ETLS Topics Courses

Topics courses are the newest ETLS courses that are available for graduate students. 


SPRING 2017 TOPICS COURSES:


New for Spring 2017!

New Product Development
ETLS 699-02, CRN 21846
Class meets Tuesday nights from 5:45 to 8:45 PM

New Product Design and Business Development is a 2-semester, graduate level course offered jointly by the Opus College of Business and School of Engineering. Teams of engineering and business students work together for over nine months to develop a working prototype and business plan for a new product development project. Students learn to identify business opportunities, define market needs, generate product concepts, conduct market, technical and financial feasibility tests, create engineering design, build working prototype, and develop manufacturing, marketing and financial plans. 

The course provides a unique opportunity to the students for developing a deep understanding of the challenges and opportunities created by new product design and business development projects, and for sharpening their engineering and business skills under close supervision of a team of faculty advisors and business mentors. 

In Part II, during the Spring semester, students will carry out the detail design of the product ideas from part I and develop a commercialization plan for this product. The deliverable for the part II will include (3) a working prototype and (4) a comprehensive business plan. The course meets with ETLS 699-02/OPMT 714-202.

For more information: Please contact the instructor, Brian Bischoff at bisc2524@stthomas.edu


New for Spring 2017!

Advanced Mechanics of Materials
ETLS 669-03, CRN 21864
Class meets Monday nights from 5:45 to 8:45 PM

This course will introduce anisotropic elasticity and develop models for the effective properties of composite materials. Analytic and computational predictive mechanics models of continuous fiber composites and particle reinforced composites will be covered.

Students enrolled in the Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering can use this course to fulfill their Materials & Mechanics requirement, or an elective requirement. Students in other majors are encouraged to work with their advisors to determine how this course could fit into their degree plans. 

For more information: Please contact the instructor, Dr. Sarah Baxter at scbaxter@stthomas.edu


New for Spring 2017!

Aviation Technology and Flight Systems
ETLS 699-04, CRN 22424
Class meets Wednesdays from 5:45 to 8:45 PM

Instructors: Jay Schrankler, Chris Cooper, Daniel Early, Benjamin Aleksander

The Aviation Technology and Flight Systems course was developed to introduce students to the technology and systems employed in the field of manned and unmanned aviation.  Demand for new pilots of manned aircraft is growing at an unprecedented rate.  At the same time, the emerging fields of UAV's (unmanned aerial vehicles) and UAS's (unmanned aerial systems) is booming and creating new opportunities each year. Alongside technologies and systems, emerging entrepreneurial opportunities and key aspects of Aviation Business Operations will be highlighted. 

This course will help prepare students to enter the field of aviation both by providing a comprehensive overview in this exciting and growing field, and by readying students to take the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) "ground school" exam that is a prerequisite to receiving a pilot's license.


New for Spring 2017!

Practical Product Reliability
ETLS 699-05, CRN 22439
Class meets Wednesdays from 5:45 to 8:45 PM

This course provides the student with a broad overview of the practical implementation, implications and interactions of Reliability Engineering in today’s Complex Systems. Subjects include Basic Reliability Statistics, Reliability in Design, Reliability Modeling & Prediction, and Reliability Testing. Application of Reliability Engineering principles during development activities is critical to products and industries such as (but not limited to) aviation, automotive, medical device, chemical and food processing equipment, consumer power tools.

For more information: Please contact the instructor, David Malenke at male0034@stthomas.edu


Spring 2017:

Frugal Innovation in the Developing World
ETLS 669-06, CRN 22499
Class meets on Saturdays from 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM. 

This unique and groundbreaking course focuses on “Frugal Innovation." Frugal innovation addresses the need for products and services in the emerging developing world. The course provides a way for faculty and students to apply their intellectual talents to work on meaningful projects that not only serve the world, but also contributes to the success of the developing world’s economy and fosters social benefits between the students.

The course is structured to include a collaboration with Egerton University in Nakuru; Kenya, with weekly satellite class sessions and weekly class discussion forums. This course is differentiated from other courses by the extent of the experiential learning and its highly cross-functional collaboration nature between the two universities in the developed and developing world.

For more information, please contact: 
Dr. Terry Danielson
dani5057@stthomas.edu


New for Spring 2017!

Introduction to Propulsion
ETLS 699-07, CRN 22627
Class meets on Mondays from 5:45 to 8:45 PM.

This course will cover essential elements of propulsion systems including gas mixtures, combustion, compressible flow, supersonic nozzles, normal and oblique shock waves, inlets, fans, compressors, combustion chambers, turbines, and exhaust nozzles. Cycle analysis and performance of common propulsion systems including ramjets, turbojets, turbofans and turboprop engines. Chemical and electric rocket propulsion, rocket staging, and orbital mechanics.

For more information: Please contact Dr. David Forliti at dforliti@stthomas.edu


FALL 2016 TOPICS COURSES:


New for Fall 2016!

Frugal Innovation in the Developing World
ETLS 669-03, CRN 42592
Class meets on Saturdays from 8:00 to 11:00 AM. 

This unique and groundbreaking course focuses on “Frugal Innovation." Frugal innovation addresses the need for products and services in the emerging developing world. The course provides a way for faculty and students to apply their intellectual talents to work on meaningful projects that not only serve the world, but also contributes to the success of the developing world’s economy and fosters social benefits between the students.

The course is structured to include a collaboration with Egerton University in Nakuru; Kenya, with weekly satellite class sessions and weekly class discussion forums. This course is differentiated from other courses by the extent of the experiential learning and its highly cross-functional collaboration nature between the two universities in the developed and developing world.

For more information, please contact: 
Dr. Terry Danielson
dani5057@stthomas.edu


New for Fall 2016!

Power System Protection and Relay
ETLS 669-04, CRN 42836
Class meets on Wednesdays from 5:30 to 8:30 P.M.

This course will cover the following topics to the extent needed for learning the fundamentals of Power System Protection :

  • Power System Basics - Components and Configurations
  • What is Power System Protection and why do we need it ?
  • Philosophies and types of Power System Protection
  • Faults, Symmetrical Components and Neutral Grounding
  • Fuses
  • Instrument Transformers
  • Relays – Types and Operating Principles
  • Circuit Breakers
  • Transmission Line Protection
  • Busbar Protection
  • Transformer Protection
  • Circuit Breaker Protection
  • Shunt Capacitor Protection
  • Shunt Reactor Protection
  • Generator Protection
  • Motor Protection
  • System Protection

For more information, please contact:
Mallur ('Satya') Satyanarayan
saty1471@stthomas.edu 

or

Greg Mowry
gsmowry@stthomas.edu 


New for Fall 2016! 

Announcing a new course sequence in Product Safety and Reliability:

A new course series on Product Safety and Reliability is being introduced in response to industry demand.  Product safety and reliability are critical considerations for many manufacturing sectors including medical device, automotive, aviation, foods, and consumer products.  Many companies employ professionals, often degreed engineers or scientists, with training in one or both of these disciplines.  Unfortunately, the opportunities for classroom training in both safety and reliability are limited.  The University of St. Thomas Graduate School of Engineering is therefore stepping up to create this relevant and much needed coursework to help grow the next generation of experts in this important discipline.

Reliability engineering and safety engineering, while separate disciplines, have significant overlap.  Many reliability issues can lead to reduced product safety, and reliability improvements are often a safety improvement methodology.  Thus, an integrated program that addresses both reliability and safety is appropriate.  

Completion of coursework in Product Reliability, Product Safety, Statistical Methods for Quality, and Systems Engineering will result in a Graduate Certificate in Product Safety and Reliability (currently in development).

The first course to be offered Fall 2016 is ETLS 699-05 "Practical Product Reliability.” 

This course provides the student with a broad overview of the practical implementation, implications and interactions of Reliability Engineering in today’s Complex Systems. Subjects include Basic Reliability Statistics, Reliability in Design, Reliability Modeling & Prediction, and Reliability Testing. Application of Reliability Engineering principles during development activities is critical to products and industries such as (but not limited to) aviation, automotive, medical device, chemical and food processing equipment, consumer power tools.

For more information, please contact:

Bob Bach
rjbach@stthomas.edu
Manufacturing Engineering Graduate Program Lead

 


FALL 2015 TOPICS COURSES:


New for Fall 2015! 

Announcing a new course sequence in New Product Development:

The University of Saint Thomas School of Engineering is excited to announce a new course series on New Product Development.  The courses will be held in the recently expanded Design Clinic and build on a well-recognized culture of applied learning.  The course sequence will cover challenging aspects of new product development, such as, the early product conceptualization, the design process and management. The courses will provide an opportunity for graduate and advanced undergraduate students interested in new product development to test themselves in a unique fast-paced environment.  The new Design Clinic space offers outstanding resources to gain experience in these important aspects of new product development.

The first course to be offered Fall 2015 is ETLS 699-02 "Translating Ideas to New Product Concepts”.  Within this course, students will explore the early stages of product development in high-growth technical areas such as preventative healthcare, consumer products, big data, and the Internet of Things.  A series of guest speakers will address critical new product development topics and provide excellent networking opportunities throughout the semester.  Students will form teams and work together to develop their own new products in these areas or respond to specific topics.  Seed funding will be provided by the University and the teams will be mentored and evaluated by a panel of industry experts

For more information, please contact:


Brian Bischoff
brian.bischoff@hwinnovate.com

or

John Abraham
jpabraham@stthomas.edu