Summer 2018 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 201 - W01 The Twin Cities Literary Scene See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

30433 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paula F. Cisewski

The Twin Cities has one of the richest literary scenes around. Who are our very own nationally/internationally known writers, poets, playwrights, and spoken word artists, and who influenced them? What are the thriving literary magazines and presses? We'll spend time with a wide range of literary voices across multiple genres, including Chris Santiago’s poetry collection TULA and Stephanie Wilbur Ash’s novel THE ANNIE YEAR. We'll also attend a live literary event and enjoy the company of a guest writer or two. The writing load for this blended/hybrid course (1/2 in class and 1/2 online) is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 2101730-1930- T - R - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 202 - W01 Business and American Identity - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30571 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

This fully online course--which students will be required to participate in six synchronous (live, real-time) discussions throughout the semester--will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W02 Existential America - T - R - - - 1730 - 2130 OEC 309

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 2130

Location:

OEC 309

Course Registration Number:

30584 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Doug P. Phillips

In this course we will examine a body of work that traffics in such existential themes as freedom and responsibility, authenticity and bad faith, anguish and abandonment, identity and subjectivity, and choice and commitment. While some of our readings will reach beyond our own shores (Sartre, Beauvoir, Camus, Kafka, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, and Kierkegaard), we will mostly focus on works by 20th-century American writers: Palahniuk's FIGHT CLUB, Krakauer's INTO THE WILD, O'Connor's A GOOD MAN IS HARD TO FIND, Baldwin's THE FIRE NEXT TIME, Salinger's The CATCHER IN THE RYE, McCarthy's NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN -- to name but a possible few. In the words of Zadie Smith, we're going to read a selection of very good books in this course, concentrating on whatever is most particular to them in the hope that this might help us understand whatever is most particular to us. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W01 Tales of Terror:Monster Novels - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30430 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gordon D. Grice

Read the classic monster books in this fully online course: DRACULA, THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY, THE STRANGE CASE OF DR. JEYKLL AND MR. HYDE, and more. These (mostly short) novels richly reveal the dark side of science and myth in the Victorian Era—and our own. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W02 Wilderness & Adventure in Lit See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

30434 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne E. Roth-Reinhardt

We can learn much about ourselves by going out into the wilderness, wherever these “wild” spaces may be found. Pushing into what’s new and moving beyond what’s comfortable can reveal a clearer sense of who we are and what we value. This course explores the relationships formed when individuals step in to unfamiliar places and examines what can be discovered when humans experience various “wilderness” experiences.The literature and film of our course focuses on the idea of internal exploration and discovery gained through challenging experiences, and it considers the influence of so-called “wild” places on individual growth and community action. The course will include the option of a guided 4-day backpacking trip along the Superior Hiking Trail. The writing load for this blended/hybrid course (1/2 in class and 1/2 online) is a minimum of 15 formal revised pages. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 2121730-1930- T - R - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 203 - W03 Tales of Terror:Monster Novels - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30569 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gordon D. Grice

Read the classic monster books in this fully online course: DRACULA, THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY, THE STRANGE CASE OF DR. JEYKLL AND MR. HYDE, and more. These (mostly short) novels richly reveal the dark side of science and myth in the Victorian Era—and our own. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W04 Wartime:Literature vs. Reality - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30570 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Alison L. Underthun-Meilahn

When writing about war, authors who have served in the military have a few literary options: a memoir, poetry, essays, or a work of fiction. This fully online course will focus on exemplary literature written by those who have been in war and the representation of war through writing. Through literature we will come to understand how the psyche of veterans is altered via warfare and the impact it has on their lives and families, as well as society at large. We will also look at how contemporary culture, and historically, veterans have been received or perceived as they return home and how their voice has been implicit/explicit in understanding their experience with war. In this course we will tease out the reality of war through those voices who tell us just what a "true war story" is. Literature we will likely focus on in this course includes Kurt Vonnegut's SLAUGHTERHOUSE-FIVE, Tim O'Brien's THE THINGS THEY CARRIED, Jim Northrup's THE REZ ROAD, and Ernest Hemingway's A FAREWELL TO ARMS. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 215 - L01 American Authors II - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30435 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew B. Harrison

How did the modern warfare of World War I change those who fought and those who stayed at home? Why did so many of the best American artists flee to Paris? How did the traditionalism and stability of the 1950s lead to the radicalism and rebellion of the 60s? How has technology, from the typewriter to the internet, reshaped literature? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework though extensive readings in American literature from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as progress and innovation, war, the “lost generation,” the New Woman, race, and conformity and individuality. This fully online course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major, counts as a second core literature/writing course for students who started that core requirement with ENGL 201, 202, 203, 204, or 206, and satisfies an allied requirement for select business majors. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 315 - D01 Visual Rhetoric & Design See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

30436 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Fernando Sanchez

This course introduces students to how to use visual texts and techniques to communicate in professional settings. As visual forms of communication become more prominent in communication between organizations and communities, it is important to develop an awareness for how images and artifacts are designed. We will discuss the theory behind visual rhetoric and apply it to real-world case studies throughout this second summer session class. By the end of the course, students will know how to do the following: 1) Use visuals to think critically. By thinking visually, we can understand problems and crystalize our ideas; 2) Analyze and interpret visual artifacts. All visuals are rhetorically constructed. Just like we need to read a text closely, we must also rhetorically analyze advertisements, art, memes, etc.; and 3) Create visual materials to help address a local community problem. This course will include a Sustainable Communities Partnership service-learning component. This course satisfies a requirement for English with a Professional Writing majors, English minors, and counts as an allied requirement for select business majors. It also satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing in the Discipline requirement. Please note that it does not count towards the core literature and writing requirement. Prerequisite: ENGl 201, 202, 203, 204, or 206.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 3051730-1930- T - R - - -
-- - - - - - -