J-Term 2020 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 217 - L01 Multicultural Literature - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10288 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Melissa J. Hendrickx

What happens when race and sexuality collide? This course will emphasize intersectionality through literature from writers of color who are also members of the LGBTQ+ community. We will discuss the impact of having multiple minority statuses, and historic (dis)connections between racial and LGBTQ+ social justice movements. Through poetry, novels, and essays, we will examine how LGBTQ+ writers of color redefine our understanding of identity, language, and relationships, while simultaneously expanding the American Literary canon.This course satisfies the core Human Diversity requirement and the Diversity requirement for English majors. This course also satisfies a WAC Writing to Learn requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Spring 2020 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 121 - W01 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20688 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Staff

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W02 Critical Thinking:Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21337 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Charles A. Conley

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W03 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 JRC 301

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

20690 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Leslie A. Miller

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W04 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 301

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

21527 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Leslie A. Miller

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W05 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20691 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Joan M. Williams

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W06 Crit Thinking: Lit/Wrtng (ADP) - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20689 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Susan J. Callaway

Please note that this section is reserved for students in the Academic Development Program (ADP) who took ENGL 110.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W07 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21999 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laura R. Zebuhr

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W08 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20903 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laura R. Zebuhr

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W01 Science Fiction Origins - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22659 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gordon D. Grice

Dinosaurs, aliens, and invisible monsters invade literature for the first time, trailing new ideas and fresh techniques. We’ll learn what science fiction really is and why it swept like a death ray across the Victorian world. Authors might include Edgar Allan Poe, H. G. Wells, and H. P. Lovecraft. The writing load for this fully online course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W02 Jazz Music & American Poetry M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22660 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucas B. Pingel

This course will explore poetry's intersection with jazz music, and the uniquely American brand of poetry that results. Students will become familiarized with some of the rich history of jazz as a music of innovation and of protest, and learn about some of the most significant musicians (John Coltrane, Charlie Parker, Charles Mingues, for example) to inspire poets to move beyond typical conventions in literature. This course will maintain a foundation in developing strong reading, writing, and analytical skills through a variety of written assignments about authors such as Langston Hughes, Frank O'Hara, Bob Kaufman and Sonia Sanchez. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W03 Writers at Work M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21967 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

Writers at Work will examine fiction, nonfiction, drama, and poetry from the point of view of both writer and audience, artist and critic. We will read contemporary literature in each genre, as well as some secondary materials written whenever possible by those same authors. For example, we might read David Mamet's play GLENGARRY, GLEN ROSS and then his craft book ON DIRECTING FILM; Charles Baxter's novel THE FEAST OF LOVE and then his craft book THE ART OF SUBTEXT; Richard Hugo's poetry as well as his craft book THE TRIGGERING TOWN; Annie Dillard and Jo Anne Beard's essays paired with Sven Birkerts' THE ART OF TIME IN MEMOIR; and then various readings paired with THE WRITERS' NOTEBOOK: CRAFT ESSAYS FROM TIN HOUSE. Everyone will both write in and about each genre. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W04 The American Short Story - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21965 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and peep into our future. As we study the artistic development of the American short story, our process of discovery will be progressive, beginning with some of this country's earliest and most influential short story writers like Irving and Poe and closing with such masters of contemporary fiction as Alice Walker and Jill McCorkle. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W05 The American Short Story - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21966 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and peep into our future. As we study the artistic development of the American short story, our process of discovery will be progressive, beginning with some of this country's earliest and most influential short story writers like Irving and Poe and closing with such masters of contemporary fiction as Alice Walker and Jill McCorkle. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W06 The American Short Story - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22000 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and peep into our future. As we study the artistic development of the American short story, our process of discovery will be progressive, beginning with some of this country's earliest and most influential short story writers like Irving and Poe and closing with such masters of contemporary fiction as Alice Walker and Jill McCorkle. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W07 Coming of Age Memoirs - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22661 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laurie E. Lindeen

Coming of age, particularly college life, as recounted by literary writers examining their own journey toward adulthood. We will read memoirs by Richard Wright, Mary Karr, Alex Lemon, and Mary McCarthy (BLACK BOY, CHERRY, HAPPY, and THE GROUP respectively) along with supplemental essays by Mary Karr and Patricia Hampl. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W01 Existential America M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22662 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Doug P. Phillips

In this course we will examine a body of work that traffics in such existential themes as freedom and responsibility, authenticity and bad faith, anguish and abandonment, identity and subjectivity, and choice and commitment. While some of our readings will reach beyond our own shores (Sartre, Beauvoir, Camus, Kafka, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, and Kierkegaard), we will mostly focus on works by 20th-century American writers: Palahniuk's FIGHT CLUB, Krakauer's INTO THE WILD, O'Connor's A GOOD MAN IS HARD TO FIND, Baldwin's THE FIRE NEXT TIME, Salinger's The CATCHER IN THE RYE, McCarthy's NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN -- to name but a possible few. In the words of Zadie Smith, we're going to read a selection of very good books in this course, concentrating on whatever is most particular to them in the hope that this might help us understand whatever is most particular to us. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W02 Business & American Identity M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22663 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

This course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W03 Literature Looks at Faith - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22664 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Barbara K. Olson

There are multiple intersections of literature and faith--in this case, Catholic faith, with both a large and a small C. We'll read both classic and contemporary writers, encountering texts as both evocations and provocations of faith; experiencing the faith (and doubt) of others vicariously--be they writers or characters; and exploring some theological implications which the elements of literary form at least sometimes entail. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W04 Medical Dramas - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21972 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy M. Muse

In medical schools you’ll now find doctors- and nurses-in-training reading literature and engaging in role-play to learn how to care. We’ll practice this, reading and writing about literature as a means of understanding ourselves and others. The plays we’ll encounter illuminate questions about intimacy and care in relationships and the physical and mental traumas of racism, poverty, addiction, bipolar disorder, depression, and suicide. Through your writing you’ll be encouraged to examine further these questions for yourself. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W01 (Im)Perfect Worlds - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22668 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Yvonne E. Asp-Grahn

What do we need to fix in our society? How would you propose we fix it? As our world struggles to improve, this course will explore the dark side of “improvement.” Dystopian literature (as well as our history) reminds us that when we seek greatness as a large and diverse community, we cannot forget to ask great for whom? After all, my vision of a perfect world could be your nightmare. The writing load for this fully online course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W02 Wartime: Lit vs. Reality - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22670 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Alison L. Underthun-Meilahn

When writing about war, authors who have served in the military have a few literary options: a memoir, poetry, essays, or a work of fiction. This course will focus on exemplary literature written by those who have been in war mainly through fiction, but we will also read poetry and essays as well. We specifically will investigate how veterans have differing perspectives on warfare and the return back to civilian life, while at the same time how many of them share similar perspectives and grapple with the re-calibration into civilian life. Through literature we will come to understand how the psyche of veterans is altered via warfare and the impact it has on their lives and families, as well as society at large. We will also look at how contemporary culture, and historically, veterans have been received or perceived as they return home and how their voice has been implicit/explicit in cultural movements (specifically the counter cultural movement of the 1960’s). How society interacts and supports veterans will be linked to our discussions, and highlighted through a service learning component. Veterans will be invited into our classroom to foster and promote dialogue and understanding on how veteran's voices are heard, what they think we hear, and how we, civilians can better be aware or shift our perspective to best support them in society. Guest speakers may include veterans from the Vietnam War, Iraq War(s), Afghanistan War, and perhaps those currently enlisted. We may also have speakers from professionals who work with veterans. Literature we will focus on in this course includes: Kurt Vonnegut's SLAUGHTERHOUSE-FIVE, Tim O'Brien's THE THINGS THEY CARRIED, Jim Northrup's THE REZ ROAD, Joseph Heller's CATCH-22, and Ernest Hemingway's A FAREWELL TO ARMS. The writing load for this fully online course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W03 Final Frontier: Mars & Beyond M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22671 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher J. Hassel

How do global politics influence our desire to explore space? How does space exploration impact our theological viewpoints of the universe? What roles might nation-states and corporations play in future space endeavors? Focusing on the human yearning to explore space, as well as current efforts to put humans on Mars in the near future, this class will attempt to answer these questions by examining a variety of literary forms including fiction, science fiction, poetry, nonfiction prose, and biography. Likely works to be studied include Tracy K. Smith’s LIFE ON MARS, Mary Doria Russell’s THE SPARROW, and Andy Weir's THE MARTIAN. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W04 Paranoid Fictions:Conspiracies M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22672 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Timothy J. Dewey

This course will examine the enduring appeal and growing influence of conspiracy theory in American political culture. We will look at key historical events, figures, and social issues in the history of our nation and the conspiracy theories they have spawned, as well as the psychological phenomena most commonly associated with conspiracies, and the rhetoric of political paranoia. The objective of the course is neither to promote nor debunk any particular theory, but to examine the role that conspiracy theories play as modern mythologies. Possible titles may include Jesse Walker’s THE UNITED STATES OF PARANOIA, Don DeLillo’s LIBRA, Ishmael Reed’s MUMBO JUMBO, Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward’s ALL THE PRESIDENT’S MEN, and Kurt Vonnegut’s JAILBIRD. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W05 Gangsters, Geeks, & Spies M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21975 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Santiago

This course explores fiction, music, poetry, video games, graphic novels, and other forms of media that explode myths about Asian & Asian American culture. We’ll meet Amadeus Cho, a teenaged genius who also happens to be the next Incredible Hulk, and Maika Halfwolf, the steampunk heroine of the Image comic MONSTRESS. We’ll read FRESH OFF THE BOAT, the memoir of a one-time thug who conquers the foodie world, and play BUTTERFLY SOUP, an interactive game about four queer girls in the Bay Area who to happen to love baseball and each other. We’ll unpack hip-hop lyrics by M.I.A., and crack the cultural codes in the standup comedy of Ali Wong and in Aziz Ansari’s Emmy Award-winning MASTER OF NONE. And we’ll decipher the testimony of the captain in the best-selling novel THE SYMPATHIZER, an ex-soldier who describes himself as “a spy, a sleeper, a spook, a man of two faces.” The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W06 Surviving Adolescence M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21974 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

British poet William Wordsworth wrote, "the Child is father of the Man"; what he meant, and explored thoughtfully in his writing, was that the experiences of childhood and adolescence serve as the foundation for the adult self a person will become. Wordsworth was clear: both joyful and painful adolescent experiences shape our characters. We will read both young adult and classic literature that focuses on the process of "surviving adolescence"--books in which writers reflect on how they or their characters navigate that challenging transition between childhood and adulthood. Possible texts may include William Shakespeare's AS YOU LIKE IT, Charlotte Bronte's JANE EYRE, E.M. Forster's A ROOM WITH A VIEW, Roald Dahl's MATILDA, and one Harry Potter text by J.K. Rowling. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W07 Clones, Doubles, & Alter Egos M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22673 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. McNiel

Whether it’s the idea of an evil twin, a shadow self, or an exact replica, the figure of the double has long fascinated humankind. More than just a staple of science-fiction or daytime soap operas, doubles may express deep-seated fears about losing our sense of self or our capacity for self-determination and control. Doubles can also be figures of fascination and desire: the power to create, control, or extend life through a second self is a tantalizing prospect. In this course, we will examine a variety of narratives that feature doppelgangers, alter egos, clones, or related figures, and explore different moral, psychological, literary, and cultural frameworks for understanding the figure of the double. Potential texts may include DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE, THE DOUBLE, HER FEARFUL SYMMETRY, NEVER LET ME GO, and selected films. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W08 Con Artists, Imposters,& Shams See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

22709 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew B. Harrison

Buyer beware! The entrepreneurial spirit in the U.S. has always given rise to ingenious inventors, but also to tricky opportunists who have sought to profit from the marketing of fantasies versus “the real thing.” In turn, for the American public, the challenge of separating what is real from what is unreal has often itself been a form of amusement. Believe it or not?! This course will explore the complex links between the “American dream,” entertainment, and the sensationalistic claims of various marketing wizards and swindlers. We’ll discuss the sometimes hazardous attraction to “invention” in American culture: how the mantra to “dream big” and how the insatiable taste for illusion have both fueled discoveries and left people vulnerable. Our readings will include The ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN, by Mark Twain; THE TALENTED MR. RIPLEY, by Patricia Highsmith; THE DUKE OF DECEPTION, by Geoffrey Wolff; and selected essays from HUMBUG: THE ART OF P.T. BARNUM, by Neil Harris, and BUNK: THE RISE OF HOAXES, PLAGIARISTS, PHONIES, POST-FACTS, AND FAKE NEWS, by Kevin Young. We’ll also view two films: THE IMPOSTER (2012) and THE BIG SHORT (2015). In this blended/hybrid course which meets on Monday and Wednesday and the remainder of the time online, students will complete at least 15-pages of formal revised writing, including a final research essay. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1215-1320M - W - - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 203 - W09 Secrets, Lies, & Deceptions See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

22674 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jeannie L. Hofmeister

“Tell all the truth but tell it slant—” American poet, Emily Dickinson suggests that the truth is often deliberately distorted. Are there times when the blunt truth is too painful to hear? Are some lies justified? Conversely, throughout history people have lied for their own gain or simply for the thrill of knowing they have the power to deceive. Are there consequences for deliberate acts of deception? In this course, we will examine how writers explore this human characteristic and discuss what we can learn about ourselves by considering the theme of lies and deception in literature. Possible texts include “Wakefield” by Nathaniel Hawthorne, THE ADVENTURES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, STATE OF WONDER by Ann Patchett, THE BURGESS BOYS by Elizabeth Strout, NEVER LET ME GO by Kazuo Ishiguro, and DOUBT by John Patrick Shanley. The writing load for this blended/hybrid course (meets on Monday and Wednesday and online remainder of the time) is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JRC 2271215-1320M - W - - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 203 - W10 Druids and Dudes: Irish Heroes M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22735 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David M. Gardiner

How does a small island off of the coast of Great Britain off of the coast of Europe invent a tradition that is distinct from both England and Europe? This course will engage in an investigation of how this country invented, and continues to form, its heroes through literature, cultural studies, history, religion, mythology, and geography. Our work will be supplemented by Irish film, music, folk history and political studies. Literary works will likely include the prose, poetry, and drama of Jonathon Swift, Maria Edgeworth, W. B. Yeats, James Joyce, Seamus Heaney, Eavan Boland, and Paula Meehan. The course will include frequent informal writings and undertake at least fifteen formal revised pages. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive Requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W11 Gangsters, Geeks, & Spies M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21976 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Santiago

This course explores fiction, music, poetry, video games, graphic novels, and other forms of media that explode myths about Asian & Asian American culture. We’ll meet Amadeus Cho, a teenaged genius who also happens to be the next Incredible Hulk, and Maika Halfwolf, the steampunk heroine of the Image comic MONSTRESS. We’ll read FRESH OFF THE BOAT, the memoir of a one-time thug who conquers the foodie world, and play BUTTERFLY SOUP, an interactive game about four queer girls in the Bay Area who to happen to love baseball and each other. We’ll unpack hip-hop lyrics by M.I.A., and crack the cultural codes in the standup comedy of Ali Wong and in Aziz Ansari’s Emmy Award-winning MASTER OF NONE. And we’ll decipher the testimony of the captain in the best-selling novel THE SYMPATHIZER, an ex-soldier who describes himself as “a spy, a sleeper, a spook, a man of two faces.” The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W12 Food: Reading Eating M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22675 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paula F. Cisewski

Why are both hunger and obesity problems? What is healthy food, and how does it make its way to us? With whom do you choose to break bread? In this course, we will explore both personal pleasures and political issues around eating. From Marcel Proust’s famous madeleine to Anthony Bourdain’s PARTS UNKNOWN, from TV ads to literature to Instagram images, we will examine our assumptions and our beliefs around food sources, food access, and food justice. Students will design individual research projects around the topic that may include interviews with food or farm experts or a service learning element. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W13 Spooky: Supernatural Lit See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

22698 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Terri L. Topness

We will investigate how we use ghost stories to address complex issues such as memory, identity, moral responsibility, and fear. In doing so, we will explore some famous ghost stories in literature, and discuss why we continue to find ghosts and the supernatural so compelling and necessary in today's world. Possible texts: TURN OF THE SCREW, BELOVED, HAUNTING OF HILL HOUSE, a selection of short stories/essays/poems, and/or possibly SPOOK: SCIENCE TACKLES THE AFTERLIFE (a collection of creative essays by Mary Roach). We would also view film clips and other media. The writing load for this hybrid/blended course that meets on Tuesday and the remainder of the time online, is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
0800-0940- T - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 203 - W14 Summer Game: Baseball Lit - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22677 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael Raimondi

Bernard Malamud (author of THE NATURAL) once wrote: "The whole history of baseball has the quality of mythology." This course will examine baseball literature as we read from a variety of writings about our baseball heroes, both the men and the women, who played the game that we call "our national pastime." We will look at our country's romanticism with baseball and how writers who wrote about it helped give the sport its mythological dimensions. Selections will include essays, short stories, and poetry by authors who loved the game. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W15 Howl in the Night: Werwolves - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22678 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shannon F. Scott

This course examines how wolves and werewolves have been portrayed and evolved in literature—from Ovid’s Metamorphosis to Indigenous American creation stories to medieval Britain and France (BISCLAVRET, THE LAI DE MELION and ARTHUR AND GORLAGON) to the Victorian era (Rudyard Kipling, Arthur Conan Doyle, Clemence Housman) to contemporary film (THE WOLF MAN), art (Jazmina Cininas), and music (Warren Zevon, Blitzen Trapper, TV on the Radio). This course also explores the biology of wolves and wolves in popular culture through the essays by L. David Mech, the fiction of Jack London, and Garry Marvin’s WOLF. By looking at fairy tales, penny dreadfuls, poems, and art we will explore how wolves have been demonized, sympathized, glorified, and romanticized—how they have become monstrous in fiction as werewolves. Contemporary work from Neil Gaiman, Karen Russell, Michael Chabon, Ben Percy, and Marisa Silver further demonstrates how werewolf lore has shifted over time as our perception of wolves and wildness has similarly changed. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W16 Once Upon A Time: Fairy Tales - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21978 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. Bouwman

In this course we'll study a small collection of fairy and folk tales closely, both in their early written sources and later literary re-imaginings. As we read different versions of the stories, we'll ask ourselves how these tales are structured, what audiences they're aimed at, what they might be telling us about the culture of the time, and what they might have to say to us today. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W17 Once Upon A Time: Fairy Tales - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21979 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. Bouwman

In this course we'll study a small collection of fairy and folk tales closely, both in their early written sources and later literary re-imaginings. As we read different versions of the stories, we'll ask ourselves how these tales are structured, what audiences they're aimed at, what they might be telling us about the culture of the time, and what they might have to say to us today. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W18 Utopias in Dystopias See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

22679 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucy A. Saliger

Both fictional and real life utopian efforts often emerge under dystopian conditions. Contrary to some notions of utopia as an impossible, perfect 'nowhere,' these utopias are grounded in a specific 'somewhere' - a time and place that call for better possibilities than the dystopian realities. We will consider examples of these efforts, beginning with Thomas More's foundational text, UTOPIA, and continuing through a mix of texts, film, music, and local organizations (St. Thomas community partners). Noting commonalities and differences as well as our own complicated responses to these necessarily imperfect utopias will help us understand their limitations and contributions. The roles of writing, reading, storytelling, and education will be a crucial part of our examination. Book authors will likely include Sandra Cisneros, David Todd Lawrence, Walter Mosley, and Indra Sinha. As a blended course, work for one of our course meetings is online with flexible timing, while the other is in person. This flexibility will help in scheduling your required community engagement work; you will choose between one of two or three community partners and work with them on-site once a week, giving you the opportunity to establish a relationship, gain new experience, and link that work to our study of utopias. The writing load for this hybrid/blended course, which meets on Tuesday and the remainder of the time online, will total a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1330-1510- T - - - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 203 - W51 Home: Living in America (ESL) M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21985 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Suzanne L. Donsky

With its focus on thematic and intertextual perspectives, the readings in this course might be ordered any number of ways: according to theme, an idea that develops across genres or literary periods, or by their incorporation of specific oral or textual precedents (e.g. mythology, the Bible, classical writings, legends, or folklore). The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - W01 Language, Power, & Identity - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21981 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Juan Li

Has anyone ever commented on the way you talk? Do you remember when you first noticed that other people spoke differently from you? Do men and women speak differently? In what ways do you see your language as part of your identities (race, gender, class, religion, education, age etc.)? Recently, a series of events that happened locally and nationally make us (re)reflect on how words we use can have important consequences. This course gives you an opportunity to investigate the complex and fascinating relationship between language, power, and identity. We will read a variety of texts that examine how individuals construct different aspects of their self identities (e.g. race, class, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, nationality, and religion) through their use of language in everyday conversations, narratives, writings, performances and public debates. As we examine how language is used by specific individuals and groups, we will also ask how group relations and power dynamics play out in patterns of language use. The writing load for this fully online course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - W02 Language, Power, & Identity - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21982 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Juan Li

Has anyone ever commented on the way you talk? Do you remember when you first noticed that other people spoke differently from you? Do men and women speak differently? In what ways do you see your language as part of your identities (race, gender, class, religion, education, age etc.)? Recently, a series of events that happened locally and nationally make us (re)reflect on how words we use can have important consequences. This course gives you an opportunity to investigate the complex and fascinating relationship between language, power, and identity. We will read a variety of texts that examine how individuals construct different aspects of their self identities (e.g. race, class, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, nationality, and religion) through their use of language in everyday conversations, narratives, writings, performances and public debates. As we examine how language is used by specific individuals and groups, we will also ask how group relations and power dynamics play out in patterns of language use. The writing load for this fully online course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - W03 Crit Discourse of Video Games - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21984 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Salvatore Pane

What does it mean to close read a video game? What is the interplay between text, digital media, and rhetoric? Where do games fit in academia? In the Critical Discourse of Video Games, students will interrogate these questions while being introduced to game studies, platform studies, and the digital humanities. Students will learn by weaving together theories of play, reading, writing, and digital creation. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 212 - L01 British Authors II - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21954 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Emily M. James

How has the category of “English literature” expanded as a result of global changes over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries? How have authors responded to fundamental upheavals in the individual, religion, the British Empire, the role of women, and the value of poetry and art? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings in the British literary tradition from approximately 1789 to the present. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as revolution and reform, authorship, war, nationality and race, and the relationships between literature and other arts. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 215 - L01 American Authors II M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21955 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne E. Roth-Reinhardt

How did the modern warfare of World War I change those who fought and those who stayed at home? Why did so many of the best American artists flee to Paris? How did the traditionalism and stability of the 1950s lead to the radicalism and rebellion of the 60s? How has technology, from the typewriter to the internet, reshaped literature? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework though extensive readings in American literature from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as progress and innovation, war, the “lost generation,” the New Woman, race, and conformity and individuality. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 218 - L01 Lit by Women:Critical Hist M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21956 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

From Sappho to Austen to Woolf to Morrison – women have been rendering the world into exquisite words for centuries. But how has the writing of women served as a critique of patriarchy? What impact has women’s writing had on important cultural and political movements such as abolition, suffrage, and environmentalism? In what ways has the writing of women been more radical than polite, more aggressive than demure, more confrontational than deferential? How have women consistently defied the limiting expectations of them through the creation of some of the most experimental, risky, and defiant works of literature in existence? These questions and more will be explored in this course, which focuses on the history of literature by women. While it will concentrate mainly on British and American women writers, the course will also address the work of non-western writers. Ultimately, this course will examine gender and its role in both the composition and reading of literary texts. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major, and the Human Diversity Requirement in the Core Curriculum. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 222 - L01 Catholic Literary Tradition M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 301

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

21942 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Martin L. Warren

What makes a text a work of Catholic literature? How do Catholic writers struggle with the existential questions of meaning, purpose, or suffering in a unique fashion? How do the themes they engage—such as forgiveness, redemption, or the power of grace in the world—place them within the Catholic tradition? Is there a sacramental imagination or incarnational theology at the root of a work of Catholic literature? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings of representative texts of Catholic literature in both English and translation from the medieval era through the present. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major and satisfies the WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 255 - W01 Intro to Imaginative Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20697 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Salvatore Pane

This course introduces students to skills necessary for imaginative writing. It includes close readings of literary texts that model basic techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students’ critical skills. This course will include instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 255 - W02 Intro to Imaginative Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20696 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Salvatore Pane

This course introduces students to skills necessary for imaginative writing. It includes close readings of literary texts that model basic techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students’ critical skills. This course will include instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 280 - L01 Intro to English Studies See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

21040 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laura R. Zebuhr

This gateway course into the English major and the minor is an introduction to (a) literary tools, techniques, and terminology for reading and writing in English studies; (b) the history of English Studies as a discipline and the intellectual concepts and critical debates that have shaped the field; and (c) the practices of English Studies, from close reading and analysis of literary and critical texts to interpretation and scholarly research. This hybrid/blended course meets on Monday and Wednesday and the remainder of the time online. This course satisfies the WAC Writing to Learn requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
1215-1320M - W - - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 297 - L01 Critical Language Awareness M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21957 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Juan Li

In literary studies, professional writing, and the rest of the academic as well as the professional worlds, we use language – reading and writing to construct and communicate our understanding of texts. Yet we rarely step back to analyze the role of language in helping us make sense of what we read and write in our academic and professional experiences. This course aims to sharpen your awareness of how language works by examining the structure and use of language in texts. We will pay special attention to language of literary texts, but will look at the workings of language in a variety of other texts (e.g. professional writing, journalistic writing, academic writing, political speeches and so on). Throughout the course, we will consider how an inward understanding of the workings of language can help us construct sophisticated perspectives and arguments about texts. This course satisfies the WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 300 - W01 Theory& Practice of Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21958 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Susan J. Callaway

This course introduces students to current writing, rhetorical, and pedagogical theory, and helps them develop a vocabulary for talking about writing and strengthen their abilities to write and to assist others in developing their academic literacy. Students will practice writing in a variety of forms such as academic writing, professional writing, experimental writing, and writing with particular attention to social justice. Required for secondary licensure in communication arts and literature students. This course fulfills the Theory and Practice requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 314 - D01 Professional Editing - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21959 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy M. Muse

This course focuses on current theories, practices, and conventions of professional editing in the field of English studies. This includes discussion of broad questions relating to authorship, textuality, and the role of the editor, as well as hands-on practice introducing, annotating, and copyediting literary texts. Students will learn techniques for ensuring consistent, accurate copy, including the use of style sheets and guides. They will also learn how to track and manage editorial projects. The course will include guest lecturers from the community as well as practice managing real-world editing assignments. This course fulfills the Theory and Practice requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 315 - D01 Business Writing See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

21960 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Fernando Sanchez

In this blended course (meets on Wednesday from 3:25-5:00pm; remainder of class is online), students will engage with effective business writing practices and the research that supports them. Topics center on how to communicate ideas succinctly in writing, make persuasive arguments for stakeholders, and/or narrativize and synthesize data. Student work may include researching solutions to local problems, creating documents necessary to make decisions and take action, and drafting white papers for presenting and disseminating findings. This course satisfies a requirement for English with a Professional Writing Emphasis majors, a requirement for select Business majors, and counts as a WAC Writing in the Discipline course. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JRC 2271525-1700- - W - - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 321 - W01 Writing Poetry - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20763 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Leslie A. Miller

This intermediate course explores traditional and innovative patterns of poetry writing. Emphasis on experimentation with a variety of techniques and development of individual voice. This course will include critique sessions, readings to broaden possibilities of form and subject, and individual instruction. Open to students with some previous experience in writing poetry. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisite: ENGL 255 or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 323 - W01 Writing Creative Nonfiction M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21961 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

This intermediate course explores traditional and innovative patterns of creative nonfiction writing. Emphasis on experimentation with a variety of techniques and development of individual voice. This course will include critique sessions, readings to broaden possibilities of form and subject, and individual instruction. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 255 or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 325 - W01 Writer's Grappling with God M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21962 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Erika C. Scheurer

How do various writers explore and convey their understandings of God, humanity, creation, redemption, faith, doubt, good, and evil? How does looking at the interplay of form and content, the elements and purpose of story-telling, and the connection of culture and ideology to artistic expression shed light on key theological questions? In this team-taught course, we will explore these literary and theological questions through critical and creative engagement with texts from a variety of time periods, literary genres, religious traditions, and perspectives. Our literary readings will be grouped in the following categories: Creation and Fall, Revelation, Suffering and Tragedy, Sin and Grace, Faith and Doubt, and Prayer. NOTE: This ENGL 325 course is cross-listed with THEO 448. Students registering for ENGL 325 can fulfill their core literature/writing requirement if they started with an ENGL 201-204 class and select business students can count this course towards their COJO/ENGL allied requirement. Students registering for this course under THEO 448 can count it towards their 400-level theology core requirement. Students may not earn both core literature/writing and core theology credit. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 337 - L01 Black Spec. Writing/Social Cg M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21963 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David T. Lawrence

Watch enough science fiction movies and you’ll notice a curious thing: there aren’t many black folks in the future imagined by white people. White conceptions of the future tend to figure blackness as either absent or as symbolic of civilization’s failure. Consequently, black diasporic people have had no place to imagine themselves but the present; it would appear that both the speculative future and the historical past are the exclusive domains of whiteness. As comedian Louis C K has commented, “Black people can’t f*** with time machines.” The emergent literary and cultural aesthetic Afrofuturism, however, offers a challenge to this conclusion. Focusing on the intersection between race and technology, Afrofuturism explores alternative futures imagined by black diasporic artists, it re-visions culture and blackness in present and future moments, and it allows us to revisit history with an eye toward alternate explanations of past conditions. Ultimately, Afrofuturism combines art, imagination, technology, theory, and Afrocentrism to conceive and render, through various mediums, multiple alternatives to a past, present, and future imposed on diasporic peoples by a restrictive white imagination. In this class we will embark on a literary journey forward and backward through time looking for ways that re-imaginings of black existence can allow us to reconsider the nature of blackness itself. Artists will include Nalo Hopkinson, W.E.B. DuBois, Samuel Delany, Octavia Butler, Sun Ra, and Janelle Monae. This course satisfies the core Human Diversity requirement and the Diversity Literature distribution requirement for English majors. This course also satisfies the WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 362 - 01 Milton & 17th Cent Brit Lit - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21943 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Raymond N. MacKenzie

This course provides an in-depth exploration of a select group of texts or authors from British literature of the seventeenth century, a time of English civil war and the upheaval of national identity, political satire, metaphysical poetry, and scientific inquiry. Alongside the work of John Milton, the selected texts or authors will be studied in terms of a particular historical, cultural, or other context, or in terms of a convergence with authors or texts from other literary traditions or intellectual disciplines. Examples might include Revolution to Restoration in British Literature, women and the stage in seventeenth-century Britain, Paradise Lost and its cultural history. This course fulfills the Contexts and Convergences requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 405 - D01 Advanced Creative Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20687 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Santiago

This advanced course will focus on the student’s development of a substantial body of work in a chosen genre: poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction. Students will review their previous writing, do further exploration of a chosen genre, and produce significant new work in that genre. Reading will include theoretical and creative texts. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisite: ENGL 321 or 322 or 323 or permission of instructor based on examination of a portfolio.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 422 - 01 Literary Magazine Practicum II M - - - - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 227

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

JRC 227

Course Registration Number:

20381 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

The spring semester component of the sequence includes readings from The Art of Literary Editing; active involvement with other editors in the selection process; learning and applying principles of literary copyediting; using desktop publishing to produce the new edition of Summit Avenue Review, from the creation of style sheets and master pages to final proofreading; writing a reflection essay on the editing process as you experienced it; examining the design and content of five professional literary magazine web sites; learning the Dreamweaver web design program; and managing the Summit Avenue Review web site. Prerequisites: ENGL 421

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 482 - D01 Capstone Sem: Pre-Prof Emph M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21944 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Olga L. Herrera

As a capstone seminar, English 482 is designed to synthesize the intellectual and the professional elements of the English major—to bridge the gap between academia and the public sphere and help students use the knowledge and skills acquired within the English major to enter the conversation of the next stage of their lives. Through discussion, reading, writing, and individualized research, the seminar engages students in a focused exploration of their career aspirations. Each student will conduct research and write a substantial essay, apply their findings for different rhetorical situations, and produce reflective writing on their intellectual development and vocational goals.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)