Dr. William Junker  portrait

Dr. William Junker

Assistant Professor of Catholic Studies; Co-Director, Terrence J. Murphy Institute for Catholic Thought, Law and Public Policy
Degree
Ph.D. John U. Nef Committee on Social Thought and the Department of English, University of Chicago, 2011
Office
Sitzmann Hall 301
Phone
(651) 962-5706

Academic History

Ph.D. John U. Nef Committee on Social Thought and the Department of English, University of Chicago, 2011
M.A. Philosophy, University of Notre Dame, 2003
B.A. English, University of Dallas, 2001

Expertise

Shakespeare
English Renaissance Poetry and Drama
Literary Criticism and Theory
History of Political Thought

Selected Publications

“Spenser, Plato, and Platonism,” in Edmund Spenser in Context, ed. Andrew Escobedo (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming).

"Benedict Among the Brambles: A Revisionary Reading of Gregory the Great's Life of Benedict," The Journal of Religion & Literature 45.3 (2013): 1-24.

"Spenser's Unarmed Cupid and the Experience of the 1590 Faerie Queene," ELH 79.1 (2012): 59-83.

"'Wonderfully Ravished': Platonic Erotics and the Heroic Genre in Sir Philip Sidney's Defence of Poesy," The Ben Jonson Journal 18.1 (2011): 45-65.

Reviews

Hans Boersma. Embodiment and Virtue in Gregory of Nyssa (Oxford University Press, 2014). In Marginalia (forthcoming).

Heather Hirschfeld. The End of Satisfaction: Drama and Repentance in the Age of Shakespeare (Cornell University Press, 2014). In Comparative Drama 49.1 (2015) (forthcoming).

Ann Baynes Coiro and Thomas Fulton, eds. Rethinking Historicism from Shakespeare to Milton (Cambridge University Press, 2012). In Modern Philology 112.1 (2014).

Julia Reinhard Lupton. Thinking with Shakespeare: Essays on Politics and Life (Chicago, 2011).

The Ben Jonson Journal 20.1 (2013): 148-154. 

Sarah Beckwith. Shakespeare and the Grammar of Forgiveness (Cornell, 2011). Early Modern Literary Studies (forthcoming). 

Jane Kingsley-Smith. Cupid in Early Modern Literature and Culture (Cambridge, 2011). Early
Modern Literary Studies 16.1 (2012)

Guy Story Brown. Shakespeare's Philosopher-King: Reading the Tragedy of King Lear (Mercer, 2010).

Early Modern Literary Studies 15.3 (2011)

Jean-Luc Marion. The Erotic Phenomenon (Chicago, 2008). American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82.2 (2008): 370-374.

Spring 2019 Courses

Spring 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
CATH 301 - D01 The Catholic Vision M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

20016 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

William J. Junker

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: Junior standing and CATH 101 and 201

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 392 - 01 Dante's Divine Comedy M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

22260 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

William J. Junker

This interdisciplinary Catholic Studies/literature course explores Dante Alighierl's Divine Comedy in its literary, historical, theological, religious, political, and linguistic contexts. The course studies in critical detail the complete text of the Commedia in English as well as portions of related works such as Dante's La Vita Nuova. Throughout the course, particular attention will be paid to the Divine Comedy's Catholic Christian themes. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 486 - 03 Dante's Divine Comedy - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22921 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

William J. Junker

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CSMA 549 - 02 Dante's Divine Comedy - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

22263 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3 Credit Hours

Instructor:

William J. Junker

This course is being taught online this semester. In this course we will read Dante's Commedia. We will pay close attention to the language of Dante's poem. By the end of the course, we will have a better understanding of the theological and political vision of the poem.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 572 - 01 Dante's Divine Comedy - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

23001 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3 Credit Hours

Instructor:

William J. Junker

Possible topics may include literature and film, the Bible and literature, the memoir, ecology and literature, literatures of the Holocaust, and literary biography. Credit may be earned more than once under this course number for different emphases.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 698 - 03 Independent Reading - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

23027 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3 Credit Hours

Instructor:

William J. Junker

Students will work closely with a faculty mentor on independent research. This research will involve substantial individualized reading, writing, and research.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2019 Courses

Summer 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2019 Courses

Fall 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
CATH 301 - D01 The Catholic Vision - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

40855 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

William J. Junker

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: Junior standing and CATH 101 and 201

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 301 - D02 The Catholic Vision - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

42032 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

William J. Junker

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: Junior standing and CATH 101 and 201

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 334 - 01 Lit/Christian Perspective - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

43109 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

William J. Junker

This course provides an in-depth exploration of how literature engages Christian thought, experience, and practice and how a reader engages works of imaginative literature from an intellectually serious Christian perspective. The course will also provide an introduction to theories in the interdisciplinary field of religion and literature. Religious themes studied will come from a variety of literary forms, including those of myth, history, parable, short story, essay, children's literature, poem, and novel. The literature chosen may reflect a variety of cultural backgrounds so that, among other things, we may consider how meaning may be affected by changes in worldview. Specific topics vary; accordingly, credit may be earned more than once for this course number. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 334 - L01 Lit from Christian Perspective - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

42529 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

William J. Junker

This course provides an in-depth exploration of how literature engages Christian thought, experience, and practice and how a reader engages works of imaginative literature from an intellectually serious Christian perspective. The course will also provide an introduction to theories in the interdisciplinary field of religion and literature. Religious themes studied will come from a variety of literary forms, including those of myth, history, parable, short story, essay, children's literature, poem, and novel. The literature chosen may reflect a variety of cultural backgrounds so that, among other things, we may consider how meaning may be affected by changes in worldview. Specific topics vary; accordingly, credit may be earned more than once for this course number. This course fulfills the Contexts and Convergences requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)