Fall 2018 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
CATH 101 - D01 The Search for Happiness M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 55S B10

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

41171 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William J. Junker

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 101 - D02 The Search for Happiness M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

41541 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William J. Junker

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 101 - D03 The Search for Happiness - - W - - - - 1800 - 2100 55S B10

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

42587 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David N. Foote

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 201 - 01 Path/Expres/Pract in Cath Spir - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

40812 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Robert G. Kennedy

This course provides an investigation into the various forms and expressions of spirituality which derive their inspiration from a common origin in Christian Revelation and the teachings of the Catholic Church. We will examine in depth a selection of topics and themes having to do with differing expressions and practices of Catholic spirituality across a number of historical eras and cultures. Possible topics include prayer and contemplation; the varieties of lay and religious spiritualities in both their solitary and communal dimensions; virtue; and vocation and work. Interdisciplinary course materials will draw on sources in theology, philosophy, history, literature, and art or music.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 297 - L02 Metaphysical Poetry M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

43288 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William J. Junker

The ambitious lyric poetry of late 16th-17th century England is known as "metaphysical" poetry on account of the breadth and ambition of its language. This poetry is seemingly able to link anything to anything else, and everything to God. Some poets we will consider include: John Donne, George Herbert, Richard Crashaw, Andrew Marvell, and Henry Vaughan.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 301 - D01 The Catholic Vision - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 55S B10

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

40980 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Erika H. Kidd

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: Junior standing and CATH 101 and 201

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 301 - D02 The Catholic Vision - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

42590 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Erika H. Kidd

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: Junior standing and CATH 101 and 201

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 308 - L01 Woman and Man M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

40718 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David P. Deavel

This course examines the definition of "woman" and "man" from both the historical and the philosophical perspective. Readings and discussion center on the question of (1) whether there are important philosophical differences between women and men and (2) whether such differences are natural or socially constructed. The implications of various answers to those questions are then examined, with special attention given to the Catholic tradition's reflections on the nature and ends of marriage, the character of priestly ordination, friendship between women and men, and human sexuality. The purpose of this course is to examine the ways in which thinkers from a wide spectrum have construed male/female relationships. A major component of this course consists in the study of power and the way it operates both in history and in contemporary culture. This course fulfills the core curriculum requirement in Human Diversity. Prerequisite: PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 387 - 01 John Henry Newman M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 55S B10

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

42591 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David P. Deavel

John Henry Newman has been called, somewhat misleadingly, the father of the Second Vatican Council. According to Jarsoslav Pelikan, "(n)ot only to his latter day disciples, ...but to many of those who have drawn other conclusions from his insights, John Henry Newman has become the most important theological thinker of modern times." T.S. Eliot had insisted that he is one of the two most eloquent sermon writers in the English language. Pope Benedict XVI stressed his importance as the theologian of conscience when he presided at his beatification in England. In this course we will examine not only Cardinal Newman's most important theological works focusing on the development of doctrine and the role of conscience in relation to Church authority, but also his philosophical works addressing the relations of faith and reason, his work on university education and selected poetry, meditations and devotions, and sermons. Prerequisite: THEO 101

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 401 - 01 Church&Culture:Soc Dim of Cath M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 55S B10

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

41544 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Robert G. Kennedy

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently social and ecclesial. Its specific focus is on the Christian engagement with the world. The course's framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) as described in Centesimus annus. We will examine the ways that Revelation, the sacramental life, and the teachings of the Church call Catholics to seek holiness and to witness to their faith in the world. Specific topics may include social and economic justice, politics and public policy, lay and religious apostolates, education, and marriage and family. Course materials may include resources from philosophy, theology, history, economics, and political science. This course will satisfy the third level Faith and Catholic Tradition core requirement. Prerequisite: CATH 101 and Junior standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 495 - 01 Cath Social Tradition - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

43594 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Martin W. Schlag

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2019 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2019 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
CATH 101 - D01 The Search for Happiness M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

21421 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Erika H. Kidd

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 101 - D02 The Search for Happiness M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

20386 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Erika H. Kidd

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 101 - D03 The Search for Happiness - T - - - - - 1800 - 2100 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

20831 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David P. Deavel

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 201 - 01 Path/Expres/Pract in Cath Spir - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

Course Registration Number:

20464 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Robert G. Kennedy

This course provides an investigation into the various forms and expressions of spirituality which derive their inspiration from a common origin in Christian Revelation and the teachings of the Catholic Church. We will examine in depth a selection of topics and themes having to do with differing expressions and practices of Catholic spirituality across a number of historical eras and cultures. Possible topics include prayer and contemplation; the varieties of lay and religious spiritualities in both their solitary and communal dimensions; virtue; and vocation and work. Interdisciplinary course materials will draw on sources in theology, philosophy, history, literature, and art or music.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 205 - 01 Crisis and Development - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

22620 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Robert G. Kennedy

This course explores from an interdisciplinary perspective the history of the Catholic Church as it interacts with the secular world and is shaped by its dominant personalities and events. No other institution in history has survived, and flourished, for so long and in the face of so many challenges. This course will critically reflect upon the history of the Church, from its origins in the Apostolic Age to the modern period, as a series of cycles with a common pattern of creativity, achievement, and retreat. Students may expect to complete the course with an awareness and understanding of the major personalities and events, secular and ecclesial, that have shaped the life of the Church.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 301 - D01 The Catholic Vision M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

20016 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William J. Junker

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: Junior standing and CATH 101 and 201

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 308 - L01 Woman and Man M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

21131 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David P. Deavel

This course examines the definition of "woman" and "man" from both the historical and the philosophical perspective. Readings and discussion center on the question of (1) whether there are important philosophical differences between women and men and (2) whether such differences are natural or socially constructed. The implications of various answers to those questions are then examined, with special attention given to the Catholic tradition's reflections on the nature and ends of marriage, the character of priestly ordination, friendship between women and men, and human sexuality. The purpose of this course is to examine the ways in which thinkers from a wide spectrum have construed male/female relationships. A major component of this course consists in the study of power and the way it operates both in history and in contemporary culture. This course fulfills the core curriculum requirement in Human Diversity. Prerequisite: PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 308 - L02 Woman and Man M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 55S B10

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

22261 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David P. Deavel

This course examines the definition of "woman" and "man" from both the historical and the philosophical perspective. Readings and discussion center on the question of (1) whether there are important philosophical differences between women and men and (2) whether such differences are natural or socially constructed. The implications of various answers to those questions are then examined, with special attention given to the Catholic tradition's reflections on the nature and ends of marriage, the character of priestly ordination, friendship between women and men, and human sexuality. The purpose of this course is to examine the ways in which thinkers from a wide spectrum have construed male/female relationships. A major component of this course consists in the study of power and the way it operates both in history and in contemporary culture. This course fulfills the core curriculum requirement in Human Diversity. Prerequisite: PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 392 - 01 Dante's Divine Comedy M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

22260 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William J. Junker

This interdisciplinary Catholic Studies/literature course explores Dante Alighierl's Divine Comedy in its literary, historical, theological, religious, political, and linguistic contexts. The course studies in critical detail the complete text of the Commedia in English as well as portions of related works such as Dante's La Vita Nuova. Throughout the course, particular attention will be paid to the Divine Comedy's Catholic Christian themes. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 398 - 01 Practical Ldrship in Cath Orgs - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

21295 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Robert G. Kennedy

In modern developed countries it is virtually impossible to earn a living or to make one’s work effective without associating with one (or even many) formal organizations. Students who major or minor in Catholic Studies can expect to receive a solid formation in the Catholic tradition—but most will also enter the world of work. The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the operation of organizations and with the perspectives and skills of managers and leaders. The course will consider both clerical and lay vocations, giving attention to management in a parish context (as a clerical function) but also to the vocation of the laity to management as this plays out in a variety of organizations. We will be assisted in this by a number of guest speakers, clerical and lay, who will share their expertise and experience. Students can expect to take away from the course a fundamental understanding of the structure and essential operations of important organizations associated with the Church and a basic grasp of management principles and skills.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 401 - 02 Church&Culture:Soc Dim of Cath - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

22525 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Michael J. Naughton, Michael J. Sarafolean

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently social and ecclesial. Its specific focus is on the Christian engagement with the world. The course's framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) as described in Centesimus annus. We will examine the ways that Revelation, the sacramental life, and the teachings of the Church call Catholics to seek holiness and to witness to their faith in the world. Specific topics may include social and economic justice, politics and public policy, lay and religious apostolates, education, and marriage and family. Course materials may include resources from philosophy, theology, history, economics, and political science. This course will satisfy the third level Faith and Catholic Tradition core requirement. Prerequisite: CATH 101 and Junior standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)