Summer 2019 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 202 - W01 Business and American Identity - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30371 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

This fully online course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W01 Horrors of the Haunted Summer - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30372 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gordon D. Grice

1816: Famous writers and their friends gather at Lake Geneva for history’s most fruitful writing workshop. Results: vampires, the Frankenstein Monster, and a legacy of fear. In this fully online class, we’ll read what Lord Byron and the Shelleys read, what they wrote—and what they inspired. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W02 Exploding the Hero in Lit/Film - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30373 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne E. Roth-Reinhardt

What makes a hero, and how do we contribute to their construction? Are super powers enough? Do they have to be good? Do they have to be likable? Must they rescue someone? Which qualities matter to audiences, and what separates the passable hero from the truly Halloween-costume and lunchbox-worthy ones? This fully online course explores the construction of “the hero” by considering its genesis, its development, and its (sometimes) eventual fall within various contemporary sources alongside older literal and visual touchstones. We will investigate what makes the hero so revered and then consider what these qualities reveal about the human condition. Possible texts include J.M. Coetzee’s FOE, Jonathan Eid’s THE LUCKIEST MAN, Gillian Flynn’s GONE GIRL, and Homer’s THE ODYSSEY. Possible films include BLACK PANTHER, SPIDERMAN, THE DARK KNIGHT and WONDER WOMAN. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W03 From Text to Film: Adaptations - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30374 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Alison L. Underthun-Meilahn

Which is better—the original book or a film adaptation of a book? How does one translate the inner voice of a narrator on film? Does a director choose to ignore that in a script or create a way to verbalize those thoughts? Is your vision of a book setting different than what ends up on the screen? Is it possible for a film to be better than the book it is adapted from? This fully online course will attempt to grapple with these questions by examining both texts and film translations of those texts. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W04 Romantic Losers See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

30375 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Doug P. Phillips

In the realm of romantic love no amount of reading will keep us from getting our hearts broken, but it may, in the words of Samuel Beckett, help us to “Try again. Fail again. Fail better.” With this in mind, we’ll immerse ourselves in the love lives of some of literature’s best and little known romantic losers, which I hope will leave us all a little wiser about the subject by the session’s end. Here are a few works that will for sure make the cut, maybe: Flaubert’s MADAME BOVARY, Millay’s sonnets, Larkin’s poems, Barthes’s A LOVER’S DISCOURSE, de Botton’s ON LOVE, Beckett’s FIRST LOVE, Kureishi’s INTIMACY, and Greene’s THE END OF THE AFFAIR. The writing load for this blended course (in-seat on Tuesday/Thursday from 5:30-7:30pm and online for the remainder) is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 2101730-1930- T - R - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 203 - W05 American Haunts - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30429 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew B. Harrison

Although Gothic literature began in Britain, the genre found quick purchase in the U.S., where internal battles often exposed the young republic as an ill-stitched federation of parts, a Frankenstein body politic threatening to come undone. America as an ideal has been resuscitated again and again, but the revived dream still reels with recurrent nightmares. This class will examine how the Gothic has shape-shifted over time to represent the most chronic social conflicts in the U.S.: beginning with a slave narrative, we’ll proceed through texts that portray the legacies of racism and other uneven distributions of opportunity and power. Our discussions will remain sensitive to the dividing and unifying movements that continue to influence visions of America. Readings will include Harriet Jacobs, INCIDENTS IN THE LIFE OF A SLAVE GIRL; Octavia Butler, FLEDGLING; Shirley Jackson, WE HAVE ALWAYS LIVED IN THE CASTLE; and Richard Brautigan, THE HAWKLINE MONSTER; as well as short stories by Poe, Chesnutt, Bierce, Hawthorne, Faulkner, Welty, O’Connor, Bowles, and Carol Oates. Selected essays from AFRICAN AMERICAN GOTHIC: SCREAMS FROM SHADOWED PLACES, by Maisha L. Wester and AMERICAN GOTHIC FICTION, by Allan Lloyd-Smith, will supplement our primary texts. Films may include THE ELECTRIC HOUSE (Keaton, 1922); INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS (Siegel, 1956); and GET OUT (Peele, 2017). The writing load for this fully online course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - W01 Social Media & Its Discontents - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30377 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Fernando Sanchez

This fully online course aims to discuss how social media platforms affect human interactions (dating, trolling, organizing, protesting, engaging in politics, etc). Potential texts may include I HATE THE INTERNET; THE PEOPLE’S PLATFORM; TWITTER AND TEAR GAS; SO YOU’VE BEEN PUBLICLY SHAMED; TECHNICALLY WRONG; and THE DEATH OF EXPERTISE. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 212 - L01 British Authors II - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30392 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Barbara K. Olson

How has the category of “English literature” expanded as a result of global changes over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries? How have authors responded to fundamental upheavals in the individual, religion, the British Empire, the role of women, and the value of poetry and art? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings in the British literary tradition from approximately 1789 to the present. Threaded throughout this literature are themes such as revolution and reform, authorship, war, nationality and race, and the relationships between literature and other arts. This fully online course satisfies a Historical Perspective requirement for English majors. It also satisfies the core literature/writing requirement for students who started with an ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204 class and counts as an allied requirement for select business majors. Finally, this course also satisfies a Writing Across the Curriculum Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 255 - W01 Intro to Imaginative Writing - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30524 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Santiago

This fully online course introduces students to skills necessary for imaginative writing. It includes close readings of literary texts (short fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction) that model basic techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students’ critical skills. This course will include instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. It also satisfies a core literature/writing requirement for students who started with an ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204 class and counts as an allied requirement for select business majors. Finally, this course satisfies a Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Fall 2019 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 121 - W01 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 SCB 325

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

SCB 325

Course Registration Number:

40815 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Timothy J. Dewey

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W02 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 311

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

OEC 311

Course Registration Number:

40816 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucas B. Pingel

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W03 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 BEC LL17

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

BEC LL17

Course Registration Number:

42354 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mercedes M. Sheldon

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W04 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 SCB 326

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

SCB 326

Course Registration Number:

40817 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David R. Rathbun

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W05 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 313

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

OEC 313

Course Registration Number:

40819 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ganeane Contreras

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W06 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 SCB 325

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

SCB 325

Course Registration Number:

40820 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Timothy J. Dewey

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W07 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 209

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OEC 209

Course Registration Number:

40821 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Andrew J. Scheiber

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W08 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 SCB 327

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

SCB 327

Course Registration Number:

40822 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W09 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 SCB 328

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

SCB 328

Course Registration Number:

41683 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher J. Hassel

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W10 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 BEC LL17

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

BEC LL17

Course Registration Number:

40823 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mercedes M. Sheldon

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W11 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 209

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 209

Course Registration Number:

40824 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Andrew J. Scheiber

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W12 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 454

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 454

Course Registration Number:

40825 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Juan Li

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W13 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 212

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

40829 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. McNiel

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W14 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MCH 233

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MCH 233

Course Registration Number:

42809 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucy A. Saliger

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W15 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MCH 235

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MCH 235

Course Registration Number:

41383 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather Holcombe

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W16 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 310

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 310

Course Registration Number:

40827 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paula F. Cisewski

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W17 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MCH 233

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MCH 233

Course Registration Number:

40828 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucy A. Saliger

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W18 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 212

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

40830 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. McNiel

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W19 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MCH 235

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MCH 235

Course Registration Number:

40848 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather Holcombe

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W20 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 309

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 309

Course Registration Number:

40831 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W21 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 SCB 328

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

SCB 328

Course Registration Number:

40832 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Juan Li

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W22 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 OEC 309

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

OEC 309

Course Registration Number:

41504 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paula F. Cisewski

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W24 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

40839 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Charles A. Conley

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W25 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 311

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 311

Course Registration Number:

40836 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

M. A. Easley

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W26 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

40837 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Charles A. Conley

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W27 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 313

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OEC 313

Course Registration Number:

41334 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael Raimondi

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W28 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OEC 207

Course Registration Number:

40840 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Joan M. Williams

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W29 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 210

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

40847 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ganeane Contreras

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W30 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 306

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 306

Course Registration Number:

40818 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Melissa J. Hendrickx

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W31 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 313

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 313

Course Registration Number:

40834 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael Raimondi

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W32 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 207

Course Registration Number:

40838 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Joan M. Williams

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W33 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 SCB 324

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

SCB 324

Course Registration Number:

41404 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W34 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 BEC LL13

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

BEC LL13

Course Registration Number:

41487 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laura R. Zebuhr

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W36 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 454

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 454

Course Registration Number:

40833 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Joseph P. Moser

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W37 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 210

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

42355 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W38 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 454

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 454

Course Registration Number:

42356 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Joseph P. Moser

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W51 Crit Thinking: Lit/Wrtng (ESL) M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 481

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

40958 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Suzanne L. Donsky

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W01 Too Graphic?: Graphic Novel - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42679 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Alison L. Underthun-Meilahn

Graphic novels have a deep capacity to inform their readers beyond the written text while utilizing inferences from the visual aspect they use in their form to foster a critical understanding in conjunction with the text. We will explore both the written and visual aspects while also developing an understanding of how the genre of the graphic novel began and the prevalence of its genre today. Readings may include: Will Eisner's MINOR MIRACLES, Bob Dylan's BOB DYLAN REVISTED: FEATURING 13 ILLUSTRATED SONGS, Art Spiegelman's MAUS, Marjane Satrapi's PERSEPOLIS, and Homer's THE ODYSSEY. The writing load for this fully online course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W02 Too Graphic?: Graphic Novel - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42680 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Alison L. Underthun-Meilahn

Graphic novels have a deep capacity to inform their readers beyond the written text while utilizing inferences from the visual aspect they use in their form to foster a critical understanding in conjunction with the text. We will explore both the written and visual aspects while also developing an understanding of how the genre of the graphic novel began and the prevalence of its genre today. Readings may include: Will Eisner's MINOR MIRACLES, Bob Dylan's BOB DYLAN REVISTED: FEATURING 13 ILLUSTRATED SONGS, Art Spiegelman's MAUS, Marjane Satrapi's PERSEPOLIS, and Homer's THE ODYSSEY. The writing load for this fully online course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W03 Sleuth: Mystery Literature - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42681 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

From its beginnings in the mid-nineteenth century, mystery fiction has been a highly formulaic genre. Add a dead body, sprinkle in a handful of usual suspects, provide a quirky detective/police officer to solve the case, occasionally mix in a guilty butler, and you have a proven formula for a potential best-seller. However, a close examination of mystery fiction reveals that there’s more than meets the (private) eye. The authors in this genre often have their fingers on the pulse of the society from which they come, as their texts reflect and critique notions of race, class, gender, social institutions, and more. Additionally, the genre has expanded from the locked-room format employed by writers such as Conan Doyle and Christie and the shady back alleys employed by hard-boiled writers like Hammett and Chandler to focus on things like international politics and espionage, featured in the works of writers like le Carre. Throughout the semester, we’ll examine a handful of texts from the perspective of how these fit with the mystery fiction genre and what these texts have to say about the world they come from, and possibly our own world. The writing load for this fully online course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W04 The Play's the Thing: Drama M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 206

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 206

Course Registration Number:

42561 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

Get your ticket, merch, and concessions, because we'll be heading to the theater! In this semester's study of drama, we'll look at several genres of comedy. We'll go to see the battle of the sexes in Classical Actors Ensemble's production of William Shakespeare's MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING. We'll look at the "laughing comedy" of the eighteenth-century, discuss the absurdist drama of Samuel Beckett's WAITING FOR GODOT, and trace the evolution of the Broadway musical. We will analyze the relationship between teacher and student as we study Paula Vogel's AND BABY MAKES SEVEN and the work of her protegee, Sarah Ruhl in THE CLEAN HOUSE and DEAD MAN'S CELL-PHONE. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W05 Sleuth: Mystery Literature M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

42682 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

From its beginnings in the mid-nineteenth century, mystery fiction has been a highly formulaic genre. Add a dead body, sprinkle in a handful of usual suspects, provide a quirky detective/police officer to solve the case, occasionally mix in a guilty butler, and you have a proven formula for a potential best-seller. However, a close examination of mystery fiction reveals that there’s more than meets the (private) eye. The authors in this genre often have their fingers on the pulse of the society from which they come, as their texts reflect and critique notions of race, class, gender, social institutions, and more. Additionally, the genre has expanded from the locked-room format employed by writers such as Conan Doyle and Christie and the shady back alleys employed by hard-boiled writers like Hammett and Chandler to focus on things like international politics and espionage, featured in the works of writers like le Carre. Throughout the semester, we’ll examine a handful of texts from the perspective of how these fit with the mystery fiction genre and what these texts have to say about the world they come from, and possibly our own world. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W06 The Coming of Age Memoir - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 212

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

42797 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laurie E. Lindeen

Coming of age, particularly college life, as recounted by literary writers examining their own journey toward adulthood. We will read memoirs by Richard Wright, Mary Karr, Alex Lemon, and Mary McCarthy (BLACK BOY, CHERRY, HAPPY, and THE GROUP respectively) along with supplemental essays by Mary Karr and Patricia Hampl. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W07 Writers at Work - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 SCB 325

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

SCB 325

Course Registration Number:

42563 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

Writers at Work will examine fiction, nonfiction, and poetry from the point of view of both writer and audience, artist and critic. We will read contemporary literature in each genre, as well as some secondary materials written whenever possible by those same authors. For example, we might read Charles Baxter's novel THE FEAST OF LOVE and then his craft book THE ART OF SUBTEXT, or Richard Hugo's poetry as well as his craft book THE TRIGGERING TOWN. Everyone will both write in and about each genre. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W08 The Coming of Age Memoir - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 212

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

42683 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laurie E. Lindeen

Coming of age, particularly college life, as recounted by literary writers examining their own journey toward adulthood. We will read memoirs by Richard Wright, Mary Karr, Alex Lemon, and Mary McCarthy (BLACK BOY, CHERRY, HAPPY, and THE GROUP respectively) along with supplemental essays by Mary Karr and Patricia Hampl. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W01 On Trial: Law and Literature M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 SCB 326

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

SCB 326

Course Registration Number:

42702 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David R. Rathbun

"Before the law stands a doorkeeper. A man from the country walks up to the doorkeeper, and asks to be admitted to the law. But the doorkeeper says he can't admit him just now." In this parable-like story by Franz Kafka, the man never gains admittance and eventually dies at the doorstep. Kafka's story invites us to question the nature of laws and how we navigate through the "halls of justice" (if we even get inside). Kafka's seminal novel, The Trial, takes this a step further, as we examine a man who is (justly? unjustly?) accused of a crime that is never revealed. Laws come to us from various sources:and sometimes we obey these laws and sometimes we take the law into our own hands. How we live our lives within these systems of law is often dramatized in literature, and consequently we examine such texts to see how they challenge society's conventional notions of justice along with connections to guilt, responsibility, and punishment. Besides The Trial, texts may include BURIAL AT THEBES, Brecht's LIFE OF GALILEO, THE MERCHANT OF VENICE, INCIDENTS IN THE LIFE OF A SLAVE GIRL, RAGTIME, "A Jury of Her Peers," "Bartleby the Scrivener," and Baldwin's GIOVANNI'S ROOM. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W02 Reading Black Resistance M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 SCB 104

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

SCB 104

Course Registration Number:

42574 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David T. Lawrence

This course focuses on the long struggle of African Americans for justice and equality in the U.S. Analyzing literary and historical texts, students in this course will learn about and engage in research on African American history and culture. Utilizing historical, literary, and cultural approaches, this interdisciplinary course will immerse students into an exploration of the African American experience from multiple perspectives using dual disciplinary frameworks. For example, students may study Richard Wright’s NATIVE SON, but would read the text within the historical and cultural framework of the Great Migration, connecting Wright’s text not just to other literary texts, but situating it within an historical and cultural context vital to the novel’s creation and essential for its interpretation. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement. NOTE: 7 seats in this section are reserved for incoming students.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W03 Existential America M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 209

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 209

Course Registration Number:

42684 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Doug P. Phillips

In this course we will examine a body of work that traffics in such existential themes as freedom and responsibility, authenticity and bad faith, anguish and abandonment, identity and subjectivity, and choice and commitment. While some of our readings will reach beyond our own shores (Sartre, Beauvoir, Camus, Kafka, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, and Kierkegaard), we will mostly focus on works by 20th-century American writers: Palahniuk's FIGHT CLUB, Krakauer's INTO THE WILD, O'Connor's A GOOD MAN IS HARD TO FIND, Baldwin's THE FIRE NEXT TIME, Salinger's The CATCHER IN THE RYE, McCarthy's NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN -- to name but a possible few. In the words of Zadie Smith, we're going to read a selection of very good books in this course, concentrating on whatever is most particular to them in the hope that this might help us understand whatever is most particular to us. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W04 Existential America M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 OEC 209

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

OEC 209

Course Registration Number:

42685 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Doug P. Phillips

In this course we will examine a body of work that traffics in such existential themes as freedom and responsibility, authenticity and bad faith, anguish and abandonment, identity and subjectivity, and choice and commitment. While some of our readings will reach beyond our own shores (Sartre, Beauvoir, Camus, Kafka, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, and Kierkegaard), we will mostly focus on works by 20th-century American writers: Palahniuk's FIGHT CLUB, Krakauer's INTO THE WILD, O'Connor's A GOOD MAN IS HARD TO FIND, Baldwin's THE FIRE NEXT TIME, Salinger's The CATCHER IN THE RYE, McCarthy's NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN -- to name but a possible few. In the words of Zadie Smith, we're going to read a selection of very good books in this course, concentrating on whatever is most particular to them in the hope that this might help us understand whatever is most particular to us. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W05 Literature Inspired by Science M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 JRC 301

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

42564 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Leslie A. Miller

Writers have long looked to the sciences for fresh metaphors, innovative structures, and conceptual models. In this course we will read fiction, poetry, and drama inspired by the sciences and explore how writers build on scientific models and methods to bring new vision to ideas about space, time, matter, and being. Texts may include THE ECOPOETRY ANTHOLOGY, Andrea Barrett’s ARCHANGEL, BEST AMERICAN SCIENCE AND NATURE WRITING, Hope Jahren’s LAB GIRL, Tracy K. Smith’s LIFE ON MARS, Mary Shelley’s FRANKENSTEIN, and Anne Patchett’s STATE OF WONDER. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W06 Literature Looks at Faith - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 309

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OEC 309

Course Registration Number:

42687 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Barbara K. Olson

There are multiple intersections of literature and faith--in this case, Catholic faith, with both a large and a small C. We'll read both classic and contemporary writers, encountering texts as both evocations and provocations of faith; experiencing the faith (and doubt) of others vicariously--be they writers or characters; and exploring some theological implications which the elements of literary form at least sometimes entail. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W07 Literature Looks at Faith - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 309

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 309

Course Registration Number:

42686 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Barbara K. Olson

There are multiple intersections of literature and faith--in this case, Catholic faith, with both a large and a small C. We'll read both classic and contemporary writers, encountering texts as both evocations and provocations of faith; experiencing the faith (and doubt) of others vicariously--be they writers or characters; and exploring some theological implications which the elements of literary form at least sometimes entail. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W08 Literature and Photography - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OSS 313

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OSS 313

Course Registration Number:

42566 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Emily M. James

This course examines intersections between image and text across the twentieth century. Working from theoretical and critical sources on visual culture, we will apply certain key terms and concepts—from ekphrasis to punctum—to photo-essays, graphic novels, and fiction about visual artists. Writers may include Roland Barthes, Susan Sontag, W. G. Sebald, John Berger, Claudia Rankine, Teju Cole, and Solmaz Sharif. This course may involve visits to local museums, galleries, and exhibits. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W09 Literature Inspired by Science - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 301

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

42565 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Leslie A. Miller

Writers have long looked to the sciences for fresh metaphors, innovative structures, and conceptual models. In this course we will read fiction, poetry, and drama inspired by the sciences and explore how writers build on scientific models and methods to bring new vision to ideas about space, time, matter, and being. Texts may include THE ECOPOETRY ANTHOLOGY, Andrea Barrett’s ARCHANGEL, BEST AMERICAN SCIENCE AND NATURE WRITING, Hope Jahren’s LAB GIRL, Tracy K. Smith’s LIFE ON MARS, Mary Shelley’s FRANKENSTEIN, and Anne Patchett’s STATE OF WONDER. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W01 Red in Tooth and Claw - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42688 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gordon D. Grice

Literature takes a walk on the wild side when men and women clash with deadly carnivores. We’ll read vintage tales by fiction writers, hunters, and naturalists for the surprising light they throw on race, gender, ecology, and even religion. Authors may include Erckmann-Chatrian, Ambrose Bierce, and Arthur Conan Doyle. The writing load for this fully online course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W02 Red in Tooth and Claw - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42689 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gordon D. Grice

Literature takes a walk on the wild side when men and women clash with deadly carnivores. We’ll read vintage tales by fiction writers, hunters, and naturalists for the surprising light they throw on race, gender, ecology, and even religion. Authors may include Erckmann-Chatrian, Ambrose Bierce, and Arthur Conan Doyle. The writing load for this fully online course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W03 Exploding the Hero in Lit/Film M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 452

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

OEC 452

Course Registration Number:

42690 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne E. Roth-Reinhardt

What makes a hero, and how do we contribute to their construction? Are super powers enough? Do they have to be good? Do they have to be likable? Must they rescue someone? Which qualities matter to audiences, and what separates the passable hero from the truly Halloween-costume and lunchbox-worthy ones? This course explores the construction of “the hero” by considering its genesis, its development, and its (sometimes) eventual fall within various contemporary sources alongside older literal and visual touchstones. We will investigate what makes the hero so revered and then consider what these qualities reveal about the human condition. Possible texts include J.M. Coetzee’s FOE, Jonathan Eid’s THE LUCKIEST MAN, Gillian Flynn’s GONE GIRL, and Homer’s THE ODYSSEY. Possible films include BLACK PANTHER, SPIDERMAN, THE DARK KNIGHT and WONDER WOMAN. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W04 Final Frontier: Mars & Beyond M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 SCB 328

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

SCB 328

Course Registration Number:

42691 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher J. Hassel

How do global politics influence our desire to explore space? How does space exploration impact our theological viewpoints of the universe? What roles might nation-states and corporations play in future space endeavors? Focusing on the human yearning to explore space, as well as current efforts to put humans on Mars in the near future, this class will attempt to answer these questions by examining a variety of literary forms including fiction, science fiction, poetry, nonfiction prose, and biography. Likely works to be studied include Tracy K. Smith’s LIFE ON MARS, Mary Doria Russell’s THE SPARROW, and Andy Weir's THE MARTIAN. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W05 Lit & Film of Horror:Past/Pres M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 SCB 324

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

SCB 324

Course Registration Number:

42693 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shannon F. Scott

Many fans, critics, and creators agree that we are living in a Golden Age of Horror. From new fiction by Kelly Link, Carmen Maria Machado, Grady Hendrix, and Tiphanie Yanique, to new films such as GET OUT (Jordan Peele 2017), A QUIET PLACE (Krasinski 2018), and HEREDITARY (Aster 2018), the genre is proving to be finely crafted, highly literary and character driven. In other words, horror in the twenty-first century is much more than slasher films, body gore, splatterpunk, and jump scares. The horror genre explores the human condition through the emotion of fear—fear of pain, disease, isolation, of being lost, consumed, or prey to supernatural forces. However, horror also teaches us how to handle those fears. According to writer Ruthanna Emrys, “Horror as a genre is built around one truth: that the world is full of fearful things. But the best horror tells us more. It tells us how to live with being afraid.” This course explores horror from early tales like Bluebeard, to Gothic classics by Poe, Stoker, and Stevenson in the nineteenth century, to American cinema’s Universal Studios monster films. The overview will also include the rise of horror comics in the 1950s, selected works by Shirley Jackson, film adaptations of horror novels in the late 1960s and 1970s, such as ROSEMARY’S BABY (Polanski 1968) and THE EXORCIST (Friedkin 1973), to contemporary works by Paul Tremblay, Koji Suzuki, Neil Gaiman, and Stephen King. Finally, the course will encourage creative exploration and publication with an emphasis on burgeoning as well as ongoing horror magazines, anthologies, and small presses like Crystal Lake Publishing, Fangoria, The Black Room Manuscripts, and Undertow Publications. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W06 Lit & Film of Horror:Past/Pres M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 SCB 324

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

SCB 324

Course Registration Number:

42694 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shannon F. Scott

Many fans, critics, and creators agree that we are living in a Golden Age of Horror. From new fiction by Kelly Link, Carmen Maria Machado, Grady Hendrix, and Tiphanie Yanique, to new films such as GET OUT (Jordan Peele 2017), A QUIET PLACE (Krasinski 2018), and HEREDITARY (Aster 2018), the genre is proving to be finely crafted, highly literary and character driven. In other words, horror in the twenty-first century is much more than slasher films, body gore, splatterpunk, and jump scares. The horror genre explores the human condition through the emotion of fear—fear of pain, disease, isolation, of being lost, consumed, or prey to supernatural forces. However, horror also teaches us how to handle those fears. According to writer Ruthanna Emrys, “Horror as a genre is built around one truth: that the world is full of fearful things. But the best horror tells us more. It tells us how to live with being afraid.” This course explores horror from early tales like Bluebeard, to Gothic classics by Poe, Stoker, and Stevenson in the nineteenth century, to American cinema’s Universal Studios monster films. The overview will also include the rise of horror comics in the 1950s, selected works by Shirley Jackson, film adaptations of horror novels in the late 1960s and 1970s, such as ROSEMARY’S BABY (Polanski 1968) and THE EXORCIST (Friedkin 1973), to contemporary works by Paul Tremblay, Koji Suzuki, Neil Gaiman, and Stephen King. Finally, the course will encourage creative exploration and publication with an emphasis on burgeoning as well as ongoing horror magazines, anthologies, and small presses like Crystal Lake Publishing, Fangoria, The Black Room Manuscripts, and Undertow Publications. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W07 The Road Not Taken See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

42695 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jeannie L. Hofmeister

Drugs, alcohol, lies and deception. Why do some young adults wander down the wrong road? Robert Frost’s poem suggests that either road is “really about the same,” but is that truly the case? Young adults confront a wide variety of unique issues and challenges as they mature. The consequences of their self-destructive decisions often result in ruined lives. Possible texts may include: EVERYTHING I NEVER TOLD YOU by Celeste Ng, A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT by Norman Maclean, WILD by Cheryl Strayed, ORDINARY GRACE by William Kent Krueger and selected works by Nathaniel Hawthorne and Robert Frost. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JRC 2271215-1320M - W - - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 203 - W09 Spooky:Supernatural Literature M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 452

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 452

Course Registration Number:

42696 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Terri L. Topness

This course will investigate how we use ghost stories to address complex issues such as memory, identity, moral responsibility, and fear. In doing so, we will explore some famous ghost stories in literature, and discuss why we continue to find ghosts and the supernatural so compelling and necessary in today's world. Possible texts: TURN OF THE SCREW, BELOVED, THE HAUNTING OF HILL HOUSE, a selection of short stories/essays/poems, and/or possibly SPOOK: SCIENCE TACKLES THE AFTERLIFE (a collection of creative essays by Mary Roach). We will also view film clips and other media. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W10 Classical Hero, Epic, & Film M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 204

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 204

Course Registration Number:

42732 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lorina N. Quartarone

This course focuses on analyzing and understanding Classical epic poetry, the ancient presentation of heroic figures and heroic exploits, and recognizing the influence of epic/heroic literature on the modern storytelling device of film. While the genre of epic is central to the course, other genres (both literary and cinematic) which present heroic figures, e.g., tragedy, history, comedy, action, fantasy, will also be explored. Analyzing the works read or viewed via writing and class discussion will constitute the primary course activities; students will engage in reading, viewing and writing outside of class, while class time will include some writing, viewing and discussion. In order to allow ample time for discussion and analysis, the majority of films in their entirety will be viewed outside of class. The course grade will be based substantially on written analysis (i.e., essays, papers) of the texts and films studied. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W11 Once Upon A Time: Fairy Tales - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 310

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OEC 310

Course Registration Number:

42567 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. Bouwman

In this course we’ll study a small collection of fairy and folk tales closely, both in their early written sources and later literary re-imaginings. As we read different versions of the stories, we’ll ask ourselves how these tales are structured, what audiences they’re aimed at, what they might be telling us about the culture of the time, and what they might have to say to us today. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W12 The Future of Global Humanity - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 306

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OEC 306

Course Registration Number:

42697 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Melissa J. Hendrickx

In a world increasingly dominated by technology and science, what role will the humanities play in our lives? Can we program morality? Are we developing the creative and critical thinking skills necessary to adapt to new environments and careers? Using the seven "revolutions" outlined by the Center for Strategic and International Studies, this course will explore how literature and film attempt to make sense of these technological, environmental, and geo-political changes. Students will be encouraged to question how globalization will impact their lives and whether or not they are prepared to meet those challenges. Possible texts include the short story anthologies CONCERT OF VOICES and COMING OF AGE AROUND THE WORLD, and the books AND THE MOUNTAINS ECHOED and 21 LESSONS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY. Films will include THE CIRCLE and ARRIVAL. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Intensive requirement. NOTE: This course is designated as a co-located class, meaning that students can take it in-seat or fully online, or mix-and-match both ways.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W13 Saints, Spirits, & Spitfires - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 206

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 206

Course Registration Number:

42570 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Olga L. Herrera

Saints guide us, spirits frighten us, and female spitfires wrote the book on behaving badly. In this course, we’ll explore these assumptions about cultural figures and myths emerging from Latinx culture by reading and discussing fiction, poetry, music, television, film, and visual art. We’ll look at the figure of the Our Lady of Guadalupe, her origins in pre-Columbian mythology, and her appearances in contemporary literature and art, including Sandra Cisneros’s WOMAN HOLLERING CREEK. We’ll investigate the Day of the Dead tradition in Mexico, watch film representations of the Day of the Dead, and glimpse the spirit world through reading about the ghostly mother spirit of La Llorona. We’ll meet La Loca, the young heroine who dies and rises again in Ana Castillo’s SO FAR FROM GOD, and Ultima, the mysterious healing woman in Rudolfo Anaya’s BLESS ME, ULTIMA. We’ll explore the spitfire bad-girl image through the figures of Frida Kahlo and others, and unpack both the limiting and liberating aspects of this image. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W14 Amer Manhood: Shepard-McCarthy - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 SCB 328

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

SCB 328

Course Registration Number:

42699 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Brian C. Brown

For decades, men in our country had been promised a “mission to manhood,” a simple road map to navigate the transition from adolescence to adulthood. At no time was this promise more fully realized than after World War II. Hundreds of thousands of young men returned home from the war ready to be educated, secure a job, buy a home, get married and have a family … and to live happily ever after. Many men followed the blueprint, becoming thoughtful husbands and fathers and successful businessmen. But many others failed – leaving the paternal continuum between fathers and sons frayed and undefined. Sam Shepard lays bare the wreckage of this broken promise – the failure of post-World War II fathers (and our culture) to guide their sons into manhood – and the long-term impact this failure has had on the American male. The course material will begin with STIFFED, Susan Faludi’s concise and thoughtful examination of “the betrayal of the American Man.” We’ll then examine a number of Shepard’s plays, short stories and films before taking a contemporary look at the apathetic and violent American male on display in Chuck Palahniuk’s FIGHT CLUB and the post-apocalyptic male in Cormac McCarthy’s THE ROAD. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W40 HNRS: Sports Literature M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 SCB 107

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

SCB 107

Course Registration Number:

42571 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

What is any sports event but a story--multiple stories--playing out before our eyes? Sports by definition involve drama: conflicts in decision making, in relationships, with nature, and, if we believe it possible, conflicts with the supernatural. It's not an accident that some of our greatest metaphors come from the arena of athletics. Through sports we have a way to look at human values--at the best we have to offer and sometimes the worst. We’ll use sports literature to investigate what is just… and what is unjust… and how we discern which is which. In this class, we will read fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry. Books may include SWIMMING TO ANTARCTICA, THE REAL ALL-AMERICANS, TAKE ME OUT, and BEST AMERICAN SPORTS WRITING 2017. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Intensive requirement. Please note that this course is open only to students in the Aquinas Scholars Honors program.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W41 HNRS Exploding Hero in Lit/Flm M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OSS 122

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OSS 122

Course Registration Number:

42572 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne E. Roth-Reinhardt

What makes a hero, and how do we contribute to their construction? Are super powers enough? Do they have to be good? Do they have to be likable? Must they rescue someone? Which qualities matter to audiences, and what separates the passable hero from the truly Halloween-costume and lunchbox-worthy ones? This course explores the construction of “the hero” by considering its genesis, its development, and its (sometimes) eventual fall within various contemporary sources alongside older literal and visual touchstones. We will investigate what makes the hero so revered and then consider what these qualities reveal about the human condition. Possible texts include J.M. Coetzee’s FOE, Jonathan Eid’s THE LUCKIEST MAN, Gillian Flynn’s GONE GIRL, and Homer’s THE ODYSSEY. Possible films include BLACK PANTHER, SPIDERMAN, THE DARK KNIGHT and WONDER WOMAN. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement. Please note that this course is open only to students in the Aquinas Scholars Honors program.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 211 - L01 British Authors I M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 301

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

42528 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Martin L. Warren

How have heroic ideals changed from Beowulf to the 18th century? How did marriage evolve from an arrangement between tribes and families to love between two people? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings in the British literary tradition in the period from approximately 900-1780. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as war and conflict, the history of love, humor and satire, social reform, religious reform and the rights of the individual. This course satisfies the core Literature and Writing requirement for students who started that requirement with an ENGL 201-204 class and fulfills both the Historical Perspectives and the Early British Literature requirements in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 214 - L01 American Authors I - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 209

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 209

Course Registration Number:

42553 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Andrew J. Scheiber

Where does the popular perception of America as the “New World” come from? How could slavery flourish in a land idealizing freedom? Why were immigrants so feared and reviled? Why did expansionism push out some and make millionaires of others? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings from the beginnings of the American literary tradition to the turn of the twentieth century. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as religious identity, political reform, race, slavery, war, gender, and industrialization. This course satisfies the core Literature and Writing requirement for students who started that requirement with an ENGL 201-204 class and fulfills both the Historical Perspectives and the Early American Literature requirements in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203 or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 217 - L01 Multicultural Literature M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 SCB 104

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

SCB 104

Course Registration Number:

42554 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David T. Lawrence

In this course students will critically engage some of the most interesting and celebrated black novels of the last twenty years with the intent of understanding what issues black writers are concerned with in the 21st century. Authors will include: Colson Whitehead, Jesmyn Ward, Edwidge Danticat, Yaa Gyasi, Percival Everett, Mitchell S. Jackson, and more. This course satisfies the both the core Literature and Writing requirement for students who started that requirement with an ENGL 201-204 class and the core Human Diversity requirement, fulfills both the Historical Perspectives and the Diversity Literature requirements in the English major, and satisfies a WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 220 - L01 The Classical Tradition - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 210

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

41934 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy M. Muse

What are we speaking of when we invoke the term “the classical tradition”? What kinds of metamorphoses might we witness (and experience) when we encounter literature of this tradition? In this class we will engage with, question, and trace the classical tradition—and its influence on us—by reading works of imaginative literature written by world-classic authors from ancient Greece and Rome, 5th-century India, Heian period Japan, and medieval and Renaissance France and Italy, including Homer, Aeschylus, Ovid, Kalidasa, Sei Shonagon, Marie de France, Dante, and Montaigne. This course satisfies the core Literature and Writing requirement for students who started that requirement with an ENGL 201-204 class and counts as a WAC Writing to Learn course. It also satisfies the Historical Perspectives requirement for English majors and counts towards the Classical Civilization major and minor. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 255 - W01 Intro to Imaginative Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 SCB 211

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

SCB 211

Course Registration Number:

41449 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Santiago

This course introduces students to skills necessary for imaginative writing. It includes close readings of literary texts that model basic techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students’ critical skills. This course will include instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures. This course satisfies the core Literature and Writing requirement for students who started that requirement with an ENGL 201-204 class, fulfills the Genre Studies requirement in the English major, and meets a requirement for the English with Creative Writing Emphasis and English with a Professional Writing Emphasis majors. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 255 - W03 Intro to Imaginative Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 310

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 310

Course Registration Number:

41982 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. Bouwman

This course introduces students to skills necessary for imaginative writing. It includes close readings of literary texts that model basic techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students’ critical skills. This course will include instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures. This course satisfies the core Literature and Writing requirement for students who started that requirement with an ENGL 201-204 class, fulfills the Genre Studies requirement in the English major, and meets a requirement for the English with Creative Writing Emphasis and English with a Professional Writing Emphasis majors. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 256 - D01 Intro to Professional Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 301

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

41932 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Fernando Sanchez

This course introduces students to principles and skills necessary for writing in professional settings. It includes study of rhetoric, ethics, and information design in workplace writing; examination of the roles of professional writers; close readings of texts and documents that model professional techniques; and practice composing in a variety of professional genres. The course will include instruction in ethical communication, rhetorical context, document design, communication technologies, precision, concision, and tone. This course fulfills the Theory and Practice requirement in the English major, a requirement for the English with Professional Writing major, and an elective for the English with Creative Writing major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 280 - L01 Intro to English Studies - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 JRC 301

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

41300 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Fernando Sanchez

This gateway course into the English major and the minor is an introduction to (a) literary tools, techniques, and terminology for reading and writing in English studies; (b) the history of English Studies as a discipline and the intellectual concepts and critical debates that have shaped the field; and (c) the practices of English Studies, from close reading and analysis of literary and critical texts to interpretation and scholarly research. This course is required for all English major tracks and should be taken as early as possible after declaring the English major. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 297 - L01 Front Lines: American War Lit - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 308

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 308

Course Registration Number:

42555 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

What constitutes a true war story? Who gets to decide? And is an accurate representation by any single voice or ideology even possible given the human dimensions of warfare? In this course, we will listen to a multiplicity of voices from the front line and the home front, beginning with the legacy of the Civil War and closing with contemporary writings about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. We will study what these authors have to tell us about war, gender, and identity in their time and in ours. And through our shared exploration we will come to a fuller appreciation of what Ernest Hemingway, a lifelong eyewitness to war, meant when he wrote, “Never think that war, no matter how necessary, nor how justified, is not a crime.” Likely authors to be studied include Crane, Cather, Hemingway, Komunyakaa, and Fallon. This course satisfies the core Literature and Writing requirement for students who started that requirement with an ENGL 201-204 class, satisfies the Genre Studies requirement for English and English with Creative Writing majors, and counts as an allied course for select business majors. This course also satisfies the WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 300 - W01 Writing Center Theory/Practice M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 209

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MHC 209

Course Registration Number:

40080 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Susan J. Callaway

This course is only open to students hired in the spring semester to work in the Center for Writing and who have permission from the instructor. In this course, students develop their writing, reading, and critical thinking abilities, strengthen their communication skills by consulting their peers in the Center for Writing, and develop their intercultural competency through mentoring refugee and immigrant high school students in the Twin Cities. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204. NOTE: A standard section of ENGL 300 Theory and Practice of Writing will be offered in Spring 2020.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 305 - 01 Linguistics: English Lang M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 454

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OEC 454

Course Registration Number:

40081 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Juan Li

This course is an introduction to the systematic study of the English language, with an emphasis on connections between academic linguistics and relevant social and educational questions. Students will study the English sound system through phonetics and phonology, how words are formed through morphology, how words combine to create clauses and meaning through syntax and semantics. After learning the linguistic tools to describe the English language, students will examine the contexts of language production in real life through the study of U.S. dialects, historical and ongoing changes in English, and various social interactions in language. This course fulfills the Theory and Practice requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 322 - W01 Writing Fiction M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 SCB 211

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

SCB 211

Course Registration Number:

40082 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Santiago

This intermediate course explores traditional and innovative patterns of fiction writing. Emphasis on experimentation with a variety of techniques and development of individual voice. This course will include critique sessions, readings to broaden possibilities of form and subject, and individual instruction. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisite: ENGL 255 or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 324 - L01 Theater Talk-Back: Drama M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 OEC 206

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

OEC 206

Course Registration Number:

42556 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

This course will study theatrical works that have been reworked across time and place, and dramas that “speak” to each other intentionally. The battle of the sexes is light-hearted in William Shakespeare’s MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING, but far more brutal in THE TAMING OF THE SHREW, and more modern plays repeat this comic take (Shaw's PYGMALION) or tragic one (Ibsen's A DOLL'S HOUSE and Tennessee Williams A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE). KING LEAR became Nahum Tate’s LEAR and Kurosawa’s RAN, meditations on aging and dying that culminate in Margaret Edson's WIT. Wendy Wasserstein's THE SISTERS ROSENSWEIG is directly modeled on Checkhov's THE THREE SISTERS, with a zany spin on both offered by Paula Vogel's AND BABY MAKES SEVEN. This course studies a kind of theatrical genealogy, examining family trees of dramatic influence. This course satisfies a core Literature and Writing requirement for students who started that requirement with an ENGL 201-204 class and a Genre Studies requirement for English majors and English with Creative Writing majors. This course also satisfies the WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 326 - W01 Writing/Illust Graphic Novels - - W - - - - 1800 - 2100 OEC 210

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

42557 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

Following the memoir boom of the late 20th century, the genre of the graphic novel/memoir erupted seemingly out of nowhere with international best-sellers such as Art Speigelman’s MAUS, Allison Bechdel’s FUN HOME, and Marjane Satrapi’s PERSEPOLIS. They have inspired many authors into the multi-faceted genre of the graphic novel where text and image and even photography work in concert. In this class we will read texts such as the above, as well as the foundational craft book on the subject, UNDERSTANDING COMICS, by Scott McCloud, and students will create two short graphic novels or memoirs of their own. The course will accommodate all levels of artistic ability and no previous drawing or illustration experience is required. ENGL 326 counts as a writing course for English with a Creative Writing Emphasis students. Prerequisite: ENGL 255 or instructor permission.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 334 - W01 Lit from Christian Perspective - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

42529 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William J. Junker

This course, cross-listed with CATH 334, provides an in-depth exploration of how literature engages Christian thought, experience, and practice and how a reader engages works of imaginative literature from an intellectually serious Christian perspective. The course will also provide an introduction to theories in the interdisciplinary field of religion and literature. Religious themes studied will come from a variety of literary forms, including those of myth, history, parable, short story, essay, children's literature, poem, and novel. The literature chosen may reflect a variety of cultural backgrounds so that, among other things, we may consider how meaning may be affected by changes in worldview. Specific topics vary; accordingly, credit may be earned more than once for this course number. This course fulfills the Contexts and Convergences requirement in the English major and an elective requirement for Catholic Studies majors and minors. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 337 - L01 Refugee Writers, Refugee Lives - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 209

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 209

Course Registration Number:

42558 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kanishka Chowdhury

Clearly, what is now termed by mainstream scholars and activists as the “refugee crisis” is a subject that needs serious study. This course will examine the historical and political conditions that determine this “crisis,” exploring concepts such as displacement, migrancy, exile, and transnationalism within the context of global capitalism. We will study the works of a variety of writers, such as Leila Abdelrazaq, Jason De León, Nadifa Mohamed, Óscar Martínez, Dinaw Mengetsu, and Viet Than Nguyen, among others. This course provides an in-depth exploration of how literature engages Christian thought, experience, and practice and how a reader engages works of imaginative literature from an intellectually serious Christian perspective. The course will also provide an introduction to theories in the interdisciplinary field of religion and literature. Religious themes studied will come from a variety of literary forms, including those of myth, history, parable, short story, essay, children's literature, poem, and novel. The literature chosen may reflect a variety of cultural backgrounds so that, among other things, we may consider how meaning may be affected by changes in worldview. Specific topics vary; accordingly, credit may be earned more than once for this course number. This course fulfills the Contexts and Convergences requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204. This course satisfies the core Literature and Writing requirement for students who started that requirement with an ENGL 201-204 class, the core Human Diversity requirement, a Diversity Literature and Contexts and Convergences requirement for English majors, a 300-level elective for English with Creative Writing and English with Professional Writing majors, and a WAC Writing to Learn requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 373 - L01 Contemporary Amer Literature M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 SCB 107

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

SCB 107

Course Registration Number:

42559 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

This course provides an in-depth exploration of a select group of texts or authors from American Literature from the late twentieth century to the present. Selected texts or authors (such as Baldwin, Morrison, Erdrich, and David Foster Wallace to the most contemporary) will be studied in terms of a particular historical, cultural, or other context, or in terms of a convergence with authors or texts from other literary traditions or intellectual disciplines. Examples might include literature and civil rights, American literature and new media, immigration narratives, American regionalisms, changing American identities. This course satisfies the core Literature and Writing requirement for students who started that requirement with an ENGL 201-204 class, fulfills the Contexts and Convergences requirement in the English major, counts as a 300-level literature course for English with Creative Writing and English with Professional Writing students, and satisfies the WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 421 - 01 Literary Magazine Practicum I M - - - - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 227

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

JRC 227

Course Registration Number:

40405 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

Activities during the fall semester of the sequence include readings from The Little Magazine: A History and Bibliography and The Little Magazine in America: A Modern Documentary History; examining the design and content of fifteen professional literary magazines; learning InDesign CS3 desktop publishing program; creating preliminary Summit Avenue Review page designs; working collaboratively with other literary magazine editors to develop selection procedures and principles; and writing a comparison essay on two professional literary magazines. Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 321 or 322 or 323 or instructor permission.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)