Elizabeth Harry  portrait

Elizabeth Harry

Adjunct Faculty
Degree
B.A. University of Wisconsin-Madison
M.A.
Ph.D. Brandeis University
Office
JRC 436/403
Phone
(651) 962-5745
Mail
University of St. Thomas
Department of History
JRC 432
2115 Summit Avenue
St. Paul, MN 55105
CV

Dr. Harry specializes in comparative world history, history of communism, especially Soviet history, comparison of East and West, Social history.

Fall 2018 Courses

Fall 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HIST 112 - W03 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

41334 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W04 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

41954 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2019 Courses

J-Term 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2019 Courses

Spring 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HIST 112 - W03 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

20975 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W05 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 414

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

21230 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the foundation and expansion of global networks from the sixteenth-century exploration to the contemporary world, and it examines the resulting breakthrough in communication and cultural exchanges between Europe and Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Key aspects of the modern world are explored, such as state power and citizenship, economic systems and human labor, ideas about belonging and community, and the relationships and activities that constitute daily life. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)