Jeni McDermott portrait

Jeni McDermott

Assistant Professor
Degree
Ph.D. Arizona State University
Office
OSS 119B
Phone
(651) 962-5254
Toll Free
(800) 328-6819, Ext. 2-5254

Professional Interests

Jeni’s research interests lie in understanding how fluvial systems interact with and shape our world, both at the orogen scale through the interplay between surface processes, deformation, and tectonics, as well as at a smaller scale where surface water and groundwater dynamically interact with our human environment, affecting the quality and availability of water resources while defining the very surface on which we live. 

Ph.D.: Arizona State University, 2012

M.S.: University of California, Santa Barbara, 2006

Research interests: 

  • Continental tectonics, especially neotectonics, the formation and continued development of orogenic systems, climate-erosion-tectonic feedback loops, and the role of extensional faulting in collisional orogens.
  • Low-temperature thermochronology, including single crystal apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He and muscovite and biotite 40Ar/39Ar thermochronometers.
  • Landform evolution and geomorphology, with an emphasis on using geomorphic tools and river profiles to understand tectonically active regions.
  • Water resource renewal and water quality 

Courses:

  • GEOL 115: Environmental Geology
  • GEOL 252: Earth Surface Processes and Geomorphology
  • GEOL 410: Hydrogeology
  • GEOL 460: Advanced Regional Geology and Field Methods

 

Recent Publications:

McDermott, J.A., Hodges, K.V., Whipple, K.X., van Soest, M.C., Hurtado, J.M., Jr. (2015) Evidence for Pleistocene Low-Angle Normal Faulting in the Annapurna-Dhaulagiri Region, Nepal. Journal of Geology, 123, DOI:10.1086/68121.

McDermott, J.A., Whipple, K.X, Hodges, K.V., van Soest, M.C. (2013) Evidence for Plio-Pleistocene north-south extension at the southern margin of the Tibetan Plateau, Nyalam region. Tectonics, 32, doi:10.1002/tect.20018.

McDermott, J.A., Avisar, D., Johnson, T.A., Clark, J.F. (2008). Groundwater travel times near spreading ponds: Inferences from geochemical and physical approaches. Journal of Hydrologic Engineering, vol 13, no11. 

Abstracts:

Spangenberg, C., McDermott, J.A. (2016) Investigating timing of slip along N-S extensional faults in the Modi Khola and Marsyandi Valleys, Annapurna Himalaya, Nepal. Poster presentation at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in San Francisco, CA December 14, 2016.

Conrad, D., Arnhold, C., McDermott, J.A. (2016) A comparison of slope-area analysis and chi-plot methods in a geomorphic analysis of the Norwegian ‘passive’ margin. Poster presentation at the Geological Society of America Regional Cordilleran Section in Ontario, CA April 5, 2016.

Kellner, J., McDermott, J.A. (2016) Constraining the timing of incision of the Virgin River Gorge. Poster presentation at the Geological Society of America Regional Cordilleran Section in Ontario, CA April 5, 2016.

Spangenberg, C., McDermott, J.A. (2016) Investigation of erosional patterns along Mississippi River gorge tributary streams. Poster presentation at the Geological Society of America Regional Cordilleran Section in Ontario, CA April 5, 2016.

Arnhold, C., Conrad, D., and McDermott, J.A. (2015) Geomorphic analysis of the More-Trondelag fault complex in southern Norway. GSA Abstracts with Programs, 47, p. 15.

McDermott, J.A., Redfield, T.F., Osmundsen, P.T., Arnhold, C., Conrad, D. (2015) A Geomorphological Analysis of the Cenozoic Rejuvenation of the Southwestern Norwegian ‘Passive’ Margin. European Geological Union Annual Meeting, Vienna, Austria.

McDermott, J.A., Hodges, K.V., Whipple, K.X., van Soest, M.C. (2013) Structural, geomorphic, and thermochronologic evidence for Quaternary N-S extension at the southern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. Geological Society of America Annual Conference 2013.

McDermott, J.A., Whipple, K.X, Hodges, K.V., van Soest, M.C. (2012) Plio-Pleistocene N-S extension at the southern margin of the Tibetan Plateau as evidenced from fluvial incision patterns and thermochronology. European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2012.

McDermott, J.A., Whipple, K.X, Hodges, K.V., van Soest, M.C. (2011) Quaternary N-S extension near the Himalayan crest: An investigation using river profiles and low-temperature thermochronology. European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2011.

McDermott, J.A., Hodges, K.V., Whipple, K.X., van Soest, M.C. (2010) Exploring evidence for possible recent N-S extension along the Himalayan crest. American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting

Whipple, K.X., McDermott, J.A., Adams, B.A. (2010) Expression of Active Tectonics in Erosional Landscapes. American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting.

McDermott, J.A., Hodges, K.V., and van Soest, M.C. (2009) Polyphase (Miocene-Pleistocene?) slip on the South Tibetan fault system in the Dhaulagiri Himalaya. American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting

McDermott, J.A., Hodges, K.V., Whipple, K.X. Monteleone, B.D., van Soest, M.C., Wang, E., and Fan, C. (2008)Polyphase extension at the southern margin of the Tibetan Plateau, Ama Drime Range, Tibet.  American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting.

Clark, J.F. & McDermott, J.A. (2006) Groundwater travel times determined with geochemical and physical techniques near artificial recharge ponds. Geological Society of America annual meeting.

McDermott, J., Clark, J.F., Avisar, D., Hudson, G.B. (2005). A comparison of hydrogeologic models, tritium/3He, and deliberate tracer experiments to understand ground water residence time. American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting. Also presented at 2005 Geological Society of America Cordilleran Section.

Smith, D.P., Vincent, M.M., McDermott, J.A., Carlson, Z. (2005) Quantified chronic sediment load from road construction in Garrapata watershed, a steep coastal trout stream on the Big Sur Coast, CA. Geological Society of America Cordilleran Section.

Fall 2017 Courses

Fall 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GEOL 115 - 01 Environmental Geology - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OWS 257
CRN: 42737 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jeni A. McDermott This course emphasizes the interactions between humans and their environment, focusing on those processes and issues that are fundamentally geological in nature. Early in the course, students will be introduced to basic geoscience concepts and principals, the scientific method, plate tectonics, and earth materials (rocks and minerals). The remainder of the course will focus on specific topics at the interface between humans and their environment, including volcanic and earthquake hazards, human impacts on the hydrological cycle, surface and groundwater contamination, climate and the carbon cycle, nuclear waste storage, soil erosion, non-renewable resources, and slope stability. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 115 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 111, or 114. Course open to Sophomores only, unless by instructor's permission.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 115 - 51 Environmental Geology Lab - T - - - - - 1330 - 1530 OSS 123
CRN: 42738 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Jeni A. McDermott This course emphasizes the interactions between humans and their environment, focusing on those processes and issues that are fundamentally geological in nature. Early in the course, students will be introduced to basic geoscience concepts and principals, the scientific method, plate tectonics, and earth materials (rocks and minerals). The remainder of the course will focus on specific topics at the interface between humans and their environment, including volcanic and earthquake hazards, human impacts on the hydrological cycle, surface and groundwater contamination, climate and the carbon cycle, nuclear waste storage, soil erosion, non-renewable resources, and slope stability. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 115 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 111, or 114.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 115 - 52 Environmental Geology Lab - T - - - - - 1600 - 1800 OSS 123
CRN: 42739 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Jeni A. McDermott This course emphasizes the interactions between humans and their environment, focusing on those processes and issues that are fundamentally geological in nature. Early in the course, students will be introduced to basic geoscience concepts and principals, the scientific method, plate tectonics, and earth materials (rocks and minerals). The remainder of the course will focus on specific topics at the interface between humans and their environment, including volcanic and earthquake hazards, human impacts on the hydrological cycle, surface and groundwater contamination, climate and the carbon cycle, nuclear waste storage, soil erosion, non-renewable resources, and slope stability. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 115 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 111, or 114.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 115 - P01 Environmental Geology - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OWS 257
CRN: 40623 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jeni A. McDermott This course emphasizes the interactions between humans and their environment, focusing on those processes and issues that are fundamentally geological in nature. Early in the course, students will be introduced to basic geoscience concepts and principals, the scientific method, plate tectonics, and earth materials (rocks and minerals). The remainder of the course will focus on specific topics at the interface between humans and their environment, including volcanic and earthquake hazards, human impacts on the hydrological cycle, surface and groundwater contamination, climate and the carbon cycle, nuclear waste storage, soil erosion, non-renewable resources, and slope stability. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 115 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 111, or 114.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 115 - P51 Environmental Geology/Lab - T - - - - - 1330 - 1530 OSS 123
CRN: 40633 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Jeni A. McDermott This course emphasizes the interactions between humans and their environment, focusing on those processes and issues that are fundamentally geological in nature. Early in the course, students will be introduced to basic geoscience concepts and principals, the scientific method, plate tectonics, and earth materials (rocks and minerals). The remainder of the course will focus on specific topics at the interface between humans and their environment, including volcanic and earthquake hazards, human impacts on the hydrological cycle, surface and groundwater contamination, climate and the carbon cycle, nuclear waste storage, soil erosion, non-renewable resources, and slope stability. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 115 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 111, or 114.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 115 - P52 Environmental Geology/Lab - T - - - - - 1600 - 1800 OSS 123
CRN: 40634 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Jeni A. McDermott This course emphasizes the interactions between humans and their environment, focusing on those processes and issues that are fundamentally geological in nature. Early in the course, students will be introduced to basic geoscience concepts and principals, the scientific method, plate tectonics, and earth materials (rocks and minerals). The remainder of the course will focus on specific topics at the interface between humans and their environment, including volcanic and earthquake hazards, human impacts on the hydrological cycle, surface and groundwater contamination, climate and the carbon cycle, nuclear waste storage, soil erosion, non-renewable resources, and slope stability. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 115 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 111, or 114.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 252 - 01 Geomorphology M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OSS 124
CRN: 41617 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jeni A. McDermott This course emphasizes the physical processes that are responsible for shaping the Earth's surface. The qualitative description of landforms is pursued, in light of student's newly-gained analytical and quantitative understanding of processes. The labs focus on techniques used by geomorphologists to characterize landforms, soils, and the processes that shape them, including: air photo interpretation, analysis of digital topographic data, experimental simulation of landforms evolution, and field techniques in geomorphology. Prerequisite: one of 102, 110, 111, 113, 114, 115 or 161

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 252 - 52 Geomorphology LAB - - - R - - - 1330 - 1630 OSS 120
CRN: 42578 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Jeni A. McDermott This course emphasizes the physical processes that are responsible for shaping the Earth's surface. The qualitative description of landforms is pursued, in light of student's newly-gained analytical and quantitative understanding of processes. The labs focus on techniques used by geomorphologists to characterize landforms, soils, and the processes that shape them, including: air photo interpretation, analysis of digital topographic data, experimental simulation of landforms evolution, and field techniques in geomorphology. Prerequisite: one of 102, 110, 111, 113, 114, 115 or 161

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2018 Courses

J-Term 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2018 Courses

Spring 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GEOL 163 - 01 Applied Geology - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OSS 123
CRN: 22580 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jeni A. McDermott This course examines geologic systems that occur at or near the Earth’s surface with a focus on processes that interact directly with human infrastructure. Effective and safe civil engineering requires an understanding of the materials upon which infrastructure is built and this course aims to provide an introduction to materials at the Earth’s surface and their response to construction and human alteration. Topics to be covered include an introduction to geologic materials (rocks, minerals, and soils), basic principles of hydrology including groundwater flow, river flow (open-channel flow), and water quality and treatment, slope stability and erosion, and surveying. The course includes weekly lab meetings to allow students to explore the topics in greater depth and apply their knowledge to real-world problems. This course is required for ENGR Civil Engineering majors, can serve as an introductory geology course for Geology and Environmental Science majors, and will satisfy the lab-science requirement for non-majors.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 163 - 51 Applied Geology - LAB - - - R - - - 1511 - 1710 OSS 120
CRN: 22581 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Jeni A. McDermott This course examines geologic systems that occur at or near the Earth’s surface with a focus on processes that interact directly with human infrastructure. Effective and safe civil engineering requires an understanding of the materials upon which infrastructure is built and this course aims to provide an introduction to materials at the Earth’s surface and their response to construction and human alteration. Topics to be covered include an introduction to geologic materials (rocks, minerals, and soils), basic principles of hydrology including groundwater flow, river flow (open-channel flow), and water quality and treatment, slope stability and erosion, and surveying. The course includes weekly lab meetings to allow students to explore the topics in greater depth and apply their knowledge to real-world problems. This course is required for ENGR Civil Engineering majors, can serve as an introductory geology course for Geology and Environmental Science majors, and will satisfy the lab-science requirement for non-majors.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)