Fall 2020 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 121 - W01 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44552 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Joan M. Williams

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SCB 3240815-0920M - W - - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 121 - W02 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44553 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucas B. Pingel

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W03 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

45666 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather Holcombe

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 2060815-0920M - W - - - -
0815-0920- - - - F - -
ENGL 121 - W04 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44556 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather Holcombe

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 2060935-1040M - W - - - -
0935-1040- - - - F - -
ENGL 121 - W05 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 454

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OEC 454

Course Registration Number:

44558 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher J. Hassel

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W06 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

45256 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Joan M. Williams

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SCB 3240935-1040M - W - - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 121 - W07 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 310

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OEC 310

Course Registration Number:

44560 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laurie E. Lindeen

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W08 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44561 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Andrew J. Scheiber

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W09 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44562 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. McNiel

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 3061055-1200M - W - - - -
1055-1200- - - - F - -
ENGL 121 - W10 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 310

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 310

Course Registration Number:

44565 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laurie E. Lindeen

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W11 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 301

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

45019 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jeannie L. Hofmeister

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W12 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

44563 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. McNiel

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 3061215-1320M - W - - - -
1215-1320- - - - F - -
ENGL 121 - W13 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44564 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucy A. Saliger

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W14 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44566 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kanishka Chowdhury

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W15 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44581 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Joseph P. Moser

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W16 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44567 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kanishka Chowdhury

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W17 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44568 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Joseph P. Moser

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W18 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 313

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

OEC 313

Course Registration Number:

45119 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Young-ok An

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W19 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 JRC 246

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

44574 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Charles A. Conley

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W20 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44571 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Terri L. Topness

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W21 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 246

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

44572 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Charles A. Conley

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W22 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 BEC LL07

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

BEC LL07

Course Registration Number:

44978 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. Bouwman

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W23 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44575 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael Raimondi

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W24 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 306

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OEC 306

Course Registration Number:

44580 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Melissa J. Hendrickx

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W25 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44555 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew B. Harrison

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W26 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 BEC LL15

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

BEC LL15

Course Registration Number:

44570 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. Bouwman

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W27 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

44573 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael Raimondi

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W28 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 454

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 454

Course Registration Number:

45036 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy M. Muse

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W29 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45102 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paula F. Cisewski

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W30 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 209

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 209

Course Registration Number:

44569 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy M. Muse

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W31 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 SCB 325

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

SCB 325

Course Registration Number:

45667 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Barbara K. Olson

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W32 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45668 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ganeane Contreras

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W33 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46415 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paula F. Cisewski

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W51 Crit Thinking: Lit/Wrtng (ESL) M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 SCB 325

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

SCB 325

Course Registration Number:

44673 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Suzanne L. Donsky

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing. Please note that this course is restricted to English as a Second Language students.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 190 - W01 Adv Crit Thinking: Lit&Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 454

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

OEC 454

Course Registration Number:

47318 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher J. Hassel

English 190 is a core course in literature and writing for specially qualified students who show greater aptitude and preparation than typical first-year students or those whose pre-matriculation credits cover some, but not all, of the content of ENGL 121. The learning goals are the same as those for ENGL 121; however, writing, critical thinking, and textual analysis are taught at a higher level and with increased complexity in this course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 190 - W02 Adv Crit Thinking: Lit&Writing - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

47319 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

English 190 is a core course in literature and writing for specially qualified students who show greater aptitude and preparation than typical first-year students or those whose pre-matriculation credits cover some, but not all, of the content of ENGL 121. The learning goals are the same as those for ENGL 121; however, writing, critical thinking, and textual analysis are taught at a higher level and with increased complexity in this course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 190 - W03 Adv Crit Thinking: Lit&Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MHC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MHC 210

Course Registration Number:

47320 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne E. Roth-Reinhardt

English 190 is a core course in literature and writing for specially qualified students who show greater aptitude and preparation than typical first-year students or those whose pre-matriculation credits cover some, but not all, of the content of ENGL 121. The learning goals are the same as those for ENGL 121; however, writing, critical thinking, and textual analysis are taught at a higher level and with increased complexity in this course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 190 - W04 Adv Crit Thinking: Lit&Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MHC 210

Course Registration Number:

47321 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne E. Roth-Reinhardt

English 190 is a core course in literature and writing for specially qualified students who show greater aptitude and preparation than typical first-year students or those whose pre-matriculation credits cover some, but not all, of the content of ENGL 121. The learning goals are the same as those for ENGL 121; however, writing, critical thinking, and textual analysis are taught at a higher level and with increased complexity in this course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 190 - W05 Adv Crit Thinking: Lit&Writing M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

47322 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shannon F. Scott

English 190 is a core course in literature and writing for specially qualified students who show greater aptitude and preparation than typical first-year students or those whose pre-matriculation credits cover some, but not all, of the content of ENGL 121. The learning goals are the same as those for ENGL 121; however, writing, critical thinking, and textual analysis are taught at a higher level and with increased complexity in this course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 190 - W06 Adv Crit Thinking: Lit&Writing M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 SCB 325

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

SCB 325

Course Registration Number:

47323 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David M. Gardiner

English 190 is a core course in literature and writing for specially qualified students who show greater aptitude and preparation than typical first-year students or those whose pre-matriculation credits cover some, but not all, of the content of ENGL 121. The learning goals are the same as those for ENGL 121; however, writing, critical thinking, and textual analysis are taught at a higher level and with increased complexity in this course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 190 - W07 Adv Crit Thinking: Lit&Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 210

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

47324 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

English 190 is a core course in literature and writing for specially qualified students who show greater aptitude and preparation than typical first-year students or those whose pre-matriculation credits cover some, but not all, of the content of ENGL 121. The learning goals are the same as those for ENGL 121; however, writing, critical thinking, and textual analysis are taught at a higher level and with increased complexity in this course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 190 - W08 Adv Crit Thinking: Lit&Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 BEC 113

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

BEC 113

Course Registration Number:

47325 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Barbara K. Olson

English 190 is a core course in literature and writing for specially qualified students who show greater aptitude and preparation than typical first-year students or those whose pre-matriculation credits cover some, but not all, of the content of ENGL 121. The learning goals are the same as those for ENGL 121; however, writing, critical thinking, and textual analysis are taught at a higher level and with increased complexity in this course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 190 - W09 Adv Crit Thinking: Lit&Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 208

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 208

Course Registration Number:

47326 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

M. A. Easley

English 190 is a core course in literature and writing for specially qualified students who show greater aptitude and preparation than typical first-year students or those whose pre-matriculation credits cover some, but not all, of the content of ENGL 121. The learning goals are the same as those for ENGL 121; however, writing, critical thinking, and textual analysis are taught at a higher level and with increased complexity in this course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 190 - W10 Adv Crit Thinking: Lit&Writing - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MCH 106

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MCH 106

Course Registration Number:

47327 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laura R. Zebuhr

English 190 is a core course in literature and writing for specially qualified students who show greater aptitude and preparation than typical first-year students or those whose pre-matriculation credits cover some, but not all, of the content of ENGL 121. The learning goals are the same as those for ENGL 121; however, writing, critical thinking, and textual analysis are taught at a higher level and with increased complexity in this course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W01 The American Short Story - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46416 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and peep into our future. As we study the artistic development of the American short story, our process of discovery will be progressive, beginning with some of this country's earliest and most influential short story writers like Irving and Poe and closing with such masters of contemporary fiction as Alice Walker and Jill McCorkle. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W02 The American Short Story - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46417 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and peep into our future. As we study the artistic development of the American short story, our process of discovery will be progressive, beginning with some of this country's earliest and most influential short story writers like Irving and Poe and closing with such masters of contemporary fiction as Alice Walker and Jill McCorkle. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W01 Man-Eating Beasts - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46677 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gordon D. Grice

Literature takes a walk on the wild side when men and women clash with deadly carnivores. We’ll read vintage tales by fiction writers, hunters, and naturalists for the surprising light they throw on race, gender, religion, and especially ecology. Authors may include Erckmann-Chatrian, Ambrose Bierce, and Arthur Conan Doyle. This course integrates basic concepts from biology with our methods. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This fully online course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W02 Man-Eating Beasts - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46676 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gordon D. Grice

Literature takes a walk on the wild side when men and women clash with deadly carnivores. We’ll read vintage tales by fiction writers, hunters, and naturalists for the surprising light they throw on race, gender, religion, and especially ecology. Authors may include Erckmann-Chatrian, Ambrose Bierce, and Arthur Conan Doyle. This course integrates basic concepts from biology with our methods. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This fully online course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W03 Native Amer Lit & Environment M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 SCB 104

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

SCB 104

Course Registration Number:

46418 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

This course will combine fiction and non-fiction texts that approach the idea of environment and environmental sustainability from a variety of Native American and Indigenous world views, with an emphasis on Minnesota Native nations. In addition to reading and writing about Native literature, this course will strive to connect students to Native American food and farming and the social-ecological systems in which the stories are embedded. If all goes as planned, we’ll be cooking some indigenous recipes and visiting Dream of Wild Health indigenous farming co-op. Texts that will likely make the reading list include Heid Erdrich’s cookbook ORIGINAL LOCAL: INDIGENOUS FOOD, STORIES, AND RECIPES FROM THE UPPER MIDWEST (and we may organize a visit and a cooking class by the author); BRAIDING SWEETGRASS, a non-fiction text by Robin Wall Kimmerer, a Potawatomi woman who is also a biology professor; and the novel SOLAR STORMS by Linda Hogan, a story about four generations of women working to save ancestral land from dam development. Other possible texts include poetry from Leslie Marmon Silko, Joy Harjo, and others; William Apess’s 1835 essay on the “…Unconstitutional Laws of Massachusetts Relative to the Mashpee Tribe”; and selections from Winona LaDuke’s ALL MY RELATIONS, David Treuer’s REZ LIFE, and Vine Deloria, Jr.’s GOD IS RED. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W04 To Heal: Literature & Medicine M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46421 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

This course looks at physicians as writers, thinkers, practitioners, and subjects; we will study texts that offer reflections from a prominent surgeon on his craft in the work of Atul Gawande. We will also explore historical, economic, political, and ethical questions related to medical care by examining how illness and caregiving are depicted in literary texts from several genres: fiction (NEVER LET ME GO), poetry (THE RESURRECTION TRADE), and drama (WIT and THE CLEAN HOUSE). What kinds of emotional and social costs does illness have? How do writers grapple with the moral dimensions of medicine? We will address these and other questions through close textual analysis and discussion; in addition, our course will draw upon the expertise of practitioners within the Minneapolis medical community. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W06 Native Amer Lit & Environment M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 SCB 104

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

SCB 104

Course Registration Number:

46419 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

This course will combine fiction and non-fiction texts that approach the idea of environment and environmental sustainability from a variety of Native American and Indigenous world views, with an emphasis on Minnesota Native nations. In addition to reading and writing about Native literature, this course will strive to connect students to Native American food and farming and the social-ecological systems in which the stories are embedded. If all goes as planned, we’ll be cooking some indigenous recipes and visiting Dream of Wild Health indigenous farming co-op. Texts that will likely make the reading list include Heid Erdrich’s cookbook ORIGINAL LOCAL: INDIGENOUS FOOD, STORIES, AND RECIPES FROM THE UPPER MIDWEST (and we may organize a visit and a cooking class by the author); BRAIDING SWEETGRASS, a non-fiction text by Robin Wall Kimmerer, a Potawatomi woman who is also a biology professor; and the novel SOLAR STORMS by Linda Hogan, a story about four generations of women working to save ancestral land from dam development. Other possible texts include poetry from Leslie Marmon Silko, Joy Harjo, and others; William Apess’s 1835 essay on the “…Unconstitutional Laws of Massachusetts Relative to the Mashpee Tribe”; and selections from Winona LaDuke’s ALL MY RELATIONS, David Treuer’s REZ LIFE, and Vine Deloria, Jr.’s GOD IS RED. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W07 Noir in Film and Literature M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46675 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shannon F. Scott

This course explores the genre of noir in both film and literature. We will look at “hard-boiled” fiction of the 1930s, German Expressionist film in pre-war Berlin, America during World War II, and blacklisting in Hollywood during the Cold War. Because this course also surveys “neo-noir” literary texts and films, we will at times pull the discussion back into the present, noting how the genre has shifted over time, particularly how female authors such as Megan Abbott, Ruth Ware, Gillian Flynn, and Paula Hawkins currently dominate the noir literary scene. Since this is an interdisciplinary course, we will also examine films and texts in conversation with each other, which means investigating how work transitions or adapts from the page to the screen. Through close reading/viewing, annotating, writing, discussing, and immersing ourselves in the genre of noir we will discover what makes a film or piece of literature irresistibly engaging and resonant. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W08 Literature Inspired by Science M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46423 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Leslie A. Miller

Writers have long looked to the sciences for fresh metaphors, innovative structures, and conceptual models. In this course we will read fiction, poetry, and drama inspired by the sciences and explore how writers build on scientific models and methods to bring new vision to ideas about space, time, matter, and being. Texts may include THE ECOPOETRY ANTHOLOGY, Andrea Barrett’s ARCHANGEL, BEST AMERICAN SCIENCE AND NATURE WRITING, Hope Jahren’s LAB GIRL, Tracy K. Smith’s LIFE ON MARS, Mary Shelley’s FRANKENSTEIN, and Anne Patchett’s STATE OF WONDER. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W10 Amer Manhood: WWII thru #MeToo - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46678 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Brian C. Brown

What does it mean to be a man in America today? According to Ron Swanson’s “Pyramid of Greatness,” live simply, fend for yourself and eat meat. Lots of meat. For generations, men were promised an equally straightforward road map to navigate adolescence through adulthood: college + job + home + family = happily ever after. But that social contract was a fraud. When these basic expectations failed to materialize, many young men responded in predictable ways. Faced with what they perceived as an attempt to usurp their inherent power and authority, they lashed out in anger, sexual violence and self-medication. And now even these destructive behaviors have been exposed for what they are - desperate attempts to control a world that offers no clear path to manhood. So, as we enter a new decade, what defines American Manhood? For an overview of American manhood we’ll read from Jack Donovan’s THE WAY OF MAN. Primary reading sources include Chuck Palahniuk’s look at the apathetic and violent existence of the American male in FIGHT CLUB. We’ll read nonfiction selections BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME by Ta-Nehisi Coates and the recently released memoir KNOW MY NAME by Chanel Miller. And we’ll examine the role of husband, father and survivor in Cormac McCarthy’s post-apocalyptic world of THE ROAD. Supporting material will include plays, short stories and films - such as BOYHOOD, MOONLIGHT and I LOVE YOU, MAN. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal, revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W11 Faith in Literature & Film - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46674 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew B. Harrison

Writers and filmmakers can create stories that inspire people to await the next coming of a favorite character or setting with near-religious devotion. Aside from producing super fans, how have popular novels and films portrayed faith and religious practice as experiences with deep relevance in go-go-go consumer cultures? How do these mass-marketed fictional media reflect, whether or not intentionally, spiritual journeys? This course will explore various narratives of faith imagined in novels and movies around the following themes: salvation; ritual; sacred places and symbols; ethics and morality; prayer; doubt; cosmology; and visions of end times. Our films will include WINGS OF DESIRE (1987); THE APOSTLE (1997); BRUCE ALMIGHTY (2003); CALVARY (2014); THE WITCH (2015); and TREE OF LIFE (2011). We will read the short novels THE SCREWTAPE LETTERS, by C.S. Lewis, and THE LEFTOVERS, by Tom Perrotta, as well as Flannery O’Connor’s brief collection of devotional writings, A PRAYER JOURNAL. To guide us through the novels and films, we will also read selections from William L. Rowe’s PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION: AN INTRODUCTION and a handful of essays that discuss movies from a theological standpoint. In our conversations, our goal will be not to judge the truthfulness of religious behaviors depicted in novels and films, but instead to understand the ways in which very popular forms of storytelling wrestle with very personal questions of faith. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W12 Literature of Mind and Brain - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46425 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Emily M. James

This course explores literature’s relationship to the brain, the mind, and cognition. We will consider how writers and artists have registered, challenged, and even shaped developments in neuroscience and cognitive science across the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Topics may include sensation and perception, neurodiversity and neuroatypicality, affect theory, machine learning, neural networks, language acquisition, theory of mind, metaphor, and memory. Writers may include Virginia Woolf, Marcel Proust, Santiago Ramón y Cajal, Oliver Sacks, Jorge Luis Borges, Ian McEwan, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, David Mitchell, Teju Cole, Ali Smith, Michael Davidson, and Naoki Higashida. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W01 Perspectives in War Literature - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46679 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Alison L. Underthun-Meilahn

When writing about war, authors who have served in the military have a few literary options: a memoir, poetry, essays, or a work of fiction. This course will focus on exemplary literature written by those who have been in war mainly through fiction, but we will also read poetry and essays as well. We specifically will investigate how veterans have differing perspectives on warfare and the return back to civilian life, while at the same time how many of them share similar perspectives and grapple with the recalibration into civilian life. Through literature we will come to understand how the psyche of veterans is altered via warfare and the impact it has on their lives and families, as well as society at large. We will also look at how contemporary culture, and historically, veterans have been received or perceived as they return home and how their voice has been implicit/explicit in cultural movements (specifically the counter cultural movement of the 1960’s). How society interacts and supports veterans will be linked to our discussions, and highlighted through a service learning component. Veterans will be invited into our classroom to foster and promote dialogue and understanding on how veteran's voices are heard, what they think we hear, and how we, civilians can better be aware or shift our perspective to best support them in society. Guest speakers may include veterans from the Vietnam War, Iraq War(s), Afghanistan War, and perhaps those currently enlisted. We may also have speakers from professionals who work with veterans. Literature we will focus on in this course includes: Kurt Vonnegut's SLAUGHTERHOUSE-FIVE, Tim O'Brien's THE THINGS THEY CARRIED, Jim Northrup's THE REZ ROAD, Joseph Heller's CATCH-22, and Ernest Hemingway's A FAREWELL TO ARMS. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This fully online course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W02 Worldbuilding Story:New Worlds M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46426 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Santiago

We will explore stories that engage in explicit acts of worldbuilding, a term first used to describe science fiction and fantasy writers' invention of languages, geographies, cultures, histories, and mythologies. We will focus on worldbuilding as it applies to writers of multiple genres, including both "literary" fiction and "genre" fiction. Along the way, we will begin to address questions raised by authors who engage in worldbuilding, such as: why diverge from the "real world" in the first place? Is there an ethical price that must be paid in order to imagine a new society? Should worldbuilding be seen as a useful tool for social critique, or is it at heart a practice of escapist entertainment? The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrating the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W03 Worldbuilding Story:New Worlds M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46427 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Santiago

We will explore stories that engage in explicit acts of worldbuilding, a term first used to describe science fiction and fantasy writers' invention of languages, geographies, cultures, histories, and mythologies. We will focus on worldbuilding as it applies to writers of multiple genres, including both "literary" fiction and "genre" fiction. Along the way, we will begin to address questions raised by authors who engage in worldbuilding, such as: why diverge from the "real world" in the first place? Is there an ethical price that must be paid in order to imagine a new society? Should worldbuilding be seen as a useful tool for social critique, or is it at heart a practice of escapist entertainment? The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. We will explore stories that engage in explicit acts of worldbuilding, a term first used to describe science fiction and fantasy writers' invention of languages, geographies, cultures, histories, and mythologies. We will focus on worldbuilding as it applies to writers of multiple genres, including both "literary" fiction and "genre" fiction. Along the way, we will begin to address questions raised by authors who engage in worldbuilding, such as: why diverge from the "real world" in the first place? Is there an ethical price that must be paid in order to imagine a new society? Should worldbuilding be seen as a useful tool for social critique, or is it at heart a practice of escapist entertainment? The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrating the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W04 Utopias in Dystopias M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46680 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucy A. Saliger

Both fictional and real life utopian efforts often emerge under dystopian conditions. Contrary to some notions of utopia as an impossible, perfect "nowhere," these utopias are grounded in a specific 'somewhere' - a time and place that call for better possibilities than the dystopian realities. We will consider examples of these efforts, beginning with Thomas More's foundational text, UTOPIA, and continuing through a mix of texts, film, music, and local organizations (St. Thomas community partners). Noting commonalities and differences as well as our own complicated responses to these necessarily imperfect utopias will help us understand their limitations and contributions. The roles of writing, reading, storytelling, and education will be a crucial part of our examination. Book authors will likely include Sandra Cisneros, David Todd Lawrence, Walter Mosley, and Indra Sinha. As a blended course, work for one of our course meetings is online with flexible timing, while the other is in person. This flexibility will help in scheduling your required community engagement work; you will choose between one of two or three community partners and work with them on-site once a week, giving you the opportunity to establish a relationship, gain new experience, and link that work to our study of utopias. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrating the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - W01 Crit Discourse of Video Games - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46429 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Salvatore Pane

What does it mean to close read a video game? What is the interplay between text, digital media, and rhetoric? Where do games fit in academia? In the Critical Discourse of Video Games, students will interrogate these questions while being introduced to game studies, platform studies, and the digital humanities. Students will learn by weaving together theories of play, reading, writing, and digital creation. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrating the Humanities requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 214 - L01 American Authors I M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46430 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Andrew J. Scheiber

Where does the popular perception of America as the “New World” come from? How could slavery flourish in a land idealizing freedom? Why were immigrants so feared and reviled? Why did expansionism push out some and make millionaires of others? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings from the beginnings of the American literary tradition to the turn of the twentieth century. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as religious identity, political reform, race, slavery, war, gender, and industrialization. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major, a WAC Writing to Learn requirement, and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement for students in the new core program. Prerequisites: ENGL 121 or ENGL 201, 202, 203 or 204. NOTE: For students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with ENGL 121, you will need to complete an ENGL 201-204 class in order to fulfill that core requirement--this course will not fulfill that requirement. However, students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with an ENGL 201-204 or 206 class may take this course to complete their core literature/writing requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 217 - L01 Multicultural Literature M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 310

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

OEC 310

Course Registration Number:

46407 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

What does it mean to be labeled an African American dramatist? A Latino/a poet? A transgender novelist? An Asian American essayist? A Native American environmental writer? How do the varied experiences and backgrounds of authors writing from diverse subject positions inform, mark, and/or transform their writing? How do the works of these writers fit into, conflict with, actively resist, or even redefine the American Literary canon as it has been traditionally understood? These questions and more will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive reading of literature from: a) American communities of color; b) postcolonial peoples; c) immigrant and/or diasporic peoples; or d) LGBTQ communities. This course will focus on the literary and cultural texts of one or more of these groups with an emphasis on the cultural, political, and historical contexts that surround them. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major, and the Human Diversity Requirement in the Core Curriculum. It is pending approval to satisfy the Integration in the Humanities and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirements in the new core program. Prerequisites: ENGL 121 or ENGL 201, 202, 203 or 204. NOTE: For students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with ENGL 121, you will need to complete an ENGL 201-204 class in order to fulfill that core requirement--this course will not fulfill that requirement. However, students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with an ENGL 201-204 or 206 class may take this course to complete their core literature/writing requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 221 - L01 Modern Tradit:European Classic M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 308

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 308

Course Registration Number:

46588 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Doug P. Phillips

Through our study of European literature and some of its most memorable characters— Voltaire’s Candide, Ibsen's Hedda Gabler, Dostoevsky’s Underground Man, Tolstoy's Ivan Ilyich, etc.—we will dig deep into life’s most pressing questions, not least of which is what makes for a good life. Our study will also give us the chance to better understand who we are today in light of the cultural shifts and philosophical drifts that have come before us. In the words of the writer Zadie Smith, we're going to read a lot of good books in this class (all in translation), “concentrating on whatever is most particular to them, in the hope that this might help us understand whatever is most particular to us.” This course satisfies both the Historical Perspectives distribution requirement for English majors and the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing to Learn requirement. This course is pending approval to satisfy the Integration in the Humanities requirement for students in the new core program. Prerequisites: ENGL 121 or ENGL 201, 202, 203 or 204. NOTE: For students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with ENGL 121, you will need to complete an ENGL 201-204 class in order to fulfill that core requirement--this course will not fulfill that requirement. However, students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with an ENGL 201-204 or 206 class may take this course to complete their core literature/writing requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 255 - W01 Intro to Creative Writing M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 212

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

45073 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

This course introduces students to the craft of creative writing, focusing on three broad genres: poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Students learn how various forms (e.g., free verse, the sonnet, narrative) have developed and evolved historically and within various contexts (cultural, political, social)—and by extension, what it means to write in these forms today. They receive instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures; and practice writing in all three genres. Assignments include close readings of literary texts that model craft techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students’ analytic and critical skills. This course fulfills the Fine Arts requirement for students under the new core program; an allied requirement for select business majors; and the Genre Study requirement for English majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or ENGL 190 (concurrent registration allowed for ENGL 190 students) or ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204. NOTE: For students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with ENGL 121, you will need to complete an ENGL 201-204 class in order to fulfill that core requirement--this course will not fulfill that requirement. However, students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with an ENGL 201-204 or 206 class may take this course to complete their core literature/writing requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 255 - W02 Intro to Creative Writing M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

46401 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

This course introduces students to the craft of creative writing, focusing on three broad genres: poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Students learn how various forms (e.g., free verse, the sonnet, narrative) have developed and evolved historically and within various contexts (cultural, political, social)—and by extension, what it means to write in these forms today. They receive instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures; and practice writing in all three genres. Assignments include close readings of literary texts that model craft techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students’ analytic and critical skills. This course fulfills the Fine Arts requirement for students under the new core program; an allied requirement for select business majors; and the Genre Study requirement for English majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or ENGL 190 (concurrent registration allowed for ENGL 190 students) or ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204. NOTE: For students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with ENGL 121, you will need to complete an ENGL 201-204 class in order to fulfill that core requirement--this course will not fulfill that requirement. However, students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with an ENGL 201-204 or 206 class may take this course to complete their core literature/writing requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 255 - W03 Intro to Creative Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

45497 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Leslie A. Miller

This course introduces students to the craft of creative writing, focusing on three broad genres: poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Students learn how various forms (e.g., free verse, the sonnet, narrative) have developed and evolved historically and within various contexts (cultural, political, social)—and by extension, what it means to write in these forms today. They receive instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures; and practice writing in all three genres. Assignments include close readings of literary texts that model craft techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students’ analytic and critical skills. This course fulfills the Fine Arts requirement for students under the new core program; an allied requirement for select business majors; and the Genre Study requirement for English majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or ENGL 190 (concurrent registration allowed for ENGL 190 students) or ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204. NOTE: For students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with ENGL 121, you will need to complete an ENGL 201-204 class in order to fulfill that core requirement--this course will not fulfill that requirement. However, students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with an ENGL 201-204 or 206 class may take this course to complete their core literature/writing requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 255 - W04 Intro to Creative Writing M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

47484 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Leslie A. Miller

This course introduces students to the craft of creative writing, focusing on three broad genres: poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Students learn how various forms (e.g., free verse, the sonnet, narrative) have developed and evolved historically and within various contexts (cultural, political, social)—and by extension, what it means to write in these forms today. They receive instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures; and practice writing in all three genres. Assignments include close readings of literary texts that model craft techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students’ analytic and critical skills. This course fulfills the Fine Arts requirement for students under the new core program; an allied requirement for select business majors; and the Genre Study requirement for English majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or ENGL 190 (concurrent registration allowed for ENGL 190 students) or ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204. NOTE: For students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with ENGL 121, you will need to complete an ENGL 201-204 class in order to fulfill that core requirement--this course will not fulfill that requirement. However, students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with an ENGL 201-204 or 206 class may take this course to complete their core literature/writing requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 256 - D01 Intro to Professional Writing See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

45461 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Fernando Sanchez

This course introduces students to principles and skills necessary for writing in professional settings. It includes study of rhetoric, ethics, and information design in workplace writing; examination of the roles of professional writers; close readings of texts and documents that model professional techniques; and practice composing in a variety of professional genres. The course will include instruction in ethical communication, rhetorical context, document design, communication technologies, precision, concision, and tone. This course fulfills the Theory and Practice requirement in the English major and a requirement for the English witha Professional Writing Emphasis. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204. Please note that this course does not count towards the core literature/writing requirement for students under the current core program.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JRC 3010800-0940- T - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 280 - L01 Intro to English Studies - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 227

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 227

Course Registration Number:

44955 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Olga L. Herrera

This gateway course into the English major and the minor is an introduction to (a) literary tools, techniques, and terminology for reading and writing in English studies; (b) the history of English Studies as a discipline and the intellectual concepts and critical debates that have shaped the field; and (c) the practices of English Studies, from close reading and analysis of literary and critical texts to interpretation and scholarly research. Prerequisites: ENGL 121 or 190. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 298 - W01 Introduction to Italian Cinema - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46461 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Salvatore Pane

What is Italian cinema, and what do diverse directors like Fellini, Wertmüller, and Antonioni have to say about topics like fascism, love, and existential despair? Covering everything from neorealism to spaghetti westerns, this course will introduce students to film theory and demonstrate how to close-read movies and analyze them through writing. Potential films include LA DOLCE VITA, ROME OPEN CITY, and ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST. This course counts as an ENGL 200-level elective for English majors/minors, an ENGL 211+ allied course for select business majors, a History/Criticism/Theory course for Film Studies majors and minors, and a WAC Writing Intensive requirement. For students under the new core, this course satisfies both the Integration in the Humanities and the Global Studies requirements. Prerequisites: None. NOTE: Please note that this course DOES NOT count towards the core literature and writing requirement for students who entered St. Thomas prior to Fall 2020 and who started that requirement with an ENGL 201, 202, 203, 204, or 206 class. Finally, this course is cross-listed with FILM 298: there are 12 seats on the ENGL 298 side and 8 seats available on the FILM 298 side.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 300 - W01 Writing Center Theory/Practice M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

43926 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Susan J. Callaway

This course is only open to students hired in the spring semester to work in the Center for Writing and who have permission from the instructor. In this course, students develop their writing, reading, and critical thinking abilities, strengthen their communication skills by consulting their peers in the Center for Writing, and develop their intercultural competency through mentoring refugee and immigrant high school students in the Twin Cities. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204. NOTE: A standard section of ENGL 300 Theory and Practice of Writing will be offered in Spring 2021.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 305 - 01 Linguistics: English Lang - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

43927 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Juan Li

This fully online course is an introduction to the systematic study of the English language, with an emphasis on connections between academic linguistics and relevant social and educational questions. Students will study the English sound system through phonetics and phonology, how words are formed through morphology, how words combine to create clauses and meaning through syntax and semantics. After learning the linguistic tools to describe the English language, students will examine the contexts of language production in real life through the study of U.S. dialects, historical and ongoing changes in English, and various social interactions in language. This course fulfills the Theory and Practice requirement in the English major and a requirement for English with a Secondary Education Emphasis majors. Prerequisites: ENGL 121 or ENGL 201, 202, 203, 204 or 206. Please note that this course does not satisfy the core literature/writing requirement for students under the old core who started that requirement with an ENGL 201, 202, 203, 204, or 206 class.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 322 - W01 Writing Fiction - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

43928 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Salvatore Pane

This intermediate course explores traditional and innovative patterns of fiction writing. Emphasis on experimentation with a variety of techniques and development of individual voice. This course will include critique sessions, readings to broaden possibilities of form and subject, and individual instruction. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisite: ENGL 255 or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 324 - L01 The Healing Art of Drama - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 209

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 209

Course Registration Number:

46434 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy M. Muse

Dramatic literature is our genre. Empathy, intimacy, and caregiving our subjects. Questions we’ll be asking include: how does the genre of drama lend itself to the development of empathy, of intimacy, of care? How is meaning negotiated in health, illness, and dramatic literature? Our reading will include theatre theory (e.g., Aristotle, Maria Irene Fornes, Sarah Ruhl), sociological theory on empathy and emotional labor (e.g., Arlie Hochschild, Allison Pugh), and a variety of plays (by Sophocles, Shakespeare, Ruhl, Quiara Alegría Hudes, Jackie Sibblies Drury, Amy Herzog, Caryl Churchill). We will examine case studies of organizations using drama and theater for healing, such as Theater of War and the uses of drama and theatre in medical school and social work training; and students will examine where their English major or minor education can be used in arts, healthcare, and social work settings. This course satisfies the Genre Studies requirement for English with a Creative Writing Emphasis majors and an ENGL 211+ allied requirement for select business majors. It also satisfies the core literature/writing requirement for students who started the current core with an ENGL 201, 202, 203, 204, or 206 class. For students under the new core program, this course is pending approval to count as an Integration in the Humanities course. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or ENGL 201, 202, 203, 204 or 206.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 341 - L01 Lit by Women: Between Worlds M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

46409 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

In BORDERLANDS/LA FRONTERA, Gloria Anzaldúa writes about being “caught between worlds, a no man’s land….A hybrid, a mixture, a mestiza: ‘Alienated from her mother culture, “alien” in the dominant culture, the woman of color [is] caught between…the spaces between the different worlds she inhabits.’” How do gender, race, sexuality, ethnicity, religion, and cultural identity intersect to make particular women feel that they are without a place of belonging? How does someone who occupies a liminal space shape her own identity? To what degrees are marginal women's identities shaped for them by others? How, in short, do women build viable lives in "no man's land"? These and many more questions about liminality and intersectionality will be at the forefront, since all the texts we will explore this semester will center on women whose lives involve the difficult negotiations of the border-dweller. This course satisfies both the core Human Diversity requirement (under the current core program) and the Diversity requirement for English majors.; it is also pending approval for students in the new core to satisfy the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. This course also satisfies a requirement for the Women's Studies major and minor. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or ENGL 201, 202, 203, 204 or 206. NOTE: For students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with ENGL 121, you will need to complete an ENGL 201-204 class in order to fulfill that core requirement--this course will not fulfill that requirement. However, students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with an ENGL 201-204 or 206 class may take this course to complete their core literature/writing requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 361 - 01 Shakespeare & Early Modern - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 SCB 324

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

SCB 324

Course Registration Number:

46410 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Raymond N. MacKenzie

This course provides an in-depth exploration of a select group of texts or authors from British literature of the Renaissance or early modern era, a time of religious schism, early British imperialism, the rebirth of the classical world, and the birth of the professional theatre in England. Alongside the work of Shakespeare, the selected texts or authors will be studied in terms of a particular historical, cultural, or other context, or in terms of a convergence with authors or texts from other literary traditions or intellectual disciplines. Examples might include Shakespeare and the rise of the Renaissance theatre; Elizabethan writers and the Islamic world; Shakespeare and the idea of the human in the drama, sonnet, and personal essay; your brain on Shakespeare: cognitive literary studies. This course fulfills the Early British Literature and the Contexts and Convergences requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 121 or ENGL 201, 202, 203, 204 or 206. NOTE: For students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with ENGL 121, you will need to complete an ENGL 201-204 class in order to fulfill that core requirement--this course will not fulfill that requirement. However, students under the current degree program who started the core literature/writing requirement with an ENGL 201-204 or 206 class may take this course to complete their core literature/writing requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 421 - 01 Literary Magazine Practicum I M - - - - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 301

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

44207 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

Activities during the fall semester of the sequence include readings from The Little Magazine: A History and Bibliography and The Little Magazine in America: A Modern Documentary History; examining the design and content of fifteen professional literary magazines; learning InDesign CS3 desktop publishing program; creating preliminary Summit Avenue Review page designs; working collaboratively with other literary magazine editors to develop selection procedures and principles; and writing a comparison essay on two professional literary magazines. Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 321 or 322 or 323 or instructor permission.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2021 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 217 - L01 Multicultural Literature - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10669 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

What does it mean to be labeled an African American dramatist? A Latino/a poet? A transgender novelist? An Asian American essayist? A Native American environmental writer? How do the varied experiences and backgrounds of authors writing from diverse subject positions inform, mark, and/or transform their writing? How do the works of these writers fit into, conflict with, actively resist, or even redefine the American Literary canon as it has been traditionally understood? These questions and more will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive reading of literature from: a) American communities of color; b) postcolonial peoples; c) immigrant and/or diasporic peoples; or d) LGBTQ communities. This course will focus on the literary and cultural texts of one or more of these groups with an emphasis on the cultural, political, and historical contexts that surround them. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 121 or 190. 

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 256 - D01 Intro to Professional Writing - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10668 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Fernando Sanchez

This course introduces students to principles and skills necessary for writing in professional settings. It includes study of rhetoric, ethics, and information design in workplace writing; examination of the roles of professional writers; close readings of texts and documents that model professional techniques; and practice composing in a variety of professional genres. The course will include instruction in ethical communication, rhetorical context, document design, communication technologies, precision, concision, and tone. This course fulfills the Theory and Practice requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 121 or 190.  

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)