Thomas Hickson portrait

Thomas Hickson

Professor and Chair of Geology
Degree
Ph.D.: Stanford University, 1999
Office
OSS 117
Hours
TW, 3-4 pm
Phone
(651) 962-5241
Toll Free
(800) 328-6819, Ext. 2-5241
Fax
651-962-5209

Research interests:

  • Lacustrine microbialite textures and chemistry
  • Tectonics and sedimentation in the Lake Mead region, Southern Nevada
  • Depositional mechanics of sediment gravity flows
  • Experimental sedimentology
  • Geoscience education

Courses:

  • GEOL 115: Environmental Geology
  • GEOL 260: Regional Geology and Geological Field Methods
  • GEOL 320: Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
  • GEOL 430: Advanced Earth History
  • GEOL 460: Advanced Field Geology
  • ESCI 390: Senior Research Seminar
  • THEO 459: Theology and the Environment

Recent publications (undergraduate co-authors in bold):

Hickson, T.A., Theissen, K.M., Lamb, M.A., and Frahm, J., 2016, Lower Pahranagat Lake: modern analogue for extensive carbonate deposition in paleolakes of the Late Oligocene to Miocene Rainbow Gardens and Horse Spring Formations: Journal of Paleolimnology, , doi: 10.1007/s10933-016-9923-1.

Lamb, M., Beard, L. S., Hickson, T., Umhoefer, P., Dunbar, N., Schleicher, J. and McIntosh, W., 2015, Late Oligocene–early Miocene landscape evolution of the Lake Mead region during the transition from Sevier contraction to Basin and Range extension, Geological Society of America Bulletin, July 2015, v. 127, no. 7-8, p. 899-925, doi:10.1130/B31144.1

Cantero, M.I., Cantelli, A., Pirmez, C., Balachandar, S., Mohrig, D., Hickson, T., Yeh, Tzu-hao, Naruse, H., and Parker, G., 2011, Emplacement of massive turbidites linked to extinction of turbulence in turbidity currents. Nature Geoscience, Vol. 5, pp. 42–45, doi:10.1038/ngeo1320.

Hickson, T., Umhoefer, P., and Anderson, Z., 2012, Terrestrial Microbial Limestones in the Miocene Horse Spring Formation of the Lake Mead area, southern Nevada Basin and Range, Society for Sedimentary Geology (SEPM) and Pacific Section SEPM Field Trip Guide #14, American Association of Petroleum Geologists and Society for Sedimentary Geology National Meeting, May 22-26, 34.pp.

Lamb, M., Martin, L., Hickson, T., Umhoefer, P. & Eaton, L. 2010. Deposition and age of the lower Horse Spring Formation in the Longwell Ridges Area, southern Nevada. Miocene Tectonics of the Lake Mead Region Geology Society of America Special Volume

Hickson, T., Ness, A., & Lamb, M. 2010. Deposition and age of the Bitter Ridge Limestone member of the Horse Spring Formation, Bitter Ridge to Gale Hills, Lake Mead, Nevada. Miocene Tectonics of the Lake Mead Region Geology Society of America Special Volume.

Fall 2018 Courses

Fall 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GEOL 111 - 54 Intro Physical Geology/Lab - T - - - - - 1600 - 1800 OSS 124

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

1600 - 1800

Location:

OSS 124

Course Registration Number:

41128 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Thomas A. Hickson

A study of the Earth's properties; the formation and classification of minerals, rocks, ore deposits, and fuels; and the nature and origin of the Earth's surface and interior. Emphasis will be placed upon a changing Earth, and the geologic processes operating at the surface and in the interior. Lecture and two laboratory hours per week. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 111 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 114, or 115.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 115 - P02 Environmental Geology LLC M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OSS 124

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OSS 124

Course Registration Number:

41773 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Thomas A. Hickson

This course emphasizes the interactions between humans and their environment, focusing on those processes and issues that are fundamentally geological in nature. Early in the course, students will be introduced to basic geoscience concepts and principals, the scientific method, plate tectonics, and earth materials (rocks and minerals). The remainder of the course will focus on specific topics at the interface between humans and their environment, including volcanic and earthquake hazards, human impacts on the hydrological cycle, surface and groundwater contamination, climate and the carbon cycle, nuclear waste storage, soil erosion, non-renewable resources, and slope stability. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 115 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 111, or 114.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 115 - P53 Environmental Geology Lab LLC - - - R - - - 1000 - 1200 OSS 124

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1000 - 1200

Location:

OSS 124

Course Registration Number:

41774 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Thomas A. Hickson

This course emphasizes the interactions between humans and their environment, focusing on those processes and issues that are fundamentally geological in nature. Early in the course, students will be introduced to basic geoscience concepts and principals, the scientific method, plate tectonics, and earth materials (rocks and minerals). The remainder of the course will focus on specific topics at the interface between humans and their environment, including volcanic and earthquake hazards, human impacts on the hydrological cycle, surface and groundwater contamination, climate and the carbon cycle, nuclear waste storage, soil erosion, non-renewable resources, and slope stability. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 115 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 111, or 114.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2019 Courses

J-Term 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2019 Courses

Spring 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
THEO 459 - L01 Theology & Environment - T - R - - - 1330 - 1515

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1515

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21282 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Cara L. Anthony, Thomas A. Hickson

This course examines Christian theological and moral reflection on the relation between human activity and the natural environment. It will address environmental issues that are of mutual concern to theologians and the natural or social sciences; thus it will study scientific analysis along with theological perspectives. The course will also review contemporary practices and/or policies that address environmental problems. Prerequisite: THEO 101 and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course, and PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)