Fall 2017 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 110 - PW1 Intensive Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

40088 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucia Pawlowski

The course provides students with intensive practice in writing, enabling them to adapt to the demands of differing rhetorical contexts. Emphasis on understanding writing processes and learning to respond thoughtfully to writing at various stages. Critical reading will be practiced as an integral part of the writing process. Prerequisite: participation in the Academic Development Program

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 110 - PW2 Intensive Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 210

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

40089 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

The course provides students with intensive practice in writing, enabling them to adapt to the demands of differing rhetorical contexts. Emphasis on understanding writing processes and learning to respond thoughtfully to writing at various stages. Critical reading will be practiced as an integral part of the writing process. Prerequisite: participation in the Academic Development Program

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 110 - PW3 Intensive Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 301

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

42453 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Erika C. Scheurer

The course provides students with intensive practice in writing, enabling them to adapt to the demands of differing rhetorical contexts. Emphasis on understanding writing processes and learning to respond thoughtfully to writing at various stages. Critical reading will be practiced as an integral part of the writing process. Prerequisite: participation in the Academic Development Program

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 27 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 SCB 206

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

SCB 206

Course Registration Number:

40998 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Andrew J. Scheiber

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 31 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 204

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 204

Course Registration Number:

40981 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Andrew J. Scheiber

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - PW1 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 454

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

OEC 454

Course Registration Number:

40989 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laura R. Zebuhr

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - PW2 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 454

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OEC 454

Course Registration Number:

40980 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy M. Muse

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - PW3 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 MHC 210

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

MHC 210

Course Registration Number:

42460 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. Bouwman

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W01 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 MCH 238

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

MCH 238

Course Registration Number:

40959 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ann M. Klein

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W02 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

40960 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucas B. Pingel

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W03 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

40961 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shannon F. Scott

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W04 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 212

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

40962 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Brett E. Jenkins

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W05 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 313

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OEC 313

Course Registration Number:

40964 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne E. Roth-Reinhardt

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W06 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

40965 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. McNiel

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W07 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 212

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

40966 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Brett E. Jenkins

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W08 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MCH 238

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

MCH 238

Course Registration Number:

40967 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ann M. Klein

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W09 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MCH 235

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

MCH 235

Course Registration Number:

42539 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Casie L. Szalapski

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W10 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 209

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 209

Course Registration Number:

40969 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Susan J. Callaway

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W11 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

40971 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. McNiel

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W12 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MCH 231

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MCH 231

Course Registration Number:

40972 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Casie L. Szalapski

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W13 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

40976 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Heather M. McNiel

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W14 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

40973 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne E. Roth-Reinhardt

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W15 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MCH 238

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MCH 238

Course Registration Number:

40974 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Casie L. Szalapski

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W16 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MCH 235

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MCH 235

Course Registration Number:

40975 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Doug P. Phillips

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W17 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 OEC 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

OEC 207

Course Registration Number:

40977 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Juan Li

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W18 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MCH 117

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

MCH 117

Course Registration Number:

40999 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne E. Roth-Reinhardt

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W19 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

40978 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Charles A. Conley

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W20 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

40979 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Charles A. Conley

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W21 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 305

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 305

Course Registration Number:

40982 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Timothy J. Dewey

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W22 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 SCB 206

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

SCB 206

Course Registration Number:

40987 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael Raimondi

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W23 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 SCB 326

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

SCB 326

Course Registration Number:

40984 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Melissa J. Hendrickx

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W24 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 209

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OEC 209

Course Registration Number:

40985 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laurie E. Lindeen

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W25 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 311

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OEC 311

Course Registration Number:

41667 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Joseph K. Campbell

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W26 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MCH 233

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MCH 233

Course Registration Number:

40988 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paula F. Cisewski

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W28 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 SCB 325

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

SCB 325

Course Registration Number:

41765 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Melissa J. Hendrickx

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W29 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OSS 127

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OSS 127

Course Registration Number:

42017 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laurie E. Lindeen

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W30 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 204

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MHC 204

Course Registration Number:

40963 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Santiago

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W32 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OSS LL18

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OSS LL18

Course Registration Number:

40986 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Santiago

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W33 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 205

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MHC 205

Course Registration Number:

41796 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laurie E. Lindeen

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W34 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 454

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 454

Course Registration Number:

41977 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Laura R. Zebuhr

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W35 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OSS 122

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OSS 122

Course Registration Number:

40983 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Terri L. Topness

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W51 Crit Thinking: Lit/Wrtng (ESL) M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 SCB 329

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

SCB 329

Course Registration Number:

41131 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Juan Li

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing. Please note that this section is reserved for English as a Second Language students.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W01 The Sentence is a Lonely Place M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 222

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

42608 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Doug P. Phillips

The title of this course is taken from Gary Lutz's essay of the same name, the upshot of which (both this course and Lutz's essay) is to focus our attention on fashioning sentences that hook, dazzle, surprise, spur double-takes, stab, make weak-kneed, and seduce. We will find our inspiration in a whirligig of writers (novelists, poets, dramatists, and essayists) whose syntactical moves and amped-up diction are worthy of thieving: Joan Didion, David Foster Wallace, Virginia Woolf, William Gass, Nicholson Baker, Colson Whitehead, Will Eno, and Elizabeth Hardwick -- to name but a possible few. Plus we'll supplement our study and practice with a critical and theoretical examination of style, using Ward Farnsworth's CLASSICAL ENGLISH RHETORIC, as well as essays by the aforementioned Didion, Wallace, Gass, and Lutz. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W02 Sleuth: Mystery Literature M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 212

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

42557 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

From its beginnings in the mid-nineteenth century, mystery fiction has been a highly formulaic genre. Add a dead body, sprinkle in a handful of usual suspects, provide a quirky detective/police officer to solve the case, occasionally mix in a guilty butler, and you have a proven formula for a potential best-seller. However, a close examination of mystery fiction reveals that there’s more than meets the (private) eye. The authors in this genre often have their fingers on the pulse of the society from which they come, as their texts reflect and critique notions of race, class, gender, social institutions, and more. Additionally, the genre has expanded from the locked-room format employed by writers such as Conan Doyle and Christie and the shady back alleys employed by hard-boiled writers like Hammett and Chandler to focus on things like international politics and espionage, featured in the works of writers like le Carre. Throughout the semester, we’ll examine a handful of texts from the perspective of how these fit with the mystery fiction genre and what these texts have to say about the world they come from, and possibly our own world. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W03 Sleuth: Mystery Literature M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 212

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

42558 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

From its beginnings in the mid-nineteenth century, mystery fiction has been a highly formulaic genre. Add a dead body, sprinkle in a handful of usual suspects, provide a quirky detective/police officer to solve the case, occasionally mix in a guilty butler, and you have a proven formula for a potential best-seller. However, a close examination of mystery fiction reveals that there’s more than meets the (private) eye. The authors in this genre often have their fingers on the pulse of the society from which they come, as their texts reflect and critique notions of race, class, gender, social institutions, and more. Additionally, the genre has expanded from the locked-room format employed by writers such as Conan Doyle and Christie and the shady back alleys employed by hard-boiled writers like Hammett and Chandler to focus on things like international politics and espionage, featured in the works of writers like le Carre. Throughout the semester, we’ll examine a handful of texts from the perspective of how these fit with the mystery fiction genre and what these texts have to say about the world they come from, and possibly our own world. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W04 Irish Memoir & Autobiography M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 310

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

OEC 310

Course Registration Number:

42567 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

James S. Rogers

In Ireland, as in the United States, memoir is one of the most-popular of all literary forms. Critical commentary on the form has also begun to catch up, with many new studies of Irish autobiography appearing in recent years. This course looks beyond the stereotypical "miserable Irish childhood" to includes lively and affirming works of memoir. In addition to readings of selected works, the course will teach the genre more generally; we will discuss the genre of memoir itself, and issues in memoir, such as the rights to privacy, the definition of "fact," and the reliability of memory. Books will be Irish memoirs from the 20th-century and will likely include Nuala O’Faolain’s ARE YOU SOMEBODY?, Frank O'Connor's AN ONLY CHILD, John McGahern's ALL WILL BE WELL, and the hilarious parody THE POOR MOUTH. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W05 Passports: Poetry Around World - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 212

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

42559 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mary E. Frandson

Get ready to stamp your passport! This course explores historical, political, social and revolutionary events and cultures from around the world channeled through poetic voices throughout the century. As Williams Carlos Williams once said, “The act of writing is to reveal,” and poetic examination at its best reveals the complex lives and the rich cultures of people from around the world, including Latin America, the Middle East, Asia, Palestine, Lebanon, and Europe. Close readings of poetic text provides an opportunity for today's scholar to deepen his or her understanding of the human condition, as each poem offers a new perspective world view. Experimentation with poetic forms is also encouraged to lead students to discover their own creative voice on the page. Students will closely read a handful of poetic text including: LANGUAGE FOR A NEW CENTURY: CONTEMPORARY POETRY FROM THE MIDDLE EAST, ASIA AND BEYOND and THE NEW EUROPEAN POETS. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W06 Exploring Local Lit Landscape - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 BEC LL03

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

BEC LL03

Course Registration Number:

42574 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paula F. Cisewski

The Twin Cities has one of the richest literary scenes around. Who are our very own nationally/internationally known writers, poets, playwrights, spoken word artists, literary magazines and presses that make it so? And who influenced them? We will spend time with a wide range of texts, attend a live literary event, and see if we can persuade a writer or two to attend our class with a well-constructed letter-writing campaign. We will read UNBEARABLE SPLENDOR by Sun Yung Shin (Coffee House Press), THE ALPHABET NOT UNLIKE THE WORLD by Katrina Vandenburg (Milkweed Editions), THE ANNIE YEAR by Stephanie Wilbur Ash (Unnamed Press), ANY PSALM YOU WANT by Khary Jackson (Write Bloody Publishing), and a diverse sampling of others. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W07 Sleuth: Mystery Literature M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MCH 231

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

MCH 231

Course Registration Number:

43423 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

From its beginnings in the mid-nineteenth century, mystery fiction has been a highly formulaic genre. Add a dead body, sprinkle in a handful of usual suspects, provide a quirky detective/police officer to solve the case, occasionally mix in a guilty butler, and you have a proven formula for a potential best-seller. However, a close examination of mystery fiction reveals that there’s more than meets the (private) eye. The authors in this genre often have their fingers on the pulse of the society from which they come, as their texts reflect and critique notions of race, class, gender, social institutions, and more. Additionally, the genre has expanded from the locked-room format employed by writers such as Conan Doyle and Christie and the shady back alleys employed by hard-boiled writers like Hammett and Chandler to focus on things like international politics and espionage, featured in the works of writers like le Carre. Throughout the semester, we’ll examine a handful of texts from the perspective of how these fit with the mystery fiction genre and what these texts have to say about the world they come from, and possibly our own world. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W01 Existential America M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 JRC 222

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

42542 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Doug P. Phillips

In this course we will examine a body of work that traffics in such existential themes as freedom and responsibility, authenticity and bad faith, anguish and abandonment, identity and subjectivity, and choice and commitment. While some of our readings will reach beyond our own shores (Sartre, Beauvoir, Camus, Kafka, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, and Kierkegaard), we will mostly focus on works by 20th-century American writers: Palahniuk's FIGHT CLUB, Krakauer's INTO THE WILD, O'Connor's A GOOD MAN IS HARD TO FIND, Baldwin's THE FIRE NEXT TIME, Salinger's The CATCHER IN THE RYE, McCarthy's NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN -- to name but a possible few. In the words of Zadie Smith, we're going to read a selection of very good books in this course, concentrating on whatever is most particular to them in the hope that this might help us understand whatever is most particular to us. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W02 Reading Black Resistance M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 206

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 206

Course Registration Number:

42485 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David C. Williard, David T. Lawrence

This course, team-taught by a historian and a literary scholar, focuses on the long struggle of African Americans for justice and equality in the U.S. Analyzing literary and historical texts, students in this course will learn about and engage in research on African American history and culture. Utilizing historical, literary, and cultural approaches, this interdisciplinary course will immerse students into an exploration of the African American experience from multiple perspectives using dual disciplinary frameworks. For example, students may study Richard Wright’s NATIVE SON, but would read the text within the historical and cultural framework of the Great Migration, connecting Wright’s text not just to other literary texts, but situating it within an historical and cultural context vital to the novel’s creation and essential for its interpretation. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W03 Literature Inspired by Science M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 JRC 301

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

42461 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Leslie A. Miller

Writers have long looked to the sciences for fresh metaphors, innovative structures, and conceptual models. In this course we will read fiction, poetry, and drama inspired by the sciences and explore how writers build on scientific models and methods to bring new vision to ideas about space, time, matter, and being. Texts may include THE ECOPOETRY ANTHOLOGY, Andrea Barrett's ARCHANGEL, BEST AMERICAN SCIENCE AND NATURE WRITING, Italo Calvino's COSMICOMICS, Tracy K. Smith's LIFE ON MARS, Mary Shelley's FRANKENSTEIN, and Anne Patchett's STATE OF WONDER. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W05 Medical Narratives M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 212

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

42463 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Emily M. James

As novelist and essayist Virginia Woolf once observed, it is "strange indeed that illness has not taken its place with love and battle and jealousy among the prime themes of literature." As we read and discuss literary narratives about health and illness, we may also explore historical and contemporary conversations about health and illness, with topics including hysteria, syphilis, tuberculosis, neurasthenia, cancer, HIV/AIDS, and vaccine controversies. Along the way, we will consider literature's role in what Susan Sontag once described as the "punitive and sentimental fantasies concocted" about illness. Key writers may include Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Sylvia Plath, Kazuo Ishiguro, Leslie Jamison, Ian McEwan, Atul Gawande, and Paul Kalanithi. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W06 Literature Looks at Faith - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 305

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OEC 305

Course Registration Number:

42540 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Barbara K. Olson

The intersections of literature and faith--in this case Christian faith-- are multiple. We'll read both classic and contemporary writers, encountering texts as both evocations and provocations of faith; experiencing the faith (and doubt) of others vicariously--be they writers or characters; and exploring some theological implications which the elements of literary form at least sometimes entail. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W07 Literature Looks at Faith - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 305

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 305

Course Registration Number:

42541 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Barbara K. Olson

The intersections of literature and faith--in this case Christian faith-- are multiple. We'll read both classic and contemporary writers, encountering texts as both evocations and provocations of faith; experiencing the faith (and doubt) of others vicariously--be they writers or characters; and exploring some theological implications which the elements of literary form at least sometimes entail. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W01 Final Frontier: Mars & Beyond M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 311

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

OEC 311

Course Registration Number:

42544 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher J. Hassel

How do global politics influence our desire to explore space? How does space exploration impact our theological viewpoints of the universe? What roles might nation-states and corporations play in future space endeavors? Focusing on the human yearning to explore space, as well as current efforts to put humans on Mars in the near future, this class will attempt to answer these questions by examining a variety of literary forms including fiction, science fiction, poetry, nonfiction prose, and biography. Likely works to be studied include Tracy K. Smith’s LIFE ON MARS, Mary Doria Russell’s THE SPARROW, and Andy Weir's THE MARTIAN. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W02 Final Frontier: Mars & Beyond M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 311

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OEC 311

Course Registration Number:

42545 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher J. Hassel

How do global politics influence our desire to explore space? How does space exploration impact our theological viewpoints of the universe? What roles might nation-states and corporations play in future space endeavors? Focusing on the human yearning to explore space, as well as current efforts to put humans on Mars in the near future, this class will attempt to answer these questions by examining a variety of literary forms including fiction, science fiction, poetry, nonfiction prose, and biography. Likely works to be studied include Tracy K. Smith’s LIFE ON MARS, Mary Doria Russell’s THE SPARROW, and Andy Weir's THE MARTIAN. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W03 Howl in the Night: Werewolves M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MCH 106

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

MCH 106

Course Registration Number:

42546 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shannon F. Scott

This course examines how wolves and werewolves have been portrayed and evolved in literature—from Ovid’s METAMORPHOSIS to Indigenous American creation stories to medieval Britain and France (BISCLAVRET, THE LAI DE MELION and ARTHUR AND GORLAGON) to the Victorian era (Rudyard Kipling, Arthur Conan Doyle, Clemence Housman) to contemporary film (THE WOLF MAN), art (Jazmina Cininas), and music (Warren Zevon, Blitzen Trapper, TV on the Radio). This course also explores the biology of wolves through the essays and photography of “Romeo” in Alaska, the fiction of Jack London, and Garry Marvin’s WOLF, which provides analysis of the wolf in popular culture. By looking at fairy tales, penny dreadfuls, poems, and art we will explore how wolves have been demonized, sympathized, glorified, and romanticized—how they have become monstrous in fiction as werewolves. Contemporary work from Neil Gaiman, Karen Russell, Michael Chabon, Ben Percy, and Marisa Silver further demonstrates how werewolf lore has shifted over time as our perception of wolves and wildness has similarly changed. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W04 Howl in the Night: Werewolves M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MCH 106

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MCH 106

Course Registration Number:

42547 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shannon F. Scott

This course examines how wolves and werewolves have been portrayed and evolved in literature—from Ovid’s METAMORPHOSIS to Indigenous American creation stories to medieval Britain and France (BISCLAVRET, THE LAI DE MELION and ARTHUR AND GORLAGON) to the Victorian era (Rudyard Kipling, Arthur Conan Doyle, Clemence Housman) to contemporary film (THE WOLF MAN), art (Jazmina Cininas), and music (Warren Zevon, Blitzen Trapper, TV on the Radio). This course also explores the biology of wolves through the essays and photography of “Romeo” in Alaska, the fiction of Jack London, and Garry Marvin’s WOLF, which provides analysis of the wolf in popular culture. By looking at fairy tales, penny dreadfuls, poems, and art we will explore how wolves have been demonized, sympathized, glorified, and romanticized—how they have become monstrous in fiction as werewolves. Contemporary work from Neil Gaiman, Karen Russell, Michael Chabon, Ben Percy, and Marisa Silver further demonstrates how werewolf lore has shifted over time as our perception of wolves and wildness has similarly changed. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W06 Perfect Storm: Disaster in Lit M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 204

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 204

Course Registration Number:

42573 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew B. Harrison

When a disaster happens, it can overwhelm our sense of reason and justice, test our capacity for empathy, and force into debate our assumptions regarding social order. Writing about disaster is an acrobatic act of reflection, mourning, coping, and investigation, but to what end? To establish blame? To preach or to rebuild character? To prepare better for the next disaster? Whatever the case, tales about disasters tend to blend strategies of personal narrative, myth, and history to bring the tragedies of titanic events back to the scale of human understanding. This course explores novels and films that depict various catastrophic "storms" in an effort to document, heal, warn, and find meaning in the apparently meaningless. Readings will include Daniel Defoe’s A JOURNAL OF THE PLAGUE YEAR, Jesmyn Ward’s SALVAGE THE BONES; Paolo Bacigalupi’s THE WATER KNIFE; Dimitry Elias Léger’s GOD LOVES HAITI; and Joshua Mehigan’s book of poetry, ACCEPTING THE DISASTER. Films will include CONTAGION (Soderbergh, 2011), BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD (Zeitlin, 2012), clips from THE DUST BOWL (Burns, 2012), and THE IMPOSSIBLE (Bayona, 2013). Students will write weekly short papers on guided topics, a final research essay, and also work in groups throughout the semester to develop a disaster prevention or survival guide. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W07 The Road Not Taken M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 227

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

JRC 227

Course Registration Number:

42549 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jeannie L. Hofmeister

Drugs, alcohol, lies and deception. Why do some young adults wander down the wrong road? Robert Frost’s poem "The Road Not Taken" suggests that either road is “really about the same,” but is that truly the case? Young adults confront a wide variety of unique issues and challenges as they mature and the consequences of self-destructive decisions often result in ruined lives. Possible texts may include: LUCY GAYHEART by Willa Cather, A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT by Norman Maclean, THE LIGHT BETWEEN OCEANS by M.L. Stedman, INTO THE WILD by Jon Krakauer, and selected works by Nathaniel Hawthorne and Robert Frost. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W08 The Road Not Taken M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 JRC 227

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

JRC 227

Course Registration Number:

42550 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jeannie L. Hofmeister

Drugs, alcohol, lies and deception. Why do some young adults wander down the wrong road? Robert Frost’s poem "The Road Not Taken" suggests that either road is “really about the same,” but is that truly the case? Young adults confront a wide variety of unique issues and challenges as they mature and the consequences of self-destructive decisions often result in ruined lives. Possible texts may include: LUCY GAYHEART by Willa Cather, A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT by Norman Maclean, THE LIGHT BETWEEN OCEANS by M.L. Stedman, INTO THE WILD by Jon Krakauer, and selected works by Nathaniel Hawthorne and Robert Frost. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W09 Behind Bars: Prison Literature - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MHC 204

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MHC 204

Course Registration Number:

42551 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucy A. Saliger

The difficult contradictions in our criminal justice system--one that purportedly aims to reduce violence and crime, keep us safe, and promote justice--hide in plain sight. Yet we as a society may or may not know the contradictory realities: the violence and injustices that can occur in our jails and prisons, disparities in legal representation and sentencing, and a host of tangled methods and aims often in conflict with one another. While "crime" shows keep certain stories ever present in our societal imagination, they tend to obscure deeper stories. In this class, we'll attempt to enter into those deeper stories using both media and texts; writers may include Michelle Alexander, Jimmy Santiago Baca, Angela Davis, Johann Hari, Martin Luther King, and Leonard Peltier. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W10 Behind Bars: Prison Literature - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 SCB 107

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

SCB 107

Course Registration Number:

42552 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucy A. Saliger

The difficult contradictions in our criminal justice system--one that purportedly aims to reduce violence and crime, keep us safe, and promote justice--hide in plain sight. Yet we as a society may or may not know the contradictory realities: the violence and injustices that can occur in our jails and prisons, disparities in legal representation and sentencing, and a host of tangled methods and aims often in conflict with one another. While "crime" shows keep certain stories ever present in our societal imagination, they tend to obscure deeper stories. In this class, we'll attempt to enter into those deeper stories using both media and texts; writers may include Michelle Alexander, Jimmy Santiago Baca, Angela Davis, Johann Hari, Martin Luther King, and Leonard Peltier. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W11 The Wild: In and Around Us - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 210

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

42464 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

This semester we will read and write personally and critically about ourselves in relation to “nature,” which is as many-faceted and complicated a notion as exists. Who defines, for instance, what is “nature”? What and for whom is “nature”? Is a federally-protected mountaintop lake as “natural” as a big-city man-made pond? Should we consider “nature” a primarily biological, geological, philosophical, theological, or existential concept? Readings will include both contemporary and historical work by mostly Western authors potentially including Milton, Dante, Charles Brockden Brown, Herman Melville, James Fenimore Cooper, Henry David Thoreau, Walt Whitman, Virginia Woolf, Black Elk, Norman Maclean, N. Scott Momaday, Annie Dillard, Yusef Komunyakaa, Adrienne Rich, Jon Krakauer, Cheryl Strayed, and Viet Nguyen. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W12 The Wild: In and Around Us - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 210

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

42465 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

This semester we will read and write personally and critically about ourselves in relation to “nature,” which is as many-faceted and complicated a notion as exists. Who defines, for instance, what is “nature”? What and for whom is “nature”? Is a federally-protected mountaintop lake as “natural” as a big-city man-made pond? Should we consider “nature” a primarily biological, geological, philosophical, theological, or existential concept? Readings will include both contemporary and historical work by mostly Western authors potentially including Milton, Dante, Charles Brockden Brown, Herman Melville, James Fenimore Cooper, Henry David Thoreau, Walt Whitman, Virginia Woolf, Black Elk, Norman Maclean, N. Scott Momaday, Annie Dillard, Yusef Komunyakaa, Adrienne Rich, Jon Krakauer, Cheryl Strayed, and Viet Nguyen. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W13 Wartime:Literature vs. Reality See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

42554 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Alison L. Underthun-Meilahn

When writing about war, authors who have served in the military have a few literary options: a memoir, poetry, essays, or a work of fiction. This course will focus on exemplary literature written by those who have been in war mainly through fiction, but we will also read poetry and essays as well. We specifically will investigate how veterans have differing perspectives on warfare and the return back to civilian life, while at the same time how many of them share similar perspectives and grapple with the recalibration into civilian life. Through literature we will come to understand how the psyche of veterans is altered via warfare and the impact it has on their lives and families, as well as society at large. We will also look at how contemporary culture, and historically, veterans have been received or perceived as they return home and how their voice has been implicit/explicit in cultural movements (specifically the counter cultural movement of the 1960’s). How society interacts and supports veterans will be linked to our discussions, and highlighted through a service learning component. Veterans will be invited into our classroom to foster and promote dialogue and understanding on how veteran's voices are heard, what they think we hear, and how we, civilians can better be aware or shift our perspective to best support them in society. Guest speakers may include veterans from the Vietnam War, Iraq War(s), Afghanistan War, and perhaps those currently enlisted. We may also have speakers from professionals who work with veterans. Literature we will focus on in this course includes: Erich Maria Remarque's ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT, Kurt Vonnegut's SLAUGHTERHOUSE-FIVE, Tim O'Brien's THE THINGS THEY CARRIED, and Phil Klay's REDEPLOYMENT. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement. NOTE: This class is considered a blended/hybrid course, meaning that students meet once a week as a class and then work online for the remainder of the course time.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 3111525-1700- - - R - - -
-- - - - - - -
ENGL 203 - W14 Horrors of the Haunted Summer - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 SCB 329

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

SCB 329

Course Registration Number:

42553 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gordon D. Grice

In 1816, famous authors and their friends gathered at Lake Geneva for history’s most fruitful writing workshop. Results: vampires, the Frankenstein Monster, a few dark poems, and a legacy of fear. We’ll read what Byron and the Shelley's read—and what they wrote. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W15 Horrors of the Haunted Summer - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 SCB 101

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

SCB 101

Course Registration Number:

42555 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gordon D. Grice

In 1816, famous authors and their friends gathered at Lake Geneva for history’s most fruitful writing workshop. Results: vampires, the Frankenstein Monster, a few dark poems, and a legacy of fear. We’ll read what Byron and the Shelley's read—and what they wrote. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W16 Perfect Storm: Disaster in Lit M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 OEC 204

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

OEC 204

Course Registration Number:

43058 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew B. Harrison

When a disaster happens, it can overwhelm our sense of reason and justice, test our capacity for empathy, and force into debate our assumptions regarding social order. Writing about disaster is an acrobatic act of reflection, mourning, coping, and investigation, but to what end? To establish blame? To preach or to rebuild character? To prepare better for the next disaster? Whatever the case, tales about disasters tend to blend strategies of personal narrative, myth, and history to bring the tragedies of titanic events back to the scale of human understanding. This course explores novels and films that depict various catastrophic "storms" in an effort to document, heal, warn, and find meaning in the apparently meaningless. Readings will include Daniel Defoe’s A JOURNAL OF THE PLAGUE YEAR, Jesmyn Ward’s SALVAGE THE BONES; Paolo Bacigalupi’s THE WATER KNIFE; Dimitry Elias Léger’s GOD LOVES HAITI; and Joshua Mehigan’s book of poetry, ACCEPTING THE DISASTER. Films will include CONTAGION (Soderbergh, 2011), BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD (Zeitlin, 2012), clips from THE DUST BOWL (Burns, 2012), and THE IMPOSSIBLE (Bayona, 2013). Students will write weekly short papers on guided topics, a final research essay, and also work in groups throughout the semester to develop a disaster prevention or survival guide. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W17 Final Frontier: Mars & Beyond M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 454

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 454

Course Registration Number:

43428 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher J. Hassel

How do global politics influence our desire to explore space? How does space exploration impact our theological viewpoints of the universe? What roles might nation-states and corporations play in future space endeavors? Focusing on the human yearning to explore space, as well as current efforts to put humans on Mars in the near future, this class will attempt to answer these questions by examining a variety of literary forms including fiction, science fiction, poetry, nonfiction prose, and biography. Likely works to be studied include Tracy K. Smith’s LIFE ON MARS, Mary Doria Russell’s THE SPARROW, and Andy Weir's THE MARTIAN. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W41 HNR Indians in Unexpctd Places M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 306

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 306

Course Registration Number:

42466 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

Did you know that one of the first basketball teams to be declared World Champions was a group of Native American women in 1904? That the greatest Olympian of all time was from the Sac and Fox tribal nation? Did you know that some of the best blues musicians of the last 150 years were Native Americans? Did you know that the Twin Cities are a hotbed for Native spoken word poetry, hip-hop, visual art, and theater? Did you know that the Twin Cities are the starting point of one of the most influential political groups of the 1960s and ‘70s, AIM, and that spirt of political protest is alive and active today? Using Dr. Philip Deloria’s book, INDIANS IN UNEXPECTED PLACES, as a jumping off point, this class will use literature by Native peoples to disrupt and complicate the existent “Indian” narrative at work in America. Books will address Native American peoples in sport, in music, in art and theater, and in political action. We’ll be reading a mix of fiction and non-fiction, drama and poetry and will be writing about the connections between the words on the page and our vibrant Ojibwe and Dakota nations here in Minneapolis and Saint Paul. This writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W42 HNR Indians in Unexpctd Places M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 306

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 306

Course Registration Number:

42467 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

Did you know that one of the first basketball teams to be declared World Champions was a group of Native American women in 1904? That the greatest Olympian of all time was from the Sac and Fox tribal nation? Did you know that some of the best blues musicians of the last 150 years were Native Americans? Did you know that the Twin Cities are a hotbed for Native spoken word poetry, hip-hop, visual art, and theater? Did you know that the Twin Cities are the starting point of one of the most influential political groups of the 1960s and ‘70s, AIM, and that spirt of political protest is alive and active today? Using Dr. Philip Deloria’s book, INDIANS IN UNEXPECTED PLACES, as a jumping off point, this class will use literature by Native peoples to disrupt and complicate the existent “Indian” narrative at work in America. Books will address Native American peoples in sport, in music, in art and theater, and in political action. We’ll be reading a mix of fiction and non-fiction, drama and poetry and will be writing about the connections between the words on the page and our vibrant Ojibwe and Dakota nations here in Minneapolis and Saint Paul. This writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W51 Immigrant Literature (ESL) M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OSS 122

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OSS 122

Course Registration Number:

42471 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Suzanne L. Donsky

This course will focus on literature about the American immigrant experience. Readings will include materials on historical and contemporary reasons for immigration, adapting to the U.S., and U.S. responses to immigrants. Some themes of the texts we'll be reading include losing and gaining traditions, culture, and language as well as family and generational conflicts. Some possible texts/readings will include short stories, novels, poetry, memoirs, and nonfiction prose and may include titles such as GREEN CARD YOUTH VOICES, THE MIDDLE OF EVERYWHERE (Pipher), BREAD GIVERS (Yezierska), LOST IN TRANSLATION (Hoffman), and THE LATEHOMECOMER (Yang). The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement. This course is open only to English as a Second Language (ESL) students with permission of the instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - W01 Race/Gender/Sexuality & Lang. M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 208

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 208

Course Registration Number:

42694 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucia Pawlowski

Do men and women speak differently? Do gay men still find a need to “code” their language? How do lesbians resist the negative connotations of “coming out?” Why do we need a word for “cis?” How does African-American Vernacular English have roots in West African languages? How is hip hop part of the African-American oral tradition? Why would a Chicana writer “code-mesh” (write in both English and Spanish) in her writing? Why would English be resisted if it’s a “global” language? How did Native American boarding schools threaten Native American languages? We live in a nation of languages--and this diversity of languages represents not a mere array of diversity, but power dynamics, histories of struggle, and warring values amongst different groups in America. We will read about the language variations of various minority groups: women, African-Americans, gay men, lesbians, Latinas, and Native Americans in colloquial and literary speech, and examine the power negotiations involved in these variations. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - W02 Re-Envisioning American Lit - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 212

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

42560 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mary E. Frandson

From the first conception of a New World to the latest re-envisioning of America, this course will survey a kaleidoscopic view of adapting American literacies through the visual arts, maps, collage and photomontage, letters, cartoons, social networks, hip-hop ballads, film, and the language of campaign speeches and inaugural addresses. We will explore how literary genres grow out of a need for expression of what it means to be an American, and question whether or not there exists a philosophy that shapes an American intellectual identity. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - W03 Crit Discourse of Video Games - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 212

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

42468 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Salvatore Pane

What does it mean to close read a video game? What is the interplay between text, digital media, and rhetoric? Where do games fit in academia? In the Critical Discourse of Video Games, students will interrogate these questions while being introduced to game studies, platform studies, and the digital humanities. Students will learn by weaving together theories of play, reading, writing, and digital creation. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - W04 Crit Discourse of Video Games - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 212

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

42469 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Salvatore Pane

What does it mean to close read a video game? What is the interplay between text, digital media, and rhetoric? Where do games fit in academia? In the Critical Discourse of Video Games, students will interrogate these questions while being introduced to game studies, platform studies, and the digital humanities. Students will learn by weaving together theories of play, reading, writing, and digital creation. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - W05 Race, Gender, Sexuality & Lang M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MHC 201

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

MHC 201

Course Registration Number:

43332 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucia Pawlowski

Do men and women speak differently? Do gay men still find a need to “code” their language? How do lesbians resist the negative connotations of “coming out?” Why do we need a word for “cis?” How does African-American Vernacular English have roots in West African languages? How is hip hop part of the African-American oral tradition? Why would a Chicana writer “code-mesh” (write in both English and Spanish) in her writing? Why would English be resisted if it’s a “global” language? How did Native American boarding schools threaten Native American languages? We live in a nation of languages--and this diversity of languages represents not a mere array of diversity, but power dynamics, histories of struggle, and warring values amongst different groups in America. We will read about the language variations of various minority groups: women, African-Americans, gay men, lesbians, Latinas, and Native Americans in colloquial and literary speech, and examine the power negotiations involved in these variations. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 211 - L01 British Authors I M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 301

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

41401 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Martin L. Warren

How have heroic ideals changed from Beowulf to the 18th century? How did marriage evolve from an arrangement between tribes and families to love between two people? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings in the British literary tradition in the period from approximately 900-1780. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as war and conflict, the history of love, humor and satire, social reform, religious reform and the rights of the individual. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 215 - 01 American Authors II M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 SCB 325

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

SCB 325

Course Registration Number:

42447 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Andrew J. Scheiber

How did the modern warfare of World War I change those who fought and those who stayed at home? Why did so many of the best American artists flee to Paris? How did the traditionalism and stability of the 1950s lead to the radicalism and rebellion of the 60s? How has technology, from the typewriter to the internet, reshaped literature? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework though extensive readings in American literature from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as progress and innovation, war, the “lost generation,” the New Woman, race, and conformity and individuality. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 255 - W01 Intro to Imaginative Writing M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 313

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 313

Course Registration Number:

41863 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

This course introduces students to skills necessary for imaginative writing. It includes close readings of literary texts that model basic techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students’ critical skills. This course will include instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 255 - W02 Intro to Imaginative Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 BEC 113

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

BEC 113

Course Registration Number:

41598 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Leslie A. Miller

This course introduces students to skills necessary for imaginative writing. It includes close readings of literary texts that model basic techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students’ critical skills. This course will include instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 280 - L01 Intro to English Studies M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 227

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 227

Course Registration Number:

41597 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Fernando Sanchez

This gateway course into the English major and the minor is an introduction to (a) literary tools, techniques, and terminology for reading and writing in English studies; (b) the history of English Studies as a discipline and the intellectual concepts and critical debates that have shaped the field; and (c) the practices of English Studies, from close reading and analysis of literary and critical texts to interpretation and scholarly research.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 298 - D01 Intro to Professional Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 227

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

JRC 227

Course Registration Number:

42473 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Fernando Sanchez

This course introduces students to principles and skills necessary for writing in professional settings. It includes study of rhetoric, ethics, and information design in workplace writing; examination of the roles of professional writers; close readings of texts and documents that model professional techniques; and practice composing in a variety of professional genres. The course will include instruction in ethical communication, rhetorical context, document design, communication technologies, precision, concision, and tone. This course fulfills the Theory and Practice requirement in the English major. Please note that this course does not count towards the core literature/writing requirement. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 300 - W01 Thry/Prac. Writng (Peer Cons.) M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 JRC 481

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

40090 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Susan J. Callaway

This course introduces students to current writing, rhetorical, and pedagogical theory, and helps them develop a vocabulary for talking about writing and strengthen their abilities to write and to assist others in developing their academic literacy. Students will practice writing in a variety of forms such as academic writing, professional writing, experimental writing, and writing with particular attention to social justice. Required for secondary licensure in communication arts and literature students. This course fulfills the Theory and Practice requirement in the English major and satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204. NOTE: This section is restricted to students who have been hired as peer writing consultants in the Center for Writing. A standard section of this course will be offered in Spring 2018.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 305 - 01 Linguistics: English Lang M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 207

Course Registration Number:

40091 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Juan Li

This course is an introduction to the systematic study of the English language, with an emphasis on connections between academic linguistics and relevant social and educational questions. Students will study the English sound system through phonetics and phonology, how words are formed through morphology, how words combine to create clauses and meaning through syntax and semantics. After learning the linguistic tools to describe the English language, students will examine the contexts of language production in real life through the study of U.S. dialects, historical and ongoing changes in English, and various social interactions in language. This course fulfills the Theory and Practice requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 315 - W01 Environmental Wrtng/Community - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MHC 205

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MHC 205

Course Registration Number:

43068 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Salvatore Pane

How do we write about the environment in an age of rapid climate change, and is there anything we can do to get involved in our local community? In Environmental Writing and Community Outreach, students will attempt to grapple with these questions while striving toward hope. Students will discuss and analyze texts that interrogate the Anthropocene--the current geological age which has been dominated by human activity--and use that thinking to collaborate with local organizations focused on sustainability right here in the Twin Cities. Possible texts include FIELD NOTES FROM A CATASTROPHE by Elizabeth Kolbert, THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING by Naomi Klein, and WRITING NATURE by Carolyn Ross. This course satisfies the Theory and Practice distribution requirement for English majors and counts as a non-literature course for English with Writing Emphasis majors. This course also satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement and counts towards the new Sustainability minor. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 322 - W01 Writing Fiction - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

40092 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Santiago

This intermediate course explores traditional and innovative patterns of fiction writing. Emphasis on experimentation with a variety of techniques and development of individual voice. This course will include critique sessions, readings to broaden possibilities of form and subject, and individual instruction. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. Prerequisite: ENGL 255 or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 337 - L01 James Baldwin/Contemp. Blk Wrt M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 206

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 206

Course Registration Number:

42450 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David T. Lawrence

James Baldwin has often been recognized as a major voice of African American literature during the twentieth century, but recently, that voice has re-emerged with an uncanny timeliness in the twenty-first, referenced by contemporary writers and commentators to illuminate the shadowy terrain of race and culture that continues to befuddle Americans today. Baldwin’s voice has not re-appeared from nowhere; it has long been with us, for nearly seventy years lodging a relentless critique of racism and injustice in American culture and society. It is no surprise then, that an entire generation of writers has been influenced by Baldwin’s perceptive eye and incisive language. From Pulitzer prize-winning playwright Suzan-Lori Parks to his cultural inheritor Ta-Nehisi Coates, Baldwin’s influence has been prominent and lasting. This course will consider the ongoing literary conversation between Baldwin and his artistic children. In addition to Baldwin, writers will include Jesmyn Ward, Coates, Parks, Kevin Young, Kiesi Laymon, Claudia Rankine, and Teju Cole. In addition to satisfying the core Human Diversity requirement, this course also satisfies the Contexts and Convergences distribution requirement and the Diversity Literature area requirement for English majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 341 - L01 20th-Century Women's Lit M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 SCB 324

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

SCB 324

Course Registration Number:

42451 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Emily M. James

This course surveys literature by women across the long twentieth century. Our readings begin with Charlotte Perkins Gilman and Virginia Woolf and close with contemporary writers such as Naomi Shihab Nye, Alison Bechdel, and Claudia Rankine. We will also read and discuss the recent work of essayists such as Roxane Gay, Leslie Jamison, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie--writers who have forged new conversations about women and feminism. This course satisfies the Contexts and Convergences distributon requirement for English majors. It also satisfies the core human diversity requirement and the core Writing Across the Curriculum Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 372 - L01 Make It New:American Modernism - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 210

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

42452 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

“Make it new” was the rallying cry of those visionary writers who literally and figuratively exploded into that revolutionary period between World War I and World War II, a time characterized by experimentation and innovation in all of the arts. Fueled by their desire to disrupt tradition and challenge the world’s values and sense of order, American moderns forged the way for our contemporary writers. And although one hundred years separate our world from theirs, their writings still feel timely and familiar. Their concerns and struggles, from politics and technology to women’s rights and racism, continue to be our concerns and struggles. So join us as we rediscover some of this country’s greatest writers, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Hughes, Hurston, and others, whose cry to “make it new” still rings true today. This course satisfies the American Literature distribution requirement for majors who started at St. Thomas previous to Fall 2015. For English majors who started at St. Thomas in Fall 2015 or later, this course satisfies the Contexts and Convergences distribution requirement and the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing to Learn core curriculum requirement. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 421 - 01 Literary Magazine Practicum I M - - - - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 227

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

JRC 227

Course Registration Number:

40464 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

Activities during the fall semester of the sequence include readings from The Little Magazine: A History and Bibliography and The Little Magazine in America: A Modern Documentary History; examining the design and content of fifteen professional literary magazines; learning InDesign CS3 desktop publishing program; creating preliminary Summit Avenue Review page designs; working collaboratively with other literary magazine editors to develop selection procedures and principles; and writing a comparison essay on two professional literary magazines. Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 321 or 322 or 323 or instructor permission.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)