Martin Warren  portrait

Martin Warren

Associate Professor of English
Degree
Ph.D., University of Minnesota
M.A., St. John's University (Minnesota)
At St. Thomas since 1998
Office
JRC 307
Hours
(Fall 2018) M 9:45-10:45am; W 12:15-1:15pm; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5665
CV

I am a medievalist whose main area of concentration is the 14th and 15th centuries. Besides teaching Chaucer, I teach the literature of King Arthur from its beginnings to the present day. Tolkien is a favorite of mine, especially since he was a medievalist. When I teach Tolkien, I teach about the medieval background to his major literary works such as The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit. Other areas that I work in are literary theory and science fiction. What fascinates me about science fiction is how it helps us to ask all kinds of great questions about how life and the universe works, whether it’s religious, political, or philosophical questions. At present, I am working on a project to do with the Gawain-poet who wrote the excellent poem, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.

Fall 2018 Courses

Fall 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 211 - L01 British Authors I M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 301

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

41312 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Martin L. Warren

How have heroic ideals changed from Beowulf to the 18th century? How did marriage evolve from an arrangement between tribes and families to love between two people? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings in the British literary tradition in the period from approximately 900-1780. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as war and conflict, the history of love, humor and satire, social reform, religious reform and the rights of the individual. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 698 - 01 Independent Reading - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

41593 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Martin L. Warren

Students will work closely with a faculty mentor on independent research. This research will involve substantial individualized reading, writing, and research.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 699 - 01 Master's Project - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

40906 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Martin L. Warren

The capstone for graduate programs in English is the Master's Project course. For the MA in English, students complete an essay that provides an opportunity for lengthy reflection about selected works or authors. The purpose is to give students a final opportunity to develop an area of expertise while they refine their writing, revising, and editing skills. For the MA in Creative Writing and Publishing, students complete a chapbook-length portfolio of 40-50 pages such as a collection of poetry, literary fiction, young adult fiction or creative nonfiction. In either program, students will present their project to a review committee of a faculty advisor and two additional faculty readers and should demonstrate a high level of cogency and stylistic grace. The Master's Project (GENG 699) is its own course with its own unique registration and counts for 3 credits towards the Master of Arts in English of Master of Arts in Creative Writing and Publishing degree.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2019 Courses

J-Term 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2019 Courses

Spring 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 221 - L01 The Modern Tradition M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 301

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

JRC 301

Course Registration Number:

20068 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Martin L. Warren

What might it mean to speak of “the modern tradition”? What does that include and exclude? And how does it matter to us today? How does the modern tradition help us understand about concepts such as authorship, originality, literacy, and literary excellence? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings of representative texts of Western literature in translation from the seventeenth century through the present, including some interactions of the European traditions with modern African, Latin American, or Asian literatures. Authors may include Racine, Goethe, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Rilke, Solzhenitsyn, Duras, Lispector, and Achebe. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 621 - 01 Telling Tales: A Chaucer Remix M - - - - - - 1800 - 2100

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

Course Registration Number:

21951 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Martin L. Warren

In what forms do Chaucer and the Middle Ages persist in the modern cultural landscape? This question will guide this seminar, which explores the global reception history of Geoffrey Chaucer from his earliest English and French contemporaries to modern-day popular culture and digital media. Focusing on Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, the seminar will “code-switch” between medieval and postmedieval frames of reference. First, we will read The Canterbury tales by Chaucer; second, we will consider how Chaucerian works are repurposed in modern media (such as spoken word poetry, visual art, film, dialect literature, YouTube videos, and comic books). As this course toggles between modes of reading, it tests the boundaries between literary criticism and popular reception history. It also asks how present-day translation theory confronts a perceived chasm separating static text-based models of “translation” from embodied culture-based models of “adaptation.” Thus, beyond studying Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, the seminar will (1) examine the online Global Chaucers project that logs and links translations and adaptations across the world; (2) explore the work of British-Nigerian poet, performer and rapper, Patience Agbabi, who revisits The Canterbury Tales and mines the Middle-English text to offer a 21st-century take on the characters, its poetry and its performance elements; and (3) wrestle with the six-part BBC Canterbury Tales adaptations of specific Canterbury Tales which are transferred to a modern, 21st-century setting, but still set along the traditional Pilgrims' route to Canterbury.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)