What courses are required?

Two courses in critical methodology and pedagogy serve as the foundation for this 18-credit program This curriculum allows students to expand their knowledge of literature, writing, and pedagogy, with a particular focus on multicultural contexts. Students may transfer in a total of 6 credits of graduate level course work in English.

The course explores the major contemporary approaches to literary studies in the context of various traditions of literary theory and criticism. It encourages students to assess constructively some of the key controversies in contemporary critical theory and apply their learning to the interpretation of literary texts.

This course explores the theory and practice of teaching literature and writing at the college level. Students will learn syllabus design as well as innovative methods for teaching reading, writing, and literary criticism.

Students will work closely with a faculty mentor on developing a final capstone project (e.g., a detailed lesson plan or curriculum). This project will involve substantial individualized reading, writing, and research.

Multicultural Literature: One course selected from the following (3 credits)

This course focuses on postcolonial writers, as well as writers from American communities of color. The course emphasis may be on the literature of one nation or ethnic community, on one geographic area, or on a group of authors who deal with a similar topic. Authors will vary, and may include Chinua Achebe, Julia Alvarez, Junot Diaz, Bessie Head, Jamaica Kincaid, Maxine Hong Kingston, Ngugi wa Thiong'o, or Derek Walcott. Credit may be earned more than once under this number for different emphases.

The study of the literature of various Native American groups from its origins in such traditional forms as creation myths and the trickster cycle through literary responses to treaty, reservation, and boarding school eras and into contemporary fiction, poetry, and autobiography. Authors covered may include Apess, Winnemucca, Zitkala-Sa, Eastman, Welch, Erdrich, and Silko.

The study of the heritage of African-American literature, beginning with the vernacular tradition, colonial poetry, and the slave narrative; proceeding through the Harlem Renaissance, the modern period, and the Black Arts Movement; and culminating in contemporary fiction, poetry, drama, and other genres. Authors covered may include Equiano, Jacobs, Douglass, Wheatley, Chesnutt, DuBois, Hughes, Hurston, Wright, Ellison, Brooks, Baldwin, Baraka, and Morrison.

Potential topics may include Third World cinema, writing and resistance in the global age, and Mexican-American literature. Potential authors may include Ama Ata Aidoo, Assia Djebar, Frantz Fanon, C.L.R. James, Arundhati Roy, Salman Rushdie, or Ngugi wa Thinong'o. Credit may be earned more than once under this number for different emphases. This course satisfies the Multicultural Literature distribution requirement. Prerequisite: GENG 513 or permission of the instructor.

Potential topics may include Ojibway and Dakota literature, contemporary Native American literature, and the literature of Native American women. Credit may be eared more than once under this number for different emphases. This course satisfies the Multicultural Literature distribution requirement. Prerequisite: GENG 513 or permission of the instructor.

Potential topics may include figures such as James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, or Zora Neale Hurston; race, gender, and sexuality in the black novel; the Harlem Renaissance; and trauma and the 19th century American slave narrative. Credit may be earned more than once under this number for different emphases. This course satisfies the Multicultural Literature distribution requirement. Prerequisite: GENG 513 or permission of the instructor.

Electives (6 credits)

Students may choose from a wide variety of courses in British, American, and world literature as well as courses in writing and pedagogy. See our current course offerings.

How long will it take to complete the certificate? 

Semester 1

GENG 513
Semester 2 GENG 507
Summer Term

Multicultural Lit

Semester 3 Elective
Semester 4 Elective
Summer Term GENG 697
Summer 1 Multicultural Lit & Elective
Fall GENG 513
Spring GENG 507
Summer 2 Elective & GENG 697
Semester 1 GENG 513 & Elective
Semester 2          GENG 507 & Multicultural Lit
Summer Term Elective & GENG 697