Raymond MacKenzie  portrait

Raymond MacKenzie

Professor of English / Director of Renaissance Program Minor
Degree
M.A., Ph.D., Kansas State University
B.A., Concordia College (Moorhead)
At St. Thomas since 1989
Office
JRC 323
Phone
(651) 962-5693

Academic History

M.A., Ph.D., Kansas State University
B.A., Concordia College (Moorhead)

Expertise/Specialties

Milton
19th- and 20th-century British Literature
Literary Criticism
Modern French Literature

Selected Publications

Italian Chronicles, by Stendahl [translation, introduction, and notes] (University of Minnesota Press, 2017).

Utopia from Thomas More to Walter Benjamin, by Miguel Abensour [translation and notes] (Univocal Press, 2017).

Diaboliques: Six Tales of Decadence, by Jules Barbey d'Aurevilly [translation, introduction, and notes] (U of MN Press, 2015).

Persian Letters, by Montesquieu [translation, introduction, and notes] (Hackett, 2014).

“Charles Baudelaire,” “François Mauriac,” and “Jean Racine” in Douglas Denton, ed., New Catholic Encyclopedia (Catholic University of America, 2011).

Germinal, by Emila Zola [translation and notes] (Hackett, 2011).

Madame Bovary, by Gustave Flaubert [translation, introduction, and notes] (Hackett, 2009).

“Rethinking Rhyme, Signifying Friendship:  Milton’s Lycidas and Epitaphium Damonis,” Modern Philology 106: 3, 2009.

Paris Spleen and La Fanfarlo, by Charles Baudelaire [translation, introduction, and notes] (Hackett, 2008).

“A Lock of Christina Rossetti’s Hair,” Connecticut Review 29: 1, 2007.

Thérèse Desqueyroux, by François Mauriac [translation, introduction, and notes] (Rowman and Littlefield, 2005).

"Mauriac's Viper's Tangle and A Woman of the Pharisees," in Mary Reichardt, ed., A Companion to Catholic Literature (Greenwood Press, 2004).

"Lady Cynthia Asquith," "Edmund Curll," "George Gilfillan," "Sir Allen Lane," "Viola Meynell," "Jacob Tonson," "William Wilson" in New Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004).

God and Mammon and What Was Lost, by François Mauriac [translation, introduction, and notes] (Rowman and Littlefield, 2003).

Viola Meynell, 1885-1956:  A Critical Biography (Edwin Mellen Press, 2002).

"Alice Meynell," in M. Reichardt, ed., Catholic Women Writers (NY:  Greenwood Press, 2001).

"Language, Self, and Business Ethics," The Journal of Markets and Morality, vol. 3, 1, 2000.

"Lady Cynthia Asquith," "Catherine Carswell," "Ivy Litvinov," and "Viola Meynell" in Paul and June Schlueter, eds., Encyclopedia of British Women Writers (Rutgers University Press, 1999).

"Edwin Muir" in George M. Johnson, ed., British Novelists between the Wars (Sumter, SC:  Bruccoli Clark Layman), 1998.

Spring 2018 Courses

Spring 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
CSMA 549 - 01 The Catholic Novel - - W - - - - 1800 - 2100 55S 207

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

22106 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Raymond N. MacKenzie

This course will let us explore a set of great Catholic fiction from the modern era, and it will also encourage us to examine a wide set of issues—moral, philosophical, and religious—raised by these works. We will work together toward defining, in a way that intellectually satisfies each of us, what a Catholic novel is, and we will give careful attention to the problems, conflicts, and controversies to which the concept has given rise.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 572 - 02 The Catholic Novel - - W - - - - 1800 - 2100 55S 207

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

22646 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Raymond N. MacKenzie

Possible topics may include literature and film, the Bible and literature, the memoir, ecology and literature, literatures of the Holocaust, and literary biography. Credit may be earned more than once under this course number for different emphases.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2018 Courses

Summer 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2018 Courses

Fall 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 220 - 01 The Classical Tradition - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42456 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Raymond N. MacKenzie

What might it mean to speak of “the classical tradition?” What does that include and exclude? And how does it matter to us today? From the ancient Greek gods in their serenity to the howls of the damned in Dante’s vision of the afterlife, whether mythological or theological, the works to be studied engage us in the most fundamental questions about what it means to be human. Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings of representative texts of Western literature in translation from ancient Greece to the Renaissance, including some interactions of the European traditions with ancient or medieval Asian, Mesopotamian, or Middle Eastern literatures. Authors may include Homer, Aeschylus, Sappho, Virgil, Dante, Rumi, Marie de France, and Christine de Pizan. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 628 - 01 The Rise of the Novel - - - R - - - 1800 - 2100

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42462 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Raymond N. MacKenzie

In this course, we'll study the eighteenth-century novel as it developed both in Britain and on the Continent. Early novels often took the form of autobiographies, and we'll examine the connection between life-writing and novel-writing. In tracing the birth and growth of what came to be a major genre, we'll be exploring class, gender, cultural and economic issues, and their relationship to what we now call the novel's realism. The writers we will study include Eliza Haywood, Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift, Henry Fielding, Jane Austen, Choderlos de Laclos, Denis Diderot, and Goethe. The course takes its title from Ian Watt's classic study from 1957, which tied the novel closely to the emergent capitalism of the early eighteenth century. To what extent has has recent criticism and theory moved beyond Watt? Do we still see the phenomenon of the rise of the novel in the same way he did? Among the many critics and theorists of the novel, we will read work by Michael Foucault, Michael McKeon, Walter Benjamin, and Nancy Armstrong. This course satisfies the pre-1800 British Literature distribution requirement. Prerequisite: GENG 513 or permission of the instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)