Alexis Easley  portrait

Alexis Easley

Professor of English / Graduate English Program Director
Degree
Ph.D., University of Oregon
B.S., M.F.A., University of Alaska Fairbanks
At St. Thomas since 2005
Office
JRC 335
Hours
(Spring 2018) T 2:00-3:00pm; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5653
CV

As a researcher, teacher, and editor, I am interested in everything Victorian. I recently published the Routledge Handbook to Nineteenth-Century British Periodicals and Newspapers (co-edited with Andrew King and John Morton), which received the 2017 Colby Prize. Other recent books include Literary Celebrity, Gender, and Victorian Authorship, 1850–1914 (U Delaware P, 2011) and First-Person Anonymous: Women Writers and Victorian Print Media, 1830-70 (Ashgate, 2004). I serve as editor of Victorian Periodicals Review, an international scholarly journal dedicated to research on the Victorian press. I am also co-editor of a forthcoming edited collection, Researching the Nineteenth-Century Periodical Press: Case Studies (Routledge, 2017). My other current research and teaching interests include Victorian women writers, Victorian drama, working-class poetry, the Brontës, Harriet Martineau, Charles Dickens, detective fiction, Gothic novels, and professional editing.

Spring 2018 Courses

Spring 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 481 - D01 Capstone Seminar: Jane Austen - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

21705 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

M. A. Easley

Jane Austen's popularity today is indisputable. Her novels are frequently reprinted had have been adapted into film, fan fiction, memes, and a wide variety of other media formats. In this course, we will read Austen’s six major novels, including PRIDE AND PREJUDICE, EMMA, and NORTHANGER ABBEY, situating these works within early nineteenth-century literature and culture. We will also explore the afterlife of Austen's fiction in twenty-first-century literary criticism and digital culture. This cross-media analysis will enable us to explore how Austen's witty social satire speaks to our own time, highlighting issues of gender, class, and social injustice. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing in the Discipline requirement. Prerequisite: Completion of five English courses at or beyond ENGL 211, including ENGL 280, or for non-majors, permission of the instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 699 - 04 Master's Essay - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22964 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3 Credit Hours

Instructor:

M. A. Easley

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2018 Courses

Summer 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2018 Courses

Fall 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location