Max Forrester portrait

Max Forrester

Adjunct Faculty
Degree
MA Washington University in St. Louis
PhD Candidate (ABD), Washington University in St. Louis
Office
JRC 434
Phone
651-962-5731
Mail
JRC 432

I am a PhD candidate in History at Washington University in St. Louis.  My interests in American history began with a curiosity about religious practice on the western frontier, and over time I have become fascinated by the people and historical processes of the American Southwest.  To that end, my graduate studies have concentrated on nineteenth-century U.S. History and on politics and religion in the borderlands of the American West.

My dissertation, "Competing Destinies: Religious and Political Conflict in the Southwest Borderlands, 1803-1848" examines the interactions between Anglo-American, Hispanic, Francophone, and Indian polities in Antebellum Texas and Louisiana. It focuses on themes of national identity, local diplomacy, and religious tolerance and intolerance, and explores the ways in which the aforementioned groups conceived of and attempted to bring about futures they considered realizable or foreordained.  My work has received support from the Briscoe Center for American History University of Texas at Austin, and the Cushwa Center at the University of Notre Dame.

My teaching experience includes courses on American borderlands (1776-1898), U.S. history (pre-and post-Civil War), the American City in the 19th and 20th centuries, and 20th century U.S. foreign relations.

Fall 2018 Courses

Fall 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HIST 113 - L03 Early Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 202

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 202

Course Registration Number:

43262 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Max Forrester

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L04 Early Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1730 - 1915 MHC 202

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

MHC 202

Course Registration Number:

43263 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Max Forrester

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2019 Courses

J-Term 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2019 Courses

Spring 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HIST 113 - L02 Early Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

20316 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Max Forrester

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - L03 Early Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

21138 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Max Forrester

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, cultural, and economic history of North America in global context, from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. It examines relations among Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, and their descendants. Major themes include: empires and colonization, race and slavery, the American Revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, the origins of American capitalism and democracy, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)