Fall 2018 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 121 - W01 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 204

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

OEC 204

Course Registration Number:

40936 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucas B. Pingel

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W02 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 452

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

OEC 452

Course Registration Number:

40937 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Timothy J. Dewey

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W04 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 SCB 104

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

SCB 104

Course Registration Number:

40939 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W05 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 313

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

OEC 313

Course Registration Number:

40941 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W06 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 212

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

40942 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W07 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 308

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OEC 308

Course Registration Number:

40943 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Andrew J. Scheiber

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W08 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MHC 205

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

MHC 205

Course Registration Number:

40944 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Susan J. Callaway

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W09 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 SCB 104

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

SCB 104

Course Registration Number:

41975 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W10 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 SCB 107

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

SCB 107

Course Registration Number:

40945 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. McNiel

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W11 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 308

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 308

Course Registration Number:

40946 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Andrew J. Scheiber

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W12 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 SCB 104

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

SCB 104

Course Registration Number:

40947 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W13 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MCH 117

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MCH 117

Course Registration Number:

40951 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher J. Hassel

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W14 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 309

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 309

Course Registration Number:

40948 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paula F. Cisewski

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W15 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 310

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 310

Course Registration Number:

40949 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laurie E. Lindeen

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W16 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MCH 116

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MCH 116

Course Registration Number:

40950 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shannon F. Scott

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W17 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 OEC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

40952 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. McNiel

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W18 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 OEC 309

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

OEC 309

Course Registration Number:

40972 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paula F. Cisewski

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W19 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 MHC 203

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

MHC 203

Course Registration Number:

40953 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Charles A. Conley

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W20 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 MHC 209

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

MHC 209

Course Registration Number:

40954 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Melissa J. Hendrickx

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W21 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 209

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 209

Course Registration Number:

40957 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Melissa J. Hendrickx

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W22 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 203

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 203

Course Registration Number:

40962 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Charles A. Conley

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W23 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 309

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OEC 309

Course Registration Number:

40959 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W24 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 308

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OEC 308

Course Registration Number:

40960 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W25 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 306

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OEC 306

Course Registration Number:

41524 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael Raimondi

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W26 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 BEC LL17

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

BEC LL17

Course Registration Number:

40963 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W27 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MHC 210

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MHC 210

Course Registration Number:

40971 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W28 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 SCB 329

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

SCB 329

Course Registration Number:

41586 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W29 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 454

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 454

Course Registration Number:

41715 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laura R. Zebuhr

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W30 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 BEC 113

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

BEC 113

Course Registration Number:

40940 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mary E. Frandson

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W31 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 210

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

40956 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Yvonne E. Asp-Grahn

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W32 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 SCB 326

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

SCB 326

Course Registration Number:

40961 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew B. Harrison

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W33 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 454

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 454

Course Registration Number:

41608 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael Raimondi

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W34 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 209

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 209

Course Registration Number:

41697 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Barbara K. Olson

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W35 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 209

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 209

Course Registration Number:

40964 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Terri L. Topness

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W36 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 210

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

40955 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Yvonne E. Asp-Grahn

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W51 Crit Thinking: Lit/Wrtng (ESL) M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 206

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OEC 206

Course Registration Number:

41088 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Suzanne L. Donsky

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W01 The Coming of Age Memoir M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 310

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OEC 310

Course Registration Number:

43105 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laurie E. Lindeen

This course will look at coming of age memoirs, particularly college life, as recounted by literary writers examining their own journey toward adulthood. We will read memoirs by Richard Wright, Mary Karr, Alex Lemon, and Mary McCarthy (BLACK BOY, CHERRY, HAPPY, and THE GROUP respectively) along with supplemental essays by Mary Karr and Patricia Hampl. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W02 The Coming of Age Memoir M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 310

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 310

Course Registration Number:

42684 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laurie E. Lindeen

This course will look at coming of age memoirs, particularly college life, as recounted by literary writers examining their own journey toward adulthood. We will read memoirs by Richard Wright, Mary Karr, Alex Lemon, and Mary McCarthy (BLACK BOY, CHERRY, HAPPY, and THE GROUP respectively) along with supplemental essays by Mary Karr and Patricia Hampl. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W01 Literature and Medicine M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 212

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

42526 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

Viewing physicians as writers, thinkers, and practitioners, we'll study texts that offer reflections from doctors on their craft. We'll also explore historical, economic, political, and ethical questions related to medical care such as: how are illness and caregiving depicted in literary texts? What kinds of emotional and social costs does illness have? How do writers grapple with the moral dimensions of medicine? These and other questions will be addressed through close textual analysis and discussion; in addition, our course will draw upon the expertise of practitioners within the Minneapolis medical community. Readings may include Jane Austen's MANSFIELD PARK, Sarah Ruhl's IN THE NEXT ROOM, Margaret Edson's WIT, Atul Gawande's COMPLICATIONS, and Mark Doty's HEAVEN'S COAST. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W02 Literature and Medicine M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 212

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

42527 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

Viewing physicians as writers, thinkers, and practitioners, we'll study texts that offer reflections from doctors on their craft. We'll also explore historical, economic, political, and ethical questions related to medical care such as: how are illness and caregiving depicted in literary texts? What kinds of emotional and social costs does illness have? How do writers grapple with the moral dimensions of medicine? These and other questions will be addressed through close textual analysis and discussion; in addition, our course will draw upon the expertise of practitioners within the Minneapolis medical community. Readings may include Jane Austen's MANSFIELD PARK, Sarah Ruhl's IN THE NEXT ROOM, Margaret Edson's WIT, Atul Gawande's COMPLICATIONS, and Mark Doty's HEAVEN'S COAST. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W03 Reading Black Resistance M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 247

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

JRC 247

Course Registration Number:

42603 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David C. Williard, David T. Lawrence

This course, team-taught by a historian and a literary scholar, focuses on the long struggle of African Americans for justice and equality in the U.S. Analyzing literary and historical texts, students in this course will learn about and engage in research on African American history and culture. Utilizing historical, literary, and cultural approaches, this interdisciplinary course will immerse students into an exploration of the African American experience from multiple perspectives using dual disciplinary frameworks. For example, students may study Richard Wright’s NATIVE SON, but would read the text within the historical and cultural framework of the Great Migration, connecting Wright’s text not just to other literary texts, but situating it within an historical and cultural context vital to the novel’s creation and essential for its interpretation. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W04 Literature Looks at Faith - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 212

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

42687 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Barbara K. Olson

There are multiple intersections of literature and faith--in this case, Catholic faith, with both a large and a small C. We'll read both classic and contemporary writers, encountering texts as both evocations and provocations of faith; experiencing the faith (and doubt) of others vicariously--be they writers or characters; and exploring some theological implications which the elements of literary form at least sometimes entail. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W05 Literature Looks at Faith - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 212

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

42688 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Barbara K. Olson

There are multiple intersections of literature and faith--in this case, Catholic faith, with both a large and a small C. We'll read both classic and contemporary writers, encountering texts as both evocations and provocations of faith; experiencing the faith (and doubt) of others vicariously--be they writers or characters; and exploring some theological implications which the elements of literary form at least sometimes entail. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W01 Kiss of Death: Homicidal Lit - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42689 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gordon D. Grice

In this fully online course, solve a murder, follow a killer to the gallows, and dig into the roots of rage. This course examines the rich and varied tradition of murder in fiction and nonfiction. Authors may include Elizabeth Gaskell, Joan Didion, and Lafcadio Hearn. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W02 Kiss of Death: Homicidal Lit - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42690 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gordon D. Grice

In this fully online course, solve a murder, follow a killer to the gallows, and dig into the roots of rage. This course examines the rich and varied tradition of murder in fiction and nonfiction. Authors may include Elizabeth Gaskell, Joan Didion, and Lafcadio Hearn. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W03 Recent Tours of the Afterlife - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42691 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew B. Harrison

Literature has a long history of imagining possible afterlives: Odysseus summons the dead in Hades; Virgil speaks to the spirit of his father in the underworld; Dante journeys deep into Hell before climbing the Mountain of Purgatory and ascending into Heaven. While acknowledging these and other precedents, this fully online course focuses on narratives of the afterlife since the late 19th century. We will discuss what recent depictions of the afterlife might reveal about the values of those still living. In what ways do afterlife narratives uphold or question dominant cultural trends? Is the afterlife exclusive or inclusive? Somber or joyful? Is it a courtroom, a ballroom, a vast field, a forest, a cloud city, an underground city, a maze, a mansion, a cosmic choir, a light at the end of a tunnel—what and why and for whom? We will begin with some representative short stories, such as Ambrose Bierce’s 1890 “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge,” alongside excerpts from Mark Mirabello’s historical survey of afterlife beliefs, A TRAVELER’S GUIDE TO THE AFTERLIFE. We will then read a set of novels: Kate Atkinson’s LIFE AFTER LIFE; Kevin Brockmeier’s THE BRIEF HISTORY OF THE DEAD; and George Saunders’s LINCOLN IN THE BARDO. Our films will include HEAVEN CAN WAIT (Lubitsch 1943), DEFENDING YOUR LIFE (Brooks 1991), AFTER LIFE (Koreeda 1998), and clips from WHAT DREAMS MAY COME (Ward 1998) and THE SEVENTH SEAL (Bergman 1957). Students will write weekly short papers on guided topics and a final research essay, as well as work throughout the semester to develop a map of an afterlife setting. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W04 Wartime:Literature vs. Reality - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42692 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Alison L. Underthun-Meilahn

When writing about war, authors who have served in the military have a few literary options: a memoir, poetry, essays, or a work of fiction. This fully online course will focus on exemplary literature written by those who have been in war and the representation of war through writing. Through literature we will come to understand how the psyche of veterans is altered via warfare and the impact it has on their lives and families, as well as society at large. We will also look at how contemporary culture, and historically, veterans have been received or perceived as they return home and how their voice has been implicit/explicit in understanding their experience with war. In this course we will tease out the reality of war through those voices who tell us just what a "true war story" is. Literature we will likely focus on in this course includes Kurt Vonnegut's SLAUGHTERHOUSE-FIVE, Tim O'Brien's THE THINGS THEY CARRIED, Jim Northrup's THE REZ ROAD, and Ernest Hemingway's A FAREWELL TO ARMS. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W05 Final Frontier: Mars & Beyond M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 454

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

OEC 454

Course Registration Number:

42695 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher J. Hassel

How do global politics influence our desire to explore space? How does space exploration impact our theological viewpoints of the universe? What roles might nation-states and corporations play in future space endeavors? Focusing on the human yearning to explore space, as well as current efforts to put humans on Mars in the near future, this class will attempt to answer these questions by examining a variety of literary forms including fiction, science fiction, poetry, nonfiction prose, and biography. Likely works to be studied include Tracy K. Smith’s LIFE ON MARS, Mary Doria Russell’s THE SPARROW, and Andy Weir's THE MARTIAN. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W06 Ringmaster: Lit of the Circus M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 MCH 106

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

MCH 106

Course Registration Number:

42696 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shannon F. Scott

This course explores performativity, exhibition, and exploitation in the circus through a series of texts told from multiple perspectives: ringmasters, sideshow acts, animal tamers, and acrobats. Moving back and forth in time, this class examines the origins of the circus in Rome, its transformation in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in France, Britain, and America, and its triumphs and challenges in twentieth century America, particularly during the Great Depression. From non-fiction essays on carnies and famous bearded ladies, by Harry Crews and Joseph Mitchell respectively, to Toulouse-Lautrec’s depictions of the circuses of Molier and Fernando and the Nouveau Cirque, to excerpts from P.T. Barnum’s autobiography, THE ART OF GETTING MONEY, OR HINTS AND HELPS TO MAKE A FORTUNE, to guest speakers in the fields of magic and tattoo artistry, this course respects the extraordinary and redefines definitions of “normal.” Texts for the class include the collection, STEP RIGHT UP: STORIES OF CARNIVALS, SIDESHOWS, AND THE CIRCUS, which features works by Ray Bradbury, Mark Twain, Angela Carter, Flannery O’Connor, and Franz Kafka. Katherine Dunn’s GEEK LOVE and Erin Morgenstern’s THE NIGHT CIRCUS will be read in their entirety. Carol Birch's ORPHANS OF THE CARNIVAL will be examined using Helen Davies theoretical approach to "Neo-Victorian Freakery." The film adaptation of Sara Gruen’s WATER FOR ELEPHANTS will also be screened outside of class. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W07 Final Frontier: Mars & Beyond M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 454

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OEC 454

Course Registration Number:

42697 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher J. Hassel

How do global politics influence our desire to explore space? How does space exploration impact our theological viewpoints of the universe? What roles might nation-states and corporations play in future space endeavors? Focusing on the human yearning to explore space, as well as current efforts to put humans on Mars in the near future, this class will attempt to answer these questions by examining a variety of literary forms including fiction, science fiction, poetry, nonfiction prose, and biography. Likely works to be studied include Tracy K. Smith’s LIFE ON MARS, Mary Doria Russell’s THE SPARROW, and Andy Weir's THE MARTIAN. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W08 Ringmaster: Lit of the Circus M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MCH 106

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

MCH 106

Course Registration Number:

42698 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shannon F. Scott

This course explores performativity, exhibition, and exploitation in the circus through a series of texts told from multiple perspectives: ringmasters, sideshow acts, animal tamers, and acrobats. Moving back and forth in time, this class examines the origins of the circus in Rome, its transformation in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in France, Britain, and America, and its triumphs and challenges in twentieth century America, particularly during the Great Depression. From non-fiction essays on carnies and famous bearded ladies, by Harry Crews and Joseph Mitchell respectively, to Toulouse-Lautrec’s depictions of the circuses of Molier and Fernando and the Nouveau Cirque, to excerpts from P.T. Barnum’s autobiography, THE ART OF GETTING MONEY, OR HINTS AND HELPS TO MAKE A FORTUNE, to guest speakers in the fields of magic and tattoo artistry, this course respects the extraordinary and redefines definitions of “normal.” Texts for the class include the collection, STEP RIGHT UP: STORIES OF CARNIVALS, SIDESHOWS, AND THE CIRCUS, which features works by Ray Bradbury, Mark Twain, Angela Carter, Flannery O’Connor, and Franz Kafka. Katherine Dunn’s GEEK LOVE and Erin Morgenstern’s THE NIGHT CIRCUS will be read in their entirety. Carol Birch's ORPHANS OF THE CARNIVAL will be examined using Helen Davies theoretical approach to "Neo-Victorian Freakery." The film adaptation of Sara Gruen’s WATER FOR ELEPHANTS will also be screened outside of class. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W09 Literary Villains M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 209

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 209

Course Registration Number:

42699 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

In most cultures, readers tend to identify with heroes and hope that their goodness will triumph over the evil antagonist. However, every now and then, readers find the villain of the text far more appealing than its hero or heroine – the villain could be more intriguing than a hero, feature more human, relatable characteristics, could provide a reader with an opportunity to live vicariously through them, or a number of other reasons. Throughout the semester, we’ll read texts that future both classic and contemporary texts that are well-known for their villains, such as Iago (William Shakespeare’s OTHELLO), Tom Ripley (Patricia Highsmith’s THE TALENTED MR. RIPLEY), Brigid O’Shaughnessy (Dashiell Hammett’s THE MALTESE FALCON), and Anton Chigurh (Cormac McCarthy’s NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN), examine the cultural context for each text and villain, and analyze what it is about these characters that makes readers want to root for them. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W11 Literary Villains M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 209

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 209

Course Registration Number:

42701 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

In most cultures, readers tend to identify with heroes and hope that their goodness will triumph over the evil antagonist. However, every now and then, readers find the villain of the text far more appealing than its hero or heroine – the villain could be more intriguing than a hero, feature more human, relatable characteristics, could provide a reader with an opportunity to live vicariously through them, or a number of other reasons. Throughout the semester, we’ll read texts that future both classic and contemporary texts that are well-known for their villains, such as Iago (William Shakespeare’s OTHELLO), Tom Ripley (Patricia Highsmith’s THE TALENTED MR. RIPLEY), Brigid O’Shaughnessy (Dashiell Hammett’s THE MALTESE FALCON), and Anton Chigurh (Cormac McCarthy’s NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN), examine the cultural context for each text and villain, and analyze what it is about these characters that makes readers want to root for them. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W12 Clones, Doubles, & Alter Egos M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

42702 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. McNiel

Whether it’s the idea of an evil twin, a shadow self, or an exact replica, the figure of the double has long fascinated humankind. More than just a staple of science fiction or daytime soap operas, doubles may express deep-seated fears about losing our sense of self or our capacity for self-determination and control. Doubles can also be figures of fascination and desire: the power to create, control, or extend life through a second self is a tantalizing prospect. In this course, we will examine a variety of narratives that feature doppelgangers, alter egos, clones, or related figures, and explore different moral, psychological, literary, and cultural frameworks for understanding the figure of the double. Potential texts may include DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE, THE DOUBLE, HER FEARFUL SYMMETRY, NEVER LET ME GO, and selected films. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W13 Sharing the Nest: Siblings M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 227

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

JRC 227

Course Registration Number:

42703 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jeannie L. Hofmeister

Brothers and sisters are frequently best friends and most loyal champions. Yet, siblings can also be fierce rivals who struggle through jealousies, the concept of fairness, and the fear of parental favoritism. By considering how authors portray sibling relationships in literature, we can explore numerous intriguing dynamics including: the manner in which birth order and innate personality affect all the birds in the nest. Possible texts may include: LUCY GAYHART by Willa Cather, COMMONWEALTH by Ann Patchett, THE BURGESS BOYS by Elizabeth Strout, THE STRANGER IN MY GENES by Bill Griffeth, A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT by Norman Maclean, and selected poetry readings. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W14 Wilderness & Adventure in Lit M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 414

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 414

Course Registration Number:

42704 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne E. Roth-Reinhardt

We can learn much about ourselves by going out into the wilderness, wherever these “wild” spaces may be found. Pushing into what’s new and moving beyond what’s comfortable can reveal a clearer sense of who we are and what we value. This course explores the relationships formed when individuals step in to unfamiliar places and examines what can be discovered when humans experience various “wilderness” experiences. The literature and film of our course--possibly including Chimamanda Ngosi Adichie's AMERICANAH, J.M Coetzee's FOE, Louise Erdrich's LA ROSE, Cheryl Strayed's WILD, Ernest Hemingway's IN OUR TIME, and Steven Spielberg's RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK--focuses on the idea of internal exploration and discovery gained through challenging experiences, and it considers the influence of so-called “wild” places on individual growth and community action. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 formal revised pages. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W15 Wilderness & Adventure in Lit M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 OEC 212

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

42705 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne E. Roth-Reinhardt

We can learn much about ourselves by going out into the wilderness, wherever these “wild” spaces may be found. Pushing into what’s new and moving beyond what’s comfortable can reveal a clearer sense of who we are and what we value. This course explores the relationships formed when individuals step in to unfamiliar places and examines what can be discovered when humans experience various “wilderness” experiences. The literature and film of our course--possibly including Chimamanda Ngosi Adichie's AMERICANAH, J.M Coetzee's FOE, Louise Erdrich's LA ROSE, Cheryl Strayed's WILD, Ernest Hemingway's IN OUR TIME, and Steven Spielberg's RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK--focuses on the idea of internal exploration and discovery gained through challenging experiences, and it considers the influence of so-called “wild” places on individual growth and community action. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 formal revised pages. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W16 Behind Bars: Prison Literature M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 SCB 329

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

SCB 329

Course Registration Number:

43240 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucy A. Saliger

The difficult contradictions in our criminal justice system--one that purportedly aims to reduce violence and crime, keep us safe, and promote justice--hide in plain sight. Yet we as a society may or may not know the contradictory realities: the violence and injustices that can occur in our jails and prisons, disparities in legal representation and sentencing, and a host of tangled methods and aims often in conflict with one another. While "crime" shows keep certain stories ever-present in our societal imagination, they tend to obscure deeper stories. In this class, we'll attempt to enter into those deeper stories using both media and texts; writers may include Michelle Alexander, Jimmy Santiago Baca, Angela Davis, Johann Hari, Martin Luther King, and Leonard Peltier. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W17 Behind Bars: Prison Literature M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 SCB 329

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

SCB 329

Course Registration Number:

43241 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucy A. Saliger

The difficult contradictions in our criminal justice system--one that purportedly aims to reduce violence and crime, keep us safe, and promote justice--hide in plain sight. Yet we as a society may or may not know the contradictory realities: the violence and injustices that can occur in our jails and prisons, disparities in legal representation and sentencing, and a host of tangled methods and aims often in conflict with one another. While "crime" shows keep certain stories ever-present in our societal imagination, they tend to obscure deeper stories. In this class, we'll attempt to enter into those deeper stories using both media and texts; writers may include Michelle Alexander, Jimmy Santiago Baca, Angela Davis, Johann Hari, Martin Luther King, and Leonard Peltier. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W18 Classical Hero, Epic, & Film M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 454

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 454

Course Registration Number:

42530 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lorina N. Quartarone

This course focuses on analyzing and understanding Classical epic poetry, the ancient presentation of heroic figures and heroic exploits, and recognizing the influence of epic/heroic literature on the modern storytelling device of film. While the genre of epic is central to the course, other genres (both literary and cinematic) which present heroic figures, e.g., tragedy, history, comedy, action, fantasy, will also be explored. Analyzing the works read or viewed via writing and class discussion will constitute the primary course activities; students will engage in reading, viewing and writing outside of class, while class time will include some writing, viewing and discussion. In order to allow ample time for discussion and analysis, the majority of films in their entirety will be viewed outside of class. The course grade will be based substantially on written analysis (i.e., essays, papers) of the texts and films studied. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W19 More Than A Game: Sports Lit - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 210

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

42708 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mary E. Frandson

Deeply intertwined with our American culture, sports give us some of our best stories – those narratives written as a ballplayer circles the plates, as the volleyball’s spiked, as snowboarder reveals a new halfpipe, it’s in the ring, it’s on the football field, and the grueling practices that few see. Through the eyes of athletes, coaches, and fans, this course is a study of how sports reveal human character, and teach us about life. We’ll read stories that ultimately ask difficult questions about who we are, as individuals and a nation socially and racially divided, what it means to be a pioneer in sports and break down barriers, stories of the changing evolution of the game of football, the transformative power of innovation in sports, and how far people will go to reclaim dreams that have slipped away. This course will survey short stories, essays, poetry, journalism, films, and writings by athletes published on the PLAYER’S TRIBUNE. Selected text will include: THE BEST AMERICAN SPORTS WRITING, THE PERFECT PASS: AMERICAN GENIUS AND THE REINVENTION OF FOOTBALL, FOOTBALL: GREAT WRITING ABOUT THE NATIONAL SPORT, PLAY BIG: LESSONS IN BEING LIMITLESS, the PLAYER’S TRIBUNE, NFL Films, and ESPN’s 30 FOR 30 film series. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W20 More Than A Game: Sports Lit - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 210

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

42709 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mary E. Frandson

Deeply intertwined with our American culture, sports give us some of our best stories – those narratives written as a ballplayer circles the plates, as the volleyball’s spiked, as snowboarder reveals a new halfpipe, it’s in the ring, it’s on the football field, and the grueling practices that few see. Through the eyes of athletes, coaches, and fans, this course is a study of how sports reveal human character, and teach us about life. We’ll read stories that ultimately ask difficult questions about who we are, as individuals and a nation socially and racially divided, what it means to be a pioneer in sports and break down barriers, stories of the changing evolution of the game of football, the transformative power of innovation in sports, and how far people will go to reclaim dreams that have slipped away. This course will survey short stories, essays, poetry, journalism, films, and writings by athletes published on the PLAYER’S TRIBUNE. Selected text will include: THE BEST AMERICAN SPORTS WRITING, THE PERFECT PASS: AMERICAN GENIUS AND THE REINVENTION OF FOOTBALL, FOOTBALL: GREAT WRITING ABOUT THE NATIONAL SPORT, PLAY BIG: LESSONS IN BEING LIMITLESS, the PLAYER’S TRIBUNE, NFL Films, and ESPN’s 30 FOR 30 film series. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W21 Sci-Fi/Literary Worldbuilding - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 209

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 209

Course Registration Number:

42532 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Santiago

We will explore stories that engage in explicit acts of worldbuilding, a term first used to describe science fiction and fantasy writers' invention of languages, geographies, cultures, histories, and mythologies. We will focus on worldbuilding as it applies to writers of multiple genres, including both "literary" fiction and "genre" fiction. Along the way, we will begin to address questions raised by authors who engage in worldbuilding, such as: why diverge from the "real world" in the first place? Is there an ethical price that must be paid in order to imagine a new society? Should worldbuilding be seen as a useful tool for social critique, or is it at heart a practice of escapist entertainment? The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W22 De/Constructing Superheroes - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 206

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 206

Course Registration Number:

42533 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Salvatore Pane

What are superheroes? Pop culture super saviors? Low culture art? Colorful allegories with ties to the ancient past? This course will interrogate the rise of the superhero genre in response to World War II and the ensuing nuclear threats of the Cold War. Students will examine writers and artists like Alan Moore and Grant Morrison who deconstructed the genre in the 1980's, in addition to films like BLACK PANTHER or current creators Gabby Rivera and G. Willow Wilson who have resurrected superheroes with influence from gender studies, postmodernism, and more. Please note that students registered for this class will be expected to buy a few comics that are only available digitally. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W23 Sci-Fi/Literary Worldbuilding - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 206

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 206

Course Registration Number:

42534 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Santiago

We will explore stories that engage in explicit acts of worldbuilding, a term first used to describe science fiction and fantasy writers' invention of languages, geographies, cultures, histories, and mythologies. We will focus on worldbuilding as it applies to writers of multiple genres, including both "literary" fiction and "genre" fiction. Along the way, we will begin to address questions raised by authors who engage in worldbuilding, such as: why diverge from the "real world" in the first place? Is there an ethical price that must be paid in order to imagine a new society? Should worldbuilding be seen as a useful tool for social critique, or is it at heart a practice of escapist entertainment? The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W24 Literature of Anti-Racism - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 206

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 206

Course Registration Number:

42531 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kanishka Chowdhury

This course will investigate the recent upsurge in racially marked politics in the United States and the widespread opposition to its many manifestations. Students will get a brief sense of the long history of anti-racist writings in the U.S. and read contemporary works by writers such as Ta-Nehisi Coates, Claudia Rankine, Ana Castillo, Celeste Ng, and others. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W25 De/Constructing Superheroes - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 212

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

42535 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Salvatore Pane

What are superheroes? Pop culture super saviors? Low culture art? Colorful allegories with ties to the ancient past? This course will interrogate the rise of the superhero genre in response to World War II and the ensuing nuclear threats of the Cold War. Students will examine writers and artists like Alan Moore and Grant Morrison who deconstructed the genre in the 1980's, in addition to films like BLACK PANTHER or current creators Gabby Rivera and G. Willow Wilson who have resurrected superheroes with influence from gender studies, postmodernism, and more. Please note that students registered for this class will be expected to buy a few comics that are only available digitally. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W41 HNRS City Lights: Urban Exper M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 227

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 227

Course Registration Number:

42536 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Olga L. Herrera

This course explores urban experience through the perspective of writers working in fiction, drama, creative nonfiction, and poetry. It will focus on the way writers in those genres use language and literary devices to address the life and landscape of the city. Students will engage first-hand with the urban environment in the Twin Cities and bring that experience into their analytic and reflective writing for the semester. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing in the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement. Please note that this course is open only to students in the Aquinas Scholars Honors program.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W42 HNRS Just Play: Sports Lit M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

42537 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

What is any sports event but a story--multiple stories--playing out before our eyes? Sports by definition involve drama: conflicts in decision making, in relationships, with nature, and, if we believe it possible, conflicts with the supernatural. It's not an accident that some of our greatest metaphors come from the arena of athletics. Through sports we have a way to look at human values--at the best we have to offer and sometimes the worst. We’ll use sports literature to investigate what is just… and what is unjust… and how we discern which is which. In this class, we will read fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry. Books may include SWIMMING TO ANTARCTICA, THE REAL ALL-AMERICANS, TAKE ME OUT, and BEST AMERICAN SPORTS WRITING 2017. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing in the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement. Please note that this course is open only to students in the Aquinas Scholars Honors program.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W51 Living in America: Home (ESL) M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MHC 205

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

MHC 205

Course Registration Number:

42538 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Juan Li

This English as a Second Language section of ENGL 203 explores how the notion of "home" is represented in literature. It invites students to reflect on what "home" means to them, especially when living overseas. Is it a geographical location (the country and city they were born in and/or live in)? Is it an emotional bond with family members and other people like themselves? Is it a sense of shelter, comfort, safety, and being welcome when they move to a new place? When one is born in a country but moves to another, where is one's home? In this course, we will explore the many ways writers have represented their senses of home and senses of being homeless in a variety of literary works--novels, poems, and memoirs. We will investigate through our readings and discussions how our senses of home are often bound up with issues such as memory, hope, loss, regionalism, alientation, and globalization. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 211 - L01 British Authors I M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 301

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

41312 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Martin L. Warren

How have heroic ideals changed from Beowulf to the 18th century? How did marriage evolve from an arrangement between tribes and families to love between two people? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings in the British literary tradition in the period from approximately 900-1780. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as war and conflict, the history of love, humor and satire, social reform, religious reform and the rights of the individual. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 214 - L01 American Authors I M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 212

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

43130 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne E. Roth-Reinhardt

Where does the popular perception of America as the “New World” come from? How could slavery flourish in a land idealizing freedom? Why were immigrants so feared and reviled? Why did expansionism push out some and make millionaires of others? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings from the beginnings of the American literary tradition to the turn of the twentieth century. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as religious identity, political reform, race, slavery, war, gender, and industrialization. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203 or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 220 - 01 The Classical Tradition - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 310

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 310

Course Registration Number:

42456 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Raymond N. MacKenzie

What might it mean to speak of “the classical tradition?” What does that include and exclude? And how does it matter to us today? From the ancient Greek gods in their serenity to the howls of the damned in Dante’s vision of the afterlife, whether mythological or theological, the works to be studied engage us in the most fundamental questions about what it means to be human. Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings of representative texts of Western literature in translation from ancient Greece to the Renaissance, including some interactions of the European traditions with ancient or medieval Asian, Mesopotamian, or Middle Eastern literatures. Authors may include Homer, Aeschylus, Sappho, Virgil, Dante, Rumi, Marie de France, and Christine de Pizan. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 255 - W01 Intro to Imaginative Writing M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 MHC 201

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

MHC 201

Course Registration Number:

41656 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

This course introduces students to skills necessary for imaginative writing. It includes close readings of literary texts that model basic techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students’ critical skills. This course will include instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 255 - W02 Intro to Imaginative Writing M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 201

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 201

Course Registration Number:

41480 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

This course introduces students to skills necessary for imaginative writing. It includes close readings of literary texts that model basic techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students’ critical skills. This course will include instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 255 - W03 Intro to Imaginative Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 SCB 112

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

SCB 112

Course Registration Number:

42520 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lon J. Otto

This course introduces students to skills necessary for imaginative writing. It includes close readings of literary texts that model basic techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students’ critical skills. This course will include instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 256 - D01 Intro to Professional Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 310

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 310

Course Registration Number:

42453 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Fernando Sanchez

This course introduces students to principles and skills necessary for writing in professional settings. It includes study of rhetoric, ethics, and information design in workplace writing; examination of the roles of professional writers; close readings of texts and documents that model professional techniques; and practice composing in a variety of professional genres. The course will include instruction in ethical communication, rhetorical context, document design, communication technologies, precision, concision, and tone. This course fulfills the Theory and Practice requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 280 - L01 Intro to English Studies - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 309

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 309

Course Registration Number:

41479 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Fernando Sanchez

This gateway course into the English major and the minor is an introduction to (a) literary tools, techniques, and terminology for reading and writing in English studies; (b) the history of English Studies as a discipline and the intellectual concepts and critical debates that have shaped the field; and (c) the practices of English Studies, from close reading and analysis of literary and critical texts to interpretation and scholarly research.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 297 - L01 Topics: Metaphysical Poetry M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

43287 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William J. Junker

The ambitious lyric poetry of late 16th-17th century England is known as "metaphysical" poetry on account of the breadth and ambition of its language. This poetry is seemingly able to link anything to anything else, and everything to God. Some poets we will consider include: John Donne, George Herbert, Richard Crashaw, Andrew Marvell, and Henry Vaughan. This course satisfies the core literature/writing requirement for students who started that core requirement with an ENGL 201-204 class, counts as an elective course for English majors, and satisfies an allied requirement for select business majors. It also counts as a Writing Across the Curriculum Writing to Learn class. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 300 - W01 Thry/Prac. Writng (Peer Cons.) M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MHC 210

Course Registration Number:

40137 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Susan J. Callaway

This course introduces students to current writing, rhetorical, and pedagogical theory, and helps them develop a vocabulary for talking about writing and strengthen their abilities to write and to assist others in developing their academic literacy. Students will practice writing in a variety of forms such as academic writing, professional writing, experimental writing, and writing with particular attention to social justice. Required for secondary licensure in communication arts and literature students. This course fulfills the Theory and Practice requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 305 - 01 Linguistics: English Lang M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MCH 114

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MCH 114

Course Registration Number:

40138 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Juan Li

This course is an introduction to the systematic study of the English language, with an emphasis on connections between academic linguistics and relevant social and educational questions. Students will study the English sound system through phonetics and phonology, how words are formed through morphology, how words combine to create clauses and meaning through syntax and semantics. After learning the linguistic tools to describe the English language, students will examine the contexts of language production in real life through the study of U.S. dialects, historical and ongoing changes in English, and various social interactions in language. This course fulfills the Theory and Practice requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 322 - W01 Writing Fiction - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 212

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

40139 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Salvatore Pane

This intermediate course explores traditional and innovative patterns of fiction writing. Emphasis on experimentation with a variety of techniques and development of individual voice. This course will include critique sessions, readings to broaden possibilities of form and subject, and individual instruction. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisite: ENGL 255 or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 326 - W01 Writing for Children/Yng Adult - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 BEC LL03

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

BEC LL03

Course Registration Number:

42525 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. Bouwman

“What we owe children: we owe them stories that matter.” –children’s author Phillis Root. In English 326, we’ll study and write literature for children and young adults (YA). We’ll read five or six middle grade and YA novels and many picture books and excerpts of novels, and we’ll complete many short writing attempts; you’ll also write several longer pieces that you’ll revise and polish. The class will focus primarily on three kinds of fiction writing—picture books, middle grade, and young adult—and all students will be expected to try their hand at writing for all three age groups. Because most middle grade and young adult fiction is published in novel form, you’ll be encouraged to begin a novel or a novel-in-verse over the semester (opening chapter[s] and outlines). This course satisfies the writing distribution requirement for English with a Creative Writing Emphasis students and the Genre Studies distribution requirement for standard English majors who are under the Fall 2015 Undergraduate Catalog or later. This course also satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 255 or permission of the instructor; ideally, it's recommended that you will also have taken either 321 Writing Poetry or ENGL 322 Writing Fiction as well, though those are not required prerequisites for this course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 337 - L01 The Black Mystery Novel M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MCH 115

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MCH 115

Course Registration Number:

41906 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David T. Lawrence

This course will explore the complex terrain of crime and mystery novels written by black authors and seek to understand the ways protagonists of these works occupy a unique and precarious position while attempting to negotiate a world in which notions of "criminality," "justice," and "morality" are highly contested and almost always dependent on who occupies the positions of power. We will also explore the ways that black criminality can offer a powerful indictment of the very laws and systems that seek to regulate it. Ultimately, we will consider the critiquing function of black detective, crime, and mystery novels and attempt to understand the world they construct for us as readers. Likely authors to be examined include Pauline Hopkins, Chester Himes, Walter Mosley, Barbara Neely, Ishmael Reed, and Percival Everett. This course satisfies the core Human Diversity requirement and the Diversity Literature distribution requirement for English majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 341 - L01 Women, Sport, & the Body M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 SCB 325

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

SCB 325

Course Registration Number:

42523 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

In 1894-1895, Annie Londonderry biked around the world and survived by writing articles! Frances Willard, advocate for women's rights, the eight-hour work day, equal pay for women (still working on that, huh?), and suffrage--learned how to ride a bike at age 53 and in 1895 published WHEEL WITHIN A WHEEL. These women paved the way for athlete-authors such as Lynne Cox (who held the women's and men's world record for swimming the English Channel) and Maxine Kumin (who, along with being U.S. Poet Laureate and a Pulitzer Prize winner, was a college athlete). These and other great women writers explore their sports and their bodies in ways that both reflect and contest societal restrictions and expectations. This course will use their texts and other essays, articles, short stories, novels, and poetry to explore the intersections of women, sport, and the body in literature. This course is ideal for men and women studying literature, gender, and various facets of physical education, sport, health, and human development. Texts may include: A WHOLE OTHER BALL GAME: WOMEN'S LITERATURE ON WOMEN'S SPORT, AROUND THE WORLD ON TWO WHEELS, WHEEL WITHIN A WHEEL, SWIMMING TO ANTARCTICA, and PRETTY GOOD FOR A GIRL. Additionally, we will venture out of the classroom to take in a roller derby bout and possibly even watch our WNBA championship MN Lynx! This course satisfies the Human Diversity requirement of the core curriculum and the Diversity Literature requirement for English majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 421 - 01 Literary Magazine Practicum I M - - - - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 227

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

JRC 227

Course Registration Number:

40484 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

Activities during the fall semester of the sequence include readings from The Little Magazine: A History and Bibliography and The Little Magazine in America: A Modern Documentary History; examining the design and content of fifteen professional literary magazines; learning InDesign CS3 desktop publishing program; creating preliminary Summit Avenue Review page designs; working collaboratively with other literary magazine editors to develop selection procedures and principles; and writing a comparison essay on two professional literary magazines. Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 321 or 322 or 323 or instructor permission.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2019 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 217 - L01 Multicultural Literature - T W R F - - 0900 - 1200

Days of Week:

- T W R F - -

Time of Day:

0900 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10151 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

What does it mean to be labeled an African American dramatist? A Latino/a poet? A transgender novelist? An Asian American essayist? A Native American environmental writer? How do the varied experiences and backgrounds of authors writing from diverse subject positions inform, mark, and/or transform their writing? How do the works of these writers fit into, conflict with, actively resist, or even redefine the American Literary canon as it has been traditionally understood? These questions and more will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive reading of literature from: a) American communities of color; b) postcolonial peoples; c) immigrant and/or diasporic peoples; or d) LGBTQ communities. This course will focus on the literary and cultural texts of one or more of these groups with an emphasis on the cultural, political, and historical contexts that surround them. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major, and the Human Diversity Requirement in the Core Curriculum. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)