Jaymin Kim portrait

Jaymin Kim

Assistant Professor

We welcome Dr. Jaymin Kim, our new East Asian historian and a recent Ph.D. graduate from the University of Michigan, to our faculty in Fall 2018. His dissertation on the Rule of Ritual in the Qing Tributary World analyzes how Qing China and its tributary states—the regions of present-day Vietnam, Korea and Uzbekistan—handled interstate refugees and criminals in the 1630s to the 1840s. He will teach HIST 119 East Asian Civilizations in Global Perspective in the fall, and he is in the process of developing upper-level courses such as “What would Confucius do?” and “The History of Modern China: Mexican Silver for Chinese Tea.”

Office
JRC 412
Phone
651-962-5734

J-Term 2020 Courses

J-Term 2020 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2020 Courses

Spring 2020 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HIST 395 - D01 Top:Heresies in Imperial China - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

21678 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Jaymin Kim

This course will investigate imperial orthodoxy and heresies in a historical context. We will start with the establishment of Confucianism as the orthodox school of thought in China by the second century BCE, focusing on Confucius and his followers as well as their opponents. In the second part of the class, we will encounter Confucianism as an institutionalized imperial orthodoxy by looking at the imperial legal codes as well as the civil service examination system, two key institutions that perpetuated its orthodoxy in late imperial China (1368-1912). Last, we will look at various “heresies” that went against this imperial orthodoxy, ranging from disobedience to one’s parents to the practice of Christianity. By analyzing legal records from the Qing dynasty (1636-1912), we will look at how orthodoxy worked in practice as well as how heresies operated and sometimes were persecuted by the imperial state. The overarching goals of this course are to highlight the historical relevance of Confucianism as a sociocultural structure, to become aware of the diversity of ways of life in imperial China, and to introduce basic components of source analysis and analytical writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2020 Courses

Summer 2020 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location