Japan) as a focal point for investigating the history of the region. Students will gain a broad‐based historical and cultural understanding of East Asia in its global context, beginning with the origins of this culture, and including its inter‐regional connections and its encounters with the West. In this way, this course addresses the preconception that East Asia existed unchanged until the arrival of Europeans. The theme of this course is “Contact and Change,” which will afford an opportunity to examine two of the principal challenges facing historians: accounting for change and understanding people and societies separated from us by space and time. This course fulfills the Historical Studies and Human Diversity requirements in the core curriculum. Fall semester focuses on Japan; spring semester focuses on China.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 205 - L01 The Ancient Greek World M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 212

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

22002 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ivancica D. Schrunk

This course is a study of ancient Greek social structures, political processes, culture, beliefs, and moral values, from the Mycenaean society in the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic world of Alexander's legacy. The objective is to learn about major social, political, economic, and cultural change over time in the Greek world, with regard to the wider context of the surrounding cultures. We examine textual and material evidence in order to learn about the nature, value, and explication of primary sources and about historical, archaeological and anthropological methods of inquiry and analysis. Overall, we seek to understand the historic roots of modern issues and the relevance of past experiences, while keeping abreast of recent research and current scholarly debate.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 298 - 01 Topics: Hist of Envir Thought M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 SCB 205

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

SCB 205

Course Registration Number:

21253 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

We live in an era of unprecedented concern for environmental dangers and disasters, but ideas and beliefs about human relationships with nature are nothing new. This course begins with ancient texts and concludes in the present, asking along the way how people - from philosophers to the illiterate, scientists to laypeople - have understood their environments. Key themes include the legacies of ancient medical and religious traditions, responses to urbanization and resource scarcity in Renaissance Europe, native American interpretations of nature, and the challenges of modern industrial society. We will consider influential environmentalists such as John Muir and Rachel Carson as well as others who fit less comfortably into that tradition including government planners and legislators, business leaders and economists, consumers and novelists. The course will conclude with an examination of environmentalism in action in students' own communities.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 298 - 02 Topics: The Long Emancipation M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MCH 232

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

MCH 232

Course Registration Number:

21456 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David C. Williard

This course examines the relationship between slavery and freedom for African Americans from the consolidation of the early American republic to the height of Jim Crow. It devotes equal weight to the political and economic structures that linked race to citizenship and to the experiences of African Americans who lived, worked, resisted, and endured that regime. Students will gain familiarity with various kinds of historical evidence and with enduring scholarly questions as they explore the fundamental question "what does it mean to be free in the United States?"

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 298 - 03 Topics: Latin Amer Urban Hist - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 302

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 302

Course Registration Number:

22003 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kari E. Zimmerman

What were the causes and consequences of urban development in Latin America? This course considers the history of urbanization in Latin America as both an official project and a lived experience. Beginning with the colonial city that served as a political and religious center, we explore the evolution of the Latin American city through nation-state formation, twentieth-century modernization projects, and up to contemporary megacities. Major themes such as market development, class conflict, labor and workers’ movements, migrations, gendered spaces, public health and social control, built environments, and urban culture are considered in a comparative framework.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 333 - 01 East-Centr Eur Monarchy to EU - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 208

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 208

Course Registration Number:

22004 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

This course is an examination of the history of East-Central Europe from 1848 to 2010. The subject of our study is one of the most fascinating places one can learn about. The "other Europe," as some people refer to it, is a multiethnic and multicultural region with a turbulent history. The geographical focus of our course will be Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, and the former Yugoslavia. The course allows students to gain knowledge of the region's history and culture. It promises to be a captivating ride, for the "land between" often served as a laboratory for the various ideological and political movements of the nineteenth and twentieth century (liberalism, nationalism, fascism, socialism/communism, capitalism etc.). Prerequisite: One 100-level history course

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 349 - 01 History of Ottoman Empire - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 SCB 206

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

SCB 206

Course Registration Number:

22005 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Wesley W. Lummus

This course is a survey of the history of the Ottomans from its origins as a small medieval principality in Asia Minor to a major global power in the sixteenth century, and to its eventual disintegration by the end of World War I. The course will concentrate on the main political, social and cultural institutions of the Ottoman society, and how these changed over time. It will also introduce students to some of the major themes and recent trends in Ottoman historiography, including debates on the origins and decline of the Ottomans, the issue of Ottomans' legacy for the successor states, as well as the growing research on the formerly underrepresented groups such as women, minorities, etc. Prerequisite: One 100-level history course

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 366 - W01 Hist-American Catholic Church - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 MHC 203

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

MHC 203

Course Registration Number:

21117 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne Klejment

Analysis of the American Catholic church from the mission era through the post Vatican II period, with emphasis on the diverse populations who have comprised the American Catholic church throughout its history. The focus of the course examines the changing relationship between Catholics, their church, and American society. Topics analyzed include anti-Catholicism and nativism; slavery and other forms of racial and ethnic injustice; economic justice and peace; ethnic and gendered spiritualities; the nature of the pre-Vatican II and post-Vatican II Catholic church. Extensive use of sources generated by American Catholics of color emphasize the rich thought and religious experiences of Catholics from diverse backgrounds. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: One 100-level history course

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 465 - D01 Capstone: N. Amer. Borderlands M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 202

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 202

Course Registration Number:

21454 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael A. Blaakman

This capstone seminar examines North American borderlands from the colonial period to the mid-nineteenth century. We will explore how Native Americans and European newcomers interacted with, influenced, and exerted power over each other in contested frontier regions, focusing on themes such as trade, cultural exchange, diplomacy, warfare, empire, revolution, dispossession, and resistance. Students will gain an in-depth knowledge of borderlands history and historiography, and will spend the semester crafting a major term paper that addresses a question of their own devising, based on original primary-source research.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2018 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HIST 112 - W01 Hist Mod World Since 1550 M - W - - - - 1730 - 2130 MCH 111

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2130

Location:

MCH 111

Course Registration Number:

30522 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kari E. Zimmerman

The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - L01 Mod Us/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1730 - 2130 MCH 235

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2130

Location:

MCH 235

Course Registration Number:

30179 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Meliha Ceric

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L01 The World Since 1900 M - W - - - - 1730 - 2130 MCH 235

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2130

Location:

MCH 235

Course Registration Number:

30178 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelly L. Donahue

This course is an introduction to the history of the world since 1900. Students will learn about the historical processes that led to the emergence of an interdependent world in the 21st century. Topics will include: the establishment of Europe's world hegemony in the years leading up to World War I, the internal conflicts which beset European civilization in the years between the wars, in particular, the rise of Communism and Fascism and the world economic crisis of the 1930's which pushed Europe and Asia toward World War II. Students will also examine the character of the world order that emerged after 1945, the origins of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and the problems of some of the nations newly emerging from colonial domination. Finally, we discuss the role of religion and international politics in one major world religion: the Middle East. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. -- -- --

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L02 The World Since 1900 - T - R - - - 0900 - 1300 MCH 111

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0900 - 1300

Location:

MCH 111

Course Registration Number:

30375 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

This course is an introduction to the history of the world since 1900. Students will learn about the historical processes that led to the emergence of an interdependent world in the 21st century. Topics will include: the establishment of Europe's world hegemony in the years leading up to World War I, the internal conflicts which beset European civilization in the years between the wars, in particular, the rise of Communism and Fascism and the world economic crisis of the 1930's which pushed Europe and Asia toward World War II. Students will also examine the character of the world order that emerged after 1945, the origins of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and the problems of some of the nations newly emerging from colonial domination. Finally, we discuss the role of religion and international politics in one major world religion: the Middle East. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. -- -- --

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L03 The World Since 1900 - T - R - - - 0900 - 1300 MCH 111

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0900 - 1300

Location:

MCH 111

Course Registration Number:

30376 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

This course is an introduction to the history of the world since 1900. Students will learn about the historical processes that led to the emergence of an interdependent world in the 21st century. Topics will include: the establishment of Europe's world hegemony in the years leading up to World War I, the internal conflicts which beset European civilization in the years between the wars, in particular, the rise of Communism and Fascism and the world economic crisis of the 1930's which pushed Europe and Asia toward World War II. Students will also examine the character of the world order that emerged after 1945, the origins of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and the problems of some of the nations newly emerging from colonial domination. Finally, we discuss the role of religion and international politics in one major world religion: the Middle East. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. -- -- --

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - L01 Middle East and North Africa - T - R - - - 1730 - 2130 MHC 206

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2130

Location:

MHC 206

Course Registration Number:

30062 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Wesley W. Lummus

Operations management focuses on planning, coordination and control of activities involved in the transformation of resources into goods and services. This course will examine the concepts and techniques utilized in the management of manufacturing and service operations. This course will focus on the strategic use of the tactical tools of operations management. Topics covered include the management of process, technology, production, six-sigma quality, inventory, supply chain, workforce, business process improvement and lean management in operating systems. After completing this course, students will have a greater appreciation for the strategic power of the operations function and greater knowledge of how effective operations management can enable an organization to attain a sustainable competitive advantage. Prerequisites: Junior standing; STAT 220; and MATH 101 or higher; concurrent or previous enrollment in MGMT 305 recommended CLARIFICATION: The class standing for OPMT 310 has been changed to sophomore standing.This change will be officially reflected in the 2018-19 catalog.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Fall 2018 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HIST 111 - W01 Origins: Mod World to 1550 M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

40503 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jenna M. Schultz

This course examines significant political, social, economic, religious and cultural developments of ancient Near East, ancient India, Greco-Roman civilizations, ancient and medieval China, ancient Japan, Islamic civilization, ancient African and American societies, and Medieval and Renaissance Europe. As beliefs and social- political concepts and practices of various civilizations formulated and developed during this period still heavily influence our modern world, this course provides a foundation to our understanding of the highly interdependent and interrelated contemporary world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 111 - W02 Origins: Mod World to 1550 M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

40207 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jenna M. Schultz

This course examines significant political, social, economic, religious and cultural developments of ancient Near East, ancient India, Greco-Roman civilizations, ancient and medieval China, ancient Japan, Islamic civilization, ancient African and American societies, and Medieval and Renaissance Europe. As beliefs and social- political concepts and practices of various civilizations formulated and developed during this period still heavily influence our modern world, this course provides a foundation to our understanding of the highly interdependent and interrelated contemporary world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - L01 Hist Mod World Since 1550 M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 246

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

40802 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - L02 Hist Mod World Since 1550 M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 246

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

41488 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W03 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

41334 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W04 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

41954 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W05 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MHC 211

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

42579 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kari E. Zimmerman

The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W06 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

42580 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kari E. Zimmerman

The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L01 Early Am/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

42576 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne L. Osler

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of North America from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. Special emphasis is given to the relation of minority groups (American Indians, African Americans, Hispanic peoples, European immigrants, etc.) to the dominant culture. Major themes include: colonization, slavery, revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, industrialization, reform movements, nativism, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L03 Early Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 202

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 202

Course Registration Number:

43262 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Max Forrester

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of North America from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. Special emphasis is given to the relation of minority groups (American Indians, African Americans, Hispanic peoples, European immigrants, etc.) to the dominant culture. Major themes include: colonization, slavery, revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, industrialization, reform movements, nativism, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L04 Early Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1730 - 1915 MHC 202

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

MHC 202

Course Registration Number:

43263 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Max Forrester

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of North America from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. Special emphasis is given to the relation of minority groups (American Indians, African Americans, Hispanic peoples, European immigrants, etc.) to the dominant culture. Major themes include: colonization, slavery, revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, industrialization, reform movements, nativism, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 07 Mod Us/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 JRC 246

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

42577 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

George M. Woytanowitz

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - L01 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 JRC 201

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

JRC 201

Course Registration Number:

41489 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Meliha Ceric

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - L02 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 201

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 201

Course Registration Number:

42230 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Meliha Ceric

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - W05 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

41683 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David C. Williard

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - W06 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

40452 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David C. Williard

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L02 The World Since 1900 M - W - - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 222

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

41112 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelly L. Donahue

This course is an introduction to the history of the world since 1900. Students will learn about the historical processes that led to the emergence of an interdependent world in the 21st century. Topics will include: the establishment of Europe's world hegemony in the years leading up to World War I, the internal conflicts which beset European civilization in the years between the wars, in particular, the rise of Communism and Fascism and the world economic crisis of the 1930's which pushed Europe and Asia toward World War II. Students will also examine the character of the world order that emerged after 1945, the origins of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and the problems of some of the nations newly emerging from colonial domination. Finally, we discuss the role of religion and international politics in one major world religion: the Middle East. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. -- -- --

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - W03 The World Since 1900 - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 246

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

41335 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

This course is an introduction to the history of the world since 1900. Students will learn about the historical processes that led to the emergence of an interdependent world in the 21st century. Topics will include: the establishment of Europe's world hegemony in the years leading up to World War I, the internal conflicts which beset European civilization in the years between the wars, in particular, the rise of Communism and Fascism and the world economic crisis of the 1930's which pushed Europe and Asia toward World War II. Students will also examine the character of the world order that emerged after 1945, the origins of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and the problems of some of the nations newly emerging from colonial domination. Finally, we discuss the role of religion and international politics in one major world religion: the Middle East. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. -- -- --

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - W04 The World Since 1900 - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 246

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

41012 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

This course is an introduction to the history of the world since 1900. Students will learn about the historical processes that led to the emergence of an interdependent world in the 21st century. Topics will include: the establishment of Europe's world hegemony in the years leading up to World War I, the internal conflicts which beset European civilization in the years between the wars, in particular, the rise of Communism and Fascism and the world economic crisis of the 1930's which pushed Europe and Asia toward World War II. Students will also examine the character of the world order that emerged after 1945, the origins of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and the problems of some of the nations newly emerging from colonial domination. Finally, we discuss the role of religion and international politics in one major world religion: the Middle East. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. -- -- --

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - 01 Middle East and North Africa - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 MHC 206

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

MHC 206

Course Registration Number:

41490 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shaherzad R. Ahmadi

This course will introduce students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa with special attention to the impact of successive Islamic movements that shaped the modern-day political system of Islam and that continues to inform their interactions with Europe and the West today. The organizing theme of the course is "Contact and Change," which will afford an opportunity to examine two of the principal challenges facing historians: accounting for change and understanding people and societies separated from us by space and time. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - W02 Middle East and North Africa M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

43138 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Wesley W. Lummus

This course will introduce students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa with special attention to the impact of successive Islamic movements that shaped the modern-day political system of Islam and that continues to inform their interactions with Europe and the West today. The organizing theme of the course is "Contact and Change," which will afford an opportunity to examine two of the principal challenges facing historians: accounting for change and understanding people and societies separated from us by space and time. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - W03 Middle East and North Africa M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

43139 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Wesley W. Lummus

This course will introduce students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa with special attention to the impact of successive Islamic movements that shaped the modern-day political system of Islam and that continues to inform their interactions with Europe and the West today. The organizing theme of the course is "Contact and Change," which will afford an opportunity to examine two of the principal challenges facing historians: accounting for change and understanding people and societies separated from us by space and time. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 119 - 01 East Asian Civilizations M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

42581 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jaymin Kim

This course uses a culture of East Asia (China or Japan) as a focal point for investigating the history of the region. Students will gain a broad‐based historical and cultural understanding of East Asia in its global context, beginning with the origins of this culture, and including its inter‐regional connections and its encounters with the West. In this way, this course addresses the preconception that East Asia existed unchanged until the arrival of Europeans. The theme of this course is “Contact and Change,” which will afford an opportunity to examine two of the principal challenges facing historians: accounting for change and understanding people and societies separated from us by space and time. This course fulfills the Historical Studies and Human Diversity requirements in the core curriculum. Fall semester focuses on Japan; spring semester focuses on China.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 119 - 02 East Asian Civilizations M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 222

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

42582 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jaymin Kim

This course uses a culture of East Asia (China or Japan) as a focal point for investigating the history of the region. Students will gain a broad‐based historical and cultural understanding of East Asia in its global context, beginning with the origins of this culture, and including its inter‐regional connections and its encounters with the West. In this way, this course addresses the preconception that East Asia existed unchanged until the arrival of Europeans. The theme of this course is “Contact and Change,” which will afford an opportunity to examine two of the principal challenges facing historians: accounting for change and understanding people and societies separated from us by space and time. This course fulfills the Historical Studies and Human Diversity requirements in the core curriculum. Fall semester focuses on Japan; spring semester focuses on China.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 208 - L01 History of the Roman World M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MCH 232

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MCH 232

Course Registration Number:

42594 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ivancica D. Schrunk

From Britain to Africa and from Spain to Iran, the Roman Empire seemingly united diverse peoples and cultures. All roads led to Rome, the City - Urbs, a cosmopolitan and overcrowded metropolis. In this course we study written records and material remains from the beginnings of Rome in the eight century BCE to the late Empire in the fourth century of our era. We follow political, social, economic, and cultural changes over time, examining a variety of evidence and voices and keeping abreast of current problematic areas and scholarly debate. The Roman material is supplemented with comparative evidence from non-Roman societies within and bordering the Empire, as we account for the relevance of past experiences to our current issues.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 222 - 01 Early Modern Europe: 1450-1750 M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 JRC 246

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

42598 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

Political, religious, and cultural development of the early modern Europe: Late Renaissance; Religious Reformations; Age of Discovery and the rise of the Atlantic Economy; State building in Early Modern Europe; the New Science.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 223 - 01 Irish Hist Survey: Celtic-1972 M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 222

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

43140 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelly L. Donahue

As a survey of Irish History, the course covers early Irish history and society, the Viking and Norman invasions, and special attention is given to the early modern period and the origins of Ulster during the Tudor-Stuart Period in English History. In the 18th century the origins of Irish nationalism and the Rising of 1798 is highlighted. In the 19th century the course covers Catholic Emancipation, the Great Famine and emigration and the movement for Home Rule. Twentieth century Ireland includes the creation of the Irish Free State and the history of contemporary Ireland to the present.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 298 - 02 Non-State Actors ME & N Africa - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

42596 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shaherzad R. Ahmadi

Non-State Actors in the Middle East and North Africa: By examining the role of non-governmental organizations in the Islamic world, this course captures the complexity of conflicts in the region since the nineteenth century. Topics include the influence of European missionary schools during the era of Ottoman and Persian capitulations, indigenous business interests in the nation building period, international humanitarian organizations during twentieth century conflicts (i.e., Israel/ Palestine and Lebanon), as well as political parties and terrorist networks opposing regional states. Thus, through this course, students learn about the role non-state actors play in shaping politics and culture in the modern Islamic world.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 298 - W01 Reading Black Resistance M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 247

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

JRC 247

Course Registration Number:

42729 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David C. Williard, David T. Lawrence

This course, team-taught by a historian and a literary scholar, focuses on the long struggle of African Americans for justice and equality in the U.S. Analyzing literary and historical texts, students in this course will learn about and engage in research on African American history and culture. Utilizing historical, literary, and cultural approaches, this interdisciplinary course will immerse students into an exploration of the African American experience from multiple perspectives using dual disciplinary frameworks. For example, students may study Richard Wright’s NATIVE SON, but would read the text within the historical and cultural framework of the Great Migration, connecting Wright’s text not just to other literary texts, but situating it within an historical and cultural context vital to the novel’s creation and essential for its interpretation. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 335 - 01 Nazi Germany and the Holocaust - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

42597 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

This course examines the origins of modern anti-Semitism, the rise of the Nazi Party and the subsequent radicalization of its racial policy from persecution to genocide. The course conceptualizes the Holocaust in the European/global framework-beyond Germans and Jews. It investigates the relationship between the various segments of the continent’s population and complexities of such concepts as collaboration and resistance. Finally, it examines the legacy, influence, and contemporary understanding of the Holocaust. Prerequisite: One 100-level HIST course

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 464 - D01 Rebellion in the Americas - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

42599 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kari E. Zimmerman

Capstone: Rebellion in the Americas This seminar examines the major interpretations of rebellion in the modern history of the Americas. Course readings and student work that culminations in an original research paper will engage in four fundamental questions: How have historical definitions of revolution and rebellion changed over time, and what explains those changes? What were the political, economic, and cultural forces that compelled ordinary people to rebel against their government and/or the status quo? Do key aspects of resistance transcend geographical boundaries as well as conceptual frameworks such as race, ethnicity, gender and class? How, in turn, have rebellions shaped the local and global societies in which they occurred?

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)