J-Term 2019 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 217 - L01 Multicultural Literature - T W R F - - 0900 - 1200 OEC 212

Days of Week:

- T W R F - -

Time of Day:

0900 - 1200

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

10151 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

What does it mean to be labeled an African American dramatist? A Latino/a poet? A transgender novelist? An Asian American essayist? A Native American environmental writer? How do the varied experiences and backgrounds of authors writing from diverse subject positions inform, mark, and/or transform their writing? How do the works of these writers fit into, conflict with, actively resist, or even redefine the American Literary canon as it has been traditionally understood? These questions and more will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive reading of literature from: a) American communities of color; b) postcolonial peoples; c) immigrant and/or diasporic peoples; or d) LGBTQ communities. This course will focus on the literary and cultural texts of one or more of these groups with an emphasis on the cultural, political, and historical contexts that surround them. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major, and the Human Diversity Requirement in the Core Curriculum. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Spring 2019 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 121 - W01 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20868 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W02 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20746 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W03 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21629 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Susan J. Callaway

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W04 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20748 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Juan Li

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W05 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21941 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ganeane Contreras

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W06 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20749 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Yvonne E. Asp-Grahn

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W07 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20747 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Casie L. Szalapski

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W08 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20977 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Charles A. Conley

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W51 Crit Thinking:Lit/Wrting (ESL) M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21003 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Suzanne L. Donsky

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W01 Science Fiction Origins - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22433 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gordon D. Grice

Dinosaurs, aliens, and invisible monsters invade literature for the first time, trailing new ideas and fresh techniques. We’ll learn what science fiction really is and why it swept like a death ray across the Victorian world. Authors might include Edgar Allan Poe, H. G. Wells, and H. P. Lovecraft. The writing load for this fully online course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W02 Too Graphic?: Graphic Novels - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22435 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Alison L. Underthun-Meilahn

Graphic novels have a deep capacity to inform their readers beyond the written text while utilizing inferences from the visual aspect they use in their form to foster a critical understanding in conjunction with the text. We will explore both the written and visual aspects while also developing an understanding of how the genre of the graphic novel began and the prevalence of its genre today. Readings may include Will Eisner's MINOR MIRACLES, Bob Dylan's BOB DYLAN REVISTED: FEATURING 13 ILLUSTRATED SONGS, Art Spiegelman's MAUS, Marjane Satrapi's PERSEPOLIS, and Homer's THE ODYSSEY. The writing load for this fully online course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W03 Too Graphic?: Graphic Novels - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22480 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Alison L. Underthun-Meilahn

Graphic novels have a deep capacity to inform their readers beyond the written text while utilizing inferences from the visual aspect they use in their form to foster a critical understanding in conjunction with the text. We will explore both the written and visual aspects while also developing an understanding of how the genre of the graphic novel began and the prevalence of its genre today. Readings may include Will Eisner's MINOR MIRACLES, Bob Dylan's BOB DYLAN REVISTED: FEATURING 13 ILLUSTRATED SONGS, Art Spiegelman's MAUS, Marjane Satrapi's PERSEPOLIS, and Homer's THE ODYSSEY. The writing load for this fully online course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W04 Jazz Music and American Poetry M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22436 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucas B. Pingel

This Writing Intensive course will explore poetry's intersection with jazz music, and the uniquely American style of poetry that is created. Students will become familiarized with some of the rich history of jazz as a music of innovation and of protest, and learn about some of the most significant musicians (John Coltrane, Charlie Parker, Charles Mingus, for example) to inspire poets to move beyond typical conventions in literature. This course will maintain a foundation in developing strong reading, writing, and analytical skills through a variety of written assignments about authors such as Langston Hughes, Frank O'Hara, Bob Kaufman and Sonia Sanchez. Students can expect at least 15 pages of formal, revised writing in the course. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W05 The American Short Story M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22437 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather Holcombe

This course surveys the evolution of the American short story from 1846 to the late twentieth century. As we develop our practice of reading, we will assume that literature is intimately tied to everyday life, interpreting the ways both writers and readers use the short story to address individual and social conflicts created by war, removal, nationalism, immigration, migration, racism, sexism, psychosis, the growth of industrialism and the modern city, mass media, and modern capitalism. Veering from Poe’s Gothic horror to Jewett’s “local color” to Butler’s science fiction, we will read with breadth and depth, traveling through multiple literary movements, spending a considerable amount of time in each place with a few authors. We will even try our hands at writing our own short stories, drawing insight from the experts and our own analysis to make and execute creative choices. While the course is conscious of chronology, it is theme-driven. As such, we will privilege theme over time, placing disparate voices, texts, and social/historical contexts in dialogue over common issues.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W06 On Stage: Irish Drama M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22438 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Joseph P. Moser

Irish drama reflects the intense political and cultural conflicts central to the country's fascinating history. In this course, we will study archetypal characters, abiding themes, and the powerful blend of tragedy and comedy in Irish plays. We will encounter influential works spanning the years 1902 to 2001, including plays by W.B. Yeats (CATHLEEN NI HOULIHAN), Lady Augusta Gregory (THE RISING OF THE MOON), J.M. Synge (THE PLAYBOY OF THE WESTERN WORLD), Samuel Beckett (WAITING FOR GODOT), Brian Friel (TRANSLATIONS), Marina Carr (BY THE BOG OF CATS) and Martin McDonagh (THE LIEUTENANT OF INISHMORE). We will also view great Irish films with historical and thematic connections to the play texts. This writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W07 Writers at Work M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21961 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

Writers at Work will examine fiction, nonfiction, drama, and poetry from the point of view of both writer and audience, artist and critic. We will read contemporary literature in each genre, as well as some secondary materials written whenever possible by those same authors. For example, we might read David Mamet's play GLENGARRY, GLEN ROSS and then his craft book ON DIRECTING FILM; Charles Baxter's novel THE FEAST OF LOVE and then his craft book THE ART OF SUBTEXT; Richard Hugo's poetry as well as his craft book THE TRIGGERING TOWN; Annie Dillard and Jo Anne Beard's essays paired with Sven Birkerts' THE ART OF TIME IN MEMOIR; and then various readings paired with THE WRITERS' NOTEBOOK: CRAFT ESSAYS FROM TIN HOUSE. Everyone will both write in and about each genre. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W08 Contemporary American Poetry - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22439 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mary E. Frandson

This course celebrates and explores the best of contemporary American poetry, and is an invitation to those interested in discovering the many creative ways to their own poetic voice through an exploration of craft and form. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W09 The Twin Cities Literary Scene - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22440 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paula F. Cisewski

The Twin Cities has one of the richest literary scenes around. Who are our very own nationally/internationally known writers, poets, playwrights, and spoken word artists, and who influenced them? What are the thriving literary magazines and presses? We'll spend time with a wide range of literary voices across multiple genres, including Chris Santiago’s poetry collection TULA and Stephanie Wilbur Ash’s novel THE ANNIE YEAR. We'll also attend a live literary event and enjoy the company of a guest writer or two. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W10 The Classic Memoir - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22441 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laurie E. Lindeen

We’ll use four must-read memoirs to explore the meaning and possibilities within this popular writing genre. Students will read selections from Frank McCourt, Maya Angelou, Tobias Wolff and David Sedaris as well as selected essays by Patricia Hampl. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W11 The Classic Memoir - T - R - - - 1730 - 1915

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22545 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laurie E. Lindeen

We’ll use four must-read memoirs to explore the meaning and possibilities within this popular writing genre. Students will read selections from Frank McCourt, Maya Angelou, Tobias Wolff and David Sedaris as well as selected essays by Patricia Hampl. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W01 Business and American Identity - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22442 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

This fully online course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.This fully online course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W02 Existential America M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22443 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Doug P. Phillips

In this course we will examine a body of work that traffics in such existential themes as freedom and responsibility, authenticity and bad faith, anguish and abandonment, identity and subjectivity, and choice and commitment. While some of our readings will reach beyond our own shores (Sartre, Beauvoir, Camus, Kafka, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, and Kierkegaard), we will mostly focus on works by 20th-century American writers: Palahniuk's FIGHT CLUB, Krakauer's INTO THE WILD, O'Connor's A GOOD MAN IS HARD TO FIND, Baldwin's THE FIRE NEXT TIME, Salinger's The CATCHER IN THE RYE, McCarthy's NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN -- to name but a possible few. In the words of Zadie Smith, we're going to read a selection of very good books in this course, concentrating on whatever is most particular to them in the hope that this might help us understand whatever is most particular to us. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W03 Blues / Lose / Choose M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21959 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Andrew J. Scheiber

The music we call the blues was invented, Ralph Ellison once wrote, by a group of people struggling with the question of how to live without power, and how to exert their will in circumstances that offered no good choices. This is true not just of the blues, but of much of literature and art reaching back at least as far as the time of the Greeks. In this class, we will look at a selections of texts--music, poetry, drama, fiction, film--that explore the challenge of affirming one's humanity in the face of powerlessness and untenable choices. We'll start with the blues but then reach outward to artists beyond the African American tradition--Robert Frost, Aeschylus, Kate Chopin--who wrestle in a significant way with human choice and agency. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W04 Existential America M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22444 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Doug P. Phillips

In this course we will examine a body of work that traffics in such existential themes as freedom and responsibility, authenticity and bad faith, anguish and abandonment, identity and subjectivity, and choice and commitment. While some of our readings will reach beyond our own shores (Sartre, Beauvoir, Camus, Kafka, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, and Kierkegaard), we will mostly focus on works by 20th-century American writers: Palahniuk's FIGHT CLUB, Krakauer's INTO THE WILD, O'Connor's A GOOD MAN IS HARD TO FIND, Baldwin's THE FIRE NEXT TIME, Salinger's The CATCHER IN THE RYE, McCarthy's NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN -- to name but a possible few. In the words of Zadie Smith, we're going to read a selection of very good books in this course, concentrating on whatever is most particular to them in the hope that this might help us understand whatever is most particular to us. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W05 Blues / Lose / Choose M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22264 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Andrew J. Scheiber

The music we call the blues was invented, Ralph Ellison once wrote, by a group of people struggling with the question of how to live without power, and how to exert their will in circumstances that offered no good choices. This is true not just of the blues, but of much of literature and art reaching back at least as far as the time of the Greeks. In this class, we will look at a selections of texts--music, poetry, drama, fiction, film--that explore the challenge of affirming one's humanity in the face of powerlessness and untenable choices. We'll start with the blues but then reach outward to artists beyond the African American tradition--Robert Frost, Aeschylus, Kate Chopin--who wrestle in a significant way with human choice and agency. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W06 Native Amer Lit & Environment M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21966 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

This course will use fiction and non-fiction multi-media to explore environmental issues using an indigenous lens. We'll focus a large portion of our reading on the Native nations specific to our region, largely Anishinaabe/Ojibwe and related peoples. We'll dispel the romantic stereotype of the nature-loving Native (Disney version and the like) by a focus on Native-authored texts and responses to historic and contemporary environmental issues. In addition to reading and writing about Native literature, this course will strive to connect students to Native American food and farming and the social-ecological systems in which the stories are embedded. Off campus trips to local sites may be organized, including Dream of Wild Health (an Indigenous farm), Mashkiikii Gitigan (an Indigenous urban garden), All My Relations Art Gallery, and Two Rivers Gallery/Gatherings Cafe. We'll also have in-class conversations with Native American leaders in community environmental activism, and we may get to try our hand at some indigenous cooking as well. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W07 Native Amer Lit & Environment M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21967 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

This course will use fiction and non-fiction multi-media to explore environmental issues using an indigenous lens. We'll focus a large portion of our reading on the Native nations specific to our region, largely Anishinaabe/Ojibwe and related peoples. We'll dispel the romantic stereotype of the nature-loving Native (Disney version and the like) by a focus on Native-authored texts and responses to historic and contemporary environmental issues. In addition to reading and writing about Native literature, this course will strive to connect students to Native American food and farming and the social-ecological systems in which the stories are embedded. Off campus trips to local sites may be organized, including Dream of Wild Health (an Indigenous farm), Mashkiikii Gitigan (an Indigenous urban garden), All My Relations Art Gallery, and Two Rivers Gallery/Gatherings Cafe. We'll also have in-class conversations with Native American leaders in community environmental activism, and we may get to try our hand at some indigenous cooking as well. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W08 Literature Looks at Medicine - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22445 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Barbara K. Olson

Hospitals, psychiatric wards, laboratories, operating tables, sick beds – all scenes presenting dilemmas of empathy and ethics for patients, doctors, and loved ones. We’ll read perspectives from both care givers and care needers: reflections from physicians on their craft as well as memoir, drama, and fiction about patients in the throes of illness. Writers may include Kopit, Taylor, Jamieson, Plath, Hawthorne, Edson, Pomerance, Fadiman, Williams, Gawande, and Mukherjee. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W09 Literature Looks at Medicine - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22446 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Barbara K. Olson

Hospitals, psychiatric wards, laboratories, operating tables, sick beds – all scenes presenting dilemmas of empathy and ethics for patients, doctors, and loved ones. We’ll read perspectives from both care givers and care needers: reflections from physicians on their craft as well as memoir, drama, and fiction about patients in the throes of illness. Writers may include Kopit, Taylor, Jamieson, Plath, Hawthorne, Edson, Pomerance, Fadiman, Williams, Gawande, and Mukherjee. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W01 Final Frontier: Mars & Beyond M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22448 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher J. Hassel

How do global politics influence our desire to explore space? How does space exploration impact our theological viewpoints of the universe? What roles might nation-states and corporations play in future space endeavors? Focusing on the human yearning to explore space, as well as current efforts to put humans on Mars in the near future, this class will attempt to answer these questions by examining a variety of literary forms including fiction, science fiction, poetry, nonfiction prose, and biography. Likely works to be studied include Tracy K. Smith’s LIFE ON MARS, Mary Doria Russell’s THE SPARROW, and Andy Weir's THE MARTIAN. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W02 Paranoid Fictions:Conspiracies M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22474 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Timothy J. Dewey

This course will examine the enduring appeal and growing influence of conspiracy theory in American political culture. We will examine key historical events and social issues in the history of our nation and the conspiracy theories they have spawned, as well as several prominent films and literary works inspired by paranoia. The objective of the course is neither to promote or debunk any particular theory, but to examine the formation and transmission of conspiracy theories and the role they play as modern mythologies—revealing less about historical truth than about the prejudices, ideologies, and anxieties of the people who believe them. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W03 Final Frontier: Mars & Beyond M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22449 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher J. Hassel

How do global politics influence our desire to explore space? How does space exploration impact our theological viewpoints of the universe? What roles might nation-states and corporations play in future space endeavors? Focusing on the human yearning to explore space, as well as current efforts to put humans on Mars in the near future, this class will attempt to answer these questions by examining a variety of literary forms including fiction, science fiction, poetry, nonfiction prose, and biography. Likely works to be studied include Tracy K. Smith’s LIFE ON MARS, Mary Doria Russell’s THE SPARROW, and Andy Weir's THE MARTIAN. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W04 Vengeance is Mine: Revenge Lit M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22450 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. McNiel

Payback. Settling scores. Taking justice into our own hands — from contemporary films to ancient literature, the quest for revenge has been explored in multiple genres, time periods, and cultures. What makes this quest so intriguing and appealing? Why are we fascinated with individuals who enact their own forms of justice or retribution, often going against social, moral, and legal codes? Is revenge an act of intense passion, a doomed act of honor, or twisted desire to inflict suffering? In this course, we will examine a variety of texts that focus on revenge, and consider how the quest for revenge relates to questions of justice, the rule of law, and beliefs about divine and human roles in punishing wrongdoers. We will also explore how cultural ideals of duty, honor, and shame have shaped perspectives on revenge in Western culture, and examine how gender roles and social structure influence our assessment of those who avenge personal or public wrongs. Texts may include Medea, The Oresteia, V for Vendetta, and True Grit, among others. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W05 Up North:Exploring Place/Space M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22447 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne E. Roth-Reinhardt

Minnesota boasts its lakes, its music, and keeps urging us to see it as more “north” than “midwest.” Got it. But what does it truly mean to be “North,” and how does this distinction influence how others see our state, and how we see ourselves? In this course we’ll explore the idea of “North” as advertised by many in the upper Midwest, and we’ll also consider images and ideas about our state and others neighboring us as seen in literature and film — both by those who call the 32nd state home, and those who just visit for a while. Possible authors may include F. Scott Fitzgerald, Patricia Hampl, Linda Hogan, Danez Smith, and Kao Kalia Yang and possible audio sources include work from Bob Dylan, Atmosphere, and Prince. The writing load for this blended/hybrid course (1/2 in class and 1/2 online) is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W07 Secrets, Lies, & Deception M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 JRC 227

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

JRC 227

Course Registration Number:

22454 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jeannie L. Hofmeister

“Tell all the truth but tell it slant—” American poet, Emily Dickinson suggests that the truth is often deliberately distorted. Are there times when the blunt truth is too painful to hear? Are some lies justified? Conversely, throughout history people have lied for their own gain or simply for the thrill of knowing they have the power to deceive. Are there consequences for deliberate acts of deception? In this course, we will examine how writers explore this human characteristic and discuss what we can learn about ourselves by considering the theme of lies and deception in literature. Possible texts include: “Wakefield” by Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, State of Wonder by Ann Patchett, The Burgess Boys by Elizabeth Strout, Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro, and Doubt by John Patrick Shanley. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W08 The Future of Global Humanity See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

22455 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Melissa J. Hendrickx

In a world increasingly dominated by technology and science, what role will the humanities play in our lives? Can we program morality? Are we developing the creative and critical thinking skills necessary to adapt to new environments and careers? Using the seven "revolutions" outlined by the Center for Strategic and International Studies, this course will explore how literature and film attempt to make sense of these technological, environmental, and geo-political changes. Students will be encouraged to question how globalization will impact their lives and whether or not they are prepared to meet those challenges. Possible texts include the short story anthologies CONCERT OF VOICES and AOMING OF AGE AROUND THE WORLD, and the books AND THE MOUNTAINS ECHOED and 21LESSONS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY. Films will include THE CIRCLE and ARRIVAL. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1335-1510M - - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 203 - W09 Classical Mythology M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21957 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lorina N. Quartarone

Mythology is the embodiment and encoding of the beliefs, principles, and aspirations of ancient cultures. This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to mythology as an introduction and foundation to Classical civilization. Both Greek and Roman myths will be examined from a variety of theoretical perspectives, including aetiological, structuralist, and psychological theories. Consideration will also be given to the study of literature in translation, art history, religion, and history. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W10 Spooky:Lit of the Supernatural See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

22456 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Terri L. Topness

This course will investigate how we use ghost stories to address complex issues such as memory, identity, moral responsibility, and fear. In doing so, we will explore some famous ghost stories in literature, and discuss why we continue to find ghosts and the supernatural so compelling and necessary in today's world. Possible texts: TURN OF THE SCREW, BELOVED, THE HAUNTING OF HILL HOUSE, a selection of short stories/essays/poems, and/or possibly SPOOK: SCIENCE TACKLES THE AFTERLIFE (a collection of creative essays by Mary Roach). We would also view film clips and other media. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0800-0940- T - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 203 - W11 Summer Game: Baseball Lit - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22457 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael Raimondi

Bernard Malamud (author of THE NATURAL) once wrote: "The whole history of baseball has the quality of mythology." This course will examine baseball literature as we read from a variety of writings about our baseball heroes, both the men and the women, who played the game that we call "our national pastime." We will look at our country's romanticism with baseball and how writers who wrote about it helped give the sport its mythological dimensions. Selections will include essays, short stories, and poetry by authors who loved the game. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W12 As the World Turns - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22488 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David R. Rathbun

"The world is too much with us" (Wordsworth). We humans are in constant contact with forces outside ourselves, in frequent conflict with the physical and social worlds. In this course we will look at literature from ancient Greece to the present day that deals with the ever-present human struggle against forces that may seem insurmountable. We will read writers who make us confront universal sources of human conflict such as family relationships, language barriers and assimilation, the natural world, political conformity, scientific "progress," and illness/death. In all of these scenarios we readers are asked to ponder questions about free will, our capacity to endure, our faith and determination, or perhaps wonder why some "fail" and others don't. Texts may include OEDIPUS (fate), Joseph Conrad's "Amy Foster" (language/assimilation) and "Typhoon" (nature), Philip Roth's NEMESIS (epidemic), Audre Lorde's CANCER JOURNALS (illness/death), Alice Munro's RUNAWAY: STORIES (family relationships), Roberto Bolano's BY NIGHT IN CHILE (political conformity/authoritarianism), Zamyatin's WE or Kathryn Davis' DUPLEX (dystopias). We will examine the historical contexts for these texts to consider how our environment, race, religion, ethnicity, gender, and other factors may influence how we face these obstacles. In addition, poetry, short stories, essays, and film will be used to enhance our discussions. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W13 As the World Turns - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22452 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David R. Rathbun

"The world is too much with us" (Wordsworth). We humans are in constant contact with forces outside ourselves, in frequent conflict with the physical and social worlds. In this course we will look at literature from ancient Greece to the present day that deals with the ever-present human struggle against forces that may seem insurmountable. We will read writers who make us confront universal sources of human conflict such as family relationships, language barriers and assimilation, the natural world, political conformity, scientific "progress," and illness/death. In all of these scenarios we readers are asked to ponder questions about free will, our capacity to endure, our faith and determination, or perhaps wonder why some "fail" and others don't. Texts may include OEDIPUS (fate), Joseph Conrad's "Amy Foster" (language/assimilation) and "Typhoon" (nature), Philip Roth's NEMESIS (epidemic), Audre Lorde's CANCER JOURNALS (illness/death), Alice Munro's RUNAWAY: STORIES (family relationships), Roberto Bolano's BY NIGHT IN CHILE (political conformity/authoritarianism), Zamyatin's WE or Kathryn Davis' DUPLEX (dystopias). We will examine the historical contexts for these texts to consider how our environment, race, religion, ethnicity, gender, and other factors may influence how we face these obstacles. In addition, poetry, short stories, essays, and film will be used to enhance our discussions. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W14 Order Up: The Lit of Food - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22458 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shannon F. Scott

This course explores food as a cultural metaphor, as a means to connect, create, and sustain family and tradition. It is also a venue to examine history through a culinary lens. In this class we question our assumptions about how food is grown, raised and prepared. What is organic? What is “junk”? Gourmet? Who decides? Who has access to food? Where and what are “food deserts”? There is also a community component, involving field trips to local eateries, work with BrightSide, and a drive for local food shelves. Fiction for this course may include: THE MISTRESS OF SPICES by Chitra Divakaruni, MY YEAR OF MEATS by Ruth Ozeki, Laura Esquivel’s LIKE WATER FOR CHOCOLATE, CHOP CHOP by Simon Wroe, or NUMBER ONE CHINESE RESTAURANT by Lillian Li. The texts, along with the issues discussed in class, will range from the personal to the political: from essays by Michael Pollan and Vandana Shiva, to poetic odes from THE HUNGRY EAR, to personal accounts of Julia Childs’ challenges as a female chef, to French chef Auguste Escoffier’s connection to food and war, to contemporary accusations of “food pornography” and “gluttony” leveled at The Food Network. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W15 Museums of Stories - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22459 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew B. Harrison

Museums are packed full with stories, and so writers have long told stories about museums, framing scenes based on the histories preserved in artifacts. In museum corridors and galleries that so often feel sacred and mysterious, writers have found inspiration for exploring how people learn to tell facts from fantasies, tricks from truths, histories from “mere” stories. The texts in this course survey the common and strange things that we collect as evidence of our values, our personalities, and our dreams. Readings will include Lawrence Weschler’s MR. WILSON’S CABINET OF WONDER; Mark Doty’s STILL LIFE WITH LEMON; Margaret Atwood’s LIFE BEFORE MAN; Thomas Bernhard’s OLD MASTERS; and selected poems by Donika Kelly, Allison Benis White, Adrienne Rich, Frank O’Hara, William Carlos Williams, Victoria Chang, and others. We’ll view at least one movie: MUSEUM HOURS (2012). The writing load for this course—a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised work—will involve both descriptive and interpretive papers about museum spaces and artifacts. Over the course of the semester, students will also construct a catalogue of images and writing that displays a story about themselves. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W16 Order Up: The Lit of Food - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22460 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shannon F. Scott

This course explores food as a cultural metaphor, as a means to connect, create, and sustain family and tradition. It is also a venue to examine history through a culinary lens. In this class we question our assumptions about how food is grown, raised and prepared. What is organic? What is “junk”? Gourmet? Who decides? Who has access to food? Where and what are “food deserts”? There is also a community component, involving field trips to local eateries, work with BrightSide, and a drive for local food shelves. Fiction for this course may include: THE MISTRESS OF SPICES by Chitra Divakaruni, MY YEAR OF MEATS by Ruth Ozeki, Laura Esquivel’s LIKE WATER FOR CHOCOLATE, CHOP CHOP by Simon Wroe, or NUMBER ONE CHINESE RESTAURANT by Lillian Li. The texts, along with the issues discussed in class, will range from the personal to the political: from essays by Michael Pollan and Vandana Shiva, to poetic odes from THE HUNGRY EAR, to personal accounts of Julia Childs’ challenges as a female chef, to French chef Auguste Escoffier’s connection to food and war, to contemporary accusations of “food pornography” and “gluttony” leveled at The Food Network. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W51 Home: Living in America (ESL) M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21958 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Juan Li

With its focus on thematic and intertextual perspectives, the readings in this course might be ordered any number of ways: according to theme, an idea that develops across genres or literary periods, or by their incorporation of specific oral or textual precedents (e.g. mythology, the Bible, classical writings, legends, or folklore). The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - W01 SimCities: Maps, Places, Power M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 227

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 227

Course Registration Number:

21964 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Fernando Sanchez

In this course, we will explore what makes a city-space. This means that we will examine the qualities necessary for a city to take on an identity as well as who gets to control the ways that cities and their inhabitants are represented. Through the semester, we will move from the macro-level (how cities are built) to the micro-level (how people shape cities through their experiences). Projects will include writing about what makes a city, producing an ethnographic account of how people use city spaces, and conducting research on a relevant city site. Readings will include THE FORD CENTURY IN AMERICA by Brian McMahon, WAR OF STREETS AND HOUSES by Sophie Yanow and Tom Kaczynski, MEANWHILE IN SAN FRANCISCO by Wendy MacNaughton, and IMAGE OF THE CITY by Kevin Lynch, as well as articles from sites like 99% Invisible and Citylab. Please note that this course may require that you purchase SimCity 4 ($20) on Steam. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - W02 Social Media Mayhem M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22461 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mercedes M. Sheldon

Today’s social media craze isn’t new, despite the constant commentary to the contrary. The explosion of print media in the 1800s rocked the English-speaking world, causing many to worry about its corrupting influence on youth and its evil power over society. Just as we hear people today decry Facebook and Instagram and whatever they invent next, so too did society fret and worry about the ever-expanding number of newspapers, specialized magazines, and low brow periodicals. In this course, we will dig into the cultural perspectives of mass media during the transformative eras of the 19th and 21st centuries. We will look at both written and visual media, including cartoons, illustrations, fiction and non-fiction. And of course we will draw on our own personal media experiences, too. Course projects will include traditional writing and writing that utilizes current media technologies. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 212 - L01 British Authors II M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21129 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

How has the category of “English literature” expanded as a result of global changes over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries? How have authors responded to fundamental upheavals in the individual, religion, the British Empire, the role of women, and the value of poetry and art? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings in the British literary tradition from approximately 1789 to the present. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as revolution and reform, authorship, war, nationality and race, and the relationships between literature and other arts. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 215 - L01 American Authors II - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21942 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Andrew J. Scheiber

How did the modern warfare of World War I change those who fought and those who stayed at home? Why did so many of the best American artists flee to Paris? How did the traditionalism and stability of the 1950s lead to the radicalism and rebellion of the 60s? How has technology, from the typewriter to the internet, reshaped literature? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework though extensive readings in American literature from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as progress and innovation, war, the “lost generation,” the New Woman, race, and conformity and individuality. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 218 - L01 Lit by Women:Critical Hist M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21955 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

From Sappho to Austen to Woolf to Morrison – women have been rendering the world into exquisite words for centuries. But how has the writing of women served as a critique of patriarchy? What impact has women’s writing had on important cultural and political movements such as abolition, suffrage, and environmentalism? In what ways has the writing of women been more radical than polite, more aggressive than demure, more confrontational than deferential? How have women consistently defied the limiting expectations of them through the creation of some of the most experimental, risky, and defiant works of literature in existence? These questions and more will be explored in this course, which focuses on the history of literature by women. While it will concentrate mainly on British and American women writers, the course will also address the work of non-western writers. Ultimately, this course will examine gender and its role in both the composition and reading of literary texts. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major, and the Human Diversity Requirement in the Core Curriculum. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 221 - L01 The Modern Tradition M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 301

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

20068 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Martin L. Warren

What might it mean to speak of “the modern tradition”? What does that include and exclude? And how does it matter to us today? How does the modern tradition help us understand about concepts such as authorship, originality, literacy, and literary excellence? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings of representative texts of Western literature in translation from the seventeenth century through the present, including some interactions of the European traditions with modern African, Latin American, or Asian literatures. Authors may include Racine, Goethe, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Rilke, Solzhenitsyn, Duras, Lispector, and Achebe. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 255 - W01 Intro to Imaginative Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20756 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Santiago

This course introduces students to skills necessary for imaginative writing. It includes close readings of literary texts that model basic techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students’ critical skills. This course will include instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 255 - W02 Intro to Imaginative Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20755 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. Bouwman

This course introduces students to skills necessary for imaginative writing. It includes close readings of literary texts that model basic techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students’ critical skills. This course will include instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 280 - L01 Intro to English Studies M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21130 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laura R. Zebuhr

This gateway course into the English major and the minor is an introduction to (a) literary tools, techniques, and terminology for reading and writing in English studies; (b) the history of English Studies as a discipline and the intellectual concepts and critical debates that have shaped the field; and (c) the practices of English Studies, from close reading and analysis of literary and critical texts to interpretation and scholarly research.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 304 - W01 Analytical/Persuasive Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21943 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Erika C. Scheurer

This course examines rhetorical strategies used in published writing, focusing in particular on the roles of analysis and persuasion in the writing process. Students will strengthen their own writing through various projects and possible partnerships with community organizations with an eye toward the writing they will be doing upon graduation. This course fulfills the Theory and Practice requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 315 - D01 Writing Grants and Proposals M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 301

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

21944 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Fernando Sanchez

The ability to write impactful grant proposals is a skill highly valued in today’s work environment, and the job applicants who possess that skill set themselves apart from other applicants. In this grant writing course, students will learn how to assess client needs, find appropriate funding sources, and use rhetorical and genre knowledge to develop and communicate their ideas for a research or project grant. Students will then work collaboratively in pairs or small groups to apply what they have learned by creating and then orally presenting a grant proposal that uses sound document design strategies. This course will teach those who have little or no prior experience with grant writing how to apply for funding across disciplines ranging from the humanities to STEM fields, across academic institutions and private organizations, and in both profit and non-profit settings. This course satisfies a requirement for the English with a Professional Writing Emphasis major. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 321 - W01 Writing Poetry M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20830 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Santiago

This intermediate course explores traditional and innovative patterns of poetry writing. Emphasis on experimentation with a variety of techniques and development of individual voice. This course will include critique sessions, readings to broaden possibilities of form and subject, and individual instruction. Open to students with some previous experience in writing poetry. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisite: ENGL 255 or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 323 - W01 Writing Creative Nonfiction M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21300 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

This intermediate course explores traditional and innovative patterns of creative nonfiction writing. Emphasis on experimentation with a variety of techniques and development of individual voice. This course will include critique sessions, readings to broaden possibilities of form and subject, and individual instruction. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 255 or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 324 - 01 Genre Study: Rise of the Novel - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21953 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Young-ok An

This course will study literature in terms of form, with explicit attention given to the concept and practice of genre—whether one or more, traditional or emerging, from various canonical or non-canonical traditions, print or emerging digital literacies, etc. Credit may be earned more than once under this number for different emphases. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 337 - L01 Latina Women Writers - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21301 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Olga L. Herrera

What kinds of insights can reading from a multicultural, internationalist perspective bring to our current moment? What can reading authors from Cuban-American, Dominican-American, Mexican-American, and Puerto Rican backgrounds teach us about the diversity we encounter in 21st century America? This course will explore literature by Latina authors writing about themes of identity, culture and politics, language, gender, religion and spirituality, and artistic experience within a contemporary U.S. context. Students will read texts published in English by authors including Isabel Allende, Julia Alvarez, Sandra Cisneros, Cristina Garcia, Cloria Anzaldua, and others. This course satisfies the Human Diversity core requirement and the Diversity distribution requirement for English majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 361 - 01 Shakespeare & Early Mod Period M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21017 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Raymond N. MacKenzie

This course provides an in-depth exploration of a select group of texts or authors from British literature of the Renaissance or early modern era, a time of religious schism, early British imperialism, the rebirth of the classical world, and the birth of the professional theatre in England. Alongside the work of Shakespeare, the selected texts or authors will be studied in terms of a particular historical, cultural, or other context, or in terms of a convergence with authors or texts from other literary traditions or intellectual disciplines. Examples might include Shakespeare and the rise of the Renaissance theatre; Elizabethan writers and the Islamic world; Shakespeare and the idea of the human in the drama, sonnet, and personal essay; your brain on Shakespeare: cognitive literary studies. This course fulfills the Contexts and Convergences requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 370 - L01 Colonial/Early American Lit See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

21947 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laura R. Zebuhr

This course provides an in-depth exploration of a select group of texts or authors from American Literature from the period of European discovery and colonization through the first decades following American independence. Selected texts or authors (such as Native American oral tales, John Winthrop, Anne Bradstreet, Mary Rowlandson, and Jonathan Edwards) will be studied in terms of a particular historical, cultural, or other context, or in terms of a convergence with authors or texts from other literary traditions or intellectual disciplines. Examples might include native voices in early American literature; poetry, journals, and the religious experience in colonial New England; representations of and responses to the slave trade in Colonial America; captivity narratives as literature and ideology; the myth of the wilderness. This course fulfills the Contexts and Convergences requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1215-1320M - W - - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 405 - D01 Advanced Creative Writing - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20745 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Salvatore Pane

This advanced course will focus on the student’s development of a substantial body of work in a chosen genre: poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction. Students will review their previous writing, do further exploration of a chosen genre, and produce significant new work in that genre. Reading will include theoretical and creative texts. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisite: ENGL 321 or 322 or 323 or permission of instructor based on examination of a portfolio.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 422 - 01 Literary Magazine Practicum II M - - - - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 227

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

JRC 227

Course Registration Number:

20405 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

The spring semester component of the sequence includes readings from The Art of Literary Editing; active involvement with other editors in the selection process; learning and applying principles of literary copyediting; using desktop publishing to produce the new edition of Summit Avenue Review, from the creation of style sheets and master pages to final proofreading; writing a reflection essay on the editing process as you experienced it; examining the design and content of five professional literary magazine web sites; learning the Dreamweaver web design program; and managing the Summit Avenue Review web site. Prerequisites: ENGL 421

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 481 - D01 Seminar: Hemingway All the Way - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21304 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

As a capstone seminar, ENGL 481 is designed to synthesize the intellectual experiences of the English major within the whole of the undergraduate curriculum, and to serve as a transition between undergraduate liberal arts education and the next steps in students' lives in graduate school or other career paths in the humanities. Students in this course will synthesize their disciplinary skills by exploring a particular literary problem or issue in depth; they will focus on, and write about, their own postgraduate vocational plans and aspirations within the field of English or related postgraduate endeavors.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)