Summer 2020 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
CATH 295 - 02 Love & Faith in Crisis - T - R - - - 0900 - 1100

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0900 - 1100

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30605 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

William J. Junker

John Donne is one of the greatest poets of the English language. He wrote about love: friendship, marriage, sex, and the soul's love of God. He often did this all in the same poem. He wrote at a time of religious crisis in England as the Reformation unsettled everything. He wrote about that too and often in the same poems. This course will read selected poems of Donne with an eye to how Donne wove these themes of love and faith together in a time of religious and spiritual crisis. 2 credits

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Fall 2020 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
CATH 101 - D01 The Search for Happiness - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

44730 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David N. Foote

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 101 - D02 The Search for Happiness M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 55S B10

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

44989 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David N. Foote

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 205 - 01 Crisis and Development - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 55S B10

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

45976 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Robert G. Kennedy

This course explores from an interdisciplinary perspective the history of the Catholic Church as it interacts with the secular world and is shaped by its dominant personalities and events. No other institution in history has survived, and flourished, for so long and in the face of so many challenges. This course will critically reflect upon the history of the Church, from its origins in the Apostolic Age to the modern period, as a series of cycles with a common pattern of creativity, achievement, and retreat. Students may expect to complete the course with an awareness and understanding of the major personalities and events, secular and ecclesial, that have shaped the life of the Church.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 301 - 01 The Catholic Vision M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

44586 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William J. Junker

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: CATH 101

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 308 - 01 Woman and Man - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

44378 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David P. Deavel

This course examines the definition of "woman" and "man" from both the historical and the philosophical perspective. Readings and discussion center on the question of (1) whether there are important philosophical differences between women and men and (2) whether such differences are natural or socially constructed. The implications of various answers to those questions are then examined, with special attention given to the Catholic tradition's reflections on the nature and ends of marriage, the character of priestly ordination, friendship between women and men, and human sexuality. The purpose of this course is to examine the ways in which thinkers from a wide spectrum have construed male/female relationships. A major component of this course consists in the study of power and the way it operates both in history and in contemporary culture.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 340 - 01 Church&Culture:Soc Dim of Cath - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 55S B10

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

46504 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Robert G. Kennedy

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently social and ecclesial. Its specific focus is on the Christian engagement with the world. The course's framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) as described in Centesimus annus. We will examine the ways that Revelation, the sacramental life, and the teachings of the Church call Catholics to seek holiness and to witness to their faith in the world. Specific topics may include social and economic justice, politics and public policy, lay and religious apostolates, education, and marriage and family. Course materials may include resources from philosophy, theology, history, economics, and political science. This course will satisfy the third level Faith and Catholic Tradition core requirement. Prerequisite: CATH 101

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 340 - 02 Vocation of the Entrepreneur - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

47296 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Michael J. Naughton, Michael J. Sarafolean

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently social and ecclesial. Its specific focus is on the Christian engagement with the world. The course's framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) as described in Centesimus annus. We will examine the ways that Revelation, the sacramental life, and the teachings of the Church call Catholics to seek holiness and to witness to their faith in the world. Specific topics may include social and economic justice, politics and public policy, lay and religious apostolates, education, and marriage and family. Course materials may include resources from philosophy, theology, history, economics, and political science. This course will satisfy the third level Faith and Catholic Tradition core requirement. Prerequisite: CATH 101

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 402 - 01 Dante's Divine Comedy M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

46936 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

William J. Junker

This interdisciplinary Catholic Studies/literature course explores Dante Alighierl's Divine Comedy in its literary, historical, theological, religious, political, and linguistic contexts. The course studies in critical detail the complete text of the Commedia in English as well as portions of related works such as Dante's La Vita Nuova. Throughout the course, particular attention will be paid to the Divine Comedy's Catholic Christian themes.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 487 - 01 St Francis M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 55S B10

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

46505 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

David N. Foote

Western Europe in the twelfth through fourteenth centuries was in the throes of transformation, arguably one of the most decisive periods of change in European history. This period witnessed the birth pangs of the modern state, the revival of urban life and the early formation of an international market economy. The birth of the first European universities and the recovery of the corpus of Aristotle’s writings revolutionized the study of the liberal arts, theology and law. For the first time in almost a millennium, the lay urban classes became a center of energy and creativity in all spheres of life. Feeding off of the spiritual energy of a century of papal, monastic, and clerical reform, lay piety was in ferment, drawn simultaneously to the Church and to heretical sects like the Cathars. In short, it was a world in need of a saint, who could reveal Christ and bring His love to bear upon its creative energy and endeavors. With all this in mind, this course will give us, who find ourselves in the throes of radical transformation as well, a wonderful opportunity to think about Christ and culture and the intersection of time with the timeless.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2021 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location