Summer 2019 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2019 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
CATH 101 - D01 The Search for Happiness M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 55S B10

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

41027 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David N. Foote

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 101 - D02 The Search for Happiness M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

41347 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David N. Foote

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 205 - 01 Crisis and Development - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 55S B10

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

43110 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Robert G. Kennedy

This course explores from an interdisciplinary perspective the history of the Catholic Church as it interacts with the secular world and is shaped by its dominant personalities and events. No other institution in history has survived, and flourished, for so long and in the face of so many challenges. This course will critically reflect upon the history of the Church, from its origins in the Apostolic Age to the modern period, as a series of cycles with a common pattern of creativity, achievement, and retreat. Students may expect to complete the course with an awareness and understanding of the major personalities and events, secular and ecclesial, that have shaped the life of the Church.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 301 - D01 The Catholic Vision M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

40855 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

John F. Boyle

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: Junior standing and CATH 101 and 201

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 308 - L01 Woman and Man M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 55S B10

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

40620 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David P. Deavel

This course examines the definition of "woman" and "man" from both the historical and the philosophical perspective. Readings and discussion center on the question of (1) whether there are important philosophical differences between women and men and (2) whether such differences are natural or socially constructed. The implications of various answers to those questions are then examined, with special attention given to the Catholic tradition's reflections on the nature and ends of marriage, the character of priestly ordination, friendship between women and men, and human sexuality. The purpose of this course is to examine the ways in which thinkers from a wide spectrum have construed male/female relationships. A major component of this course consists in the study of power and the way it operates both in history and in contemporary culture. This course fulfills the core curriculum requirement in Human Diversity. Prerequisite: PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 334 - W01 Lit/Christian Perspective - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

43109 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

William J. Junker

This course--cross-listed with ENGL 334--provides an in-depth exploration of how literature engages Christian thought, experience, and practice and how a reader engages works of imaginative literature from an intellectually serious Christian perspective. The course will also provide an introduction to theories in the interdisciplinary field of religion and literature. Religious themes studied will come from a variety of literary forms, including those of myth, history, parable, short story, essay, children's literature, poem, and novel. The literature chosen may reflect a variety of cultural backgrounds so that, among other things, we may consider how meaning may be affected by changes in worldview. Specific topics vary; accordingly, credit may be earned more than once for this course number. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204. 4.000 Credit hours

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 401 - 01 Church&Culture:Soc Dim of Cath - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

41348 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Martin W. Schlag, Michael J. Sarafolean

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently social and ecclesial. Its specific focus is on the Christian engagement with the world. The course's framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) as described in Centesimus annus. We will examine the ways that Revelation, the sacramental life, and the teachings of the Church call Catholics to seek holiness and to witness to their faith in the world. Specific topics may include social and economic justice, politics and public policy, lay and religious apostolates, education, and marriage and family. Course materials may include resources from philosophy, theology, history, economics, and political science. This course will satisfy the third level Faith and Catholic Tradition core requirement. Prerequisite: CATH 101 and Junior standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 401 - 02 Church&Culture:Soc Dim of Cath - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 55S B10

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

43352 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Martin W. Schlag

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently social and ecclesial. Its specific focus is on the Christian engagement with the world. The course's framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) as described in Centesimus annus. We will examine the ways that Revelation, the sacramental life, and the teachings of the Church call Catholics to seek holiness and to witness to their faith in the world. Specific topics may include social and economic justice, politics and public policy, lay and religious apostolates, education, and marriage and family. Course materials may include resources from philosophy, theology, history, economics, and political science. This course will satisfy the third level Faith and Catholic Tradition core requirement. Prerequisite: CATH 101 and Junior standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 487 - 01 Chesterton M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 55S B10

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

43414 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2

Instructor:

David P. Deavel

Upon the death of G. K. Chesterton, the scholar and novelist T. H. White remarked that P. G. Wodehouse was now the master of the English language. Pope Pius XI sent a telegram of condolence calling Chesterton “Defender of the Faith” (a title not printed in newspapers because it was reserved for English kings and queens). Chesterton was both these things and more: the genres in which he wrote included poetry, novels, detective stories, literary criticism, popular history, travel literature, and, in countless newspapers and magazines, political pundit and atheist. This course, which will be a mixture of lecture and discussion, will be a survey of some of the most important major works of Chesterton the Defender of the Faith, including Orthodoxy and The Everlasting Man, as well as selections from various other aspects of his work.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2020 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location