J-Term 2018 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 217 - L01 Multicultural Literature See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

10218 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Melissa J. Hendrickx

What happens when race and sexuality collide? This course will explore literature from writers of color who are also members of the LGBTQ community. We will discuss the impact of having multiple minority statuses, and historic connections between racial and LGBTQ social justice movements. Potential authors include James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Benjamin Alire Sáenz, Ryka Aoki, Deborah Miranda, and others. Through their poetry, novels, and essays, we will examine how these writers redefine our understanding of gender, ethnicity, and relationships, while simultaneously expanding the American Literary canon. Students' final project will consist of connecting one of these authors to a current cultural or political issue. This is a blended/hyrbid course that will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays, with students completing online assignments on Wednesdays and Fridays. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major, the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum, and counts as a Writing Across the Curriculum Writing to Learn course. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 2100900-1200- T - R - - -
-- - - - - - -

Spring 2018 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 121 - W01 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

20955 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Brett E. Jenkins

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W02 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 212

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

20818 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W03 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 208

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 208

Course Registration Number:

20819 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W04 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

22356 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W05 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 305

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OEC 305

Course Registration Number:

20820 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laurie E. Lindeen

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W06 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 301

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

21066 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Leslie A. Miller

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W07 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

20821 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Alison L. Underthun-Meilahn

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement. Please note that this course is half in-class (meets weekly on Thursdays from 3:25-5:00pm) and half online.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 2101525-1700- - - R - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 121 - W51 Crit Thinking:Lit/Wrting (ESL) M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 481

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

21097 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Suzanne L. Donsky

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W01 Thrilling Tales of Adventure - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22381 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gordon D. Grice

This fully online class will examine stories of men and women in quest of riches, relics, scientific discovery, or a new understanding of life. We'll read adventure tales in diverse genres--including fiction, poetry, and nonfiction--and along the way we'll consider what these stories have to say about clashing cultures and human need. Authors may include Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Elizabeth Gaskell, Joseph Conrad, and H. Rider Haggard. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W02 Jazz Music and American Poetry M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 MCH 106

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

MCH 106

Course Registration Number:

22382 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucas B. Pingel

This Writing Intensive course will explore poetry's intersection with jazz music, and the uniquely American brand of poetry that results. Students will become familiarized with some of the rich history of jazz as a music of innovation and of protest, and learn about some of the most significant musicians (John Coltrane, Charlie Parker, Charles Mingues, for example) to inspire poets to move beyond typical conventions in literature. This course will maintain a foundation in developing strong reading, writing, and analytical skills through a variety of written assignments about authors such as Langston Hughes, Frank O'Hara, Bob Kaufman and Sonia Sanchez. Students can expect to produce at least 15 pages of formal, revised writing in the course. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W03 Screeds and Manifestos M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 246

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

22384 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Charles A. Conley

At least since we learned to write, humanity has been straying from the path of righteousness, and it seems someone was always there writing a screed to tell us precisely how to stay on that path. For about as long, people have been writing manifestos to explain what needs to be done to fix everything. Screeds and manifestos are uncompromising and strident forms of persuasion, seemingly at odds with the purposes of academic writing. But by studying these forms of persuasive writing in extremis, we will learn tools and strategies to help us become more sensitive readers and more powerful writers. The historical range of course texts will be extensive, from Puritan-era jeremiads through twentieth century artistic and political manifestos like Tristan Tzara’s Dada Manifesto and Donna Haraway’s Cyborg Manifesto. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W04 Passports: Poetry Around World - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 311

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 311

Course Registration Number:

22385 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mary E. Frandson

Get ready to stamp your passport! This course explores historical, political, social and revolutionary events and cultures from around the world channeled through poetic voices throughout the century. As Williams Carlos Williams once said, “The act of writing is to reveal,” and poetic examination at its best reveals the complex lives and the rich cultures of people from around the world, including Latin America, the Middle East, Asia, Palestine, Lebanon, and Europe. Close readings of poetic text provides an opportunity for today's scholar to deepen his or her understanding of the human condition, as each poem offers a new perspective world view. Experimentation with poetic forms is also encouraged to lead students to discover their own creative voice on the page. Students will closely read a handful of poetic text including: LANGUAGE FOR A NEW CENTURY: CONTEMPORARY POETRY FROM THE MIDDLE EAST, ASIA AND BEYOND and THE NEW EUROPEAN POETS. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W01 Business and American Identity - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22386 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

This fully online course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W02 Community Perspectives M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 306

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OEC 306

Course Registration Number:

22387 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne E. Roth-Reinhardt

This course considers the necessity of an engaged, representative citizenry for a healthy democracy. Course readings, class discussion, formal and informal writing, and your participation in a public work project will address the role of the individual in shaping the community and the responsibility of the community toward its populace. We will begin by examining various strategies for growing and maintaining healthy communities. Then, we will listen to the diverse voices that make up our community, both local and national, and consider the benefits of empowerment and the importance of representation. Throughout the semester, our study will consider the impact of community strategies and practices in our public work, listen to the voices that make up our own neighborhoods, and measure the health of our democracy by assessing the power of its people. Possible texts to be studied may include E.L. Doctorow's RAGTIME and Anna Deavere Smith's drama TWILIGHT: LOS ANGELES 1992 as well as selections from works by Hannah Arendt, Ta-Nehisi Coates, and Ralph Ellison. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W03 Sports and Social Justice M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 222

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

22388 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David T. Lawrence

Why did two men walk, shoeless, to the medal podium at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City and raise black-gloved fists during the playing of the U.S. national anthem? Who stood beside them in solidarity? Why does a poem about the first Olympic gold medalist in Women’s Marathon in 1984 end with the line, “and standing”? What basketball team was declared World Champion following the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904? These and other questions highlight the convergence of sport, culture, and social justice, an intersection that is embedded in our history and lauded in our literature. In this class, we will investigate the literature of sport and social justice via interdisciplinary perspectives. Sport provides a lens through which we can see the values of America more clearly. It can show us the best we have to offer . . . and sometimes, unfortunately, the worst. We will consider it all, focusing on the ways that sport has become an arena for politics, culture, and social justice. To accomplish this we will read the work of sports writers, essayists, poets, novelists and playwrights, but we will also engage productions of contemporary culture such as photographic images, social media, videos, and memes. Through all of these we will seek to consider sport not as an apolitical pastime, but as a complex and fraught landscape where the issues and problems that our country grapples with are present in numerous and fascinating ways. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W04 Sports and Social Justice M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 246

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

22389 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

Why did two men walk, shoeless, to the medal podium at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City and raise black-gloved fists during the playing of the U.S. national anthem? Who stood beside them in solidarity? Why does a poem about the first Olympic gold medalist in Women’s Marathon in 1984 end with the line, “and standing”? What basketball team was declared World Champion following the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904? These and other questions highlight the convergence of sport, culture, and social justice, an intersection that is embedded in our history and lauded in our literature. In this class, we will investigate the literature of sport and social justice via interdisciplinary perspectives. Sport provides a lens through which we can see the values of America more clearly. It can show us the best we have to offer . . . and sometimes, unfortunately, the worst. We will consider it all, focusing on the ways that sport has become an arena for politics, culture, and social justice. To accomplish this we will read the work of sports writers, essayists, poets, novelists and playwrights, but we will also engage productions of contemporary culture such as photographic images, social media, videos, and memes. Through all of these we will seek to consider sport not as an apolitical pastime, but as a complex and fraught landscape where the issues and problems that our country grapples with are present in numerous and fascinating ways. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W05 Sports and Social Justice M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

22390 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David T. Lawrence

Why did two men walk, shoeless, to the medal podium at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City and raise black-gloved fists during the playing of the U.S. national anthem? Who stood beside them in solidarity? Why does a poem about the first Olympic gold medalist in Women’s Marathon in 1984 end with the line, “and standing”? What basketball team was declared World Champion following the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904? These and other questions highlight the convergence of sport, culture, and social justice, an intersection that is embedded in our history and lauded in our literature. In this class, we will investigate the literature of sport and social justice via interdisciplinary perspectives. Sport provides a lens through which we can see the values of America more clearly. It can show us the best we have to offer . . . and sometimes, unfortunately, the worst. We will consider it all, focusing on the ways that sport has become an arena for politics, culture, and social justice. To accomplish this we will read the work of sports writers, essayists, poets, novelists and playwrights, but we will also engage productions of contemporary culture such as photographic images, social media, videos, and memes. Through all of these we will seek to consider sport not as an apolitical pastime, but as a complex and fraught landscape where the issues and problems that our country grapples with are present in numerous and fascinating ways. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W06 Sports and Social Justice M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 246

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

22391 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

Why did two men walk, shoeless, to the medal podium at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City and raise black-gloved fists during the playing of the U.S. national anthem? Who stood beside them in solidarity? Why does a poem about the first Olympic gold medalist in Women’s Marathon in 1984 end with the line, “and standing”? What basketball team was declared World Champion following the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904? These and other questions highlight the convergence of sport, culture, and social justice, an intersection that is embedded in our history and lauded in our literature. In this class, we will investigate the literature of sport and social justice via interdisciplinary perspectives. Sport provides a lens through which we can see the values of America more clearly. It can show us the best we have to offer . . . and sometimes, unfortunately, the worst. We will consider it all, focusing on the ways that sport has become an arena for politics, culture, and social justice. To accomplish this we will read the work of sports writers, essayists, poets, novelists and playwrights, but we will also engage productions of contemporary culture such as photographic images, social media, videos, and memes. Through all of these we will seek to consider sport not as an apolitical pastime, but as a complex and fraught landscape where the issues and problems that our country grapples with are present in numerous and fascinating ways. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W07 Medical Narratives M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

22268 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Emily M. James

As novelist and essayist Virginia Woolf once observed, it is "strange indeed that illness has not taken its place with love and battle and jealousy among the prime themes of literature." As we read and discuss literary narratives about health and illness, we may also explore historical and contemporary conversations about health and illness, with topics including hysteria, syphilis, tuberculosis, neurasthenia, cancer, HIV/AIDS, and vaccine controversies. Along the way, we will consider literature's role in what Susan Sontag once described as the "punitive and sentimental fantasies concocted" about illness. Key writers may include Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Sylvia Plath, Kazuo Ishiguro, Leslie Jamison, Ian McEwan, Atul Gawande, and Paul Kalanithi. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W08 Literature Looks at the Family - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 MHC 211

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

22392 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Barbara K. Olson

The family has been subjected to harsh spotlights on our American stages. The pages of American fiction have been equally revealing, though perhaps less harsh. Whatever the genre, American writers have paid particular attention to family secrets, cultural assimilation, and the pressures of war. Likely texts to be used in this class will include works from Lahiri, Akhtar, O'Neill, Miller, Ng, and Wilson. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W09 At the Crossroads of the Blues - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 309

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 309

Course Registration Number:

22393 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Andrew J. Scheiber

Though born of necessity as a response to racial oppression and the legacy of slavery, the music we call “the blues” has traveled far—across time, geography, racial boundaries, and even beyond its original musical forms. In this class we’ll look at some of the crossings and intersections that the blues have travelled through. We’ll see how the blues are not just a form of music, but also a way of making art more generally, and a way of understanding the human condition. This course does not assume any prior musical knowledge, but welcomes anyone who is ready to read, listen, and reflect on the often challenging, disturbing, but ultimately life-affirming messages of the blues. Readings will include Zora Neale Hurston’s THEIR EYES WERE WATCHING GOD, August Wilson’s MA RAINEY'S BLACK BOTTOM, and blues-themed poems by authors from the African American and other literary traditions. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W10 At the Crossroads of the Blues - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 SCB 325

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

SCB 325

Course Registration Number:

22394 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Andrew J. Scheiber

Though born of necessity as a response to racial oppression and the legacy of slavery, the music we call “the blues” has traveled far—across time, geography, racial boundaries, and even beyond its original musical forms. In this class we’ll look at some of the crossings and intersections that the blues have travelled through. We’ll see how the blues are not just a form of music, but also a way of making art more generally, and a way of understanding the human condition. This course does not assume any prior musical knowledge, but welcomes anyone who is ready to read, listen, and reflect on the often challenging, disturbing, but ultimately life-affirming messages of the blues. Readings will include Zora Neale Hurston’s THEIR EYES WERE WATCHING GOD, August Wilson’s MA RAINEY'S BLACK BOTTOM, and blues-themed poems by authors from the African American and other literary traditions. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W11 Text as Art/Art as Text See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

22395 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Casie L. Szalapski

The Pre-Raphaelites painted Ophelia, “The Lady of Shalott”, and “La Belle Dam Sans Merci.” Salvador Dali painted scenes from Alice and Wonderland. Rodin sculpted Dante’s hell. Artists have often found their inspiration from the great stories of human history. While it seems inevitable that story and painting and poetry and sculpture share a rich, dynamic relationship, this course will explore the reasons behind that and attempt to make explicit the parallels between literary art and fine art. Additionally, we will explore how reading various forms of fine art as a text (ex., conducting formal analysis on composition, proportions, etc.; identifying the style/genre; understanding the historical context; uncovering the patron and his or her agenda) will develop our understanding and interpretation of it; likewise, we will learn to see a literary work as an object of art to be admired and gazed upon rather than merely dissected for ideas. Ultimately, this course aims to teach how a literary work and a corresponding piece of art can work toward a deeper understanding and appreciation of one another. Students will visit the Minneapolis Institute of Art as part of a class project. Additionally, students will choose to either create their own artwork of a literary scene or figure or compose a story or poem based on a piece of art. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 formal revised pages. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement. Please note that this course is half in-class (meets weekly on Tuesdays from 3:25-5:00pm) and half online.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JRC 4141525-1700- T - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 203 - W01 Final Frontier: Mars & Beyond M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 212

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

22396 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher J. Hassel

How do global politics influence our desire to explore space? How does space exploration impact our theological viewpoints of the universe? What roles might nation-states and corporations play in future space endeavors? Focusing on the human yearning to explore space, as well as current efforts to put humans on Mars in the near future, this class will attempt to answer these questions by examining a variety of literary forms including fiction, science fiction, poetry, nonfiction prose, and biography. Likely works to be studied include Tracy K. Smith’s LIFE ON MARS, Mary Doria Russell’s THE SPARROW, and Andy Weir's THE MARTIAN. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W02 Romantic Losers M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 209

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

OEC 209

Course Registration Number:

22397 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Doug P. Phillips

In the realm of romantic love no amount of reading will keep us from getting our hearts broken, but it may, in the words of Samuel Beckett, help us to “Try again. Fail again. Fail better.” With this in mind, we’ll immerse ourselves in the love lives of some of literature’s best and little known romantic losers, which I hope will leave us all a little wiser about the subject by the semester’s end. Here are a few works that will for sure make the cut, maybe: Flaubert’s MADAME BOVARY, Millay’s sonnets, Larkin’s poems, Barthes’s A LOVER’S DISCOURSE, de Botton’s ON LOVE, Beckett’s FIRST LOVE, Kureishi’s INTIMACY, and Greene’s THE END OF THE AFFAIR. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W03 Saved by Hope M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

22398 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ann M. Klein

In what and for what? This course explores the origin and power of hope amidst darkness and its relation to faith and love. Dostoevsky’s “Grand Inquisitor” will open our discussion by putting God on trial for allowing innocents to suffer. We will then probe reasons for belief through an analysis of THE TREE OF LIFE (film); grounds for hope through UTOPIA (dialogue), MAN’S SEARCH FOR MEANING (memoir), and “The Wreck of the Deutschland” (ode); and dimensions of charity through THE JEWELER’S SHOP (play), DEATH COMES FOR THE ARCHBISHOP (novel), and THE LIVING FLAME OF LOVE (mystical poem). Pope Emeritus Benedict XIV’s THE YES OF JESUS CHRIST will shed further light on the relevance of these virtues in our culture today. Formal and informal assignments will involve creative and analytical writing. By confronting vital questions and insights posed by diverse genres, students will have opportunities to ponder deeply and develop understanding and wisdom as they hone their composition skills through exploration, reflection, research, teamwork, drafting, revising, and editing. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W04 Bump in the Night:Spectral Lit M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

22399 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shannon F. Scott

This course is meant to explore aspects of the spectral in literature, art, film, and music. This includes the uncanny, examples of loss, grief, and acceptance, as well as identifying techniques used to frighten and captivate an audience in a more entertaining and creepy manner. We will also study questions about our responsibilities to the dead, what it means to be haunted, and our ideas/beliefs/interpretations regarding “The Other Side.” The result should be a spooky but eye-opening experience. Texts for this course may include: Dickens’s A CHRISTMAS CAROL, Gaiman’s THE GRAVEYARD BOOK, Hill’s THE WOMAN IN BLACK, Irving’s THE LEGEND OF SLEEPY HOLLOW, Jackson’s THE HAUNTING OF HILL HOUSE, James’s THE TURN OF THE SCREW, and Morrison’s BELOVED. In addition, there would be poetry from SPOON RIVER ANTHOLOGY, music from Jeremy Messersmith’s THE RELUCTANT GRAVEYARD, examples of spirit photography, Dia de Los Muertos folk art, and films like TRULY, MADLY, DEEPLY and VERTIGO. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W05 Paranoid Fictions:Conspiracies M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 309

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OEC 309

Course Registration Number:

22400 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Timothy J. Dewey

This course will examine the enduring appeal and growing influence of conspiracy theory in American political culture. We will examine key historical events and social issues in the history of our nation and the conspiracy theories they have spawned, as well as several prominent films and literary works inspired by paranoia. The objective of the course is neither to promote or debunk any particular theory, but to examine the formation and transmission of conspiracy theories and the role they play as modern mythologies—revealing less about historical truth than about the prejudices, ideologies, and anxieties of the people who believe them. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W06 Monsters, Inc. M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

22402 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. McNiel

Monsters are a big business: from Disney’s cute, cuddly monsters to nightmarish versions of zombies, vampires, and giant lizards, huge franchises have been built around monsters and the terror or fascination they inspire in us. Our obsession with monster stories and their adaptations may seem to be a recent phenomenon, but history is full of examples of monster stories that have been reinterpreted and reformulated for new purposes and audiences. This course will examine some of the most influential literary works featuring monsters, and trace how they were adapted and reinterpreted for various artistic and commercial purposes, often using different genres or formats. Texts may include FRANKENSTEIN, DRACULA, BEOWULF, as well as films and other media. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W07 Sherlock Holmes: Then & Now M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 310

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 310

Course Registration Number:

21729 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

When Sir Aruthur Conan Doyle created Shrlock Holmes in 1887, he had no idea the sensation his detective hero would become. Growing weary of writing about the sleuth, Conan Doyle killed him off, but fans clamored for resuscitation. This particular detective just wouldn't die, as one can witness through the current popularity of the Rowert Downey Jr. and Benedict Cumberbatch portrayals. So of course we'll be reading Sherlock Holmes stories, including modern sequels to Conan Doyle's work by laurie King and Mitch Culin. We will also look at British mystery writers who develop the detective tradition along the lines of Conan Doyle. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W08 Secrets, Lies, & Deception M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 227

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

JRC 227

Course Registration Number:

22469 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jeannie L. Hofmeister

“Tell all the truth but tell it slant—” American poet, Emily Dickinson suggests that the truth is often deliberately distorted. Are there times when the blunt truth is too painful to hear? Are some lies justified? Conversely, throughout history people have lied for their own gain or simply for the thrill of knowing they have the power to deceive. Are there consequences for deliberate acts of deception? In this course, we will examine how writers explore this human characteristic and discuss what we can learn about ourselves by considering the theme of lies and deception in literature. Possible texts include: “Wakefield” by Nathaniel Hawthorne, STATE OF WONDER by Ann Patchett, THE BURGESS BOYS by Elizabeth Strout, NEVER LET ME GO by Kazuo Ishiguro, DOUBT by John Patrick Shanley, and selected poems by Emily Dickinson and Ann Sexton. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W09 Home Sweet Home M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 JRC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

JRC 414

Course Registration Number:

22267 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Juan Li

What does “home” mean to you? Is it a place where you live and can truly be yourself within protected boundaries? Is it a feeling of love, comfort, peace, and security that you share with your family? Is it a sense of belonging, feeling welcome and valued when you move to a new place? When one is born in one geographical location (e.g., a country, a city) but moves to another, where is one’s home? This course examines the concept of “home” in literature and relates it to specific social, historical, and political contexts in which writers represent their senses of being home and homeless. By reading a variety of literary works – novels, poems, essays, and memoirs, by writers such as Walt Whitman, William Faulkner, Gloria Anzaldua, Eva Hoffman, and Bharati Mukherjee, we will investigate how meanings of literary “homes” are often bound up with issues of memory, hope, loss, language, race, regionalism, and globalization, all of which are central to our contemporary life. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W10 Hocus Pocus: The Magic Touch M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 SCB 104

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

SCB 104

Course Registration Number:

22405 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew B. Harrison

Magic in literature and film is often portrayed as a secret skillset or way of seeing that enables vulnerable characters to escape, resist, or change restrictive environments. Characters who learn magic can suggest that, with the right mentorship, codes, tools, and focus—not to mention a good deal of luck—one can transform into someone or something more potent and resilient. But who, in the magical worlds of such stories, controls access to techniques of self-transformation? What other techniques are out there? What are the dangers and responsibilities of using systems of magic? What is “good” magic? What is “bad”? Is the dream of success behind magical thinking just a misguided fantasy? Do other “rational” systems of thought ever convey assumptions about the world that seem “magical”? We will debate these questions as they arise in several books and films. Our readings will include REDEMPTION IN INDIGO, by Karen Lord; THE MAGICIANS, by Lev Grossman; ALL THE BIRDS IN THE SKY, by Charlie Jane Anders; and selected short stories by Kelly Link and Helen Oyeyemi. Films will include THE MAGICIAN (1958), SPIRITED AWAY (2002), and NOW YOU SEE ME (2013). Students will write weekly short papers on guided topics and a final research essay. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W11 Beyonce's "Lemonade" Library M - W - - - - 1730 - 1915 OEC 209

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

OEC 209

Course Registration Number:

21721 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laura R. Zebuhr

Inspired by Candice Benbow's "Lemonade Syllabus," (2016) this course puts Knowles' visual album into a literary historical context by considering it alongside novels, poems, and autobiographical writing from the 18th c. to today, as well as 20th and 21st c. Black feminist thought. We will also examine how the album uses intertextuality by looking at some of its literary and cultural allusions. Required reading includes: Zora Neale Hurston's THEIR EYES WERE WATCHING GOD and Assata Shakur's autobiography, ASSATA. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised pages. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W12 Fairy/Folk Tales in Literature - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 308

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OEC 308

Course Registration Number:

21715 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. Bouwman

In this course we’ll study a small collection of fairy and folk tales closely, both in their early written sources and later literary re-imaginings—for example, Grimm’s Snow White story along with Helen Oyeyemi’s BOY, SNOW, BIRD; or selections from ARABIAN NIGHTS along with Renée Ahdieh’s THE WRATH AND THE DAWN. As we read different versions of the stories, we’ll ask ourselves how these tales are structured, what audiences they’re aimed at, what they might be telling us about the culture of the time, and what they might have to say to us today. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W13 (Im)Perfect Worlds - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 310

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 310

Course Registration Number:

22410 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Yvonne E. Asp-Grahn

What do we need to fix in our society, and how should we fix it? As we struggle to improve through politics, culture, religion, etcetera, this course will explore the dark side of societal “improvement”. Dystopian literature and history teaches us that when seeking greatness as a large and diverse community, we cannot forget to ask “great for whom?” After all, my idea of a perfect world could be your nightmare. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W14 Gangsters, Geeks, and Spies - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 246

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

21723 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Santiago

This course explores stories, poems, music, and other forms of media that explode myths about Asian & Asian This course explores fiction, music, poetry, video games, graphic novels, and other forms of media that explode myths about Asian & Asian American culture. We’ll meet Amadeus Cho, a teenaged genius who also happens to be the next Incredible Hulk, and Maika Halfwolf, the steampunk heroine of the Image comic MONSTRESS. We’ll read FRESH OFF THE BOAT, the memoir of a one-time thug who conquers the foodie world, and play BUTTERFLY SOUP, an interactive game about four queer girls in the Bay Area who to happen to love baseball and each other. We’ll unpack hip-hop lyrics by M.I.A., and crack the cultural codes in the standup comedy of Ali Wong and in Aziz Ansari’s Emmy Award-winning MASTER OF NONE. And we’ll decipher the testimony of the captain in the best-selling novel THE SYMPATHIZER, an ex-soldier who describes himself as “a spy, a sleeper, a spook, a man of two faces.” The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W15 Reading Eating - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 SCB 107

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

SCB 107

Course Registration Number:

22411 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paula F. Cisewski

Why are both hunger and obesity problems? What is healthy food, and how does it make its way to us? With whom do you choose to break bread? In this course, we will explore both personal pleasures and political issues around eating. From Marcel Proust’s famous madeleine to Anthony Bourdain’s PARTS UNKNOWN, from TV ads to literature to Instagram images, we will examine our assumptions and our beliefs around food sources, food access, and food justice. Students will design individual research projects around the topic that may include interviews with food or farm experts or a service learning element. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W16 American Idealism See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

22413 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucy A. Saliger

In this course, we will read stories, essays, and poetry depicting the efforts of their respective authors or fictional protagonists to "rise" in their societies - individually, collectively, or both. Our focus will be on education as an integral facet of these ascension narratives - formal education as well as other formative kinds of learning. Our efforts over the duration of the semester will help us examine the role of education as a means of uplift in our own lives as well as our broader society. We will explore questions regarding success and failure in these endeavors along with inescapable contradictions in these stories while reflecting on how and why they work on many of us so powerfully. Authors may include Frederick Douglass, Zitkala-Sa, Jack Conroy, Anne Moody, Jimmy Baca, and Francisco Jimenez. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement. NOTE: This is a hybrid course that is scheduled to meet weekly on Thursdays from 3:25-5:00pm; during some days or weeks of the semester, we will meet online during regular class time or work and meet online according to our own individual schedules while keeping up with course work and class discussions. The instructor will be traveling during part of the semester, interviewing people living through various stages in their own educational ascension narratives and inviting them to speak with her and the class via Skype. By the end of the semester, the hope is that students will gain deeper insight into their own ideals regarding education and its place in our lives.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JRC 4141525-1700- - - R - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 203 - W17 Gangsters, Geeks, and Spies - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 210

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 210

Course Registration Number:

22265 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Santiago

This course explores stories, poems, music, and other forms of media that explode myths about Asian & Asian This course explores fiction, music, poetry, video games, graphic novels, and other forms of media that explode myths about Asian & Asian American culture. We’ll meet Amadeus Cho, a teenaged genius who also happens to be the next Incredible Hulk, and Maika Halfwolf, the steampunk heroine of the Image comic MONSTRESS. We’ll read FRESH OFF THE BOAT, the memoir of a one-time thug who conquers the foodie world, and play BUTTERFLY SOUP, an interactive game about four queer girls in the Bay Area who to happen to love baseball and each other. We’ll unpack hip-hop lyrics by M.I.A., and crack the cultural codes in the standup comedy of Ali Wong and in Aziz Ansari’s Emmy Award-winning MASTER OF NONE. And we’ll decipher the testimony of the captain in the best-selling novel THE SYMPATHIZER, an ex-soldier who describes himself as “a spy, a sleeper, a spook, a man of two faces.” The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W51 Living in America: Home (ESL) M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 481

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

21398 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Juan Li

This English as a Second Language section of ENGL 203 explores how the notion of "home" is represented in literature. It invites students to reflect on what "home" means to them, especially when living overseas. Is it a geographical location (the country and city they were born in and/or live in)? Is it an emotional bond with family members and other people like themselves? Is it a sense of shelter, comfort, safety, and being welcome when they move to a new place? When one is born in a country but moves to another, where is one's home? In this course, we will explore the many ways writers have represented their senses of home and senses of being homeless in a variety of literary works--novels, poems, and memoirs. We will investigate through our readings and discussions how our senses of home are often bound up with issues such as memory, hope, loss, regionalism, alientation, and globalization. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - W01 Race/Gender/Sexuality & Lang. M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 209

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 209

Course Registration Number:

22376 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucia Pawlowski

Do men and women speak differently? Do gay men still find a need to “code” their language? How do lesbians resist the negative connotations of “coming out?” Why do we need a word for “cis?” How does African-American Vernacular English have roots in West African languages? How is hip hop part of the African-American oral tradition? Why would a Chicana writer “code-mesh” (write in both English and Spanish) in her writing? Why would English be resisted if it’s a “global” language? How did Native American boarding schools threaten Native American languages? We live in a nation of languages--and this diversity of languages represents not a mere array of diversity, but power dynamics, histories of struggle, and warring values amongst different groups in America. We will read about the language variations of various minority groups: women, African-Americans, gay men, lesbians, Latinas, and Native Americans in colloquial and literary speech, and examine the power negotiations involved in these variations. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - W02 Race/Gender/Sexuality & Lang. M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 209

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 209

Course Registration Number:

22377 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucia Pawlowski

Do men and women speak differently? Do gay men still find a need to “code” their language? How do lesbians resist the negative connotations of “coming out?” Why do we need a word for “cis?” How does African-American Vernacular English have roots in West African languages? How is hip hop part of the African-American oral tradition? Why would a Chicana writer “code-mesh” (write in both English and Spanish) in her writing? Why would English be resisted if it’s a “global” language? How did Native American boarding schools threaten Native American languages? We live in a nation of languages--and this diversity of languages represents not a mere array of diversity, but power dynamics, histories of struggle, and warring values amongst different groups in America. We will read about the language variations of various minority groups: women, African-Americans, gay men, lesbians, Latinas, and Native Americans in colloquial and literary speech, and examine the power negotiations involved in these variations. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - W03 Crit Discourse of Video Games - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 211

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

21724 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Salvatore Pane

What does it mean to close read a video game? What is the interplay between text, digital media, and rhetoric? Where do games fit in academia? In the Critical Discourse of Video Games, students will interrogate these questions while being introduced to game studies, platform studies, and the digital humanities. Students will learn by weaving together theories of play, reading, writing, and digital creation. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - W04 Crit Discourse of Video Games - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 211

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

21728 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Salvatore Pane

What does it mean to close read a video game? What is the interplay between text, digital media, and rhetoric? Where do games fit in academia? In the Critical Discourse of Video Games, students will interrogate these questions while being introduced to game studies, platform studies, and the digital humanities. Students will learn by weaving together theories of play, reading, writing, and digital creation. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 212 - L01 British Authors II M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 310

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OEC 310

Course Registration Number:

21241 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

How has the category of “English literature” expanded as a result of global changes over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries? How have authors responded to fundamental upheavals in the individual, religion, the British Empire, the role of women, and the value of poetry and art? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings in the British literary tradition from approximately 1789 to the present. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as revolution and reform, authorship, war, nationality and race, and the relationships between literature and other arts. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 218 - L01 Lit by Women:Critical Hist M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 209

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 209

Course Registration Number:

20325 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

From Sappho to Austen to Woolf to Morrison – women have been rendering the world into exquisite words for centuries. But how has the writing of women served as a critique of patriarchy? What impact has women’s writing had on important cultural and political movements such as abolition, suffrage, and environmentalism? In what ways has the writing of women been more radical than polite, more aggressive than demure, more confrontational than deferential? How have women consistently defied the limiting expectations of them through the creation of some of the most experimental, risky, and defiant works of literature in existence? These questions and more will be explored in this course, which focuses on the history of literature by women. While it will concentrate mainly on British and American women writers, the course will also address the work of non-western writers. Ultimately, this course will examine gender and its role in both the composition and reading of literary texts. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major, and the Human Diversity Requirement in the Core Curriculum. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 221 - L01 The Modern Tradition - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 306

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 306

Course Registration Number:

20074 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Doug P. Phillips

Through our study of European literature and some of its most memorable characters—Moliere’s Tartuffe, Voltaire’s Candide, Flaubert’s Emma Bovary, Dostoevsky’s Underground Man, Kafka’s Bug-Man, etc.—we will dig deep into life’s most pressing questions, not least of which is what makes for a good life. Our study will also give us the chance to better understand who we are today in light of the cultural shifts and philosophical drifts that have come before us. In the words of the writer Zadie Smith, we're going to read a lot of good books in this class (all in translation), “concentrating on whatever is most particular to them, in the hope that this might help us understand whatever is most particular to us.” This course satisfies both the Historical Perspectives distribution requirement for English majors and the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 255 - W01 Intro to Imaginative Writing M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 JRC 481

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

20828 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Leslie A. Miller

This course introduces students to skills necessary for imaginative writing. It includes close readings of literary texts that model basic techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students’ critical skills. This course will include instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 255 - W02 Intro to Imaginative Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 SCB 104

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

SCB 104

Course Registration Number:

20827 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. Bouwman

This course introduces students to skills necessary for imaginative writing. It includes close readings of literary texts that model basic techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students’ critical skills. This course will include instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 280 - L01 Intro to English Studies M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

21242 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laura R. Zebuhr

This gateway course into the English major and the minor is an introduction to (a) literary tools, techniques, and terminology for reading and writing in English studies; (b) the history of English Studies as a discipline and the intellectual concepts and critical debates that have shaped the field; and (c) the practices of English Studies, from close reading and analysis of literary and critical texts to interpretation and scholarly research.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 298 - W01 Topics: Screenwriting M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 212

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

21984 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

James T. Snapko

The purpose of this course is to explore how to write effective narrative screenplays, with an emphasis on the creation of short scripts. In order to explore and identify basic dramatic principles of story, character, and structure, we will analyze numerous short scripts and films made from them. We’ll also look at how the dramatic principles of short scripts have been expanded and turned into feature screenplays by exploring the work of such successful writers and filmmakers as Raymond Chandler (DOUBLE INDEMNITY), Joel & Ethan Coen (FARGO), Nora Ephron (WHEN HARRY MET SALLY), and Akira Kurosawa (RASHOMAN), to name just a few. Once we establish the basics of effective screenplays, students will apply these concepts to the development of their own original short scripts. By the end of the semester, students will have written several complete short scripts that are ready to be shot on their own, produced as part of UST’s filmmaking course, or could be developed further into feature length screenplays. This course counts as a production/practice course for students pursuing the Film Studies minor and as an elective course for English majors; please note that it DOES NOT COUNT towards the literature and writing core requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 300 - W01 Theory& Practice of Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 SCB 107

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

SCB 107

Course Registration Number:

20075 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Susan J. Callaway

This course introduces students to current writing, rhetorical, and pedagogical theory, and helps them develop a vocabulary for talking about writing and strengthen their abilities to write and to assist others in developing their academic literacy. Students will practice writing in a variety of forms such as academic writing, professional writing, experimental writing, and writing with particular attention to social justice. Required for secondary licensure in communication arts and literature students. This course fulfills the Theory and Practice requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 315 - D01 Writing in Health/Human Scienc - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 227

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 227

Course Registration Number:

21995 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Fernando Sanchez

This course examines the power that writing has in health, medical, and human science professions. We will discuss how experts use writing to create and transmit knowledge within their own fields and how they communicate this knowledge to public audiences. As importantly, we will explore how communities craft their own knowledge regarding health and what role professional writers have in acting as a bridge between these varying types of expertise. This course counts for English with Professional Writing Emphasis students and as a Writing Across the Curriculum Writing in the Discipline course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 321 - W01 Writing Poetry - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

20912 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Leslie A. Miller

This intermediate course explores traditional and innovative patterns of poetry writing. Emphasis on experimentation with a variety of techniques and development of individual voice. This course will include critique sessions, readings to broaden possibilities of form and subject, and individual instruction. Open to students with some previous experience in writing poetry. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisite: ENGL 255 or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 323 - W01 Writing Creative Nonfiction M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 481

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

21700 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

This intermediate course explores traditional and innovative patterns of creative nonfiction writing. Emphasis on experimentation with a variety of techniques and development of individual voice. This course will include critique sessions, readings to broaden possibilities of form and subject, and individual instruction. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 255 or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 324 - L01 Genre: Science Fiction M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 301

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

21699 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Martin L. Warren

Do you want to rule the world? Blow apart a sun? Test a theory about medicine and the spread of disease? It is possible. . . at least in the imagination. Follow the paths of science fiction authors who have explored both our wildest dreams and greatest fears for where technology and new ideas might lead us. In its fascinating evolution, science fiction has always functioned as a lens to think about society, whether it’s Mary Shelley in 1818 looking on as Victor Frankenstein turns to modern experiments with electricity in the laboratory or Ernest Cline in 2011 imagining the energy crisis and global warming in a near-future world. We will approach the genre of SF as a mode of thought-experimentation and world-building that explores themes such as cloning, environmental apocalypse, the alien, utopias and dystopias, race, gender, and sexuality, religion and culture. Possible texts (written and film) may include BLADERUNNER, THE LEFT HAND OF DARKNESS, DISTRICT 9, THE UNIT, BLACK MIRROR, and THE HANDMAID'S TALE. This courses satisfies the Genre Studies requirement for English and English with a Creative Writing Emphasis majors. It also satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 325 - L01 History of English Language M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 SCB 107

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

SCB 107

Course Registration Number:

21701 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Juan Li

Why is the pronoun "she" the word of the millenium? How did English spelling become the "world's most awesome mess," as Mario Pei puts it? This course invites you to examine the dramatic and interesting ways in which the English language has changed over the past 1200 years--from a liitle known dialect spoken on a British Isle to a global language spoken by 500 million people around the world as their native tongue. We will study the stages of the "life" of English, beginning with Old English and continuing through Middle English, Early Modern English, and into present-day English. We will consider both internal linguistic changes of the language as well as cultural and literary events that caused changes. In this process of investigating the language's past, we will also reflect on its present and look ahead to its future. By the end of the term, you will gain proficiency in describing the evolution of the English language. You will also have opportunities to apply your knowledge of the history of English to your own areas of interest--literary historical studies, colonial and post-colonial studies, language studies, and the teaching of writing. No background in linguistics is required for this course. The only prerequisite---other than an ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204 class--is your enthusiasm in studying the changes of the English language. This course satisfes the Theory and Practice requirement for English majors.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 337 - L01 Voyages: Trans-Pacific Lit - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 210

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MHC 210

Course Registration Number:

21702 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Santiago

The Polynesian exploration of the Pacific, popularized in such films as MOANA and WHALE RIDER, has been called “the greatest human adventure story of all time.” Guided by the night sky, Polynesian voyagers navigated thousands of miles in Hōkūleʻa canoes, finding small islands in the middle of the largest ocean on Earth. Our voyage begins with poet Craig Santos Perez, who blends ecological, ethnographic, and epic modes in linking these Polynesian ancestors to the people of his native Guam and to his current home, Hawai’i. We will read the work of Kao Kalia Yang and Viet Nguyen, as we explore the stories of immigrants, refugees, picture brides, soldiers, and indigenous people who cross and re-cross the Pacific, many of them displaced by American intervention in Korea, the Philippines, Laos, and Vietnam. We will read these stories in terms of the transnational movement of people and ideas between Asia, the Pacific Islands, and the United States, stories of creation, birth, migration, environmental catastrophe, and the hope for a sustainable future. This course satisfies the core Human Diversity requirement and the English major diversity distribution requirement; it also counts as a Contexts and Convergences course for English majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 361 - L01 Bodying Forth Shakespeare - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 MHC 209

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

MHC 209

Course Registration Number:

21113 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy M. Muse

Audiences in the age of Shakespeare were well familiar with the visceral impact of literature, the way in which drama, for example, can work on both the nerves and the mind. They took seriously somatic responses to literary texts and saw clear ties between literature, emotions, and bodily health. Some feared that drama had a dangerous invasive power, like a virus, while others praised it for its curative properties. In this course we will read such 17th-century best-sellers as Robert Burton’s ANATOMY OF MELANCHOLY and Thomas Heywood’s APOLOGY FOR ACTORS alongside deep and close examinations of love, melancholy, rage, and forgiveness in plays such as Shakespeare’s HAMLET, MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING, THE MERCHANT OF VENICE, KING LEAR, and THE WINTER'S TALE, Heywood’s A WOMAN KILLED WITH KINDNESS, and John Webster’s THE DUCHESS OF MALFI. We will also research early modern medical practices and theories of the emotions and passions and the body and soul, seeing what they illuminate about the plays as well as what they might say to us about our understandings of literature, emotions, and health today. This course counts both as an early British literature course and as a Contexts and Convergences course for English majors. It also satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 367 - L01 20th-Cent. British Lit & Arts M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 201

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 201

Course Registration Number:

21703 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Emily M. James

This course surveys twentieth-century literary experiments alongside parallel developments in painting, music, dance, film, and other arts. Our readings and materials will allow us to consider how writers and artists navigated the century's social, cultural, and historical upheavals and worked to redefine Britain's national identity along the way. Key writers may include Virginia Woolf, T.S. Eliot, Kazuo Ishiguro, and Zadie Smith. This course counts as a Contexts and Convergences course for English majors and satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 371 - L01 A Century of "Unruly" Women M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 SCB 107

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

SCB 107

Course Registration Number:

21704 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Andrew J. Scheiber

Nineteenth Century America was dominated by a gender ideology of “separate spheres,” in which large public questions—politics, business, national identity—were largely seen as the realm of the male and women were relegated to the “domestic” spheres of home, family, and unpaid charitable work. The literature of this period tells a different story, however; the genre of literary fiction was dominated by best-selling female writers who confronted the barriers to women’s full participation in the life of the nation in ways that were by turns direct and cleverly subversive. Even male writers of the period created vivid, powerful female protagonists who registered men’s anxiety about, and admiration of, the insurgent female moral and creative energies of the era. In this course we’ll read a generous selection of writings (mainly by women, but a few by men as well) that exemplify in literary form the challenges to the prevailing gender norms of the time, most significantly in the areas of politics, economics, and literary production. Likely titles to be examined include Catharine Sedgwick’s HOPE LESLIE, Nathaniel Hawthorne’s BLITHEDALE ROMANCE, and Kate Chopin’s THE AWAKENING, among others Likely Students will write a series of short reflection papers, one research report, and an extended final essay on a selected author or work from the course readings. This course counts both as a Contexts and Convergences course for English majors and as an Early American Literature class; it also satisfies a Writing Across the Curriculum Writing to Learn class. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 405 - D01 Advanced Creative Writing - - - R - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 222

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

20817 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Salvatore Pane

This advanced course will focus on the student’s development of a substantial body of work in a chosen genre: poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction. Students will review their previous writing, do further exploration of a chosen genre, and produce significant new work in that genre. Reading will include theoretical and creative texts. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisite: ENGL 321 or 322 or 323 or permission of instructor based on examination of a portfolio.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 422 - 01 Literary Magazine Practicum II M - - - - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 227

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

JRC 227

Course Registration Number:

20445 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

The spring semester component of the sequence includes readings from The Art of Literary Editing; active involvement with other editors in the selection process; learning and applying principles of literary copyediting; using desktop publishing to produce the new edition of Summit Avenue Review, from the creation of style sheets and master pages to final proofreading; writing a reflection essay on the editing process as you experienced it; examining the design and content of five professional literary magazine web sites; learning the Dreamweaver web design program; and managing the Summit Avenue Review web site. Prerequisites: ENGL 421

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 481 - D01 Capstone Seminar: Jane Austen - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

21705 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

M. A. Easley

Jane Austen's popularity today is indisputable. Her novels are frequently reprinted had have been adapted into film, fan fiction, memes, and a wide variety of other media formats. In this course, we will read Austen’s six major novels, including PRIDE AND PREJUDICE, EMMA, and NORTHANGER ABBEY, situating these works within early nineteenth-century literature and culture. We will also explore the afterlife of Austen's fiction in twenty-first-century literary criticism and digital culture. This cross-media analysis will enable us to explore how Austen's witty social satire speaks to our own time, highlighting issues of gender, class, and social injustice. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing in the Discipline requirement. Prerequisite: Completion of five English courses at or beyond ENGL 211, including ENGL 280, or for non-majors, permission of the instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)