Martin Warren  portrait

Martin Warren

Associate Professor of English
Degree
Ph.D., University of Minnesota
M.A., St. John's University (Minnesota)
At St. Thomas since 1998
Office
JRC 307
Hours
(Spring 2019) M 3:30-5:30pm; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5665
CV

I am a medievalist whose main area of concentration is the 14th and 15th centuries. Besides teaching Chaucer, I teach the literature of King Arthur from its beginnings to the present day. Tolkien is a favorite of mine, especially since he was a medievalist. When I teach Tolkien, I teach about the medieval background to his major literary works such as The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit. Other areas that I work in are literary theory and science fiction. What fascinates me about science fiction is how it helps us to ask all kinds of great questions about how life and the universe works, whether it’s religious, political, or philosophical questions. At present, I am working on a project to do with the Gawain-poet who wrote the excellent poem, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.

Summer 2019 Courses

Summer 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2019 Courses

Fall 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 211 - L01 British Authors I M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 301

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

42528 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Martin L. Warren

How have heroic ideals changed from Beowulf to the 18th century? How did marriage evolve from an arrangement between tribes and families to love between two people? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings in the British literary tradition in the period from approximately 900-1780. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as war and conflict, the history of love, humor and satire, social reform, religious reform and the rights of the individual. This course satisfies the core Literature and Writing requirement for students who started that requirement with an ENGL 201-204 class and fulfills both the Historical Perspectives and the Early British Literature requirements in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 521 - 01 Tolkien: Mid Ages, Mid Earth - - - R - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

42552 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Martin L. Warren

J.R.R. Tolkien, an Oxford professor and eminent medievalist, is best known for The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, works that have been popular since they were first published. One of Tolkien’s distinctive contributions to fantasy writing lies in the example he set as a builder of worlds. Fantasy and science-fiction novelists, game designers, and role-play enthusiasts all acknowledge Tolkien as a master in the art of constructing a universe with its own history and geography, flora and fauna, cultures and languages, magic and physics. Tolkien rooted his fictional works in the language and traditions of the Anglo-Saxon, Norse, Gothic, and Celtic cultures that he studied as a medievalist. The class examines his major, seminal fantasy fictions through these cultures, traditions, and languages alongside the theories he himself developed of fantasy world-building. The labor of creating Middle-earth, in its various phases, revisions and versions, has become a subject of study, to which much academic attention has been devoted. Questions that guide this class are: What are the implications and ramifications of the act of worldbuilding, especially as it was conceived and practiced by Tolkien? How do we situate Tolkien's creation within the context of Tolkien’s work as both artist and medievalist and alongside its medieval sources and modern parallels, the uses of tradition, the nature of history and its relationship to place? What does Tolkien’s work teach us about storytelling, art and imagination? How are Tolkien’s works repurposed in modern media (a children’s play, spoken word poetry, visual art, film, radio, song cycle, Aubusson tapestries, dialect literature and YouTube videos)? This course fulfills the early British literature distribution requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2020 Courses

J-Term 2020 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location