Dr. William Junker  portrait

Dr. William Junker

Assistant Professor of Catholic Studies; Co-Director, Terrence J. Murphy Institute for Catholic Thought, Law and Public Policy
Degree
Ph.D. John U. Nef Committee on Social Thought and the Department of English, University of Chicago, 2011
Office
Sitzmann Hall 301
Phone
(651) 962-5706

Academic History

Ph.D. John U. Nef Committee on Social Thought and the Department of English, University of Chicago, 2011
M.A. Philosophy, University of Notre Dame, 2003
B.A. English, University of Dallas, 2001

Expertise

Shakespeare
English Renaissance Poetry and Drama
Literary Criticism and Theory
History of Political Thought

Selected Publications

“Spenser, Plato, and Platonism,” in Edmund Spenser in Context, ed. Andrew Escobedo (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming).

"Benedict Among the Brambles: A Revisionary Reading of Gregory the Great's Life of Benedict," The Journal of Religion & Literature 45.3 (2013): 1-24.

"Spenser's Unarmed Cupid and the Experience of the 1590 Faerie Queene," ELH 79.1 (2012): 59-83.

"'Wonderfully Ravished': Platonic Erotics and the Heroic Genre in Sir Philip Sidney's Defence of Poesy," The Ben Jonson Journal 18.1 (2011): 45-65.

Reviews

Hans Boersma. Embodiment and Virtue in Gregory of Nyssa (Oxford University Press, 2014). In Marginalia (forthcoming).

Heather Hirschfeld. The End of Satisfaction: Drama and Repentance in the Age of Shakespeare (Cornell University Press, 2014). In Comparative Drama 49.1 (2015) (forthcoming).

Ann Baynes Coiro and Thomas Fulton, eds. Rethinking Historicism from Shakespeare to Milton (Cambridge University Press, 2012). In Modern Philology 112.1 (2014).

Julia Reinhard Lupton. Thinking with Shakespeare: Essays on Politics and Life (Chicago, 2011).

The Ben Jonson Journal 20.1 (2013): 148-154. 

Sarah Beckwith. Shakespeare and the Grammar of Forgiveness (Cornell, 2011). Early Modern Literary Studies (forthcoming). 

Jane Kingsley-Smith. Cupid in Early Modern Literature and Culture (Cambridge, 2011). Early
Modern Literary Studies 16.1 (2012)

Guy Story Brown. Shakespeare's Philosopher-King: Reading the Tragedy of King Lear (Mercer, 2010).

Early Modern Literary Studies 15.3 (2011)

Jean-Luc Marion. The Erotic Phenomenon (Chicago, 2008). American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82.2 (2008): 370-374.

Spring 2018 Courses

Spring 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
CATH 301 - D01 The Catholic Vision M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

20016 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

William J. Junker

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: Junior standing and CATH 101 and 201

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 308 - L01 Woman and Man M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

21246 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

William J. Junker

This course examines the definition of "woman" and "man" from both the historical and the philosophical perspective. Readings and discussion center on the question of (1) whether there are important philosophical differences between women and men and (2) whether such differences are natural or socially constructed. The implications of various answers to those questions are then examined, with special attention given to the Catholic tradition's reflections on the nature and ends of marriage, the character of priestly ordination, friendship between women and men, and human sexuality. The purpose of this course is to examine the ways in which thinkers from a wide spectrum have construed male/female relationships. A major component of this course consists in the study of power and the way it operates both in history and in contemporary culture. This course fulfills the core curriculum requirement in Human Diversity. Prerequisite: PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CSMA 599 - 03 Beauty & Suffering - - - - - - - 0600 - 0800

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

0600 - 0800

Location:

Course Registration Number:

23007 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3 Credit Hours

Instructor:

William J. Junker

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2018 Courses

Summer 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
CSMA 549 - 01 Shakespeare Nature & Grace M - W - - - - 0900 - 1200 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

0900 - 1200

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

30480 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3 Credit Hours

Instructor:

William J. Junker

This course examines the relationship between the natural and supernatural orders as imagined in the drama of Shakespeare. Some questions we will ask include: What is the relationship between good (and bad) human acts and the broader order of creation? What effect, if any, does the supernatural gift of grace play in transforming human action? How does such grace find representation within Shakespeare's plays? Does Shakespeare offer a consistent picture of how God relates to the world of nature and human action? We will pursue these questions through a close reading of a number of Shakespeare's plays.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Fall 2018 Courses

Fall 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
CATH 101 - D01 The Search for Happiness M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 55S B10

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

41171 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

William J. Junker

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 101 - D02 The Search for Happiness M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

41541 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

William J. Junker

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 297 - L02 Metaphysical Poetry M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 55S

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

55S

Course Registration Number:

43288 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

William J. Junker

The ambitious lyric poetry of late 16th-17th century England is known as "metaphysical" poetry on account of the breadth and ambition of its language. This poetry is seemingly able to link anything to anything else, and everything to God. Some poets we will consider include: John Donne, George Herbert, Richard Crashaw, Andrew Marvell, and Henry Vaughan.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 398 - 01 Reformation History & Theology - - - R - - - 1800 - 2100 55S 207

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

43285 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

William J. Junker

This course offers a synoptic overview of the history and theology of the 16th century Reformation. What political and ecclesial crises drove the Reformation? How did it develop? How did the Reformers understand themselves? What is the theology of the Reformation? How should we understand the Council of Trent? Students will read widely from primary and secondary sources.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 297 - L01 Topics: Metaphysical Poetry M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

43287 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

William J. Junker

The ambitious lyric poetry of late 16th-17th century England is known as "metaphysical" poetry on account of the breadth and ambition of its language. This poetry is seemingly able to link anything to anything else, and everything to God. Some poets we will consider include: John Donne, George Herbert, Richard Crashaw, Andrew Marvell, and Henry Vaughan. This course satisfies the core literature/writing requirement for students who started that core requirement with an ENGL 201-204 class, counts as an elective course for English majors, and satisfies an allied requirement for select business majors. It also counts as a Writing Across the Curriculum Writing to Learn class. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)