Alexis Easley  portrait

Alexis Easley

Professor of English
Degree
Ph.D., University of Oregon
B.S., M.F.A., University of Alaska Fairbanks
At St. Thomas since 2005
Office
JRC 335
Phone
(651) 962-5653
CV

 

As a researcher, teacher, and editor, I am interested in everything Victorian. I recently published two award-winning essay collections, The Routledge Handbook to Nineteenth-Century Periodicals and Newspapers (2016) and Researching the Nineteenth-Century Periodical Press: Case Studies (2017), both co-edited with Andrew King and John Morton. I have also published two monographs, Literary Celebrity, Gender, and Victorian Authorship, 1850–1914 (U Delaware P, 2011) and First-Person Anonymous: Women Writers and Victorian Print Media, 1830-70 (Ashgate-Routledge, 2004). I am currently working on an edited collection, Women, Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1830s–1900s, with Beth Rodgers and Clare Gill (Edinburgh UP, 2019). Other current research and teaching interests include Victorian women writers, literary copyright, nineteenth-century journalism, mass-market poetry, media studies, Eliza Cook, and the Brontës.

 

Spring 2019 Courses

Spring 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Summer 2019 Courses

Summer 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 630 - 01 Victorian Literary Genres See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

30504 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3 Credit Hours

Instructor:

M. A. Easley

The Victorian age was a period of literary innovation. With the rise of periodicals came the serial novel, which soon became a ubiquitous part of everyday life. The three-volume realist novel emerged with the proliferation of lending libraries, which imposed a censoring effect on literary production. The sensation novel, New Woman novel, and detective serial genres were all born in the Victorian period, and the epic poem, fairy tale, and gothic novel were reinvented in ways that spoke to the scandals and social controversies of the modern age. New genres arose alongside other new technologies and innovations – e.g., the railway, illustrated advertisements, film, mass-market journalism, and photography – which intersected with literary genres in exciting ways. The reading list will include works by Charles Dickens, Alfred Tennyson, Mary Braddon, and Frances Browne. This is a hybrid course. We will meet three hours per week for ten weeks. The other four weeks will be dedicated to conferencing and independent research. This course satisfies the Early British Literature requirement (previous curriculum) or the Early British/American requirement (new curriculum).

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
OEC 2081800-2100- - W - - - -
-- - - - - - -
OEC 2081800-210031 Jul '19
OEC 2081800-210021 Aug '19

Fall 2019 Courses

Fall 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 121 - W25 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 311

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 311

Course Registration Number:

40836 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

M. A. Easley

Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 699 - 01 Master's Project - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

40787 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3 Credit Hours

Instructor:

M. A. Easley

The capstone for graduate programs in English is the Master's Project course. For the MA in English, students complete an essay that provides an opportunity for lengthy reflection about selected works or authors. The purpose is to give students a final opportunity to develop an area of expertise while they refine their writing, revising, and editing skills. For the MA in Creative Writing and Publishing, students complete a chapbook-length portfolio of 40-50 pages such as a collection of poetry, literary fiction, young adult fiction or creative nonfiction. In either program, students will present their project to a review committee of a faculty advisor and two additional faculty readers and should demonstrate a high level of cogency and stylistic grace. The Master's Project (GENG 699) is its own course with its own unique registration and counts for 3 credits towards the Master of Arts in English of Master of Arts in Creative Writing and Publishing degree.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)