Alexis Easley  portrait

Alexis Easley

Professor of English / Graduate Program Director
Degree
Ph.D., University of Oregon
B.S., M.F.A., University of Alaska Fairbanks
At St. Thomas since 2005
Office
JRC 335
Phone
(651) 962-5653
CV

 

As a researcher, teacher, and editor, I am interested in everything Victorian. I recently published two award-winning essay collections, The Routledge Handbook to Nineteenth-Century Periodicals and Newspapers (2016) and Researching the Nineteenth-Century Periodical Press: Case Studies (2017), both co-edited with Andrew King and John Morton. I have also published two monographs, Literary Celebrity, Gender, and Victorian Authorship, 1850–1914 (U Delaware P, 2011) and First-Person Anonymous: Women Writers and Victorian Print Media, 1830-70 (Ashgate-Routledge, 2004). I am currently working on an edited collection, Women, Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1830s–1900s, with Beth Rodgers and Clare Gill (Edinburgh UP, 2019). Other current research and teaching interests include Victorian women writers, literary copyright, nineteenth-century journalism, mass-market poetry, media studies, Eliza Cook, and the Brontës.

 

Fall 2019 Courses

Fall 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 699 - 01 Master's Project - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

40787 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3 Credit Hours

Instructor:

M. A. Easley

The capstone for graduate programs in English is the Master's Project course. For the MA in English, students complete an essay that provides an opportunity for lengthy reflection about selected works or authors. The purpose is to give students a final opportunity to develop an area of expertise while they refine their writing, revising, and editing skills. For the MA in Creative Writing and Publishing, students complete a chapbook-length portfolio of 40-50 pages such as a collection of poetry, literary fiction, young adult fiction or creative nonfiction. In either program, students will present their project to a review committee of a faculty advisor and two additional faculty readers and should demonstrate a high level of cogency and stylistic grace. The Master's Project (GENG 699) is its own course with its own unique registration and counts for 3 credits towards the Master of Arts in English of Master of Arts in Creative Writing and Publishing degree.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2020 Courses

J-Term 2020 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2020 Courses

Spring 2020 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 630 - 01 The Gothic Novel See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

22327 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3 Credit Hours

Instructor:

M. A. Easley

Vampires, ghosts, murders, madness, living portraits, dungeons, secret passageways, sexual deviance, forbidden romance, and hysteria. The sensationalism of the Gothic novel made it one of the most popular -- and controversial -- genres in British literary history. This course will begin with the roots of the Gothic novel in the late eighteenth century and will then trace the development and transformation of gothicism over the course of the nineteenth century. Following current scholarship, we will pose questions about belief in the supernatural, representations of violence, the significance of fantasy and fear, and the role of gender, race, class, and sexuality in the literature of terror. Course texts will include Horace Walpole's THE CASTLE OF OTRANTO, Matthew Lewis's THE MONK, Jane Austen's NORTHANGER ABBEY, and Bram Stoker's DRACULA. Novels will be supplemented with readings in recent theory and criticism as well as a selection of cultural materials, including nineteenth-century poetry, journalism, and visual arts. This course will meet in class for the first 10 weeks, followed by 3 weeks of independent study and advising, and a final presentation week at the end of the semester. This course satisfies the early literature distribution requirement and counts as a 600-level course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JRC 2221800-2100- - - R - - -
-- - - - - - -
1800-210021 May '20