Spring 2019 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HIST 111 - W01 Origins: Mod World to 1550 M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 JRC 246

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

20973 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jenna M. Schultz

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the development of and interconnections between religious, legal, economic, social, and political institutions around the world. It considers the rise and fall of various civilizations, the peaceful and destructive interactions between and within different societies, and the lasting impacts of the pre-modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 111 - W02 Origins: Mod World to 1550 M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 246

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

20974 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jenna M. Schultz

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the development of and interconnections between religious, legal, economic, social, and political institutions around the world. It considers the rise and fall of various civilizations, the peaceful and destructive interactions between and within different societies, and the lasting impacts of the pre-modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - L01 Hist Mod World Since 1550 M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

20314 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - L02 Hist Mod World Since 1550 M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

20315 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W03 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

20975 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W04 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 206

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MHC 206

Course Registration Number:

22292 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shaherzad R. Ahmadi

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W05 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

21230 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W06 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 MHC 209

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

MHC 209

Course Registration Number:

21322 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shaherzad R. Ahmadi

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L01 Early Am/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

20384 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne L. Osler

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L02 Early Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

20316 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Max Forrester

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L03 Early Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

21138 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Max Forrester

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L04 Early Am/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 306

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OEC 306

Course Registration Number:

22810 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne L. Osler

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 05 Mod Us/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 MHC 208

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

MHC 208

Course Registration Number:

21328 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

George M. Woytanowitz

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - L02 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 JRC 247

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

JRC 247

Course Registration Number:

21147 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Meliha Ceric

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - L04 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 247

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

JRC 247

Course Registration Number:

21327 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Meliha Ceric

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - W03 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 246

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

20317 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David C. Williard

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - W41 Honors Mod Us/Global Perspect M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 246

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

20124 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David C. Williard

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L01 The World Since 1900 M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

20385 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelly L. Donahue

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the origin, development, reception, alteration, and rejection of various ideologies—including, but not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, communism, liberalism, fascism and Nazism—and the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that they produced. Through a close examination of the twentieth century, students gain appreciation for the intricate nature of power and dependency that characterizes the modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L02 The World Since 1900 M - W - - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

20845 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelly L. Donahue

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the origin, development, reception, alteration, and rejection of various ideologies—including, but not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, communism, liberalism, fascism and Nazism—and the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that they produced. Through a close examination of the twentieth century, students gain appreciation for the intricate nature of power and dependency that characterizes the modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L03 The World Since 1900 - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 309

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 309

Course Registration Number:

21226 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the origin, development, reception, alteration, and rejection of various ideologies—including, but not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, communism, liberalism, fascism and Nazism—and the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that they produced. Through a close examination of the twentieth century, students gain appreciation for the intricate nature of power and dependency that characterizes the modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L04 The World Since 1900 - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 309

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 309

Course Registration Number:

21228 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the origin, development, reception, alteration, and rejection of various ideologies—including, but not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, communism, liberalism, fascism and Nazism—and the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that they produced. Through a close examination of the twentieth century, students gain appreciation for the intricate nature of power and dependency that characterizes the modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 117 - W01 Latin Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MHC 210

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MHC 210

Course Registration Number:

22290 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kari E. Zimmerman

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, and economic history of Latin America in global context from the Independence movements to the present. Major topics include: democracy and dictatorship, economic development and dependence, slavery and race relations, political revolution, urban and rural societies, migration, militarism, the Church and the struggle for social justice. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement for the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 117 - W02 Latin Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 201

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 201

Course Registration Number:

22291 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kari E. Zimmerman

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, and economic history of Latin America in global context from the Independence movements to the present. Major topics include: democracy and dictatorship, economic development and dependence, slavery and race relations, political revolution, urban and rural societies, migration, militarism, the Church and the struggle for social justice. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement for the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - W01 Middle East and North Africa M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 JRC LL62

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

JRC LL62

Course Registration Number:

21137 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Wesley W. Lummus

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze historical evidence in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course introduces students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa, focusing on the region's interaction with global powers. With special attention placed on global developments and local responses, the course will highlight the origins and expansion of Islamic empires, modern interactions with the West through imperialism and oil concessions, responses to this interaction from nationalist, secularist, and Islamist movements, and the issues these responses generate in the present day, including questions of ethnic conflict and religious pluralism. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - W02 Middle East and North Africa M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 JRC 222

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

22283 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Wesley W. Lummus

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze historical evidence in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course introduces students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa, focusing on the region's interaction with global powers. With special attention placed on global developments and local responses, the course will highlight the origins and expansion of Islamic empires, modern interactions with the West through imperialism and oil concessions, responses to this interaction from nationalist, secularist, and Islamist movements, and the issues these responses generate in the present day, including questions of ethnic conflict and religious pluralism. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 119 - 01 East Asian Civilizations M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

21630 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jaymin Kim

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course uses a culture of East Asia (e.g., China or Japan) as a focal point for investigating the history of the region. Students will gain a broad-based historical and cultural understanding of East Asia in its global context, beginning with the origins of this culture, and including its inter-regional connections and its encounters with the West. Topics may include Eastern philosophies of politics and religion, political dynasties and nation state formation, expansion and empire, multiculturalism, commodities and trade, rebellion and revolution. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 119 - 02 East Asian Civilizations M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MHC 203

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

MHC 203

Course Registration Number:

22284 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jaymin Kim

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course uses a culture of East Asia (e.g., China or Japan) as a focal point for investigating the history of the region. Students will gain a broad-based historical and cultural understanding of East Asia in its global context, beginning with the origins of this culture, and including its inter-regional connections and its encounters with the West. Topics may include Eastern philosophies of politics and religion, political dynasties and nation state formation, expansion and empire, multiculturalism, commodities and trade, rebellion and revolution. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 211 - 01 Women/Families in the Americas - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 201

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MHC 201

Course Registration Number:

22293 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kari E. Zimmerman

This course examines how seemingly impersonal forces are historically associated with personal changes for women and the family across the Americas. We will analyze how women and the family intersected with the economy, politics, and society. A comparative approach allows for consideration of national circumstances and social norms regarding race, ethnicity, and class. Examining the history or women and the family throughout the Americas also highlights similarities and differences within the reciprocal relationship between private lives and public policy. Topics include working women and the family economy, slavery, political rights and protective legislature, social movements, youth culture and immigration. Understanding the history of women and the family helps explain current contentions over women’s roles and modern family structure.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 226 - 01 Modern Europe since 1914 - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MHC 203

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MHC 203

Course Registration Number:

22289 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

This course is a close examination of twentieth century European history or, as some historians refer to it, the "short twentieth century" of the "dark continent." It follows the cultural, social, economic, and political development of Europe through wars and reconstruction. Topics include, but are not limited to, imperial and national rivalry, WW I and its aftermath, Russian Revolution, Fascism and Nazism, WW II and its aftermath, Cold War and the division of Europe, 1989, and the emergence of the European Union.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 244 - 01 Modern East Asia M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 222

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

22285 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jaymin Kim

In this course, we will read about and discuss the development of "modern" societies in China, Korea, and Japan from early modern times to the present. We will focus on problems such as empire, historical memory, and the formation of modern nation-states. Readings include memoirs and other personal writings as historical texts, as a way to understand the times.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 355 - 01 Civil War Era M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 JRC 246

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

22288 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David C. Williard

The American Civil War was a pivotal event, followed by incomplete efforts at changing the shape of the nation through Reconstruction. The causes of the war, its conduct on both sides, and the consequences of this "War of Rebellion," including Reconstruction, form the three parts of this course. Prerequisite: One 100-level history course

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 386 - L01 Historical Archaeology M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 481

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

22286 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ivancica D. Schrunk

The course deals with archaeological methods, theories and interpretations in discovering, reconstructing, and understanding past societies worldwide. As we address specific thematic units and case studies, we learn how archaeological evidence and interdisciplinary research reveal human responses and adaptations to their environments and climate change. Archaeology generally deals with material remains and is the primary discipline that systematically studies societies and time periods that lack written documents. Historical archaeology combines the methods of archaeology with analysis of written and oral sources. This holistic approach builds our knowledge of the human past, enables critical reappraisal of the interconnection between cultural and environmental change and accounts for the relevance of past experiences to our current issues.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 394 - 01 Topics: The Enlightenment M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 222

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

22391 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

The Enlightenment: The "Age of Reason" in Europe and its Empires During the 18th century Europeans were increasingly confident that they had entered an age of reason, in which rationality and science would bring progress and end superstition and oppression. In this course we will examine key examples of this thinking, including the economic, religious, and political works of influential figures like Adam Smith, Voltaire, and Ben Franklin. But we will also focus on many of the questions that historians are now asking about this process: did religious faith really decline? what roles did women play in this movement? did these ideas lead to political revolutions, and if so did they cause liberty or violence? why was an "age of reason" actually so full of emotion? and why, if this was really a European process, did so much of the Enlightenment take place elsewhere, in American colonies and among Europeans discovering the rest of the globe?

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 395 - 01 Topics: The Shi’i-Sunni Split - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 206

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 206

Course Registration Number:

22390 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shaherzad R. Ahmadi

This course will begin by delving into the origins of the Sunni/ Shi’i split in the seventh century. Although the two sects made efforts to distinguish their faiths in the medieval period, the rise of spiritual Islam brought the two sects closer together by the fifteenth century. European colonialism, however, which overtook the Islamic world in the nineteenth century, caused many Muslims to become more conscious of their sectarian identities. Nevertheless, although Shi’ism and Sunnism formed different jurisprudential traditions, they experienced many of the same historical pressures and therefore developed similar solutions to colonialism, westernization, and secularism. Thus, this course asks, to what extent is there a Shi’i-Sunni split and in what ways have modern politics obscured the similarities between the two sects?

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2019 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HIST 113 - D01 Early Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 0900 - 1300 MHC 210

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0900 - 1300

Location:

MHC 210

Course Registration Number:

30221 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Max Forrester

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L02 Early Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1730 - 2130 MHC 206

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2130

Location:

MHC 206

Course Registration Number:

30455 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - L01 Mod Us/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1730 - 2130 MHC 202

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2130

Location:

MHC 202

Course Registration Number:

30145 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L01 The World Since 1900 M - W - - - - 1730 - 2130 MHC 202

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2130

Location:

MHC 202

Course Registration Number:

30144 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the origin, development, reception, alteration, and rejection of various ideologies—including, but not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, communism, liberalism, fascism and Nazism—and the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that they produced. Through a close examination of the twentieth century, students gain appreciation for the intricate nature of power and dependency that characterizes the modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L02 The World Since 1900 - T - R - - - 0900 - 1300 MHC 206

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0900 - 1300

Location:

MHC 206

Course Registration Number:

30205 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the origin, development, reception, alteration, and rejection of various ideologies—including, but not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, communism, liberalism, fascism and Nazism—and the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that they produced. Through a close examination of the twentieth century, students gain appreciation for the intricate nature of power and dependency that characterizes the modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L03 The World Since 1900 - T - R - - - 0900 - 1300 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0900 - 1300

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

30206 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Zsolt Nagy

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the origin, development, reception, alteration, and rejection of various ideologies—including, but not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, communism, liberalism, fascism and Nazism—and the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that they produced. Through a close examination of the twentieth century, students gain appreciation for the intricate nature of power and dependency that characterizes the modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - L01 Middle East and North Africa - T - R - - - 1730 - 2130 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2130

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

30050 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shaherzad R. Ahmadi

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze historical evidence in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course introduces students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa, focusing on the region's interaction with global powers. With special attention placed on global developments and local responses, the course will highlight the origins and expansion of Islamic empires, modern interactions with the West through imperialism and oil concessions, responses to this interaction from nationalist, secularist, and Islamist movements, and the issues these responses generate in the present day, including questions of ethnic conflict and religious pluralism. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Fall 2019 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HIST 111 - W01 Origins: Mod World to 1550 M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

Course Registration Number:

40423 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jenna M. Schultz

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the development of and interconnections between religious, legal, economic, social, and political institutions around the world. It considers the rise and fall of various civilizations, the peaceful and destructive interactions between and within different societies, and the lasting impacts of the pre-modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - 05 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42023 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jaymin Kim

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - 06 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42024 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jaymin Kim

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - L01 Hist Mod World Since 1550 M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

40694 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - L02 Hist Mod World Since 1550 M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

41306 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W03 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

41173 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W04 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

41668 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L01 Early Am/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42020 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne L. Osler

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L02 Early Am/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42265 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne L. Osler

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L03 Early Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42266 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Max Forrester

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L04 Early Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42624 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Max Forrester

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L05 Early Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1730 - 1915

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42625 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Max Forrester

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 03 Mod Us/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42021 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 06 Mod Us/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42637 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 07 Mod Us/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1730 - 1915

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42638 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - L01 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 JRC 201

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

JRC 201

Course Registration Number:

41307 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Meliha Ceric

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - L02 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 247

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

JRC 247

Course Registration Number:

41819 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Meliha Ceric

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - W04 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

41474 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David C. Williard

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - W05 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

40378 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David C. Williard

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. The course introduces students to social, political, cultural, and economic developments from the American Civil War to the present day. It not only traces how ideas and lived experiences within each of those categories of historical analysis changed over time, but also shows how developments in each realm of American life shaped
the others. It pays special attention to how American politics, institutions, and cultural norms emerged from—and produced—a changing role for the United States in its global context. It also interrogates how efforts to define American identity have both provided the terrain for inclusion and been used to justify the exclusion of various people, including racial, ethnic, and immigrant groups, people of different genders and sexual identities, and people of diverse religious and political beliefs. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L01 The World Since 1900 M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

40980 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelly L. Donahue

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the origin, development, reception, alteration, and rejection of various ideologies—including, but not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, communism, liberalism, fascism and Nazism—and the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that they produced. Through a close examination of the twentieth century, students gain appreciation for the intricate nature of power and dependency that characterizes the modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - L02 The World Since 1900 M - W - - - - 1730 - 1915

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

Course Registration Number:

41174 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelly L. Donahue

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course examines the origin, development, reception, alteration, and rejection of various ideologies—including, but not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, communism, liberalism, fascism and Nazism—and the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that they produced. Through a close examination of the twentieth century, students gain appreciation for the intricate nature of power and dependency that characterizes the modern world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - W01 Middle East and North Africa - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

41308 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shaherzad R. Ahmadi

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze historical evidence in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course introduces students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa, focusing on the region's interaction with global powers. With special attention placed on global developments and local responses, the course will highlight the origins and expansion of Islamic empires, modern interactions with the West through imperialism and oil concessions, responses to this interaction from nationalist, secularist, and Islamist movements, and the issues these responses generate in the present day, including questions of ethnic conflict and religious pluralism. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - W02 Middle East and North Africa - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42626 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shaherzad R. Ahmadi

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze historical evidence in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course introduces students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa, focusing on the region's interaction with global powers. With special attention placed on global developments and local responses, the course will highlight the origins and expansion of Islamic empires, modern interactions with the West through imperialism and oil concessions, responses to this interaction from nationalist, secularist, and Islamist movements, and the issues these responses generate in the present day, including questions of ethnic conflict and religious pluralism. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - W03 Middle East and North Africa M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42242 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Wesley W. Lummus

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze historical evidence in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course introduces students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa, focusing on the region's interaction with global powers. With special attention placed on global developments and local responses, the course will highlight the origins and expansion of Islamic empires, modern interactions with the West through imperialism and oil concessions, responses to this interaction from nationalist, secularist, and Islamist movements, and the issues these responses generate in the present day, including questions of ethnic conflict and religious pluralism. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - W04 Middle East and North Africa M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42243 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Wesley W. Lummus

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze historical evidence in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course introduces students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa, focusing on the region's interaction with global powers. With special attention placed on global developments and local responses, the course will highlight the origins and expansion of Islamic empires, modern interactions with the West through imperialism and oil concessions, responses to this interaction from nationalist, secularist, and Islamist movements, and the issues these responses generate in the present day, including questions of ethnic conflict and religious pluralism. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 205 - L01 The Ancient Greek World M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42672 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ivancica D. Schrunk

This course is a study of ancient Greek social structures, political processes, culture, beliefs, and moral values, from the Mycenaean society in the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic world of Alexander's legacy. The objective is to learn about major social, political, economic, and cultural change over time in the Greek world, with regard to the wider context of the surrounding cultures. We examine textual and material evidence in order to learn about the nature, value, and explication of primary sources and about historical, archaeological and anthropological methods of inquiry and analysis. Overall, we seek to understand the historic roots of modern issues and the relevance of past experiences, while keeping abreast of recent research and current scholarly debate.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 216 - 01 African-American History M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42634 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne L. Osler

An introductory social history survey of African-American experience in global perspective. This course will cover developments from the beginnings of the trans-Atlantic slave trade through the present. Topics include: West African cultures; origins of the international slave trade; African American life in the colonies and during the Revolution; development of slavery in global comparative perspective; resistance to slavery; and the role of African Americans in the Civil War and Reconstruction eras; Jim Crow culture and its challengers; migration; changes during the depression and WWII; black nationalism and independent Africa; the freedom movements of the North and South; and the post civil rights era.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 241 - 01 History of Modern China - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42636 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jaymin Kim

This course studies the impact of Imperialism on Chinese state and society and China's subsequent transformation from about 1800 to the 1980s. Topics include: early Chinese and Western contacts; the Canton System; the Opium War and unequal treaties; China's reforms and domestic tensions - the Taiping Rebellion, the Boxer Uprising and the 1911 Revolution; the May Fourth cultural iconoclasm; Chiang Kai-shek and the Nationalist government; the Sino-Japanese War; the nature of Mao Zedong's Communism; the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution; Deng Xiaoping, revisionism and the democratic crackdown. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 263 - 01 United States Military History M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42632 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David C. Williard

This course provides and overview of the military history of the United States from its revolutionary origins to its contemporary challenges. It examines the composition and employment of the United States military as a product of the larger political and cultural aims of American society while also paying attention to the reciprocal effect that wars have on the societies that engage in them. Special attention will be devoted to the human experience of warfare as an ethical, social, and intellectual problem.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 394 - 01 Topics in European History M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42671 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jenna M. Schultz

The subject matter of this course will vary from year to year and will focus on a specific historical period or event and/or particular methodological approach(es) to doing history. It will not duplicate existing courses in European history. Students will be asked not only to employ evidence in support of historical interpretations but also to think critically about the relationship between varying types of evidence, to engage in prevalent debates within fields of historical scholarship, and to evaluate historical questions themselves for their utility and manageability. Prerequisite: one 100-level history course

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 395 - 01 Topics:Africa/Asia/Lat/MidEast - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42631 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shaherzad R. Ahmadi

The subject matter of this course will vary from year to year and will focus on a specific historical period or event and/or particular methodological approach(es) to doing history. It will not duplicate existing courses in the history of the Africa, Asia, Latin America, or the Middle East. Students will be asked not only to employ evidence in support of historical interpretations but also to think critically about the relationship between varying types of evidence,to engage in prevalent debates within fields of historical scholarship, and to evaluate historical questions themselves for their utility and manageability. Prerequisite: one 100-level history course

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 466 - D01 Capstone Seminar in History M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42635 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William M. Cavert

History seminars involve students (primarily, though not exclusively, majors and minors) with the methodological and historiographical dimensions of research in the seminar's topic. Students in the seminar will complete and present to other members of the class a significant research project. This course fulfills the Writing in the Disciplines requirement. Prerequisites: at least two 300-level History courses completed before registration for this seminar.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)