Summer 2019 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 202 - W01 Business and American Identity - - - - - - - -

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Course Registration Number:

30371 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel G. Jones

This fully online course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W01 Horrors of the Haunted Summer - - - - - - - -

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Time of Day:

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Location:

Course Registration Number:

30372 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gordon D. Grice

1816: Famous writers and their friends gather at Lake Geneva for history’s most fruitful writing workshop. Results: vampires, the Frankenstein Monster, and a legacy of fear. In this fully online class, we’ll read what Lord Byron and the Shelleys read, what they wrote—and what they inspired. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W02 Exploding the Hero in Lit/Film - - - - - - - -

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Time of Day:

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Location:

Course Registration Number:

30373 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne E. Roth-Reinhardt

What makes a hero, and how do we contribute to their construction? Are super powers enough? Do they have to be good? Do they have to be likable? Must they rescue someone? Which qualities matter to audiences, and what separates the passable hero from the truly Halloween-costume and lunchbox-worthy ones? This fully online course explores the construction of “the hero” by considering its genesis, its development, and its (sometimes) eventual fall within various contemporary sources alongside older literal and visual touchstones. We will investigate what makes the hero so revered and then consider what these qualities reveal about the human condition. Possible texts include J.M. Coetzee’s FOE, Jonathan Eid’s THE LUCKIEST MAN, Gillian Flynn’s GONE GIRL, and Homer’s THE ODYSSEY. Possible films include BLACK PANTHER, SPIDERMAN, THE DARK KNIGHT and WONDER WOMAN. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W03 From Text to Film: Adaptations - - - - - - - -

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Time of Day:

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Location:

Course Registration Number:

30374 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Alison L. Underthun-Meilahn

Which is better—the original book or a film adaptation of a book? How does one translate the inner voice of a narrator on film? Does a director choose to ignore that in a script or create a way to verbalize those thoughts? Is your vision of a book setting different than what ends up on the screen? Is it possible for a film to be better than the book it is adapted from? This fully online course will attempt to grapple with these questions by examining both texts and film translations of those texts. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W04 Romantic Losers See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

30375 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Doug P. Phillips

In the realm of romantic love no amount of reading will keep us from getting our hearts broken, but it may, in the words of Samuel Beckett, help us to “Try again. Fail again. Fail better.” With this in mind, we’ll immerse ourselves in the love lives of some of literature’s best and little known romantic losers, which I hope will leave us all a little wiser about the subject by the session’s end. Here are a few works that will for sure make the cut, maybe: Flaubert’s MADAME BOVARY, Millay’s sonnets, Larkin’s poems, Barthes’s A LOVER’S DISCOURSE, de Botton’s ON LOVE, Beckett’s FIRST LOVE, Kureishi’s INTIMACY, and Greene’s THE END OF THE AFFAIR. The writing load for this blended course (in-seat on Tuesday/Thursday from 5:30-7:30pm and online for the remainder) is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 2101730-1930- T - R - - -
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ENGL 203 - W05 American Haunts - - - - - - - -

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Time of Day:

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Location:

Course Registration Number:

30429 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew B. Harrison

Although Gothic literature began in Britain, the genre found quick purchase in the U.S., where internal battles often exposed the young republic as an ill-stitched federation of parts, a Frankenstein body politic threatening to come undone. America as an ideal has been resuscitated again and again, but the revived dream still reels with recurrent nightmares. This class will examine how the Gothic has shape-shifted over time to represent the most chronic social conflicts in the U.S.: beginning with a slave narrative, we’ll proceed through texts that portray the legacies of racism and other uneven distributions of opportunity and power. Our discussions will remain sensitive to the dividing and unifying movements that continue to influence visions of America. Readings will include Harriet Jacobs, INCIDENTS IN THE LIFE OF A SLAVE GIRL; Octavia Butler, FLEDGLING; Shirley Jackson, WE HAVE ALWAYS LIVED IN THE CASTLE; and Richard Brautigan, THE HAWKLINE MONSTER; as well as short stories by Poe, Chesnutt, Bierce, Hawthorne, Faulkner, Welty, O’Connor, Bowles, and Carol Oates. Selected essays from AFRICAN AMERICAN GOTHIC: SCREAMS FROM SHADOWED PLACES, by Maisha L. Wester and AMERICAN GOTHIC FICTION, by Allan Lloyd-Smith, will supplement our primary texts. Films may include THE ELECTRIC HOUSE (Keaton, 1922); INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS (Siegel, 1956); and GET OUT (Peele, 2017). The writing load for this fully online course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - W01 Social Media & Its Discontents - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

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Location:

Course Registration Number:

30377 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Fernando Sanchez

This fully online course aims to discuss how social media platforms affect human interactions (dating, trolling, organizing, protesting, engaging in politics, etc). Potential texts may include I HATE THE INTERNET; THE PEOPLE’S PLATFORM; TWITTER AND TEAR GAS; SO YOU’VE BEEN PUBLICLY SHAMED; TECHNICALLY WRONG; and THE DEATH OF EXPERTISE. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 212 - L01 British Authors II - - - - - - - -

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Time of Day:

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Location:

Course Registration Number:

30392 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Barbara K. Olson

How has the category of “English literature” expanded as a result of global changes over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries? How have authors responded to fundamental upheavals in the individual, religion, the British Empire, the role of women, and the value of poetry and art? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings in the British literary tradition from approximately 1789 to the present. Threaded throughout this literature are themes such as revolution and reform, authorship, war, nationality and race, and the relationships between literature and other arts. This fully online course satisfies a Historical Perspective requirement for English majors. It also satisfies the core literature/writing requirement for students who started with an ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204 class and counts as an allied requirement for select business majors. Finally, this course also satisfies a Writing Across the Curriculum Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 255 - W01 Intro to Imaginative Writing - - - - - - - -

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Time of Day:

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Location:

Course Registration Number:

30524 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Santiago

This fully online course introduces students to skills necessary for imaginative writing. It includes close readings of literary texts (short fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction) that model basic techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students’ critical skills. This course will include instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures. This course fulfills the Genre Study requirement in the English major. It also satisfies a core literature/writing requirement for students who started with an ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204 class and counts as an allied requirement for select business majors. Finally, this course satisfies a Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)