Heather McNiel

Instructor of English
Office
JRC 311
Hours
(Spring 2018) M/F 12:00-12:30pm; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5616

Spring 2018 Courses

Spring 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 203 - W06 Monsters, Inc. M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

22402 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Heather M. McNiel

Monsters are a big business: from Disney’s cute, cuddly monsters to nightmarish versions of zombies, vampires, and giant lizards, huge franchises have been built around monsters and the terror or fascination they inspire in us. Our obsession with monster stories and their adaptations may seem to be a recent phenomenon, but history is full of examples of monster stories that have been reinterpreted and reformulated for new purposes and audiences. This course will examine some of the most influential literary works featuring monsters, and trace how they were adapted and reinterpreted for various artistic and commercial purposes, often using different genres or formats. Texts may include FRANKENSTEIN, DRACULA, BEOWULF, as well as films and other media. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2018 Courses

Summer 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2018 Courses

Fall 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 121 - W17 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 OEC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

40952 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Heather M. McNiel

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W10 Clones, Doubles, & Alter Egos M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

42700 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Heather M. McNiel

Whether it’s the idea of an evil twin, a shadow self, or an exact replica, the figure of the double has long fascinated humankind. More than just a staple of science fiction or daytime soap operas, doubles may express deep-seated fears about losing our sense of self or our capacity for self-determination and control. Doubles can also be figures of fascination and desire: the power to create, control, or extend life through a second self is a tantalizing prospect. In this course, we will examine a variety of narratives that feature doppelgangers, alter egos, clones, or related figures, and explore different moral, psychological, literary, and cultural frameworks for understanding the figure of the double. Potential texts may include DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE, THE DOUBLE, HER FEARFUL SYMMETRY, NEVER LET ME GO, and selected films. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W12 Clones, Doubles, & Alter Egos M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

42702 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Heather M. McNiel

Whether it’s the idea of an evil twin, a shadow self, or an exact replica, the figure of the double has long fascinated humankind. More than just a staple of science fiction or daytime soap operas, doubles may express deep-seated fears about losing our sense of self or our capacity for self-determination and control. Doubles can also be figures of fascination and desire: the power to create, control, or extend life through a second self is a tantalizing prospect. In this course, we will examine a variety of narratives that feature doppelgangers, alter egos, clones, or related figures, and explore different moral, psychological, literary, and cultural frameworks for understanding the figure of the double. Potential texts may include DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE, THE DOUBLE, HER FEARFUL SYMMETRY, NEVER LET ME GO, and selected films. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)