Kelli Larson  portrait

Kelli Larson

Professor of English / Academic Development Program Coordinator
Degree
M.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University
B.A., Aquinas College
At St. Thomas since 1990
Office
JRC 318
Hours
(Spring 2019) T 9:00-9:45am; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5615
CV
I specialize in American literature of the 19th and 20th centuries and regularly teach the American Authors I survey, the American short story, and an occasional modern American literature course. I particularly enjoy teaching the works of Ambrose Bierce, Edgar Allan Poe, and Ernest Hemingway. Most recently, I have been working with a small group of students each fall semester to update the volume Ernest Hemingway, A Reference Guide published back in 1990 and to produce the "Current Bibliography" for The Hemingway Review.

Spring 2019 Courses

Spring 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 481 - D01 Sem: Hemingway in Love & War - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

21304 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

At the time of his death in 1961, Ernest Hemingway was one of the most celebrated writers in the world. Today he is a cultural icon with websites, films, look-alike contests, and even his own category on Jeopardy. The Hemingway brand is big business—from fishing tackle to an upscale furniture collection of sofas and barstools—urging buyers to “live the legend.” Yet how does Hemingway, so often accused of misogyny, racism, and warmongering, endure as one of the twentieth century's most popular and greatest authors? How does he continue to capture the imaginations of readers around the world in an era of equal rights and global peace initiatives? In this course, we will challenge well-known stereotypes about Hemingway by reading the actual words he wrote and by studying the man behind his public persona. We will study Papa's writings chronologically, historically, and culturally to gain greater familiarity with his artistic development over time as well as with his contributions to the world literary scene. And, of course, we will address those common myths about "the most interesting man in the world" and where they originated. Prerequisite: Completion of five English courses at or beyond ENGL 211, including ENGL 280, or for non-majors, permission of the instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 598 - 01 Hemingway in Love & War - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

22940 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2019 Courses

Summer 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 572 - 01 Kate Chopin: THE AWAKENING - T - R - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

30535 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

1 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

When THE AWAKENING appeared in 1899, it was widely condemned by reviewers as vulgar and sordid, and then largely forgotten for decades. Today Chopin’s once controversial novel is a classic of American literature, immensely popular with both literary and nonliterary readers alike. In this course, we will study Chopin’s masterpiece together with her short stories, exploring what she has to tell us about gender, sexuality class, and race in her time. And how her writings of over a century ago still speak to these same issues in our own time.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Fall 2019 Courses

Fall 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 110 - PW2 Intensive Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 308

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OEC 308

Course Registration Number:

40079 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

The course provides students with intensive practice in writing, enabling them to adapt to the demands of differing rhetorical contexts. Emphasis on understanding writing processes and learning to respond thoughtfully to writing at various stages. Critical reading will be practiced as an integral part of the writing process. Prerequisite: participation in the Academic Development Program

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 297 - L01 Front Lines: American War Lit - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 308

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 308

Course Registration Number:

42555 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Kelli A. Larson

What constitutes a true war story? Who gets to decide? And is an accurate representation by any single voice or ideology even possible given the human dimensions of warfare? In this course, we will listen to a multiplicity of voices from the front line and the home front, beginning with the legacy of the Civil War and closing with contemporary writings about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. We will study what these authors have to tell us about war, gender, and identity in their time and in ours. And through our shared exploration we will come to a fuller appreciation of what Ernest Hemingway, a lifelong eyewitness to war, meant when he wrote, “Never think that war, no matter how necessary, nor how justified, is not a crime.” Likely authors to be studied include Crane, Cather, Hemingway, Komunyakaa, and Fallon. This course satisfies the core Literature and Writing requirement for students who started that requirement with an ENGL 201-204 or 206 class and counts as an allied course for select business majors. This course also satisfies the WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, 204, or 206.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)