Elizabeth Wilkinson  
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Elizabeth Wilkinson

Associate Professor of English
Degree
Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro
M.A., Virginia Polytechnic and State University
B.A., M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University at University Park
At St. Thomas since 2008
Office
JRC 358
Hours
(Fall 2019) M/W 3:30-5:00pm; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5632
CV

Siyo! ("Hi" in Tsalagi) I moved here from North Carolina, where I had been studying Cherokee language, literature, and culture. Here, I'm tapping into and expanding my knowledge of the Dakota and Anishinaabe peoples--the indigenous nations of Minnesota. Along with Native American literatures from all over North America, I teach Women's Literature, and Sports Literature; more often than you might expect, these three overlap. My courses often cross-list with Women's Studies and with American Culture and Difference. Miigwitch! ("Thanks" in Anisinaabeg)

Fall 2019 Courses

Fall 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 203 - W08 Just Play: Sports Literature M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 SCB 107

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

SCB 107

Course Registration Number:

43475 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

What is any sports event but a story--multiple stories--playing out before our eyes? Sports by definition involve drama: conflicts in decision making, in relationships, with nature, and, if we believe it possible, conflicts with the supernatural. It's not an accident that some of our greatest metaphors come from the arena of athletics. Through sports we have a way to look at human values--at the best we have to offer and sometimes the worst. We’ll use sports literature to investigate what is just… and what is unjust… and how we discern which is which. In this class, we will read fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry. Books may include SWIMMING TO ANTARCTICA, THE REAL ALL-AMERICANS, TAKE ME OUT, and BEST AMERICAN SPORTS WRITING 2017. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W40 HNRS: Sports Literature M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 SCB 107

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

SCB 107

Course Registration Number:

42571 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

What is any sports event but a story--multiple stories--playing out before our eyes? Sports by definition involve drama: conflicts in decision making, in relationships, with nature, and, if we believe it possible, conflicts with the supernatural. It's not an accident that some of our greatest metaphors come from the arena of athletics. Through sports we have a way to look at human values--at the best we have to offer and sometimes the worst. We’ll use sports literature to investigate what is just… and what is unjust… and how we discern which is which. In this class, we will read fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry. Books may include SWIMMING TO ANTARCTICA, THE REAL ALL-AMERICANS, TAKE ME OUT, and BEST AMERICAN SPORTS WRITING 2017. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Intensive requirement. Please note that this course is open only to students in the Aquinas Scholars Honors program.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2020 Courses

J-Term 2020 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2020 Courses

Spring 2020 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 559 - 01 Indians in Unexpected Places - T - - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

21946 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

Taking a cue from Dr. Philip Deloria (Dakota), this class will survey the “unexpected” long history of indigenous North American fiction, essay, poetry, and theory from the 18th Century to the present. From the gynocratic (Paula Gunn Allen—Laguna Pueblo) roots of Native women’s writing to the survivance (Gerald Vizenor—Anishinaabe) rhetoric deployed pan-tribally over centuries, we will look at the many ways Native writers show us that sometimes “the body needs a story more than food to survive” (Barry Lopez from CROW AND WEASEL). This course satisfies the multicultural distribution requirement and the early American literature requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
WMST 205 - L01 Found in Women's Studies - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 222

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

20279 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

This multi-disciplinary course is designed to raise awareness of women's status and women's diversity; to critically examine disciplines and social practices through the lens of feminist theory; to recover past achievements of women and survey the work that women do now; to expand perspectives; and to provide a basis for critical evaluation of future learning. Available each semester on at least one consortial campus, usually offered at UST Spring semester. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)