Ann Marie Klein portrait

Ann Marie Klein

Instructor of English

 

Office
JRC 353
Hours
(Fall 2017) W 11:00am-12:00pm; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5612

Academic History
Ph.D., Literature, Institute of Philosophic Studies, University of Dallas, 2013
M.A. Literature, University of Dallas, 2009
M.A. English Philology and Literature, University of Helsinki, Finland, 2001
B.A. English and Secondary Education with Certification, University of Boston College, 1986

Areas of Research
Gerard Manley Hopkins
Romantic and Victorian Poetry
Thomas Carlyle on Work
William Shakespeare’s Hamlet
Thomas More’s Utopia
Philip Sidney's Apology for Poetry
John Duns Scotus and Thomas Aquinas on Will and Natural Law

Recent Publications
“'Laus Deo': Robert Bridges’s Response to G.M. Hopkins,” The Hopkins Quarterly, Vol. XL, Nos. 1-2, Winter-Spring, 2013, 3-18.

“Only the Lover Sings: Scotus’s Influence on Hopkins’s ‘Wreck,’” The Hopkins Quarterly, Vol. XLI, Nos. 1-2, Winter-Spring, 2014, 19-38.

Selected Presentations
"The Grace and Light of Hopkins Final Retreat: Fleshing Out What He Had Inscaped in 'The Wreck,'" Hopkins Society Conference, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel, 15-18 March 2016.

"'Speaking Pictures': Sidney's Artful Use of Allusions in his Apology for Poetry," Sixteenth Century Society Conference, Vancouver, British Columbia, October 2015.

"Portraying Carlyle's Ethic: George Eliot's Tailors and Tools," Victorian Institute and Journal Conference on "Victorian Work and Labor," Spartanburg, SC, 2 October 2015.

"Hopkins opposes Carlyle on Work: What do they 'worship' and 'burn'?" International Hopkins, S. J. Conference, Regis University, Denver, March 2015.

“The Missing Wings of Eros: How More’s Utopia Can Enlighten Students on Freedom,” Association for Core Texts and Courses Conference, Los Angeles, California, 2014.

“Hopkins’ Pindaric Ode: Craft as Action,” International Hopkins, S.J. Conference, Regis University, Denver, Colorado, 2014.

‘“Laus Deo’: Bridges’s Response to Hopkins,” International Hopkins, S.J. Conference, Regis University, Denver, Colorado, 2013.

“Inscaping the Sky and Sea: Why Hopkins Thought of Scotus,” International Hopkins, S.J. Conference, Regis University, Denver, Colorado, 2012.

“Perfection of the Will in Hopkins’s Wreck: Divinely Coerced?” International Hopkins, S.J. Conference, Regis University, Denver, Colorado, 2011.

“The Natural Law in Aquinas and Scotus: Does it Include the Second Table of the Ten Commandments?” Institute of Philosophic Studies Colloquium, University of Dallas, Dallas, Texas, 2010.

‘“He who heeds but hides’: Hopkins’ Ploughman” International Hopkins, S.J. Conference, Regis at Gonzaga University, Spokane, Washington, 2010.

“Accommodation in Plato’s Phaedrus and More’s Utopia,” Federation Rhetoric Symposium, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, 2009.

“Shakespeare’s Transformation of Kyd’s Revenger in Hamlet,” Shakespeare Association of America, Annual Meeting, Dallas, Texas, 2008.

“Echoes of Luther and Aquinas in Shakespeare’s Hamlet: Implications for Charity and Friendship” Lubbock University Conference, Lubbock, Texas, 2007.

“Liberty and Human Nature” European Union Baltic Ethics Conference, Tartu, Estonia, 2002.

Book in Progress
Gerard Manley Hopkins on Work
Against the backdrop of the Victorian labor riots and Thomas Carlyle’s hero-worship, this study addresses Gerard Manley Hopkins’ Scotist treatment of work in his poetry, prose, and personal life.

Experience
For two years, Dr. Klein has taught in the intensive writing and literature programs at both the University of Dallas and Southern Methodist University. At UD, she led seminars and guided student papers on Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, Virgil's Aeneid, Beowulf, Dante's Divine Comedy, and Milton's Paradise Lost. At SMU, she designed and taught courses on friendship and freedom. Texts for discussion and written analysis in these seminars included writings of Plato and Aristotle, Shakespeare and More, Austen and Paton, Marx and Milowcz.

Co-founding teacher of a bilingual high school in Helsinki, Finland, Dr. Klein designed and taught all of its English writing and literature courses to prepare Finns for competitive university studies at Oxford, Cambridge, St. Andrews, Edinburgh, Wellesley, Cornell and other schools in Great Britain and the United States. She worked in Finland's renowned education system for sixteen years.

With a passion for the underprivileged, Dr. Klein has guided college students over the decades in educating Chicago's inner-city children, in teaching sanitary methods to families living in the mountains outside of Guadalajara, in caring for the elderly in Estonia, and in doing crafts with teens suffering from cerebral palsy in Finland.

Fall 2017 Courses

Fall 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 121 - W01 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 MCH 238
CRN: 40959 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Ann M. Klein Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W08 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MCH 238
CRN: 40967 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Ann M. Klein Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2018 Courses

J-Term 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2018 Courses

Spring 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 203 - W03 Saved by Hope M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 MHC 211
CRN: 22398 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Ann M. Klein In what and for what? This course explores the origin and power of hope amidst darkness and its relation to faith and love. Dostoevsky’s “Grand Inquisitor” will open our discussion by putting God on trial for allowing innocents to suffer. We will then probe reasons for belief through an analysis of THE TREE OF LIFE (film); grounds for hope through UTOPIA (dialogue), MAN’S SEARCH FOR MEANING (memoir), and “The Wreck of the Deutschland” (ode); and dimensions of charity through THE JEWELER’S SHOP (play), DEATH COMES FOR THE ARCHBISHOP (novel), and THE LIVING FLAME OF LOVE (mystical poem). Pope Emeritus Benedict XIV’s THE YES OF JESUS CHRIST will shed further light on the relevance of these virtues in our culture today. Formal and informal assignments will involve creative and analytical writing. By confronting vital questions and insights posed by diverse genres, students will have opportunities to ponder deeply and develop understanding and wisdom as they hone their composition skills through exploration, reflection, research, teamwork, drafting, revising, and editing. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 314 - L01 Christian Spirituality M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 MHC 204
CRN: 22544 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Ann M. Klein This course explores the diverse expressions of Christian spirituality. Students will discuss the definitions given to the term "spirituality" and consider methodological issues in the academic study of spirituality whether these are historical, anthropological or theological in approach. Emphasis is placed on a wide reading in the Christian tradition of both primary and secondary literature in order to assist the student in grasping the integral link between the lived faith of Christians and the theological articulation of that faith. Spiritualties will be seen in the context of their historical emergence, the unique contributions each makes to Christianity, and the link they demonstrate between spiritual life and theological insight. Prerequisite: THEO 101

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)